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SB-959 University of California: contracts: bidding.(2015-2016)

Senate:
1st
Cmt
2nd
3rd
Pass
Pass
Veto
Assembly:
1st
Cmt
2nd
3rd
Pass
Bill Status
SB-959
Lara (S)
-
Gonzalez (A)
University of California: contracts: bidding.
03/10/16
An act to amend, repeal, and add Section 10507.7 of, and to add Section 10507.6 to, the Public Contract Code, relating to public contracts.
Senate
09/02/16
08/15/16

Type of Measure
Active Bill - In Floor Process
Majority Vote Required
Non-Appropriation
Fiscal Committee
Non-State-Mandated Local Program
Non-Urgency
Non-Tax levy
Last 5 History Actions
Date Action
11/30/16 Last day to consider Governor’s veto pursuant to Joint Rule 58.5.
09/28/16 In Senate. Consideration of Governor's veto pending.
09/28/16 Vetoed by the Governor.
09/08/16 Enrolled and presented to the Governor at 5 p.m.
08/30/16 Assembly amendments concurred in. (Ayes 25. Noes 14. Page 5514.) Ordered to engrossing and enrolling.
Governor's Veto Message
To the Members of the California State Senate:

I am returning Senate Bill 959 without my signature.

This bill seeks to bring wage and benefit parity to the University of California's contracted workers in specific job categories, such as custodial, clerical and food services, and other services associated with the University's medical enterprises.

Earlier this year, the author requested and the Legislature approved a specific state audit of UC contracting practices and contracted employees. As has been the case with prior audits, this process will likely yield some number of recommendations for change, and it would be prudent to await the recommendations from the State Auditor before embarking on the path prescribed by this bill.

While this audit is pending, I would strongly caution the University to keep its spending in check, specifically as it relates to the compensation of its highest wage earners-many of whom already make hundreds of thousands of dollars more in salary and benefits than the average UC employee or its contracted workers in the aforementioned job categories.

Continuing to enrich the highest paid workers-and they are workers for the public good-will only undermine UC's essential argument that it can't afford parity policies such as the one contemplated in this bill.

Sincerely,



Edmund G. Brown Jr.