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SB-372 Medium- and heavy-duty fleet purchasing assistance program: zero-emission vehicles.(2021-2022)

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Date Published: 03/04/2021 09:00 PM
SB372:v98#DOCUMENT

Amended  IN  Senate  March 04, 2021

CALIFORNIA LEGISLATURE— 2021–2022 REGULAR SESSION

Senate Bill
No. 372


Introduced by Senator Leyva

February 10, 2021


An act to add Division 27.5 (commencing with Section 44800) to the Health and Safety Code, relating to vehicles.


LEGISLATIVE COUNSEL'S DIGEST


SB 372, as amended, Leyva. Medium- and heavy-duty fleet purchasing assistance program: zero-emission vehicles.
Existing law designates the State Air Resources Board as the state agency with the primary responsibility for the control of vehicular air pollution and as the state agency charged with monitoring and regulating sources of emissions of greenhouse gases that cause global warming in order to reduce emissions of greenhouse gases. Existing law requires the state board to adopt rules and regulations to achieve the maximum technologically feasible and cost-effective greenhouse gas emissions reductions to ensure that the statewide greenhouse gas emissions are reduced to at least 40% below the statewide greenhouse gas emissions limit, as defined, no later than December 31, 2030. law, the California Pollution Control Financing Authority Act, establishes the California Pollution Control Financing Authority, with specified powers and duties, and authorizes the authority to approve financing for projects or pollution control facilities to prevent or reduce environmental pollution.
This bill would require an unspecified agency the California Pollution Control Financing Authority to establish a program to make financing tools and nonfinancial supports available to the operators of medium- and heavy-duty vehicle fleets to enable those operators to transition their fleets to zero-emission vehicles. The bill would require the agency authority to consult with various state agencies and stakeholders in the development and implementation of the program.
Existing constitutional provisions require that a statute that limits the right of access to the meetings of public bodies or the writings of public officials and agencies be adopted with findings demonstrating the interest protected by the limitation and the need for protecting that interest.
This bill would make legislative findings to that effect.
Vote: MAJORITY   Appropriation: NO   Fiscal Committee: YES   Local Program: NO  

The people of the State of California do enact as follows:


SECTION 1.

 The Legislature finds and declares all of the following:
(a) The transition to zero-emission medium- and heavy-duty vehicles is the goal of the state, as outlined in the Governor’s Executive Order N-79-20 and the State Air Resources Board’s Advanced Clean Trucks and Advanced Clean Fleets regulations.
(b) Statewide, about 12,000,000 Californians live in communities that exceed the federal ozone and PM 2.5 standards. According to the American Lung Association, more than 90 percent of Californians live in counties affected with unhealthy air during certain parts of the year. The south coast and San Joaquin Valley are the only two areas in the nation designated as “extreme” nonattainment. Researchers found that southern California has seen a 10 percent increase in deaths attributable to ozone pollution from 2010 to 2017, inclusive.
(c) Emissions from medium- and heavy-duty vehicles make up a significant proportion of harmful air pollution in California, despite making up just 7 percent of vehicles on the road. Heavy-duty trucks are responsible for about 35 percent of total statewide NOx emissions and over 70 percent of NOx emissions from on-road mobile sources. Heavy-duty trucks are also responsible for approximately 26 percent of total statewide diesel PM emissions.
(d) The risks of near-road air pollution are particularly high for minority and low-income communities, because these communities constitute a higher percentage of the population near major roadways.
(e) These emissions near roadways add to the health burdens in vulnerable, low-income, underserved, priority, and disadvantaged communities and cleaning up transportation emissions in these communities is long overdue and should be the focus of state clean air programs.
(f) Using zero-emission vehicles instead of internal combustion engine vehicles saves the operators of medium- and heavy-duty vehicle fleets money over the lifetime of the zero-emission vehicles because zero-emission vehicles have lower operation costs. Additionally, using zero-emission medium- and heavy-duty vehicles has broader societal benefits, including improved health outcomes, resulting in reduced costs related to health care.
(g) Even with this lower operating cost, getting to this transition requires near-term, scalable, and replicable financing tools and nonfinancial supports, such as technical and policy supports, with an understanding that small and microfleets of medium- and heavy-duty vehicles will require development of their own set of specific financing solutions relative to larger fleets of medium- and heavy-duty vehicles, and the state’s commitment to developing those financing solutions.
(h) Small and microfleets, those with 20 trucks or less and 5 trucks or less, respectively, are more likely to operate in disadvantaged communities, have less access to market capital, and face other financial burdens, and, for those reasons, could benefit from the cost savings of zero-emission vehicles if financing tools and nonfinancial supports are designed for, and directed to, those fleets.
(i) Large fleets will likely need public moneys and nonfinancial supports to help transition those fleets to zero-emission vehicles and incentives directed towards large fleets vehicles. These tools can be leveraged with infusions of private capital.
(j) Public moneys, other financing tools, and nonfinancial policy supports can be designed to go where they are needed the most and will have the most impact, bringing in as much private capital as possible to complement and leverage limited existing funding, while ensuring that small and microfleets are made economically better off through this process, rather than adding to their financial burden of purchasing a new or used vehicle.
(k) Bus fleets are often on the cutting edge of zero-emission vehicle transportation, help to support the transition to zero-emission vehicles, and would benefit from financial and nonfinancial support designed to suit their fleets.

SEC. 2.

 Division 27.5 (commencing with Section 44800) is added to the Health and Safety Code, to read:

DIVISION 27.5. Medium- and Heavy-Duty Zero-Emission Vehicle Fleet Purchasing Assistance Program

44800.
 For purposes of this division, the following definitions apply:
(a) “Administering agency” means ____. the California Pollution Control Financing Authority.
(b) “Financing tools” includes, but is not limited to, any of the following:
(1) Capital instruments, which are financing instruments that increase access to capital or other resources or reduce the cost of capital, or both.
(2) Risk reduction instruments, which are financing instruments that reduce exposure to risk or uncertainty.
(3) Cost smoothing instruments, which are financing instruments that reduce and smooth up-front or recurrent costs, or both.
(c) “Large fleet” means a fleet of medium- or heavy-duty vehicles, or both, under the control or ownership of one operator that has more than 500 vehicles.
(d) “Microfleet” means a fleet of medium- or heavy-duty vehicles, or both, under the control or ownership of one operator that has up to five vehicles.
(e) “Nonfinancial supports” means technical support, such as supports for technical management of electric medium- and heavy-duty vehicles and technical assistance for financing approaches, or policy action, such as policy measures to enable financing and or encourage fleet transitions.
(f) “Priority population” means a community identified as disadvantaged pursuant to Section 39711, or a low-income household or a low-income community, as defined in Section 39713.
(g) “Small fleet” means a fleet of medium- or heavy-duty vehicles, or both, under the control or ownership of one operator that has less than 20 vehicles but more than 5 vehicles.
(h) “Underserved community” means a community that meets one of the following criteria:
(1) Is a “disadvantaged community” as defined by subdivision (g) of Section 75005 of the Public Resources Code.
(2) Is included within the definition of “low-income communities” as defined by paragraph (2) of subdivision (d) of Section 39713.
(3) Is within an area identified as among the most disadvantaged 25 percent in the state according to the California Environmental Protection Agency and based on the most recent California Communities Environmental Health Screening Tool, also known as CalEnviroScreen.
(4) Is a community in which at least 75 percent of public school students in the project area are eligible to receive free or reduced-price meals under the National School Lunch Program.
(5) Is a community located on lands belonging to a federally recognized California Native American tribe.

44802.
 The administering agency shall establish a program to make financing tools and nonfinancial supports available to the operators of medium- and heavy-duty vehicle fleets to enable those operators to transition their fleets to zero-emission vehicles.

44804.
 In developing and implementing the program established pursuant to Section 44802, the administering agency shall do all of the following:
(a) Seek input from environmental justice organizations, the operators of medium- and heavy-duty vehicle fleets of diverse sizes and types, financiers, original truck equipment manufacturers, transportation, logistics, and fleet management companies, nongovernmental organizations, and other relevant stakeholders on all of the following topics:
(1) Which medium- and heavy-duty fleets should be designated as high-priority fleets pursuant to subdivision (d), taking into consideration the implications for climate change, pollution and environmental justice, state policy regarding clean air and transportation, and post-COVID economic recovery.
(2) The critical barriers that impede operators of medium- and heavy-duty fleets in different sectors and of different fleet sizes from transitioning to zero-emission vehicles.
(3) The financing tools and nonfinancial supports that should be used to help overcome the critical barriers identified pursuant to paragraph (2).
(4) How to determine whether the program is successful in meeting its goals.
(b) Develop and design, in consultation with other relevant state agencies and building on the input received pursuant to subdivision (a), financing tools and nonfinancial supports that are most appropriate for different sizes and sectors of medium- and heavy-duty vehicle fleets.
(c) Ensure that a minimum of 75 percent of financing products offered under the program are directed towards operators of medium- and heavy-duty fleets whose fleets directly impact, or operate ____ percent of the time in, an underserved community or priority population, or both.
(d) Designate which medium- and heavy-duty fleets are the high-priority fleets that will have access to the program first based on a consideration of state transportation policy and the input received pursuant to subdivision (a). The administering agency shall designate port and drayage truck fleets as one of the high-priority fleets.
(e) Provide financing tools to operators of small and microfleets that include, but are not limited to, direct assistance, such as incentives, grants, and vouchers, that increase access to capital and reduce exposure to market risks or uncertainties.
(f) Provide financing tools to operators of large fleets that are designed to increase access to private capital. capital in ways that make it easier, less expensive, or reduce uncertainties, or any combination of these things, for the operators to transition to zero-emission vehicles.
(g) Facilitate the decommissioning of high-polluting medium- and heavy-duty vehicles in accordance with the state’s clean air targets and goals.
(h) Enable the development of replicable business models that allow private capital to fully engage, while meeting the goals of this division.
(i) Include optimal financing tools and appropriate nonfinancial supports that are designed and targeted to catalyze electrification at scale.
(j) Encourage emerging flexible business, operational, and ownership models that accomplish the goals of this division, such as lease-backs or electric vehicle managers and lessors.

(h)

(k) (1) Establish deadlines for the program that align with milestones established in Executive Order N-79-20 and the proposed revisions to Division 3 (commencing with Section 1900) of Title 13 (commencing with Section 1900) of the California Code of Regulations known as the Proposed Advanced Clean Trucks Regulation, which were approved by the State Air Resources Board on June 25, 2020.
(2) The administering agency shall do both of the following:
(A) Establish penetration targets for deployment of financing tools and nonfinancial supports to operators including, but not limited to, those whose fleets directly impact, or operate ____ percent of the time in, underserved communities and priority populations for each milestone specified in paragraph (1).
(B) Compile data and information about the deployment of financing tools and nonfinancial supports provided pursuant to the program to operators including, but not limited to, those whose fleets directly impact, or operate ____ percent of the time in, underserved communities and priority populations.

(i)

(l) Create, in coordination with other state agencies that administer similar programs, a “one-stop shop” that provides information to operators of medium- and heavy-duty fleets about all of the potential financing and grant options and other technical assistance available to help obtain financing for zero-emission medium- and heavy-duty vehicles.

(j)

(m) Coordinate with the State Air Resources Board, the Public Utilities Commission, and the State Energy Resources Conservation and Development Commission to provide marketing, education, and outreach to underserved communities and priority populations regarding the program.

(k)

(n) Ensure the financing tools and nonfinancial supports designed and developed pursuant to this section are available to operators of medium- and heavy-duty fleet operators by January 1, 2023.

44806.
 (a) The administering agency shall develop a data collection and dissemination strategy for the program to facilitate informed decisionmaking by other state agencies and private sector financiers.
(b) The strategy developed pursuant to subdivision (a) shall include data that is necessary to facilitate the financing of zero-emission vehicles in order to increase the scalability of financial tools and nonfinancial supports. These data include, but are not limited to, vehicle and battery performance, upfront and operational costs, residual values, operational revenues, and zero-emissions vehicle miles traveled.
(c) This section shall not be construed as a requirement to disclose any proprietary business information collected pursuant to the program to the public as part of the data dissemination strategy.

44808.
 The administering agency shall consult with the State Energy Resources Conservation and Development Commission and the Public Utilities Commission on the use of on-bill tariff products for charging and fueling infrastructure that would allow operators of medium- and heavy-duty fleets to see fuel cost savings of zero-emission vehicles relative to diesel fuel.

SEC. 3.

 The Legislature finds and declares that Section 2 of this act, which adds Section 44806 of the Health and Safety Code, imposes a limitation on the public’s right of access to the meetings of public bodies or the writings of public officials and agencies within the meaning of Section 3 of Article I of the California Constitution. Pursuant to that constitutional provision, the Legislature makes the following findings to demonstrate the interest protected by this limitation and the need for protecting that interest:
In order to protect the privacy of the operators of medium- and heavy-duty vehicle fleets and encourage their participation in the program established pursuant to Section 2, it is necessary to limit the public’s right of access to their proprietary business information.