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AB-12 California Fostering Connections to Success Act.(2009-2010)

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AB12:v86#DOCUMENT

Assembly Bill No. 12
CHAPTER 559

An act to amend Section 17552 of the Family Code, to amend Sections 1501.1 and 1505 of, and to add Section 1502.7 to, the Health and Safety Code, and to amend Sections 241.1, 293, 295, 297, 303, 317, 358.1, 360, 361.45, 361.5, 366, 366.21, 366.22, 366.25, 366.3, 366.4, 388, 727.2, 785, 10609.4, 11008.15, 11155.5, 11253, 11363, 11376, 11400, 11401, 11401.1, 11401.4, 11402, 11403.2, 11405, 11450, 11450.16, 11454.5, 11461, 11464, 11465, 11466.23, 11466.24, 13754, 13757, 16120, 16123, 16501, 16501.1, 16501.25, 16503, 16504.5, 16507.3, 16507.4, 16507.6, and 16508 of, to amend, repeal, and add Sections 391 and 11403 of, to add Sections 300.3, 366.31, 10101.2, 11217, 11253.3, 11401.05, and 11402.2 to, to add Article 4.7 (commencing with Section 11385) to Chapter 2 of Part 3 of Division 9 of, to repeal and add Section 11401.5 of, and to repeal and add Article 4.5 (commencing with Section 11360) of Chapter 2 of Part 3 of Division 9 of, the Welfare and Institutions Code, relating to foster children.

[ Approved by Governor  September 30, 2010. Filed with Secretary of State  September 30, 2010. ]

LEGISLATIVE COUNSEL'S DIGEST


AB 12, Beall. California Fostering Connections to Success Act.
(1) Existing law provides for the out-of-home placement of children who are unable to remain in the custody and care of their parent or parents, and provides for a range of child welfare, foster care, and adoption assistance services for which these children may be eligible.
Existing federal law, the Fostering Connections to Success and Increasing Adoptions Act of 2008, revises and expands federal programs and funding for certain foster and adopted children.
Existing law, the California Community Care Facilities Act, provides for the licensure and regulation of community care facilities, including facilities that provide care for foster children, by the State Department of Social Services. A violation of these provisions is a misdemeanor.
Existing law authorizes the placement of children with varying designations and varying needs in the same facility under specified circumstances.
This bill would extend these provisions to also include nonminor dependents commencing January 1, 2012. The bill would define the term “nonminor dependent” and related terms for purposes of the bill.
This bill, commencing no later than July 1, 2012, would require the department, in consultation with specified government and other entities, to revise regulations regarding health and safety standards for licensing foster family homes and community care facilities in which nonminor dependents of the juvenile court are placed under the responsibility of the county welfare or probation department or an Indian tribe that has entered into a specified agreement with the department.
Under existing law, the California Community Care Facilities Act does not apply to designated categories of facilities, including, among others, the home of a relative caregiver or nonrelative extended family member of a child placed by a juvenile court, as specified.
This bill would include, on and after January 1, 2012, a supervised independent living setting, and a THP-Plus-Foster Care placement, as established by the bill, for a nonminor dependent placed by the juvenile court on the list of facilities to which the act does not apply. The bill would require the department to convene a workgroup to establish a new rate structure for THP-Plus-Foster Care placements, and would require counties to submit to the department a plan setting forth how the county would provide for the THP-Plus-Foster Care program, as specified. By requiring counties to perform additional duties with respect to implementation of the THP-Plus-Foster Care program, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program.
(2) Existing law establishes the jurisdiction of the juvenile court, which is permitted to adjudge certain children to be dependents of the court under certain circumstances.
This bill would expand the jurisdiction of the juvenile court, effective January 1, 2012, to include a child who had been previously removed from the custody of his or her parent and placed in foster care, who was also declared a delinquent ward of the court, as specified. The bill would authorize a court to modify an existing order with respect to the delinquent ward under these circumstances and assert dependency jurisdiction, as specified.
Existing law authorizes a juvenile court to retain jurisdiction over any person who is found to be a dependent child of the juvenile court until the ward or dependent child attains 21 years of age.
Existing law places certain minors for whom a guardianship has been established within the jurisdiction of the juvenile court.
This bill would expand the court’s jurisdiction to include, on and after January 1, 2012, a nonminor dependent who is receiving specified kinship guardian assistance payments.
This bill would extend the court’s jurisdiction to a ward who has been placed into foster care or a dependent who reaches the age of majority before jurisdiction is terminated until the nonminor reaches 21 years of age. The bill, commencing January 1, 2012, would allow a nonminor who left foster care at or after the age of majority to petition the court to have dependency or delinquency jurisdiction resumed, in accordance with a provision of existing law. The bill would authorize a local entity to obtain specified background information regarding a nonminor who may be placed in a foster care setting with minor dependent children under these circumstances. By making various conforming changes in provisions relating to the duties of local agency employees in dependency and delinquency proceedings, this bill would create a state-mandated local program.
(3) Existing law authorizes a social worker to place a child whom the court has ordered to be removed from his or her home into one of 7 designated placements, including the home of a noncustodial parent or the approved home of a relative.
This bill would add to this list of approved placements, on and after January 1, 2012, a supervised independent living setting, as defined by the bill, for a nonminor dependent between 18 and 21 years of age.
(4) Existing law authorizes a change in the placement of a child on an emergency basis due to the sudden unavailability of a foster caregiver.
This bill, on and after January 1, 2012, would require, under these emergency circumstances, when a nonminor dependent is placed in the home of a relative or nonrelative, that the home be approved using the health and safety standards established by the department for the placement of nonminor dependents, as required by the bill. The bill would require the department, in consultation with specified stakeholders, to prepare for the implementation of these provisions by publishing all-county letters or similar instructions from the director, pending the adoption of emergency regulations, as specified.
(5) Existing law requires the status of dependent children to be periodically reviewed, and requires the court to consider the safety of the child and make certain determinations.
This bill similarly would require a status review for every nonminor dependent who is in foster care to be conducted pursuant to specified provisions. This bill, commencing January 1, 2012, would require the court to ensure that the child’s transitional independent living case plan includes a plan for the child to meet one or more criteria that would allow the child to remain a nonminor dependent, and to ensure that the child has been informed of his or her right to seek the termination of dependency jurisdiction.
This bill, on and after October 1, 2012, would authorize a court to continue jurisdiction over a nonminor dependent with a permanent plan of long-term foster care, and would designate the responsibilities of the court in this regard.
(6) Existing law establishes procedures for a hearing to terminate the court’s jurisdiction over a dependent child who has reached the age of majority.
This bill would delete the existing hearing procedures as of January 1, 2012, and would set forth revised hearing requirements for determining whether to terminate or continue dependency jurisdiction. The bill would require the court to continue dependency jurisdiction for a child participating in certain educational or vocational activities. This bill would impose various duties on county welfare departments in connection with the hearing process, thereby creating a state-mandated local program.
This bill would require a court to authorize a trial period of independence from foster care, as defined, when it terminates dependency jurisdiction over a nonminor dependent youth, as authorized by specified federal law.
(7) Existing law requires the State Department of Social Services to develop statewide standards for the Independent Living Program for emancipated foster youth, which is established and funded pursuant to federal law to assist these individuals in making the transition to self-sufficiency. Under existing law, the department is required to develop and adopt emergency regulations that counties are required to meet when administering the program, that are achievable within available resources.
This bill would require the department to develop and adopt the Independent Living Program regulations on or before July 1, 2012, and would specify that the regulations be achievable within both available program resources and available federal funds for case management and case plan review provided for in the federal act. The bill would require the department, by a specified date, to review and develop modifications to the Independent Living Program to also serve the needs of nonminor dependent youth, as specified.
(8) Existing law prohibits benefits under the CalWORKs program from being paid to or on behalf of any child who has attained 18 years of age, unless the child is engaged in specified educational or training activities.
This bill, on and after January 1, 2012, also would authorize a nonminor dependent, as defined, to receive CalWORKs aid, as specified.
(9) Existing law authorizes a child who is declared a ward or dependent child of the court who is 16 years of age or older, to retain specified cash resources and still remain eligible to receive public social services.
This bill would apply this provision, on and after January 1, 2012, to a current or former dependent child or ward of the court between 18 and 21 years of age, who is participating in a transitional independent living case plan pursuant to the federal act.
(10) Existing law, through the Kinship Guardianship Assistance Payment Program (Kin-GAP), which is a part of the CalWORKs program, provides aid on behalf of eligible children who are placed in the home of a relative caretaker. The program is funded by state and county funding and available federal funds. Existing eligibility requirements for the Kin-GAP Program include a requirement that a child has been living with a relative for at least 12 consecutive months.
This bill would reduce the above requirement to 6 months, consistent with federal law. To the extent that this would increase duties of counties administering the Kin-GAP program, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program.
This bill would revise the Kin-GAP Program, by repealing the existing program and enacting similar provisions, effective on the date that the Director of Social Services executes a declaration, as required by the bill, declaring that increased federal financial participation in the Emergency Contingency Fund for State TANF Programs is no longer available pursuant to the federal American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) (Public Law 111-5), or subsequent federal legislation that maintains or extends increased federal financial participation to provide state-funded assistance for youth not eligible under the federally funded program and would require the state to exercise its option under specified federal law to establish a kinship guardianship assistance payment program, with components as set forth in the bill, for youth eligible for federal financial participation. This bill would require, as a condition of receiving payments under the revised Kin-GAP Program provisions, that a county welfare agency, probation department, or Indian tribe, as applicable, negotiate and enter into a written, binding kinship guardianship assistance agreement with the relative guardian of an eligible child, as prescribed. The bill also would specify the state’s share of cost for the support and care of children eligible for Kin-GAP benefits. The bill would make related conforming changes.
This bill, under the revised Kin-GAP Program provisions, also would require a county, at the time of the annual redetermination of state-funded Kin-GAP benefits, to determine whether a child was receiving federal AFDC-FC benefits before receiving Kin-GAP, while a dependent child or ward of the juvenile court. The bill would require the county to reassign these children to the county social worker for information regarding transition to the federal Kin-GAP program.
By increasing county responsibilities, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program.
(11) Existing law establishes the Aid to Families with Dependent Children-Foster Care (AFDC-FC) program, under which counties provide payments to foster care providers on behalf of qualified children in foster care. The program is funded by a combination of federal, state, and county funds. Under existing law, AFDC-FC benefits are available, with specified exceptions, on behalf of qualified children under 18 years of age. Existing law requires a county to annually redetermine AFDC-FC eligibility, as specified.
This bill would require the department to amend its foster care state plan required under specified federal law, to extend AFDC-FC benefits, commencing January 1, 2012, to specified individuals up to 21 years of age, in accordance with a designated provision of federal law. The bill would repeal the existing annual redetermination requirement.
This bill would extend AFDC-FC benefits to nonminor dependents, as specified, on and after January 1, 2012, including revising AFDC-FC rate provisions to apply to these individuals.
This bill would require an annual review of a child’s or nonminor’s payment amount, as specified. The bill also would require a county to contribute to the cost of extending aid to eligible nonminor dependents who have reached 18 years of age and who are under the jurisdiction of the county, and to the cost of providing permanent placement services and administering the AFDC–FC program, as specified. The bill would provide that the county’s total contribution for these purposes would not exceed the amount of savings realized by the county as a result of the implementation of the federally funded Kin-GAP Program.
By expanding eligibility and duties under the county-administered AFDC-FC program, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program.
(12) Under existing law, in order to be eligible for AFDC-FC benefits, a child must be placed in one of 8 designated placements.
This bill would add to the eligible AFDC-FC placements, with respect to an otherwise eligible youth over 18 years of age, a supervised independent living setting. By increasing county duties in administering the AFDC-FC program, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program.
(13) Under existing law, a minor between 16 and 18 years of age who is eligible for AFDC-FC benefits and who meets other specified requirements is eligible for certain transitional housing placement program services in a participating county.
This bill, commencing January 1, 2012, would make a nonminor dependent who is eligible for AFDC-FC benefits also eligible for transitional housing benefits.
This bill would revise existing provisions relating to the resolution of certain foster care overpayments to apply to Kin-GAP guardian homes and payments on behalf of nonminor dependents residing in supervised independent living settings.
(14) Under existing law, a parent or caretaker relative is ineligible to receive CalWORKs aid when he or she has received aid for a cumulative total of 60 months. Existing law excludes from this calculation months when designated conditions exist.
This bill, commencing January 1, 2012, would additionally exclude from the above calculation months when a recipient is a nonminor dependent participating in educational or training activities, as prescribed.
Moneys from the General Fund are continuously appropriated to pay for a portion of CalWORKs aid grant costs, and for the state’s share of AFDC-FC costs.
This bill would provide that no appropriation from the General Fund would be made for the purposes of implementing these provisions.
By increasing duties of counties administering the AFDC-FC program, this bill also would impose a state-mandated local program.
(15) Existing law, the federal Social Security Act, provides for benefits for eligible beneficiaries, including survivorship and disability benefits and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits for, among others, blind and disabled children. The act authorizes a person or entity to be appointed as a representative payee for a beneficiary who cannot manage or direct the management of his or her money. Existing law also provides for State Supplemental Payments (SSP) in supplementation of SSI benefits.
Existing law, the Foster Care Social Security and Supplemental Security Income Assistance Program, requires the county to apply to be appointed representative payee on behalf of a child beneficiary in its custody when no other appropriate party is available to serve.
This bill would additionally require the county, when a child beneficiary reaches 18 years of age and elects to remain in the custody of the county as a nonminor dependent, to provide specified information to the youth regarding the process for becoming his or her own payee, and to assist the youth in this process, unless becoming his or her own payee is not in the youth’s best interests, as specified. It would, as part of this process, express the intent of the Legislature that the county ensure that the nonminor receive direct payment of SSI benefits at least one month each year.
Existing law requires every youth who is in foster care and nearing emancipation to be screened by the county for potential eligibility for SSI benefits, as prescribed. Existing law authorizes a county, under certain circumstances, to forgo a youth’s federally funded AFDC-FC benefits in the month of application for SSI benefits, and instead to use state resources to fund the placement, in order to ensure that the youth meets all of the SSI eligibility requirements.
This bill would establish similar requirements for a county child welfare agency, with respect to a nonminor dependent who has been approved for SSI payments but is receiving an AFDC-FC or Kin-GAP benefit that includes federal financial participation in an amount that exceeds the SSI payment, causing the SSI payment to be placed in suspense.
By placing new duties on county child welfare agencies, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program.
(16) Existing law provides for the Adoption Assistance Program (AAP), to be established and administered by the State Department of Social Services or the county, for the purpose of benefiting children residing in foster homes by providing the stability and security of permanent homes. The AAP provides for the payment by the department and counties, of cash assistance to eligible families that adopt eligible children, and bases the amount of the payment on the needs of the child and the resources of the family to meet those needs. Existing law sets forth eligibility requirements for the AAP, including that a child must be under 18 years of age, or under 21 years of age with a mental or physical disability that warrants continued assistance.
This bill would additionally include children under 21 years of age who turned 16 years of age before the adoption assistance agreement became effective, and is involved in designated education or employment activities, or is incapable of engaging in these activities due to a medical condition. Payment of adoption assistance would be available for these individuals commencing January 1, 2012, as long as specified federal funds remain available and the state continues to exercise its option to extend payments up to 21 years of age, pursuant to the federal act.
(17) Existing law requires the state, through the department and county welfare departments, to establish and support a public system of statewide child welfare services. Under existing law, the term “child welfare services” includes various services provided on behalf of children alleged to be the victims of child abuse, neglect, or exploitation. Existing law establishes the case plan as the foundation and central unifying tool in the provision of child welfare services.
This bill would revise the definition of child welfare services to include transitional independent living services, as needed in connection with the provision of other permanent placement services. The bill would revise the requirements for the case plan, effective January 1, 2012, with respect to nonminor dependents, to address the developmental needs of young adults, as specified. The bill would also require the case plan to specify why a group home placement, if made, is necessary for the nonminor dependent’s transition to independent living, and would require the nonminor dependent to participate and develop, and to sign, his or her case plan, commencing January 1, 2012. By increasing the duties of counties in preparing case plans, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program.
This bill would revise the definition of a whole family foster home, to include a home that provides foster care for a nonminor dependent parent and his or her child, for purposes of the AFDC-FC program. Effective January 1, 2012, the bill would require that the same rate be paid for the care and supervision of the child of a nonminor dependent as is paid for the child of a teen parent in a whole family foster home. The bill would make other provisions applicable to a teen parent, for purposes of the child welfare services program, also applicable to certain nonminor dependents living in a whole family foster home.
Existing law limits child welfare services for voluntarily placed children to a period not to exceed 6 consecutive months, as specified.
This bill would, instead, limit the services to a period not to exceed 180 days, and would make conforming changes.
(18) (A) This bill would incorporate additional changes in Section 11402 of the Welfare and Institutions Code proposed by SB 1214, that would become operative only if SB 1214 and this bill are both chaptered and become effective on or before January 1, 2011, and this bill is chaptered last.
(B) The bill would also incorporate additional changes in Section 16501.1 of the Welfare and Institutions Code proposed by SB 945 and SB 1353, to be operative only if this bill and one or both of the other bills are chaptered and become effective on or before January 1, 2011, and this bill is chaptered last.
(19) The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.
This bill would provide that with regard to certain mandates no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason.
With regard to any other mandates, this bill would provide that, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that the bill contains costs so mandated by the state, reimbursement for those costs shall be made pursuant to the statutory provisions noted above.
Vote: MAJORITY   Appropriation: NO   Fiscal Committee: YES   Local Program: YES  

The people of the State of California do enact as follows:


SECTION 1.

 This act shall be known, and may be cited, as the “California Fostering Connections to Success Act.”

SEC. 2.

 Section 17552 of the Family Code is amended to read:

17552.
 (a) The State Department of Social Services, in consultation with the Department of Child Support Services, shall promulgate regulations by which the county child welfare department, in any case of separation or desertion of a parent or parents from a child that results in foster care assistance payments under Section 11400 of, or CalWORKs payments to a caretaker relative of a child who comes within the jurisdiction of the juvenile court under Section 300, 601, or 602 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, who has been removed from the parental home and placed with the caretaker relative by court order, and who is under the supervision of the county child welfare agency or probation department under Section 11250 of, or Kin-GAP payments under Article 4.5 (commencing with Section 11360) or Article 4.7 (commencing with Section 11385) of, or aid under subdivision (c) of Section 10101 of, the Welfare and Institutions Code, shall determine whether it is in the best interests of the child to have the case referred to the local child support agency for child support services. If reunification services are not offered or are terminated, the case may be referred to the local child support agency, unless the child’s permanent plan is legal guardianship with a relative who is receiving Kin-GAP and the payment of support by the parent may compromise the stability of the current placement with the related guardian. In making the determination, the department regulations shall provide the factors the county child welfare department shall consider, including:
(1) Whether the payment of support by the parent will pose a barrier to the proposed reunification, in that the payment of support will compromise the parent’s ability to meet the requirements of the parent’s reunification plan.
(2) Whether the payment of support by the parent will pose a barrier to the proposed reunification in that the payment of support will compromise the parent’s current or future ability to meet the financial needs of the child.
(b) The department regulations shall provide that, where the county child welfare department determines that it is not in the best interests of the child to seek a support order against the parent, the county child welfare department shall refrain from referring the case to the local child support agency. The regulations shall define those circumstances in which it is not in the best interest of the child to refer the case to the local child support agency.
(c) The department regulations shall provide, where the county child welfare department determines that it is not in the child’s best interest to have his or her case referred to the local child support agency, the county child welfare department shall review that determination annually to coincide with the redetermination of AFDC-FC eligibility under Section 11401.5 of, or the CalWORKs eligibility under Section 11265 of, or Kin-GAP eligibility under Article 4.5 (commencing with Section 11360) or Article 4.7 (commencing with Section 11385) of Chapter 2 of Part 3 of Division 9 of, the Welfare and Institutions Code, and shall refer the child’s case to the local child support agency upon a determination that, due to a change in the child’s circumstances, it is no longer contrary to the child’s best interests to have his or her case referred to the local child support agency.
(d) The State Department of Social Services shall promulgate all necessary regulations pursuant to this section on or before October 1, 2002.

SEC. 3.

 Section 1501.1 of the Health and Safety Code is amended to read:

1501.1.
 (a) It is the policy of the state to facilitate the proper placement of every child in residential care facilities where the placement is in the best interests of the child. A county may require placement or licensing agencies, or both placement and licensing agencies, to actively seek out-of-home care facilities capable of meeting the varied needs of the child. Therefore, in placing children in out-of-home care, particular attention should be given to the individual child’s needs, the ability of the facility to meet those needs, the needs of other children in the facility, the licensing requirements of the facility as determined by the licensing agency, and the impact of the placement on the family reunification plan.
(b) Pursuant to this section, children with varying designations and varying needs, including, on and after January 1, 2012, nonminor dependents, as defined in subdivision (v) of Section 11400 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, except as provided by statute, may be placed in the same facility provided the facility is licensed, complies with all licensing requirements relevant to the protection of the child, and has a special permit, if necessary, to meet the needs of each child so placed. A facility may not require, as a condition of placement, that a child be identified as an individual with exceptional needs as defined by Section 56026 of the Education Code.
(c) Neither the requirement for any license nor any regulation shall restrict the implementation of the provisions of this section. Implementation of this section does not obviate the requirement for a facility to be licensed by the department.
(d) Pursuant to this section, children with varying designations and varying needs, including, on and after January 1, 2012, nonminor dependents, as defined in subdivision (v) of Section 11400 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, except as provided by statute, may be placed in the same licensed foster family home or with a foster family agency for subsequent placement in a certified family home. Children, including nonminor dependents, with developmental disabilities, mental disorders, or physical disabilities may be placed in licensed foster family homes or certified family homes, provided that an appraisal of the child’s or nonminor dependent’s needs and the ability of the receiving home to meet those needs is made jointly by the placement agency and the licensee in the case of licensed foster family homes or the placement agency and the foster family agency in the case of certified family homes, and is followed by written confirmation prior to placement. The appraisal shall confirm that the placement poses no threat to any child in the home.
For purposes of this chapter, the placing of children by foster family agencies shall be referred to as “subsequent placement” to distinguish the activity from the placing by public agencies.

SEC. 4.

 Section 1502.7 is added to the Health and Safety Code, to read:

1502.7.
 (a) On or before July 1, 2012, the department, in consultation with representatives of the Legislature, the County Welfare Directors Association, the Chief Probation Officers of California, the California Youth Connection, the Judicial Council, former foster youth, child advocacy organizations, dependency counsel for children, juvenile justice advocacy organizations, foster caregiver organizations, labor organizations, and representatives of tribes, shall revise regulations regarding health and safety standards for licensing foster family homes and community care facilities in which nonminor dependents, as defined in subdivision (v) of Section 11400 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, of the juvenile court are placed under the responsibility of the county welfare or probation department or an Indian tribe that entered into an agreement pursuant to Section 10553.1 of the Welfare and Institutions Code.
(b) The regulations shall recognize the status of nonminor dependents as legal adults. At a minimum, the regulations shall provide both of the following:
(1) That nonminors described in subdivision (a) shall have the greatest amount of freedom that will safely prepare them for self-sufficiency.
(2) That nonminors described in subdivision (a) in a community care facility shall not be subject to criminal background clearances pursuant to Sections 1522 and 1522.1, for the purposes of facility licensing.
(c) Notwithstanding the Administrative Procedure Act, Chapter 3.5 (commencing with Section 11340) of Part 1 of Division 3 of Title 2 of the Government Code, the department shall, in consultation with the stakeholders listed in subdivision (a), prepare for implementation of the applicable provisions of this section by publishing all-county letters or similar instructions from the director by October 1, 2011, to be effective January 1, 2012. Emergency regulations to implement this section may be adopted by the director in accordance with the Administrative Procedure Act. The initial adoption of the emergency regulations and one readoption of the initial regulations shall be deemed to be an emergency and necessary for the immediate preservation of the public peace, health, safety, or general welfare. Initial emergency regulations and the first readoption of those emergency regulations shall be exempt from review by the Office of Administrative Law. The emergency regulations authorized by this section shall be submitted to the Office of Administrative Law for filing with the Secretary of State and shall remain in effect for no more than 180 days.

SEC. 5.

 Section 1505 of the Health and Safety Code is amended to read:

1505.
 This chapter does not apply to any of the following:
(a) Any health facility, as defined by Section 1250.
(b) Any clinic, as defined by Section 1202.
(c) Any juvenile placement facility approved by the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, Division of Juvenile Justice, or any juvenile hall operated by a county.
(d) Any place in which a juvenile is judicially placed pursuant to subdivision (a) of Section 727 of the Welfare and Institutions Code.
(e) Any child day care facility, as defined in Section 1596.750.
(f) Any facility conducted by and for the adherents of any well-recognized church or religious denomination for the purpose of providing facilities for the care or treatment of the sick who depend upon prayer or spiritual means for healing in the practice of the religion of the church or denomination.
(g) Any school dormitory or similar facility determined by the department.
(h) Any house, institution, hotel, homeless shelter, or other similar place that supplies board and room only, or room only, or board only, provided that no resident thereof requires any element of care as determined by the director.
(i) Recovery houses or other similar facilities providing group living arrangements for persons recovering from alcoholism or drug addiction where the facility provides no care or supervision.
(j) Any alcoholism or drug abuse recovery or treatment facility as defined by Section 11834.11.
(k) Any arrangement for the receiving and care of persons by a relative or any arrangement for the receiving and care of persons from only one family by a close friend of the parent, guardian, or conservator, if the arrangement is not for financial profit and occurs only occasionally and irregularly, as defined by regulations of the department. For purposes of this chapter, arrangements for the receiving and care of persons by a relative shall include relatives of the child for the purpose of keeping sibling groups together.
(l) (1) Any home of a relative caregiver of children who are placed by a juvenile court, supervised by the county welfare or probation department, and the placement of whom is approved according to subdivision (d) of Section 309 of the Welfare and Institutions Code.
(2) Any home of a nonrelative extended family member, as described in Section 362.7 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, providing care to children who are placed by a juvenile court, supervised by the county welfare or probation department, and the placement of whom is approved according to subdivision (d) of Section 309 of the Welfare and Institutions Code.
(3) On and after January 1, 2012, any supervised independent living setting for nonminor dependents, as defined in subdivision (w) of Section 11400 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, who are placed by the juvenile court, supervised by the county welfare department, probation department, or Indian tribe that entered into an agreement pursuant to Section 10553.1 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, and whose placement is approved pursuant to subdivision (k) of Section 11400 of the Welfare and Institutions Code.
(4) On and after January 1, 2012, a THP-Plus Foster Care setting, for nonminor dependents, as defined in subdivision (x) of Section 11400 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, who are placed by the juvenile court, supervised by the county welfare department or probation department and the placement of whom is approved, in accordance with subdivision (k) of Section 11400 of the Welfare and Institutions Code.
(m) Any supported living arrangement for individuals with developmental disabilities, as defined in Section 4689 of the Welfare and Institutions Code.
(n) (1) Any family home agency, family home, or family teaching home as defined in Section 4689.1 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, that is vendored by the State Department of Developmental Services and that does any of the following:
(A) As a family home approved by a family home agency, provides 24-hour care for one or two adults with developmental disabilities in the residence of the family home provider or providers and the family home provider or providers’ family, and the provider is not licensed by the State Department of Social Services or the State Department of Public Health or certified by a licensee of the State Department of Social Services or the State Department of Public Health.
(B) As a family teaching home approved by a family home agency, provides 24-hour care for a maximum of three adults with developmental disabilities in independent residences, whether contiguous or attached, and the provider is not licensed by the State Department of Social Services or the State Department of Public Health or certified by a licensee of the State Department of Social Services or the State Department of Public Health.
(C) As a family home agency, engages in recruiting, approving, and providing support to family homes.
(2) No part of this subdivision shall be construed as establishing by implication either a family home agency or family home licensing category.
(o) Any facility in which only Indian children who are eligible under the federal Indian Child Welfare Act (Chapter 21 (commencing with Section 1901) of Title 25 of the United States Code) are placed and that is one of the following:
(1) An extended family member of the Indian child, as defined in Section 1903 of Title 25 of the United States Code.
(2) A foster home that is licensed, approved, or specified by the Indian child’s tribe pursuant to Section 1915 of Title 25 of the United States Code.
(p) (1) (A) Any housing occupied by elderly or disabled persons, or both, that is initially approved and operated under a regulatory agreement pursuant to Section 202 of Public Law 86-372 (12 U.S.C. Sec. 1701q), or Section 811 of Public Law 101-625 (42 U.S.C. Sec. 8013), or whose mortgage is insured pursuant to Section 236 of Public Law 90-448 (12 U.S.C. Sec. 1715z), or that receives mortgage assistance pursuant to Section 221d (3) of Public Law 87-70 (12 U.S.C. Sec. 1715l), where supportive services are made available to residents at their option, as long as the project owner or operator does not contract for or provide the supportive services.
(B) Any housing that qualifies for a low-income housing credit pursuant to Section 252 of Public Law 99-514 (26 U.S.C. Sec. 42) or that is subject to the requirements for rental dwellings for low-income families pursuant to Section 8 of Public Law 93-383 (42 U.S.C. Sec. 1437f), and that is occupied by elderly or disabled persons, or both, where supportive services are made available to residents at their option, as long as the project owner or operator does not contract for or provide the supportive services.
(2) The project owner or operator to which paragraph (1) applies may coordinate, or help residents gain access to, the supportive services, either directly, or through a service coordinator.
(q) Any similar facility determined by the director.

SEC. 5.5.

 Section 241.1 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

241.1.
 (a) Whenever a minor appears to come within the description of both Section 300 and Section 601 or 602, the county probation department and the child welfare services department shall, pursuant to a jointly developed written protocol described in subdivision (b), initially determine which status will serve the best interests of the minor and the protection of society. The recommendations of both departments shall be presented to the juvenile court with the petition that is filed on behalf of the minor, and the court shall determine which status is appropriate for the minor. Any other juvenile court having jurisdiction over the minor shall receive notice from the court, within five calendar days, of the presentation of the recommendations of the departments. The notice shall include the name of the judge to whom, or the courtroom to which, the recommendations were presented.
(b) The probation department and the child welfare services department in each county shall jointly develop a written protocol to ensure appropriate local coordination in the assessment of a minor described in subdivision (a), and the development of recommendations by these departments for consideration by the juvenile court. These protocols shall require, but not be limited to, consideration of the nature of the referral, the age of the minor, the prior record of the minor’s parents for child abuse, the prior record of the minor for out-of-control or delinquent behavior, the parents’ cooperation with the minor’s school, the minor’s functioning at school, the nature of the minor’s home environment, and the records of other agencies that have been involved with the minor and his or her family. The protocols also shall contain provisions for resolution of disagreements between the probation and child welfare services departments regarding the need for dependency or ward status and provisions for determining the circumstances under which a request to the court may be made to consider a change in the minor’s status.
(c) Whenever a minor who is under the jurisdiction of the juvenile court of a county pursuant to Section 300, 601, or 602 is alleged to come within the description of Section 300, 601, or 602 by another county, the county probation department or child welfare services department in the county that has jurisdiction under Section 300, 601, or 602 and the county probation department or child welfare services department of the county alleging the minor to be within one of those sections shall initially determine which status will best serve the best interests of the minor and the protection of society. The recommendations of both departments shall be presented to the juvenile court in which the petition is filed on behalf of the minor, and the court shall determine which status is appropriate for the minor. In making their recommendation to the juvenile court, the departments shall conduct an assessment consistent with the requirements of subdivision (b). Any other juvenile court having jurisdiction over the minor shall receive notice from the court in which the petition is filed within five calendar days of the presentation of the recommendations of the departments. The notice shall include the name of the judge to whom, or the courtroom to which, the recommendations were presented.
(d) Except as provided in subdivision (e), nothing in this section shall be construed to authorize the filing of a petition or petitions, or the entry of an order by the juvenile court, to make a minor simultaneously both a dependent child and a ward of the court. However, on and after January 1, 2012, if the court finds that a delinquent ward under 18 years of age, who was removed from his or her parents or guardian and placed in foster care as a dependent child of the court at the time the court adjudged the child a delinquent ward or who was removed from his or her parents or guardian and placed in foster care as a delinquent ward, no longer appears to come within the description of a delinquent ward, but does come within the description of a dependent child as set forth in Section 300, the court may modify its order of jurisdiction pursuant to Section 601 or 602, and assert dependency jurisdiction pursuant to Section 300 by means of a petition filed pursuant to Section 387 or 388. The county protocols described in subdivisions (a) and (b) shall include a process for determining which agency and court shall supervise dependent children whose jurisdiction is modified pursuant to this subdivision.
(e) Notwithstanding subdivision (d), the probation department and the child welfare services department, in consultation with the presiding judge of the juvenile court, in any county may create a jointly written protocol to allow the county probation department and the child welfare services department to jointly assess and produce a recommendation that the child be designated as a dual status child, allowing the child to be simultaneously a dependent child and a ward of the court. This protocol shall be signed by the chief probation officer, the director of the county social services agency, and the presiding judge of the juvenile court prior to its implementation. No juvenile court may order that a child is simultaneously a dependent child and a ward of the court pursuant to this subdivision unless and until the required protocol has been created and entered into. This protocol shall include all of the following:
(1) A description of the process to be used to determine whether the child is eligible to be designated as a dual status child.
(2) A description of the procedure by which the probation department and the child welfare services department will assess the necessity for dual status for specified children and the process to make joint recommendations for the court’s consideration prior to making a determination under this section. These recommendations shall ensure a seamless transition from wardship to dependency jurisdiction, as appropriate, so that services to the child are not disrupted upon termination of the wardship.
(3) A provision for ensuring communication between the judges who hear petitions concerning children for whom dependency jurisdiction has been suspended while they are within the jurisdiction of the juvenile court pursuant to Section 601 or 602. A judge may communicate by providing a copy of any reports filed pursuant to Section 727.2 concerning a ward to a court that has jurisdiction over dependency proceedings concerning the child.
(4) A plan to collect data in order to evaluate the protocol pursuant to Section 241.2.
(5) Counties that exercise the option provided for in this subdivision shall adopt either an “on-hold” system as described in subparagraph (A) or a “lead court/lead agency” system as described in subparagraph (B). In no case shall there be any simultaneous or duplicative case management or services provided by both the county probation department and the child welfare services department. It is the intent of the Legislature that judges, in cases in which more than one judge is involved, shall not issue conflicting orders.
(A) In counties in which an on-hold system is adopted, the dependency jurisdiction shall be suspended or put on hold while the child is subject to jurisdiction as a ward of the court. When it appears that termination of the court’s jurisdiction, as established pursuant to Section 601 or 602, is likely and that reunification of the child with his or her parent or guardian would be detrimental to the child, the county probation department and the child welfare services department shall jointly assess and produce a recommendation for the court regarding whether the court’s dependency jurisdiction shall be resumed.
(B) In counties in which a lead court/lead agency system is adopted, the protocol shall include a method for identifying which court or agency will be the lead court/lead agency. That court or agency shall be responsible for case management, conducting statutorily mandated court hearings, and submitting court reports.

SEC. 6.

 Section 293 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

293.
 The social worker or probation officer shall give notice of the review hearings held pursuant to Section 366.21, 366.22, or 366.25 in the following manner:
(a) Notice of the hearing shall be given to the following persons:
(1) The mother.
(2) The presumed father or any father receiving services.
(3) The legal guardian or guardians.
(4) The child, if the child is 10 years of age or older.
(5) Any known sibling of the child who is the subject of the hearing if that sibling either is the subject of a dependency proceeding or has been adjudged to be a dependent child of the juvenile court. If the sibling is 10 years of age or older, the sibling, the sibling’s caregiver, and the sibling’s attorney. If the sibling is under 10 years of age, the sibling’s caregiver and the sibling’s attorney. However, notice is not required to be given to any sibling whose matter is calendared in the same court on the same day.
(6) In the case of a child removed from the physical custody of his or her parent or legal guardian, the current caregiver of the child, including the foster parents, relative caregivers, preadoptive parents, nonrelative extended family members, community care facility, or foster family agency having custody of the child. In a case in which a foster family agency is notified of the hearing pursuant to this section, and the child resides in a foster home certified by the foster family agency, the foster family agency shall provide timely notice of the hearing to the child’s caregivers.
(7) Each attorney of record if that attorney was not present at the time that the hearing was set by the court.
(b) No notice is required for a parent whose parental rights have been terminated. On and after January 1, 2012, in the case of a nonminor dependent, as described in subdivision (v) of Section 11400, no notice is required for a parent.
(c) The notice of hearing shall be served not earlier than 30 days, nor later than 15 days, before the hearing.
(d) The notice shall contain a statement regarding the nature of the hearing to be held and any change in the custody or status of the child being recommended by the supervising agency. If the notice is to the child, parent or parents, or legal guardian or guardians, the notice shall also advise them of the right to be present, the right to be represented by counsel, the right to request counsel, and the right to present evidence. The notice shall also state that if the parent or parents or legal guardian or guardians fail to appear, the court may proceed without them.
(e) Service of the notice shall be by first-class mail addressed to the last known address of the person to be noticed or by personal service on the person. Service of a copy of the notice shall be by personal service or by certified mail, return receipt requested, or any other form of notice that is equivalent to service by first-class mail.
(f) Notice to the current caregiver of the child, including a foster parent, a relative caregiver, a preadoptive parent, or a nonrelative extended family member, or to a certified foster parent who has been approved for adoption, or the State Department of Social Services when it is acting as an adoption agency in counties that are not served by a county adoption agency or by a licensed county adoption agency, shall indicate that the person notified may attend all hearings or may submit any information he or she deems relevant to the court in writing.
(g) If the social worker or probation officer knows or has reason to know that an Indian child is involved, notice shall be given in accordance with Section 224.2.

SEC. 6.5.

 Section 295 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

295.
 The social worker or probation officer shall give notice of review hearings held pursuant to Section 366.3 in the following manner:
(a) Notice of the hearing shall be given to the following persons:
(1) The mother.
(2) The presumed father.
(3) The legal guardian or guardians.
(4) The child, if the child is 10 years of age or older.
(5) Any known sibling of the child who is the subject of the hearing if that sibling either is the subject of a dependency proceeding or has been adjudged to be a dependent child of the juvenile court. If the sibling is 10 years of age or older, the sibling, the sibling’s caregiver, and the sibling’s attorney. If the sibling is under 10 years of age, the sibling’s caregiver and the sibling’s attorney. However, notice is not required to be given to any sibling whose matter is calendared in the same court on the same day.
(6) The current caregiver of the child, including foster parents, relative caregivers, preadoptive parents, nonrelative extended family members, community care facility, or foster family agency having physical custody of the child if a child is removed from the physical custody of the parents or legal guardian. The person notified may attend all hearings and may submit any information he or she deems relevant to the court in writing.
(7) The attorney of record if that attorney of record was not present at the time that the hearing was set by the court.
(8) The alleged father or fathers, but only if the recommendation is to set a new hearing pursuant to Section 366.26.
(b) No notice is required for a parent whose parental rights have been terminated. On and after January 1, 2012, in the case of a nonminor dependent, as described in subdivision (v) of Section 11400, no notice is required for a parent.
(c) The notice of the review hearing shall be served no earlier than 30 days, nor later than 15 days, before the hearing.
(d)  The notice of the review hearing shall contain a statement regarding the nature of the hearing to be held, any recommended change in the custody or status of the child, and any recommendation that the court set a new hearing pursuant to Section 366.26 in order to select a more permanent plan.
(e) Service of notice shall be by first-class mail addressed to the last known address of the person to be provided notice. In the case of an Indian child, notice shall be by registered mail, return receipt requested.
(f) If the child is ordered into a permanent plan of legal guardianship, and subsequently a petition to terminate or modify the guardianship is filed, the probation officer or social worker shall serve notice of the petition not less than 15 court days prior to the hearing on all persons listed in subdivision (a) and on the court that established legal guardianship if it is in another county.
(g) If the social worker or probation officer knows or has reason to know that an Indian child is involved, notice shall be given in accordance with Section 224.2.

SEC. 6.7.

 Section 297 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

297.
 (a) Notice required for an initial petition filed pursuant to Section 300 is applicable to a subsequent petition filed pursuant to Section 342.
(b) Upon the filing of a supplemental petition pursuant to Section 387, the clerk of the juvenile court shall immediately set the matter for hearing within 30 days of the date of the filing, and the social worker or probation officer shall cause notice thereof to be served upon the persons required by, and in the manner prescribed by, Sections 290.1, 290.2, and 291.
(c) If a petition for modification has been filed pursuant to Section 388, and it appears that the best interest of the child may be promoted by the proposed change of the order, the recognition of a sibling relationship, or the termination of jurisdiction, the court shall order that a hearing be held and shall give prior notice, or cause prior notice to be given, to the social worker or probation officer and to the child’s attorney of record, or if there is no attorney of record for the child, to the child, and his or her parent or parents or legal guardian or guardians in the manner prescribed by Section 291 unless a different manner is prescribed by the court.
(d) If the court knows or has reason to know that an Indian child is involved, notice shall be given in accordance with Section 224.2.
(e) On and after January 1, 2012, if a petition for modification has been filed pursuant to subdivision (e) of Section 388 by a nonminor dependent, as described in subdivision (v) of Section 11400, no notice is required for a parent.

SEC. 7.

 Section 300.3 is added to the Welfare and Institutions Code, to read:

300.3.
 (a) Notwithstanding Section 215 or 272, or any other provision of law, a child or nonminor whose jurisdiction is modified pursuant to subdivision (d) of Section 241.1 and who is placed in foster care may be supervised by the probation department of the county in which the court with jurisdiction over the dependent is located, if the county protocol in that county requires it. In those counties, all case management, case plan review, and reporting functions as described in Sections 671 and 675 of Title 42 of the United States Code and contained in this article shall be performed by the probation officer for these dependents.
(b) This section shall become operative on January 1, 2012.

SEC. 8.

 Section 303 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

303.
 (a) The court may retain jurisdiction over any person who is found to be a dependent child of the juvenile court until the ward or dependent child attains the age of 21 years.
(b) On and after January 1, 2012, the court shall have within its jurisdiction any nonminor dependent, as defined in subdivision (v) of Section 11400. The court may terminate its dependency or delinquency jurisdiction over the nonminor dependent between the time the nonminor reaches the age of majority and 21 years of age. If the court terminates dependency or delinquency jurisdiction, the nonminor dependent shall remain under the jurisdiction of the court in order to allow for a petition under subdivision (e) of Section 388.
(c) On and after January 1, 2012, a nonminor who has not yet attained 21 years of age and who exited foster care at or after the age of majority may petition the court pursuant to subdivision (e) of Section 388 to resume dependency or delinquency jurisdiction over the nonminor dependent.
(d) Nothing in this code, including, but not limited to, Sections 340, 366.27, and 369.5, shall be construed to provide legal custody of a person who has attained 18 years of age to the county welfare or probation department or to otherwise abrogate any other rights that a person who has attained 18 years of age may have as an adult under California law. A nonminor dependent shall retain all of his or her legal decisionmaking authority as an adult. The nonminor shall enter into a mutual agreement for placement, as described in subdivision (d) of Section 11403, in which the nonminor consents to placement in a setting supervised by the placing agency as a condition of the receipt of foster care benefits.
(e) Unless otherwise specified the rights of a dependent child and the responsibilities of the county welfare or probation department, or tribe, and other entities, toward the child and family, shall also apply to nonminor dependents.

SEC. 8.5.

 Section 317 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

317.
 (a) (1) When it appears to the court that a parent or guardian of the child desires counsel but is presently financially unable to afford and cannot for that reason employ counsel, the court may appoint counsel as provided in this section.
(2) When it appears to the court that a parent or Indian custodian in an Indian child custody proceeding desires counsel but is presently unable to afford and cannot for that reason employ counsel, the provisions of subsection (b) of Section 1912 of the Indian Child Welfare Act (25 U.S.C. Sec. 1901 et seq.) and Section 23.13 of Title 25 of the Code of Federal Regulations are applicable.
(b) When it appears to the court that a parent or guardian of the child is presently financially unable to afford and cannot for that reason employ counsel, and the child has been placed in out-of-home care, or the petitioning agency is recommending that the child be placed in out-of-home care, the court shall appoint counsel for the parent or guardian, unless the court finds that the parent or guardian has made a knowing and intelligent waiver of counsel as provided in this section.
(c)  If a child is not represented by counsel, the court shall appoint counsel for the child unless the court finds that the child would not benefit from the appointment of counsel. The court shall state on the record its reasons for that finding. A primary responsibility of any counsel appointed to represent a child pursuant to this section shall be to advocate for the protection, safety, and physical and emotional well-being of the child. Counsel for the child may be a district attorney, public defender, or other member of the bar, provided that the counsel does not represent another party or county agency whose interests conflict with the child’s interests. The fact that the district attorney represents the child in a proceeding pursuant to Section 300 as well as conducts a criminal investigation or files a criminal complaint or information arising from the same or reasonably related set of facts as the proceeding pursuant to Section 300 is not in and of itself a conflict of interest. The court may fix the compensation for the services of appointed counsel. The appointed counsel shall have a caseload and training that ensures adequate representation of the child. The Judicial Council shall promulgate rules of court that establish caseload standards, training requirements, and guidelines for appointed counsel for children and shall adopt rules as required by Section 326.5 no later than July 1, 2001.
(d) The counsel appointed by the court shall represent the parent, guardian, or child at the detention hearing and at all subsequent proceedings before the juvenile court. Counsel shall continue to represent the parent, guardian, or child unless relieved by the court upon the substitution of other counsel or for cause. The representation shall include representing the parent, guardian, or the child in termination proceedings and in those proceedings relating to the institution or setting aside of a legal guardianship. On and after January 1, 2012, in the case of a nonminor dependent, as described in subdivision (v) of Section 11400, no representation by counsel shall be provided for a parent.
(e) The counsel for the child shall be charged in general with the representation of the child’s interests. To that end, the counsel shall make or cause to have made any further investigations that he or she deems in good faith to be reasonably necessary to ascertain the facts, including the interviewing of witnesses, and he or she shall examine and cross-examine witnesses in both the adjudicatory and dispositional hearings. He or she may also introduce and examine his or her own witnesses, make recommendations to the court concerning the child’s welfare, and participate further in the proceedings to the degree necessary to adequately represent the child. In any case in which the child is four years of age or older, counsel shall interview the child to determine the child’s wishes and to assess the child’s well-being, and shall advise the court of the child’s wishes. Counsel for the child shall not advocate for the return of the child if, to the best of his or her knowledge, that return conflicts with the protection and safety of the child. In addition counsel shall investigate the interests of the child beyond the scope of the juvenile proceeding and report to the court other interests of the child that may need to be protected by the institution of other administrative or judicial proceedings. The attorney representing a child in a dependency proceeding is not required to assume the responsibilities of a social worker and is not expected to provide nonlegal services to the child. The court shall take whatever appropriate action is necessary to fully protect the interests of the child.
(f) Either the child or the counsel for the child, with the informed consent of the child if the child is found by the court to be of sufficient age and maturity to so consent, which shall be presumed, subject to rebuttal by clear and convincing evidence, if the child is over 12 years of age, may invoke the psychotherapist-client privilege, physician-patient privilege, and clergyman-penitent privilege; and if the child invokes the privilege, counsel may not waive it, but if counsel invokes the privilege, the child may waive it. Counsel shall be holder of these privileges if the child is found by the court not to be of sufficient age and maturity to so consent. For the sole purpose of fulfilling his or her obligation to provide legal representation of the child, counsel for a child shall have access to all records with regard to the child maintained by a health care facility, as defined in Section 1545 of the Penal Code, health care providers, as defined in Section 6146 of the Business and Professions Code, a physician and surgeon or other health practitioner, as defined in former Section 11165.8 of the Penal Code, as that section read on January 1, 2000, or a child care custodian, as defined in former Section 11165.7 of the Penal Code, as that section read on January 1, 2000. Notwithstanding any other law, counsel shall be given access to all records relevant to the case which are maintained by state or local public agencies. All information requested from a child protective agency regarding a child who is in protective custody, or from a child’s guardian ad litem, shall be provided to the child’s counsel within 30 days of the request.
(g) In a county of the third class, if counsel is to be provided to a child at county expense other than by counsel for the agency, the court shall first utilize the services of the public defender prior to appointing private counsel, to provide legal counsel. Nothing in this subdivision shall be construed to require the appointment of the public defender in any case in which the public defender has a conflict of interest. In the interest of justice, a court may depart from that portion of the procedure requiring appointment of the public defender after making a finding of good cause and stating the reasons therefor on the record.
(h) In a county of the third class, if counsel is to be appointed for a parent or guardian at county expense, the court shall first utilize the services of the alternate public defender, prior to appointing private counsel, to provide legal counsel. Nothing in this subdivision shall be construed to require the appointment of the alternate public defender in any case in which the public defender has a conflict of interest. In the interest of justice, a court may depart from that portion of the procedure requiring appointment of the alternate public defender after making a finding of good cause and stating the reasons therefor on the record.

SEC. 9.

 Section 358.1 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, as amended by Section 4 of Chapter 287 of the Statutes of 2009, is amended to read:

358.1.
 Each social study or evaluation made by a social worker or child advocate appointed by the court, required to be received in evidence pursuant to Section 358, shall include, but not be limited to, a factual discussion of each of the following subjects:
(a) Whether the county welfare department or social worker has considered child protective services, as defined in Chapter 5 (commencing with Section 16500) of Part 4 of Division 9, as a possible solution to the problems at hand, and has offered these services to qualified parents if appropriate under the circumstances.
(b) What plan, if any, for return of the child to his or her parents and for achieving legal permanence for the child if efforts to reunify fail, is recommended to the court by the county welfare department or probation officer.
(c) Whether the best interests of the child will be served by granting reasonable visitation rights with the child to his or her grandparents, in order to maintain and strengthen the child’s family relationships.
(d) (1) Whether the child has siblings under the court’s jurisdiction, and, if any siblings exist, all of the following:
(A) The nature of the relationship between the child and his or her siblings.
(B) The appropriateness of developing or maintaining the sibling relationships pursuant to Section 16002.
(C) If the siblings are not placed together in the same home, why the siblings are not placed together and what efforts are being made to place the siblings together, or why those efforts are not appropriate.
(D) If the siblings are not placed together, the frequency and nature of the visits between siblings.
(E) The impact of the sibling relationships on the child’s placement and planning for legal permanence.
(2) The factual discussion shall include a discussion of indicators of the nature of the child’s sibling relationships, including, but not limited to, whether the siblings were raised together in the same home, whether the siblings have shared significant common experiences or have existing close and strong bonds, whether either sibling expresses a desire to visit or live with his or her sibling, as applicable, and whether ongoing contact is in the child’s best emotional interest.
(e) If the parent or guardian is unwilling or unable to participate in making an educational decision for his or her child, or if other circumstances exist that compromise the ability of the parent or guardian to make educational decisions for the child, the county welfare department or social worker shall consider whether the right of the parent or guardian to make educational decisions for the child should be limited. If the study or evaluation makes that recommendation, it shall identify whether there is a responsible adult available to make educational decisions for the child pursuant to Section 361.
(f) Whether the child appears to be a person who is eligible to be considered for further court action to free the child from parental custody and control.
(g) Whether the parent has been advised of his or her option to participate in adoption planning, including the option to enter into a postadoption contact agreement as described in Section 8714.7 of the Family Code, and to voluntarily relinquish the child for adoption if an adoption agency is willing to accept the relinquishment.
(h) The appropriateness of any relative placement pursuant to Section 361.3. However, this consideration may not be cause for continuance of the dispositional hearing.
(i) Whether the caregiver desires, and is willing, to provide legal permanency for the child if reunification is unsuccessful.
(j) For an Indian child, in consultation with the Indian child’s tribe, whether tribal customary adoption is an appropriate permanent plan for the child if reunification is unsuccessful.
(k) On and after the date that the director executes a declaration pursuant to Section 11217, whether the child has been placed in an approved relative’s home under a voluntary placement agreement for a period not to exceed 180 days, the parent or guardian is not interested in additional family maintenance or family reunification services, and the relative desires and is willing to be appointed the child’s legal guardian.
(l) This section shall remain in effect only until January 1, 2014, and as of that date is repealed, unless a later enacted statute, that is enacted before January 1, 2014, deletes or extends that date.

SEC. 10.

 Section 358.1 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, as added by Section 5 of Chapter 287 of the Statutes of 2009, is amended to read:

358.1.
 Each social study or evaluation made by a social worker or child advocate appointed by the court, required to be received in evidence pursuant to Section 358, shall include, but not be limited to, a factual discussion of each of the following subjects:
(a) Whether the county welfare department or social worker has considered child protective services, as defined in Chapter 5 (commencing with Section 16500) of Part 4 of Division 9, as a possible solution to the problems at hand, and has offered these services to qualified parents if appropriate under the circumstances.
(b) What plan, if any, for return of the child to his or her parents and for achieving legal permanence for the child if efforts to reunify fail, is recommended to the court by the county welfare department or probation officer.
(c) Whether the best interests of the child will be served by granting reasonable visitation rights with the child to his or her grandparents, in order to maintain and strengthen the child’s family relationships.
(d) (1) Whether the child has siblings under the court’s jurisdiction, and, if any siblings exist, all of the following:
(A) The nature of the relationship between the child and his or her siblings.
(B) The appropriateness of developing or maintaining the sibling relationships pursuant to Section 16002.
(C) If the siblings are not placed together in the same home, why the siblings are not placed together and what efforts are being made to place the siblings together, or why those efforts are not appropriate.
(D) If the siblings are not placed together, the frequency and nature of the visits between siblings.
(E) The impact of the sibling relationships on the child’s placement and planning for legal permanence.
(2) The factual discussion shall include a discussion of indicators of the nature of the child’s sibling relationships, including, but not limited to, whether the siblings were raised together in the same home, whether the siblings have shared significant common experiences or have existing close and strong bonds, whether either sibling expresses a desire to visit or live with his or her sibling, as applicable, and whether ongoing contact is in the child’s best emotional interest.
(e) If the parent or guardian is unwilling or unable to participate in making an educational decision for his or her child, or if other circumstances exist that compromise the ability of the parent or guardian to make educational decisions for the child, the county welfare department or social worker shall consider whether the right of the parent or guardian to make educational decisions for the child should be limited. If the study or evaluation makes that recommendation, it shall identify whether there is a responsible adult available to make educational decisions for the child pursuant to Section 361.
(f) Whether the child appears to be a person who is eligible to be considered for further court action to free the child from parental custody and control.
(g) Whether the parent has been advised of his or her option to participate in adoption planning, including the option to enter into a postadoption contact agreement as described in Section 8714.7 of the Family Code, and to voluntarily relinquish the child for adoption if an adoption agency is willing to accept the relinquishment.
(h) The appropriateness of any relative placement pursuant to Section 361.3. However, this consideration may not be cause for continuance of the dispositional hearing.
(i) Whether the caregiver desires, and is willing, to provide legal permanency for the child if reunification is unsuccessful.
(j) For an Indian child, in consultation with the Indian child’s tribe, whether tribal customary adoption is an appropriate permanent plan for the child if reunification is unsuccessful.
(k) On and after the date that the director executes a declaration pursuant to Section 11217, whether the child has been placed in an approved relative’s home under a voluntary placement agreement for a period not to exceed 180 days, the parent or guardian is not interested in additional family maintenance or family reunification services, and the relative desires and is willing to be appointed the child’s legal guardian.
(l) This section shall become operative on January 1, 2014.

SEC. 11.

 Section 360 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

360.
 After receiving and considering the evidence on the proper disposition of the case, the juvenile court may enter judgment as follows:
(a) Notwithstanding any other provision of law, if the court finds that the child is a person described by Section 300 and the parent has advised the court that the parent is not interested in family maintenance or family reunification services, it may, in addition to or in lieu of adjudicating the child a dependent child of the court, order a legal guardianship, appoint a legal guardian, and issue letters of guardianship, if the court determines that a guardianship is in the best interest of the child, provided the parent and the child agree to the guardianship, unless the child’s age or physical, emotional, or mental condition prevents the child’s meaningful response. The court shall advise the parent and the child that no reunification services will be provided as a result of the establishment of a guardianship. The proceeding for the appointment of a guardian shall be in the juvenile court.
Any application for termination of guardianship shall be filed in juvenile court in a form as may be developed by the Judicial Council pursuant to Section 68511 of the Government Code. Sections 366.4 and 388 shall apply to this order of guardianship.
No person shall be appointed a legal guardian under this section until an assessment as specified in subdivision (g) of Section 361.5 is read and considered by the court and reflected in the minutes of the court.
On and after the date that the director executes a declaration pursuant to Section 11217, if the court appoints an approved relative caregiver as the child’s legal guardian, the child has been in the care of that approved relative for a period of six consecutive months under a voluntary placement agreement, and the child otherwise meets the conditions for federal financial participation, the child shall be eligible for aid under the Kin-GAP Program as provided in Article 4.7 (commencing with Section 11385) of Chapter 2. The nonfederally eligible child placed with an approved relative caregiver who is appointed as the child’s legal guardian shall be eligible for aid under the state-funded Kin-GAP Program, as provided for in Article 4.5 (commencing with Section 11360) of Chapter 2.
The person responsible for preparing the assessment may be called and examined by any party to the guardianship proceeding.
(b) If the court finds that the child is a person described by Section 300, it may, without adjudicating the child a dependent child of the court, order that services be provided to keep the family together and place the child and the child’s parent or guardian under the supervision of the social worker for a time period consistent with Section 301.
(c) If the family subsequently is unable or unwilling to cooperate with the services being provided, the social worker may file a petition with the juvenile court pursuant to Section 332 alleging that a previous petition has been sustained and that disposition pursuant to subdivision (b) has been ineffective in ameliorating the situation requiring the child welfare services. Upon hearing the petition, the court shall order either that the petition shall be dismissed or that a new disposition hearing shall be held pursuant to subdivision (d).
(d) If the court finds that the child is a person described by Section 300, it may order and adjudge the child to be a dependent child of the court.

SEC. 12.

 Section 361.45 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

361.45.
 (a) Notwithstanding any other provision of law, when the sudden unavailability of a foster caregiver requires a change in placement on an emergency basis for a child who is under the jurisdiction of the juvenile court pursuant to Section 300, if an able and willing relative, as defined in Section 319, or an able and willing nonrelative extended family member, as defined in Section 362.7, is available and requests temporary placement of the child pending resolution of the emergency situation, the county welfare department shall initiate an assessment of the relative’s or nonrelative extended family member’s suitability, which shall include an in-home inspection to assess the safety of the home and the ability of the relative or nonrelative extended family member to care for the child’s needs, and a consideration of the results of a criminal records check conducted pursuant to Section 16504.5 and a check of allegations of prior child abuse or neglect concerning the relative or nonrelative extended family member and other adults in the home. Upon completion of this assessment, the child may be placed in the assessed home. For purposes of this paragraph, and except for the criminal records check conducted pursuant to Section 16504.5, the standards used to determine suitability shall be the same standards set forth in the regulations for the licensing of foster family homes.
(b) Immediately following the placement of a child in the home of a relative or a nonrelative extended family member, the county welfare department shall evaluate and approve or deny the home for purposes of AFDC-FC eligibility pursuant to Section 11402. The standards used to evaluate and grant or deny approval of the home of the relative and of the home of a nonrelative extended family member, as described in Section 362.7, shall be the same standards set forth in regulations for the licensing of foster family homes which prescribe standards of safety and sanitation for the physical plant and standards for basic personal care, supervision, and services provided by the caregiver.
(c) If a relative or nonrelative extended family member, and other adults in the home, as indicated, meets all other conditions for approval, except for the receipt of the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s criminal history information for the relative or nonrelative extended family member, the county welfare department may approve the home and document that approval, if the relative or nonrelative extended family member, and each adult in the home, has signed and submitted a statement that he or she has never been convicted of a crime in the United States, other than a traffic infraction as defined in paragraph (1) of subdivision (a) of Section 42001 of the Vehicle Code. If, after the approval has been granted, the department determines that the relative or nonrelative extended family member or other adult in the home has a criminal record, the approval may be terminated.
(d) (1) On and after January 1, 2012, if a nonminor dependent, as defined in subdivision (v) of Section 11400, is placed in the home of a relative or nonrelative extended family member, the home shall be approved using the same standards set forth in regulations as described in Section 1502.7 of the Health and Safety Code.
(2) On or before July 1, 2012, the department, in consultation with representatives of the Legislature, the County Welfare Directors Association, the Chief Probation Officers of California, the California Youth Connection, the Judicial Council, former foster youth, child advocacy organizations, dependency counsel for children, juvenile justice advocacy organizations, foster caregiver organizations, labor organizations, and representatives of Indian tribes, shall revise regulations regarding health and safety standards for approving relative homes in which nonminor dependents, as defined in subdivision (v) of Section 11400, of the juvenile court are placed under the responsibility of the county welfare or probation department, or an Indian tribe that entered into an agreement pursuant to Section 10553.1.
(3) Notwithstanding the Administrative Procedure Act (Chapter 3.5 (commencing with Section 11340) of Part 1 of Division 3 of Title 2 of the Government Code), the department, in consultation with the stakeholders listed in paragraph (2), shall prepare for implementation of the applicable provisions of this section by publishing all-county letters or similar instructions from the director by October 1, 2011, to be effective January 1, 2012. Emergency regulations to implement this section may be adopted by the director in accordance with the Administrative Procedure Act. The initial adoption of the emergency regulations and one readoption of the initial regulations shall be deemed to be an emergency and necessary for the immediate preservation of the public peace, health, safety, or general welfare. Initial emergency regulations and the first readoption of those emergency regulations shall be exempt from review by the Office of Administrative Law. The emergency regulations authorized by this section shall be submitted to the Office of Administrative Law for filing with the Secretary of State and shall remain in effect for no more than 180 days.

SEC. 13.

 Section 361.5 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, as amended by Section 6 of Chapter 287 of the Statutes of 2009, is amended to read:

361.5.
 (a)  Except as provided in subdivision (b), or when the parent has voluntarily relinquished the child and the relinquishment has been filed with the State Department of Social Services, or upon the establishment of an order of guardianship pursuant to Section 360, whenever a child is removed from a parent’s or guardian’s custody, the juvenile court shall order the social worker to provide child welfare services to the child and the child’s mother and statutorily presumed father or guardians. Upon a finding and declaration of paternity by the juvenile court or proof of a prior declaration of paternity by any court of competent jurisdiction, the juvenile court may order services for the child and the biological father, if the court determines that the services will benefit the child.
(1) Family reunification services, when provided, shall be provided as follows:
(A) Except as otherwise provided in subparagraph (C), for a child who, on the date of initial removal from the physical custody of his or her parent or guardian, was three years of age or older, court-ordered services shall be provided beginning with the dispositional hearing and ending 12 months after the date the child entered foster care as defined in Section 361.49, unless the child is returned to the home of the parent or guardian.
(B) For a child who, on the date of initial removal from the physical custody of his or her parent or guardian, was under three years of age, court-ordered services shall be provided for a period of six months from the dispositional hearing as provided in subdivision (e) of Section 366.21, but no longer than 12 months from the date the child entered foster care as defined in Section 361.49 unless the child is returned to the home of the parent or guardian.
(C) For the purpose of placing and maintaining a sibling group together in a permanent home should reunification efforts fail, for a child in a sibling group whose members were removed from parental custody at the same time, and in which one member of the sibling group was under three years of age on the date of initial removal from the physical custody of his or her parent or guardian, court-ordered services for some or all of the sibling group may be limited as set forth in subparagraph (B). For the purposes of this paragraph, “a sibling group” shall mean two or more children who are related to each other as full or half siblings.
(2) Any motion to terminate court-ordered reunification services prior to the hearing set pursuant to subdivision (f) of Section 366.21 for a child described by subparagraph (A) of paragraph (1), or prior to the hearing set pursuant to subdivision (e) of Section 366.21 for a child described by subparagraph (B) or (C) of paragraph (1), shall be made pursuant to the requirements set forth in subdivision (c) of Section 388. A motion to terminate court-ordered reunification services shall not be required at the hearing set pursuant to subdivision (e) of Section 366.21 if the court finds by clear and convincing evidence one of the following:
(A) That the child was removed initially under subdivision (g) of Section 300 and the whereabouts of the parent are still unknown.
(B) That the parent has failed to contact and visit the child.
(C) That the parent has been convicted of a felony indicating parental unfitness.
(3) Notwithstanding subparagraphs (A), (B), and (C) of paragraph (1), court-ordered services may be extended up to a maximum time period not to exceed 18 months after the date the child was originally removed from physical custody of his or her parent or guardian if it can be shown, at the hearing held pursuant to subdivision (f) of Section 366.21, that the permanent plan for the child is that he or she will be returned and safely maintained in the home within the extended time period. The court shall extend the time period only if it finds that there is a substantial probability that the child will be returned to the physical custody of his or her parent or guardian within the extended time period or that reasonable services have not been provided to the parent or guardian. In determining whether court-ordered services may be extended, the court shall consider the special circumstances of an incarcerated or institutionalized parent or parents, or parent or parents court-ordered to a residential substance abuse treatment program, including, but not limited to, barriers to the parent’s or guardian’s access to services and ability to maintain contact with his or her child. The court shall also consider, among other factors, good faith efforts that the parent or guardian has made to maintain contact with the child. If the court extends the time period, the court shall specify the factual basis for its conclusion that there is a substantial probability that the child will be returned to the physical custody of his or her parent or guardian within the extended time period. The court also shall make findings pursuant to subdivision (a) of Section 366 and subdivision (e) of Section 358.1.
When counseling or other treatment services are ordered, the parent or guardian shall be ordered to participate in those services, unless the parent’s or guardian’s participation is deemed by the court to be inappropriate or potentially detrimental to the child, or unless a parent or guardian is incarcerated and the corrections facility in which he or she is incarcerated does not provide access to the treatment services ordered by the court. Physical custody of the child by the parents or guardians during the applicable time period under subparagraph (A), (B), or (C) of paragraph (1) shall not serve to interrupt the running of the period. If at the end of the applicable time period, a child cannot be safely returned to the care and custody of a parent or guardian without court supervision, but the child clearly desires contact with the parent or guardian, the court shall take the child’s desire into account in devising a permanency plan.
In cases where the child was under three years of age on the date of the initial removal from the physical custody of his or her parent or guardian or is a member of a sibling group as described in subparagraph (C) of paragraph (1), the court shall inform the parent or guardian that the failure of the parent or guardian to participate regularly in any court-ordered treatment programs or to cooperate or avail himself or herself of services provided as part of the child welfare services case plan may result in a termination of efforts to reunify the family after six months. The court shall inform the parent or guardian of the factors used in subdivision (e) of Section 366.21 to determine whether to limit services to six months for some or all members of a sibling group as described in subparagraph (C) of paragraph (1).
(4) Notwithstanding paragraph (3), court-ordered services may be extended up to a maximum time period not to exceed 24 months after the date the child was originally removed from physical custody of his or her parent or guardian if it is shown, at the hearing held pursuant to subdivision (b) of Section 366.22, that the permanent plan for the child is that he or she will be returned and safely maintained in the home within the extended time period. The court shall extend the time period only if it finds that it is in the child’s best interest to have the time period extended and that there is a substantial probability that the child will be returned to the physical custody of his or her parent or guardian who is described in subdivision (b) of Section 366.22 within the extended time period, or that reasonable services have not been provided to the parent or guardian. If the court extends the time period, the court shall specify the factual basis for its conclusion that there is a substantial probability that the child will be returned to the physical custody of his or her parent or guardian within the extended time period. The court also shall make findings pursuant to subdivision (a) of Section 366 and subdivision (e) of Section 358.1.
When counseling or other treatment services are ordered, the parent or guardian shall be ordered to participate in those services, in order for substantial probability to be found. Physical custody of the child by the parents or guardians during the applicable time period under subparagraph (A), (B), or (C) of paragraph (1) shall not serve to interrupt the running of the period. If at the end of the applicable time period, the child cannot be safely returned to the care and custody of a parent or guardian without court supervision, but the child clearly desires contact with the parent or guardian, the court shall take the child’s desire into account in devising a permanency plan.
Except in cases where, pursuant to subdivision (b), the court does not order reunification services, the court shall inform the parent or parents of Section 366.26 and shall specify that the parent’s or parents’ parental rights may be terminated.
(b) Reunification services need not be provided to a parent or guardian described in this subdivision when the court finds, by clear and convincing evidence, any of the following:
(1) That the whereabouts of the parent or guardian is unknown. A finding pursuant to this paragraph shall be supported by an affidavit or by proof that a reasonably diligent search has failed to locate the parent or guardian. The posting or publication of notices is not required in that search.
(2) That the parent or guardian is suffering from a mental disability that is described in Chapter 2 (commencing with Section 7820) of Part 4 of Division 12 of the Family Code and that renders him or her incapable of utilizing those services.
(3) That the child or a sibling of the child has been previously adjudicated a dependent pursuant to any subdivision of Section 300 as a result of physical or sexual abuse, that following that adjudication the child had been removed from the custody of his or her parent or guardian pursuant to Section 361, that the child has been returned to the custody of the parent or guardian from whom the child had been taken originally, and that the child is being removed pursuant to Section 361, due to additional physical or sexual abuse.
(4) That the parent or guardian of the child has caused the death of another child through abuse or neglect.
(5) That the child was brought within the jurisdiction of the court under subdivision (e) of Section 300 because of the conduct of that parent or guardian.
(6) That the child has been adjudicated a dependent pursuant to any subdivision of Section 300 as a result of severe sexual abuse or the infliction of severe physical harm to the child, a sibling, or a half sibling by a parent or guardian, as defined in this subdivision, and the court makes a factual finding that it would not benefit the child to pursue reunification services with the offending parent or guardian.
A finding of severe sexual abuse, for the purposes of this subdivision, may be based on, but is not limited to, sexual intercourse, or stimulation involving genital-genital, oral-genital, anal-genital, or oral-anal contact, whether between the parent or guardian and the child or a sibling or half sibling of the child, or between the child or a sibling or half sibling of the child and another person or animal with the actual or implied consent of the parent or guardian; or the penetration or manipulation of the child’s, sibling’s, or half sibling’s genital organs or rectum by any animate or inanimate object for the sexual gratification of the parent or guardian, or for the sexual gratification of another person with the actual or implied consent of the parent or guardian.
A finding of the infliction of severe physical harm, for the purposes of this subdivision, may be based on, but is not limited to, deliberate and serious injury inflicted to or on a child’s body or the body of a sibling or half sibling of the child by an act or omission of the parent or guardian, or of another individual or animal with the consent of the parent or guardian; deliberate and torturous confinement of the child, sibling, or half sibling in a closed space; or any other torturous act or omission that would be reasonably understood to cause serious emotional damage.
(7) That the parent is not receiving reunification services for a sibling or a half sibling of the child pursuant to paragraph (3), (5), or (6).
(8) That the child was conceived by means of the commission of an offense listed in Section 288 or 288.5 of the Penal Code, or by an act committed outside of this state that, if committed in this state, would constitute one of those offenses. This paragraph only applies to the parent who committed the offense or act.
(9) That the child has been found to be a child described in subdivision (g) of Section 300, that the parent or guardian of the child willfully abandoned the child, and the court finds that the abandonment itself constituted a serious danger to the child; or that the parent or other person having custody of the child voluntarily surrendered physical custody of the child pursuant to Section 1255.7 of the Health and Safety Code. For the purposes of this paragraph, “serious danger” means that without the intervention of another person or agency, the child would have sustained severe or permanent disability, injury, illness, or death. For purposes of this paragraph, “willful abandonment” shall not be construed as actions taken in good faith by the parent without the intent of placing the child in serious danger.
(10) That the court ordered termination of reunification services for any siblings or half siblings of the child because the parent or guardian failed to reunify with the sibling or half sibling after the sibling or half sibling had been removed from that parent or guardian pursuant to Section 361 and that parent or guardian is the same parent or guardian described in subdivision (a) and that, according to the findings of the court, this parent or guardian has not subsequently made a reasonable effort to treat the problems that led to removal of the sibling or half sibling of that child from that parent or guardian.
(11) That the parental rights of a parent over any sibling or half sibling of the child had been permanently severed, and this parent is the same parent described in subdivision (a), and that, according to the findings of the court, this parent has not subsequently made a reasonable effort to treat the problems that led to removal of the sibling or half sibling of that child from the parent.
(12) That the parent or guardian of the child has been convicted of a violent felony, as defined in subdivision (c) of Section 667.5 of the Penal Code.
(13) That the parent or guardian of the child has a history of extensive, abusive, and chronic use of drugs or alcohol and has resisted prior court-ordered treatment for this problem during a three-year period immediately prior to the filing of the petition that brought that child to the court’s attention, or has failed or refused to comply with a program of drug or alcohol treatment described in the case plan required by Section 358.1 on at least two prior occasions, even though the programs identified were available and accessible.
(14) That the parent or guardian of the child has advised the court that he or she is not interested in receiving family maintenance or family reunification services or having the child returned to or placed in his or her custody and does not wish to receive family maintenance or reunification services.
The parent or guardian shall be represented by counsel and shall execute a waiver of services form to be adopted by the Judicial Council. The court shall advise the parent or guardian of any right to services and of the possible consequences of a waiver of services, including the termination of parental rights and placement of the child for adoption. The court shall not accept the waiver of services unless it states on the record its finding that the parent or guardian has knowingly and intelligently waived the right to services.
(15) That the parent or guardian has on one or more occasions willfully abducted the child or child’s sibling or half sibling from his or her placement and refused to disclose the child’s or child’s sibling’s or half sibling’s whereabouts, refused to return physical custody of the child or child’s sibling or half sibling to his or her placement, or refused to return physical custody of the child or child’s sibling or half sibling to the social worker.
(c) In deciding whether to order reunification in any case in which this section applies, the court shall hold a dispositional hearing. The social worker shall prepare a report that discusses whether reunification services shall be provided. When it is alleged, pursuant to paragraph (2) of subdivision (b), that the parent is incapable of utilizing services due to mental disability, the court shall order reunification services unless competent evidence from mental health professionals establishes that, even with the provision of services, the parent is unlikely to be capable of adequately caring for the child within the time limits specified in subdivision (a).
The court shall not order reunification for a parent or guardian described in paragraph (3), (4), (6), (7), (8), (9), (10), (11), (12), (13), (14), or (15) of subdivision (b) unless the court finds, by clear and convincing evidence, that reunification is in the best interest of the child.
In addition, the court shall not order reunification in any situation described in paragraph (5) of subdivision (b) unless it finds that, based on competent testimony, those services are likely to prevent reabuse or continued neglect of the child or that failure to try reunification will be detrimental to the child because the child is closely and positively attached to that parent. The social worker shall investigate the circumstances leading to the removal of the child and advise the court whether there are circumstances that indicate that reunification is likely to be successful or unsuccessful and whether failure to order reunification is likely to be detrimental to the child.
The failure of the parent to respond to previous services, the fact that the child was abused while the parent was under the influence of drugs or alcohol, a past history of violent behavior, or testimony by a competent professional that the parent’s behavior is unlikely to be changed by services are among the factors indicating that reunification services are unlikely to be successful. The fact that a parent or guardian is no longer living with an individual who severely abused the child may be considered in deciding that reunification services are likely to be successful, provided that the court shall consider any pattern of behavior on the part of the parent that has exposed the child to repeated abuse.
(d) If reunification services are not ordered pursuant to paragraph (1) of subdivision (b) and the whereabouts of a parent become known within six months of the out-of-home placement of the child, the court shall order the social worker to provide family reunification services in accordance with this subdivision.
(e) (1) If the parent or guardian is incarcerated or institutionalized, the court shall order reasonable services unless the court determines, by clear and convincing evidence, those services would be detrimental to the child. In determining detriment, the court shall consider the age of the child, the degree of parent-child bonding, the length of the sentence, the length and nature of the treatment, the nature of the crime or illness, the degree of detriment to the child if services are not offered and, for children 10 years of age or older, the child’s attitude toward the implementation of family reunification services, the likelihood of the parent’s discharge from incarceration or institutionalization within the reunification time limitations described in subdivision (a), and any other appropriate factors. In determining the content of reasonable services, the court shall consider the particular barriers to an incarcerated or otherwise institutionalized parent’s access to those court-mandated services and ability to maintain contact with his or her child, and shall document this information in the child’s case plan. Reunification services are subject to the applicable time limitations imposed in subdivision (a). Services may include, but shall not be limited to, all of the following:
(A) Maintaining contact between the parent and child through collect telephone calls.
(B) Transportation services, where appropriate.
(C) Visitation services, where appropriate.
(D) Reasonable services to extended family members or foster parents providing care for the child if the services are not detrimental to the child.
An incarcerated parent may be required to attend counseling, parenting classes, or vocational training programs as part of the reunification service plan if actual access to these services is provided. The social worker shall document in the child’s case plan the particular barriers to an incarcerated or institutionalized parent’s access to those court-mandated services and ability to maintain contact with his or her child.
(2) The presiding judge of the juvenile court of each county may convene representatives of the county welfare department, the sheriff’s department, and other appropriate entities for the purpose of developing and entering into protocols for ensuring the notification, transportation, and presence of an incarcerated or institutionalized parent at all court hearings involving proceedings affecting the child pursuant to Section 2625 of the Penal Code. The county welfare department shall utilize the prisoner locator system developed by the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation to facilitate timely and effective notice of hearings for incarcerated parents.
(3) Notwithstanding any other provision of law, if the incarcerated parent is a woman seeking to participate in the community treatment program operated by the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation pursuant to Chapter 4.8 (commencing with Section 1174) of Title 7 of Part 2 of, Chapter 4 (commencing with Section 3410) of Title 2 of Part 3 of, the Penal Code, the court shall determine whether the parent’s participation in a program is in the child’s best interest and whether it is suitable to meet the needs of the parent and child.
(f) If the court, pursuant to paragraph (2), (3), (4), (5), (6), (7), (8), (9), (10), (11), (12), (13), (14), or (15) of subdivision (b) or paragraph (1) of subdivision (e), does not order reunification services, it shall, at the dispositional hearing, that shall include a permanency hearing, determine if a hearing under Section 366.26 shall be set in order to determine whether adoption, guardianship, or long-term foster care, or in the case of an Indian child, in consultation with the child’s tribe, tribal customary adoption, is the most appropriate plan for the child, and shall consider in-state and out-of-state placement options. If the court so determines, it shall conduct the hearing pursuant to Section 366.26 within 120 days after the dispositional hearing. However, the court shall not schedule a hearing so long as the other parent is being provided reunification services pursuant to subdivision (a). The court may continue to permit the parent to visit the child unless it finds that visitation would be detrimental to the child.
(g) (1) Whenever a court orders that a hearing shall be held pursuant to Section 366.26, including, when, in consultation with the child’s tribe, tribal customary adoption is recommended, it shall direct the agency supervising the child and the licensed county adoption agency, or the State Department of Social Services when it is acting as an adoption agency in counties that are not served by a county adoption agency, to prepare an assessment that shall include:
(A) Current search efforts for an absent parent or parents and notification of a noncustodial parent in the manner provided for in Section 291.
(B) A review of the amount of and nature of any contact between the child and his or her parents and other members of his or her extended family since the time of placement. Although the extended family of each child shall be reviewed on a case-by-case basis, “extended family” for the purpose of this subparagraph shall include, but not be limited to, the child’s siblings, grandparents, aunts, and uncles.
(C) An evaluation of the child’s medical, developmental, scholastic, mental, and emotional status.
(D) A preliminary assessment of the eligibility and commitment of any identified prospective adoptive parent or guardian, including a prospective tribal customary adoptive parent, particularly the caretaker, to include a social history, including screening for criminal records and prior referrals for child abuse or neglect, the capability to meet the child’s needs, and the understanding of the legal and financial rights and responsibilities of adoption and guardianship. If a proposed guardian is a relative of the minor, the assessment shall also consider, but need not be limited to, all of the factors specified in subdivision (a) of Section 361.3 and in Section 361.4. As used in this subparagraph, “relative” means an adult who is related to the minor by blood, adoption, or affinity within the fifth degree of kinship, including stepparents, stepsiblings, and all relatives whose status is preceded by the words “great,” “great-great,” or “grand,” or the spouse of any of those persons even if the marriage was terminated by death or dissolution.
(E) The relationship of the child to any identified prospective adoptive parent or guardian, including a prospective tribal customary parent, the duration and character of the relationship, the degree of attachment of the child to the prospective relative guardian or adoptive parent, the relative’s or adoptive parent’s strong commitment to caring permanently for the child, the motivation for seeking adoption or guardianship, a statement from the child concerning placement and the adoption or guardianship, and whether the child over 12 years of age has been consulted about the proposed relative guardianship arrangements, unless the child’s age or physical, emotional, or other condition precludes his or her meaningful response, and if so, a description of the condition.
(F) An analysis of the likelihood that the child will be adopted if parental rights are terminated.
(G) In the case of an Indian child, in addition to subparagraphs (A) to (F), inclusive, an assessment of the likelihood that the child will be adopted, when, in consultation with the child’s tribe, a customary tribal adoption, as defined in Section 366.24, is recommended. If tribal customary adoption is recommended, the assessment shall include an analysis of both of the following:
(i) Whether tribal customary adoption would or would not be detrimental to the Indian child and the reasons for reaching that conclusion.
(ii) Whether the Indian child cannot or should not be returned to the home of the Indian parent or Indian custodian and the reasons for reaching that conclusion.
(2) (A) A relative caregiver’s preference for legal guardianship over adoption, if it is due to circumstances that do not include an unwillingness to accept legal or financial responsibility for the child, shall not constitute the sole basis for recommending removal of the child from the relative caregiver for purposes of adoptive placement.
(B) A relative caregiver shall be given information regarding the permanency options of guardianship and adoption, including the long-term benefits and consequences of each option, prior to establishing legal guardianship or pursuing adoption.
(h) If, at any hearing held pursuant to Section 366.26, a guardianship is established for the minor with an approved relative caregiver and juvenile court dependency is subsequently dismissed, the minor shall be eligible for aid under the Kin-GAP Program as provided for in Article 4.5 (commencing with Section 11360) or Article 4.7 (commencing with Section 11385) of Chapter 2, as applicable.
(i) In determining whether reunification services will benefit the child pursuant to paragraph (6) or (7) of subdivision (b), the court shall consider any information it deems relevant, including the following factors:
(1) The specific act or omission comprising the severe sexual abuse or the severe physical harm inflicted on the child or the child’s sibling or half sibling.
(2) The circumstances under which the abuse or harm was inflicted on the child or the child’s sibling or half sibling.
(3) The severity of the emotional trauma suffered by the child or the child’s sibling or half sibling.
(4) Any history of abuse of other children by the offending parent or guardian.
(5) The likelihood that the child may be safely returned to the care of the offending parent or guardian within 12 months with no continuing supervision.
(6) Whether or not the child desires to be reunified with the offending parent or guardian.
(j) The court shall read into the record the basis for a finding of severe sexual abuse or the infliction of severe physical harm under paragraph (6) of subdivision (b), and shall also specify the factual findings used to determine that the provision of reunification services to the offending parent or guardian would not benefit the child.
(k) This section shall remain in effect only until January 1, 2014, and as of that date is repealed, unless a later enacted statute, that is enacted before January 1, 2014, deletes or extends that date.

SEC. 14.

 Section 361.5 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, as added by Section 7 of Chapter 287 of the Statutes of 2009, is amended to read:

361.5.
 (a) Except as provided in subdivision (b), or when the parent has voluntarily relinquished the child and the relinquishment has been filed with the State Department of Social Services, or upon the establishment of an order of guardianship pursuant to Section 360, whenever a child is removed from a parent’s or guardian’s custody, the juvenile court shall order the social worker to provide child welfare services to the child and the child’s mother and statutorily presumed father or guardians. Upon a finding and declaration of paternity by the juvenile court or proof of a prior declaration of paternity by any court of competent jurisdiction, the juvenile court may order services for the child and the biological father, if the court determines that the services will benefit the child.
(1) Family reunification services, when provided, shall be provided as follows:
(A) Except as otherwise provided in subparagraph (C), for a child who, on the date of initial removal from the physical custody of his or her parent or guardian, was three years of age or older, court-ordered services shall be provided beginning with the dispositional hearing and ending 12 months after the date the child entered foster care as defined in Section 361.49, unless the child is returned to the home of the parent or guardian.
(B) For a child who, on the date of initial removal from the physical custody of his or her parent or guardian, was under three years of age, court-ordered services shall be provided for a period of six months from the dispositional hearing as provided in subdivision (e) of Section 366.21, but no longer than 12 months from the date the child entered foster care as defined in Section 361.49 unless the child is returned to the home of the parent or guardian.
(C) For the purpose of placing and maintaining a sibling group together in a permanent home should reunification efforts fail, for a child in a sibling group whose members were removed from parental custody at the same time, and in which one member of the sibling group was under three years of age on the date of initial removal from the physical custody of his or her parent or guardian, court-ordered services for some or all of the sibling group may be limited as set forth in subparagraph (B). For the purposes of this paragraph, “a sibling group” shall mean two or more children who are related to each other as full or half siblings.
(2) Any motion to terminate court-ordered reunification services prior to the hearing set pursuant to subdivision (f) of Section 366.21 for a child described by subparagraph (A) of paragraph (1), or prior to the hearing set pursuant to subdivision (e) of Section 366.21 for a child described by subparagraph (B) or (C) of paragraph (1), shall be made pursuant to the requirements set forth in subdivision (c) of Section 388. A motion to terminate court-ordered reunification services shall not be required at the hearing set pursuant to subdivision (e) of Section 366.21 if the court finds by clear and convincing evidence one of the following:
(A) That the child was removed initially under subdivision (g) of Section 300 and the whereabouts of the parent are still unknown.
(B) That the parent has failed to contact and visit the child.
(C) That the parent has been convicted of a felony indicating parental unfitness.
(3) Notwithstanding subparagraphs (A), (B), and (C) of paragraph (1), court-ordered services may be extended up to a maximum time period not to exceed 18 months after the date the child was originally removed from physical custody of his or her parent or guardian if it can be shown, at the hearing held pursuant to subdivision (f) of Section 366.21, that the permanent plan for the child is that he or she will be returned and safely maintained in the home within the extended time period. The court shall extend the time period only if it finds that there is a substantial probability that the child will be returned to the physical custody of his or her parent or guardian within the extended time period or that reasonable services have not been provided to the parent or guardian. In determining whether court-ordered services may be extended, the court shall consider the special circumstances of an incarcerated or institutionalized parent or parents, or parent or parents court-ordered to a residential substance abuse treatment program, including, but not limited to, barriers to the parent’s or guardian’s access to services and ability to maintain contact with his or her child. The court shall also consider, among other factors, good faith efforts that the parent or guardian has made to maintain contact with the child. If the court extends the time period, the court shall specify the factual basis for its conclusion that there is a substantial probability that the child will be returned to the physical custody of his or her parent or guardian within the extended time period. The court also shall make findings pursuant to subdivision (a) of Section 366 and subdivision (e) of Section 358.1.
When counseling or other treatment services are ordered, the parent or guardian shall be ordered to participate in those services, unless the parent’s or guardian’s participation is deemed by the court to be inappropriate or potentially detrimental to the child, or unless a parent or guardian is incarcerated and the corrections facility in which he or she is incarcerated does not provide access to the treatment services ordered by the court. Physical custody of the child by the parents or guardians during the applicable time period under subparagraph (A), (B), or (C) of paragraph (1) shall not serve to interrupt the running of the period. If at the end of the applicable time period, a child cannot be safely returned to the care and custody of a parent or guardian without court supervision, but the child clearly desires contact with the parent or guardian, the court shall take the child’s desire into account in devising a permanency plan.
In cases where the child was under three years of age on the date of the initial removal from the physical custody of his or her parent or guardian or is a member of a sibling group as described in subparagraph (C) of paragraph (1), the court shall inform the parent or guardian that the failure of the parent or guardian to participate regularly in any court-ordered treatment programs or to cooperate or avail himself or herself of services provided as part of the child welfare services case plan may result in a termination of efforts to reunify the family after six months. The court shall inform the parent or guardian of the factors used in subdivision (e) of Section 366.21 to determine whether to limit services to six months for some or all members of a sibling group as described in subparagraph (C) of paragraph (1).
(4) Notwithstanding paragraph (3), court-ordered services may be extended up to a maximum time period not to exceed 24 months after the date the child was originally removed from physical custody of his or her parent or guardian if it is shown, at the hearing held pursuant to subdivision (b) of Section 366.22, that the permanent plan for the child is that he or she will be returned and safely maintained in the home within the extended time period. The court shall extend the time period only if it finds that it is in the child’s best interest to have the time period extended and that there is a substantial probability that the child will be returned to the physical custody of his or her parent or guardian who is described in subdivision (b) of Section 366.22 within the extended time period, or that reasonable services have not been provided to the parent or guardian. If the court extends the time period, the court shall specify the factual basis for its conclusion that there is a substantial probability that the child will be returned to the physical custody of his or her parent or guardian within the extended time period. The court also shall make findings pursuant to subdivision (a) of Section 366 and subdivision (e) of Section 358.1.
When counseling or other treatment services are ordered, the parent or guardian shall be ordered to participate in those services, in order for substantial probability to be found. Physical custody of the child by the parents or guardians during the applicable time period under subparagraph (A), (B), or (C) of paragraph (1) shall not serve to interrupt the running of the period. If at the end of the applicable time period, the child cannot be safely returned to the care and custody of a parent or guardian without court supervision, but the child clearly desires contact with the parent or guardian, the court shall take the child’s desire into account in devising a permanency plan.
Except in cases where, pursuant to subdivision (b), the court does not order reunification services, the court shall inform the parent or parents of Section 366.26 and shall specify that the parent’s or parents’ parental rights may be terminated.
(b) Reunification services need not be provided to a parent or guardian described in this subdivision when the court finds, by clear and convincing evidence, any of the following:
(1) That the whereabouts of the parent or guardian is unknown. A finding pursuant to this paragraph shall be supported by an affidavit or by proof that a reasonably diligent search has failed to locate the parent or guardian. The posting or publication of notices is not required in that search.
(2) That the parent or guardian is suffering from a mental disability that is described in Chapter 2 (commencing with Section 7820) of Part 4 of Division 12 of the Family Code and that renders him or her incapable of utilizing those services.
(3) That the child or a sibling of the child has been previously adjudicated a dependent pursuant to any subdivision of Section 300 as a result of physical or sexual abuse, that following that adjudication the child had been removed from the custody of his or her parent or guardian pursuant to Section 361, that the child has been returned to the custody of the parent or guardian from whom the child had been taken originally, and that the child is being removed pursuant to Section 361, due to additional physical or sexual abuse.
(4) That the parent or guardian of the child has caused the death of another child through abuse or neglect.
(5) That the child was brought within the jurisdiction of the court under subdivision (e) of Section 300 because of the conduct of that parent or guardian.
(6) That the child has been adjudicated a dependent pursuant to any subdivision of Section 300 as a result of severe sexual abuse or the infliction of severe physical harm to the child, a sibling, or a half sibling by a parent or guardian, as defined in this subdivision, and the court makes a factual finding that it would not benefit the child to pursue reunification services with the offending parent or guardian.
A finding of severe sexual abuse, for the purposes of this subdivision, may be based on, but is not limited to, sexual intercourse, or stimulation involving genital-genital, oral-genital, anal-genital, or oral-anal contact, whether between the parent or guardian and the child or a sibling or half sibling of the child, or between the child or a sibling or half sibling of the child and another person or animal with the actual or implied consent of the parent or guardian; or the penetration or manipulation of the child’s, sibling’s, or half sibling’s genital organs or rectum by any animate or inanimate object for the sexual gratification of the parent or guardian, or for the sexual gratification of another person with the actual or implied consent of the parent or guardian.
A finding of the infliction of severe physical harm, for the purposes of this subdivision, may be based on, but is not limited to, deliberate and serious injury inflicted to or on a child’s body or the body of a sibling or half sibling of the child by an act or omission of the parent or guardian, or of another individual or animal with the consent of the parent or guardian; deliberate and torturous confinement of the child, sibling, or half sibling in a closed space; or any other torturous act or omission that would be reasonably understood to cause serious emotional damage.
(7) That the parent is not receiving reunification services for a sibling or a half sibling of the child pursuant to paragraph (3), (5), or (6).
(8) That the child was conceived by means of the commission of an offense listed in Section 288 or 288.5 of the Penal Code, or by an act committed outside of this state that, if committed in this state, would constitute one of those offenses. This paragraph only applies to the parent who committed the offense or act.
(9) That the child has been found to be a child described in subdivision (g) of Section 300, that the parent or guardian of the child willfully abandoned the child, and the court finds that the abandonment itself constituted a serious danger to the child; or that the parent or other person having custody of the child voluntarily surrendered physical custody of the child pursuant to Section 1255.7 of the Health and Safety Code. For the purposes of this paragraph, “serious danger” means that without the intervention of another person or agency, the child would have sustained severe or permanent disability, injury, illness, or death. For purposes of this paragraph, “willful abandonment” shall not be construed as actions taken in good faith by the parent without the intent of placing the child in serious danger.
(10) That the court ordered termination of reunification services for any siblings or half siblings of the child because the parent or guardian failed to reunify with the sibling or half sibling after the sibling or half sibling had been removed from that parent or guardian pursuant to Section 361 and that parent or guardian is the same parent or guardian described in subdivision (a) and that, according to the findings of the court, this parent or guardian has not subsequently made a reasonable effort to treat the problems that led to removal of the sibling or half sibling of that child from that parent or guardian.
(11) That the parental rights of a parent over any sibling or half sibling of the child had been permanently severed, and this parent is the same parent described in subdivision (a), and that, according to the findings of the court, this parent has not subsequently made a reasonable effort to treat the problems that led to removal of the sibling or half sibling of that child from the parent.
(12) That the parent or guardian of the child has been convicted of a violent felony, as defined in subdivision (c) of Section 667.5 of the Penal Code.
(13) That the parent or guardian of the child has a history of extensive, abusive, and chronic use of drugs or alcohol and has resisted prior court-ordered treatment for this problem during a three-year period immediately prior to the filing of the petition that brought that child to the court’s attention, or has failed or refused to comply with a program of drug or alcohol treatment described in the case plan required by Section 358.1 on at least two prior occasions, even though the programs identified were available and accessible.
(14) That the parent or guardian of the child has advised the court that he or she is not interested in receiving family maintenance or family reunification services or having the child returned to or placed in his or her custody and does not wish to receive family maintenance or reunification services.
The parent or guardian shall be represented by counsel and shall execute a waiver of services form to be adopted by the Judicial Council. The court shall advise the parent or guardian of any right to services and of the possible consequences of a waiver of services, including the termination of parental rights and placement of the child for adoption. The court shall not accept the waiver of services unless it states on the record its finding that the parent or guardian has knowingly and intelligently waived the right to services.
(15) That the parent or guardian has on one or more occasions willfully abducted the child or child’s sibling or half sibling from his or her placement and refused to disclose the child’s or child’s sibling’s or half sibling’s whereabouts, refused to return physical custody of the child or child’s sibling or half sibling to his or her placement, or refused to return physical custody of the child or child’s sibling or half sibling to the social worker.
(c) In deciding whether to order reunification in any case in which this section applies, the court shall hold a dispositional hearing. The social worker shall prepare a report that discusses whether reunification services shall be provided. When it is alleged, pursuant to paragraph (2) of subdivision (b), that the parent is incapable of utilizing services due to mental disability, the court shall order reunification services unless competent evidence from mental health professionals establishes that, even with the provision of services, the parent is unlikely to be capable of adequately caring for the child within the time limits specified in subdivision (a).
The court shall not order reunification for a parent or guardian described in paragraph (3), (4), (6), (7), (8), (9), (10), (11), (12), (13), (14), or (15) of subdivision (b) unless the court finds, by clear and convincing evidence, that reunification is in the best interest of the child.
In addition, the court shall not order reunification in any situation described in paragraph (5) of subdivision (b) unless it finds that, based on competent testimony, those services are likely to prevent reabuse or continued neglect of the child or that failure to try reunification will be detrimental to the child because the child is closely and positively attached to that parent. The social worker shall investigate the circumstances leading to the removal of the child and advise the court whether there are circumstances that indicate that reunification is likely to be successful or unsuccessful and whether failure to order reunification is likely to be detrimental to the child.
The failure of the parent to respond to previous services, the fact that the child was abused while the parent was under the influence of drugs or alcohol, a past history of violent behavior, or testimony by a competent professional that the parent’s behavior is unlikely to be changed by services are among the factors indicating that reunification services are unlikely to be successful. The fact that a parent or guardian is no longer living with an individual who severely abused the child may be considered in deciding that reunification services are likely to be successful, provided that the court shall consider any pattern of behavior on the part of the parent that has exposed the child to repeated abuse.
(d) If reunification services are not ordered pursuant to paragraph (1) of subdivision (b) and the whereabouts of a parent become known within six months of the out-of-home placement of the child, the court shall order the social worker to provide family reunification services in accordance with this subdivision.
(e) (1) If the parent or guardian is incarcerated or institutionalized, the court shall order reasonable services unless the court determines, by clear and convincing evidence, those services would be detrimental to the child. In determining detriment, the court shall consider the age of the child, the degree of parent-child bonding, the length of the sentence, the length and nature of the treatment, the nature of the crime or illness, the degree of detriment to the child if services are not offered and, for children 10 years of age or older, the child’s attitude toward the implementation of family reunification services, the likelihood of the parent’s discharge from incarceration or institutionalization within the reunification time limitations described in subdivision (a), and any other appropriate factors. In determining the content of reasonable services, the court shall consider the particular barriers to an incarcerated or otherwise institutionalized parent’s access to those court-mandated services and ability to maintain contact with his or her child, and shall document this information in the child’s case plan. Reunification services are subject to the applicable time limitations imposed in subdivision (a). Services may include, but shall not be limited to, all of the following:
(A) Maintaining contact between the parent and child through collect telephone calls.
(B) Transportation services, where appropriate.
(C) Visitation services, where appropriate.
(D) Reasonable services to extended family members or foster parents providing care for the child if the services are not detrimental to the child.
An incarcerated parent may be required to attend counseling, parenting classes, or vocational training programs as part of the reunification service plan if actual access to these services is provided. The social worker shall document in the child’s case plan the particular barriers to an incarcerated or institutionalized parent’s access to those court-mandated services and ability to maintain contact with his or her child.
(2) The presiding judge of the juvenile court of each county may convene representatives of the county welfare department, the sheriff’s department, and other appropriate entities for the purpose of developing and entering into protocols for ensuring the notification, transportation, and presence of an incarcerated or institutionalized parent at all court hearings involving proceedings affecting the child pursuant to Section 2625 of the Penal Code. The county welfare department shall utilize the prisoner locator system developed by the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation to facilitate timely and effective notice of hearings for incarcerated parents.
(3) Notwithstanding any other provision of law, if the incarcerated parent is a woman seeking to participate in the community treatment program operated by the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation pursuant to Chapter 4.8 (commencing with Section 1174) of Title 7 of Part 2 of, Chapter 4 (commencing with Section 3410) of Title 2 of Part 3 of, the Penal Code, the court shall determine whether the parent’s participation in a program is in the child’s best interest and whether it is suitable to meet the needs of the parent and child.
(f) If the court, pursuant to paragraph (2), (3), (4), (5), (6), (7), (8), (9), (10), (11), (12), (13), (14), or (15) of subdivision (b) or paragraph (1) of subdivision (e), does not order reunification services, it shall, at the dispositional hearing, that shall include a permanency hearing, determine if a hearing under Section 366.26 shall be set in order to determine whether adoption, guardianship, or long-term foster care is the most appropriate plan for the child, and shall consider in-state and out-of-state placement options. If the court so determines, it shall conduct the hearing pursuant to Section 366.26 within 120 days after the dispositional hearing. However, the court shall not schedule a hearing so long as the other parent is being provided reunification services pursuant to subdivision (a). The court may continue to permit the parent to visit the child unless it finds that visitation would be detrimental to the child.
(g) (1) Whenever a court orders that a hearing shall be held pursuant to Section 366.26, it shall direct the agency supervising the child and the licensed county adoption agency, or the State Department of Social Services when it is acting as an adoption agency in counties that are not served by a county adoption agency, to prepare an assessment that shall include:
(A) Current search efforts for an absent parent or parents and notification of a noncustodial parent in the manner provided for in Section 291.
(B) A review of the amount of and nature of any contact between the child and his or her parents and other members of his or her extended family since the time of placement. Although the extended family of each child shall be reviewed on a case-by-case basis, “extended family” for the purpose of this subparagraph shall include, but not be limited to, the child’s siblings, grandparents, aunts, and uncles.
(C) An evaluation of the child’s medical, developmental, scholastic, mental, and emotional status.
(D) A preliminary assessment of the eligibility and commitment of any identified prospective adoptive parent or guardian, particularly the caretaker, to include a social history, including screening for criminal records and prior referrals for child abuse or neglect, the capability to meet the child’s needs, and the understanding of the legal and financial rights and responsibilities of adoption and guardianship. If a proposed guardian is a relative of the minor, the assessment shall also consider, but need not be limited to, all of the factors specified in subdivision (a) of Section 361.3 and in Section 361.4. As used in this subparagraph, “relative” means an adult who is related to the minor by blood, adoption, or affinity within the fifth degree of kinship, including stepparents, stepsiblings, and all relatives whose status is preceded by the words “great,” “great-great,” or “grand,” or the spouse of any of those persons even if the marriage was terminated by death or dissolution.
(E) The relationship of the child to any identified prospective adoptive parent or guardian, the duration and character of the relationship, the degree of attachment of the child to the prospective relative guardian or adoptive parent, the relative’s or adoptive parent’s strong commitment to caring permanently for the child, the motivation for seeking adoption or guardianship, a statement from the child concerning placement and the adoption or guardianship, and whether the child over 12 years of age has been consulted about the proposed relative guardianship arrangements unless the child’s age or physical, emotional, or other condition precludes his or her meaningful response, and if so, a description of the condition.
(F) An analysis of the likelihood that the child will be adopted if parental rights are terminated.
(2) (A) A relative caregiver’s preference for legal guardianship over adoption, if it is due to circumstances that do not include an unwillingness to accept legal or financial responsibility for the child, shall not constitute the sole basis for recommending removal of the child from the relative caregiver for purposes of adoptive placement.
(B) A relative caregiver shall be given information regarding the permanency options of guardianship and adoption, including the long-term benefits and consequences of each option, prior to establishing legal guardianship or pursuing adoption.
(h) If, at any hearing held pursuant to Section 366.26, a guardianship is established for the minor with an approved relative caregiver and juvenile court dependency is subsequently dismissed, the minor shall be eligible for aid under the Kin-GAP Program as provided for in Article 4.5 (commencing with Section 11360) or Article 4.7 (commencing with Section 11385) of Chapter 2, as applicable.
(i) In determining whether reunification services will benefit the child pursuant to paragraph (6) or (7) of subdivision (b), the court shall consider any information it deems relevant, including the following factors:
(1) The specific act or omission comprising the severe sexual abuse or the severe physical harm inflicted on the child or the child’s sibling or half sibling.
(2) The circumstances under which the abuse or harm was inflicted on the child or the child’s sibling or half sibling.
(3) The severity of the emotional trauma suffered by the child or the child’s sibling or half sibling.
(4) Any history of abuse of other children by the offending parent or guardian.
(5) The likelihood that the child may be safely returned to the care of the offending parent or guardian within 12 months with no continuing supervision.
(6) Whether or not the child desires to be reunified with the offending parent or guardian.
(j) The court shall read into the record the basis for a finding of severe sexual abuse or the infliction of severe physical harm under paragraph (6) of subdivision (b), and shall also specify the factual findings used to determine that the provision of reunification services to the offending parent or guardian would not benefit the child.
(k) This section shall become operative on January 1, 2014.

SEC. 15.

 Section 366 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

366.
 (a) (1) The status of every dependent child in foster care shall be reviewed periodically as determined by the court but no less frequently than once every six months, as calculated from the date of the original dispositional hearing, until the hearing described in Section 366.26 is completed. The court shall consider the safety of the child and shall determine all of the following:
(A) The continuing necessity for and appropriateness of the placement.
(B) The extent of the agency’s compliance with the case plan in making reasonable efforts, or, in the case of an Indian child, active efforts as described in Section 361.7, to return the child to a safe home and to complete any steps necessary to finalize the permanent placement of the child, including efforts to maintain relationships between a child who is 10 years of age or older and who has been in an out-of-home placement for six months or longer, and individuals other than the child’s siblings who are important to the child, consistent with the child’s best interests.
(C) Whether there should be any limitation on the right of the parent or guardian to make educational decisions for the child. That limitation shall be specifically addressed in the court order and may not exceed those necessary to protect the child. Whenever the court specifically limits the right of the parent or guardian to make educational decisions for the child, the court shall at the same time appoint a responsible adult to make educational decisions for the child pursuant to Section 361.
(D) (i) Whether the child has other siblings under the court’s jurisdiction, and, if any siblings exist, all of the following:
(I) The nature of the relationship between the child and his or her siblings.
(II) The appropriateness of developing or maintaining the sibling relationships pursuant to Section 16002.
(III) If the siblings are not placed together in the same home, why the siblings are not placed together and what efforts are being made to place the siblings together, or why those efforts are not appropriate.
(IV) If the siblings are not placed together, the frequency and nature of the visits between siblings.
(V) The impact of the sibling relationships on the child’s placement and planning for legal permanence.
(VI) The continuing need to suspend sibling interaction, if applicable, pursuant to subdivision (c) of Section 16002.
(ii) The factors the court may consider in making a determination regarding the nature of the child’s sibling relationships may include, but are not limited to, whether the siblings were raised together in the same home, whether the siblings have shared significant common experiences or have existing close and strong bonds, whether either sibling expresses a desire to visit or live with his or her sibling, as applicable, and whether ongoing contact is in the child’s best emotional interests.
(E) The extent of progress that has been made toward alleviating or mitigating the causes necessitating placement in foster care.
(F) On and after January 1, 2012, if the review hearing is the last review hearing to be held before the child attains 18 years of age, the court shall ensure all of the following:
(i) That the child’s transitional independent living case plan includes a plan for the child to satisfy one or more of the criteria set forth in subdivision (b) of Section 11403, so that the child is eligible to remain a nonminor dependent.
(ii) That the child has been informed of his or her right to seek termination of dependency jurisdiction pursuant to Section 391, and understands the potential benefits of continued dependency.
(iii) That the child is informed of his or her right to have dependency reinstated pursuant to subdivision (e) of Section 388, and understands the potential benefits of continued dependency.
(2) The court shall project a likely date by which the child may be returned to and safely maintained in the home or placed for adoption, legal guardianship, or in another planned permanent living arrangement.
(b) Subsequent to the hearing, periodic reviews of each child in foster care shall be conducted pursuant to the requirements of Sections 366.3 and 16503.
(c) If the child has been placed out of state, each review described in subdivision (a) and any reviews conducted pursuant to Sections 366.3 and 16503 shall also address whether the out-of-state placement continues to be the most appropriate placement selection and in the best interests of the child.
(d) A child may not be placed in an out-of-state group home, or remain in an out-of-state group home, unless the group home is in compliance with Section 7911.1 of the Family Code.
(e) The implementation and operation of the amendments to subparagraph (B) of paragraph (1) of subdivision (a) enacted at the 2005–06 Regular Session shall be subject to appropriation through the budget process and by phase, as provided in Section 366.35.
(f) On and after January 1, 2012, the status review of every nonminor dependent, as defined in subdivision (v) of Section 11400, shall be conducted pursuant to the requirements of Sections 366.3 and 16503 until dependency jurisdiction is terminated pursuant to Section 391. The review shall include all of the issues set forth in subdivision (a), except subparagraph (C) of paragraph (1) of subdivision (a), and shall be conducted in a manner that respects the nonminor dependent’s status as a legal adult, be focused on the goals and services described in the nonminor dependent’s transitional independent living case plan, including efforts made to achieve permanence, including maintaining or obtaining permanent connections with caring and committed adults, and attended as appropriate by additional participants invited by the nonminor dependent. An appropriate placement for a nonminor dependent may include a supervised independent living setting, as described in Section 11400.

SEC. 16.

 Section 366.21 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, as amended by Section 8 of Chapter 287 of the Statutes of 2009, is amended to read:

366.21.
 (a) Every hearing conducted by the juvenile court reviewing the status of a dependent child shall be placed on the appearance calendar. The court shall advise all persons present at the hearing of the date of the future hearing and of their right to be present and represented by counsel.
(b) Except as provided in Sections 294 and 295, notice of the hearing shall be provided pursuant to Section 293.
(c) At least 10 calendar days prior to the hearing, the social worker shall file a supplemental report with the court regarding the services provided or offered to the parent or legal guardian to enable him or her to assume custody and the efforts made to achieve legal permanence for the child if efforts to reunify fail, including, but not limited to, efforts to maintain relationships between a child who is 10 years of age or older and has been in out-of-home placement for six months or longer and individuals who are important to the child, consistent with the child’s best interests; the progress made; and, where relevant, the prognosis for return of the child to the physical custody of his or her parent or legal guardian; and shall make his or her recommendation for disposition. If the child is a member of a sibling group described in subparagraph (C) of paragraph (1) of subdivision (a) of Section 361.5, the report and recommendation may also take into account those factors described in subdivision (e) relating to the child’s sibling group. If the recommendation is not to return the child to a parent or legal guardian, the report shall specify why the return of the child would be detrimental to the child. The social worker shall provide the parent or legal guardian, counsel for the child, and any court-appointed child advocate with a copy of the report, including his or her recommendation for disposition, at least 10 calendar days prior to the hearing. In the case of a child removed from the physical custody of his or her parent or legal guardian, the social worker shall, at least 10 calendar days prior to the hearing, provide a summary of his or her recommendation for disposition to any foster parents, relative caregivers, and certified foster parents who have been approved for adoption by the State Department of Social Services when it is acting as an adoption agency in counties that are not served by a county adoption agency or by a licensed county adoption agency, community care facility, or foster family agency having the physical custody of the child. The social worker shall include a copy of the Judicial Council Caregiver Information Form (JV-290) with the summary of recommendations to the child’s foster parents, relative caregivers, or foster parents approved for adoption, in the caregiver’s primary language when available, along with information on how to file the form with the court.
(d) Prior to any hearing involving a child in the physical custody of a community care facility or a foster family agency that may result in the return of the child to the physical custody of his or her parent or legal guardian, or in adoption or the creation of a legal guardianship, or in the case of an Indian child, in consultation with the child’s tribe, tribal customary adoption, the facility or agency shall file with the court a report, or a Judicial Council Caregiver Information Form (JV-290), containing its recommendation for disposition. Prior to the hearing involving a child in the physical custody of a foster parent, a relative caregiver, or a certified foster parent who has been approved for adoption by the State Department of Social Services when it is acting as an adoption agency or by a licensed adoption agency, the foster parent, relative caregiver, or the certified foster parent who has been approved for adoption by the State Department of Social Services when it is acting as an adoption agency in counties that are not served by a county adoption agency or by a licensed county adoption agency, may file with the court a report containing his or her recommendation for disposition. The court shall consider the report and recommendation filed pursuant to this subdivision prior to determining any disposition.
(e) At the review hearing held six months after the initial dispositional hearing, but no later than 12 months after the date the child entered foster care as determined in Section 361.49, whichever occurs earlier, the court shall order the return of the child to the physical custody of his or her parent or legal guardian unless the court finds, by a preponderance of the evidence, that the return of the child to his or her parent or legal guardian would create a substantial risk of detriment to the safety, protection, or physical or emotional well-being of the child. The social worker shall have the burden of establishing that detriment. At the hearing, the court shall consider the criminal history, obtained pursuant to paragraph (1) of subdivision (f) of Section 16504.5, of the parent or legal guardian subsequent to the child’s removal to the extent that the criminal record is substantially related to the welfare of the child or the parent’s or guardian’s ability to exercise custody and control regarding his or her child, provided the parent or legal guardian agreed to submit fingerprint images to obtain criminal history information as part of the case plan. The failure of the parent or legal guardian to participate regularly and make substantive progress in court-ordered treatment programs shall be prima facie evidence that return would be detrimental. In making its determination, the court shall review and consider the social worker’s report and recommendations and the report and recommendations of any child advocate appointed pursuant to Section 356.5; and shall consider the efforts or progress, or both, demonstrated by the parent or legal guardian and the extent to which he or she availed himself or herself to services provided, taking into account the particular barriers to an incarcerated or institutionalized parent or legal guardian’s access to those court-mandated services and ability to maintain contact with his or her child.
Regardless of whether the child is returned to a parent or legal guardian, the court shall specify the factual basis for its conclusion that the return would be detrimental or would not be detrimental. The court also shall make appropriate findings pursuant to subdivision (a) of Section 366; and, where relevant, shall order any additional services reasonably believed to facilitate the return of the child to the custody of his or her parent or legal guardian. The court shall also inform the parent or legal guardian that if the child cannot be returned home by the 12-month permanency hearing, a proceeding pursuant to Section 366.26 may be instituted. This section does not apply in a case where, pursuant to Section 361.5, the court has ordered that reunification services shall not be provided.
If the child was under three years of age on the date of the initial removal, or is a member of a sibling group described in subparagraph (C) of paragraph (1) of subdivision (a) of Section 361.5, and the court finds by clear and convincing evidence that the parent failed to participate regularly and make substantive progress in a court-ordered treatment plan, the court may schedule a hearing pursuant to Section 366.26 within 120 days. If, however, the court finds there is a substantial probability that the child, who was under three years of age on the date of initial removal or is a member of a sibling group described in subparagraph (C) of paragraph (1) of subdivision (a) of Section 361.5, may be returned to his or her parent or legal guardian within six months or that reasonable services have not been provided, the court shall continue the case to the 12-month permanency hearing.
For the purpose of placing and maintaining a sibling group together in a permanent home, the court, in making its determination to schedule a hearing pursuant to Section 366.26 for some or all members of a sibling group, as described in subparagraph (C) of paragraph (1) of subdivision (a) of Section 361.5, shall review and consider the social worker’s report and recommendations. Factors the report shall address, and the court shall consider, may include, but need not be limited to, whether the sibling group was removed from parental care as a group, the closeness and strength of the sibling bond, the ages of the siblings, the appropriateness of maintaining the sibling group together, the detriment to the child if sibling ties are not maintained, the likelihood of finding a permanent home for the sibling group, whether the sibling group is currently placed together in a preadoptive home or has a concurrent plan goal of legal permanency in the same home, the wishes of each child whose age and physical and emotional condition permits a meaningful response, and the best interest of each child in the sibling group. The court shall specify the factual basis for its finding that it is in the best interest of each child to schedule a hearing pursuant to Section 366.26 in 120 days for some or all of the members of the sibling group.
If the child was removed initially under subdivision (g) of Section 300 and the court finds by clear and convincing evidence that the whereabouts of the parent are still unknown, or the parent has failed to contact and visit the child, the court may schedule a hearing pursuant to Section 366.26 within 120 days. The court shall take into account any particular barriers to a parent’s ability to maintain contact with his or her child due to the parent’s incarceration or institutionalization. If the court finds by clear and convincing evidence that the parent has been convicted of a felony indicating parental unfitness, the court may schedule a hearing pursuant to Section 366.26 within 120 days.
If the child had been placed under court supervision with a previously noncustodial parent pursuant to Section 361.2, the court shall determine whether supervision is still necessary. The court may terminate supervision and transfer permanent custody to that parent, as provided for by paragraph (1) of subdivision (b) of Section 361.2.
In all other cases, the court shall direct that any reunification services previously ordered shall continue to be offered to the parent or legal guardian pursuant to the time periods set forth in subdivision (a) of Section 361.5, provided that the court may modify the terms and conditions of those services.
If the child is not returned to his or her parent or legal guardian, the court shall determine whether reasonable services that were designed to aid the parent or legal guardian in overcoming the problems that led to the initial removal and the continued custody of the child have been provided or offered to the parent or legal guardian. The court shall order that those services be initiated, continued, or terminated.
(f) The permanency hearing shall be held no later than 12 months after the date the child entered foster care, as that date is determined pursuant to Section 361.49. At the permanency hearing, the court shall determine the permanent plan for the child, which shall include a determination of whether the child will be returned to the child’s home and, if so, when, within the time limits of subdivision (a) of Section 361.5. The court shall order the return of the child to the physical custody of his or her parent or legal guardian unless the court finds, by a preponderance of the evidence, that the return of the child to his or her parent or legal guardian would create a substantial risk of detriment to the safety, protection, or physical or emotional well-being of the child. The social worker shall have the burden of establishing that detriment. At the permanency hearing, the court shall consider the criminal history, obtained pursuant to paragraph (1) of subdivision (f) of Section 16504.5, of the parent or legal guardian subsequent to the child’s removal to the extent that the criminal record is substantially related to the welfare of the child or the parent or legal guardian’s ability to exercise custody and control regarding his or her child, provided that the parent or legal guardian agreed to submit fingerprint images to obtain criminal history information as part of the case plan. The court shall also determine whether reasonable services that were designed to aid the parent or legal guardian to overcome the problems that led to the initial removal and continued custody of the child have been provided or offered to the parent or legal guardian. For each youth 16 years of age and older, the court shall also determine whether services have been made available to assist him or her in making the transition from foster care to independent living. The failure of the parent or legal guardian to participate regularly and make substantive progress in court-ordered treatment programs shall be prima facie evidence that return would be detrimental. In making its determination, the court shall review and consider the social worker’s report and recommendations and the report and recommendations of any child advocate appointed pursuant to Section 356.5, shall consider the efforts or progress, or both, demonstrated by the parent or legal guardian and the extent to which he or she availed himself or herself of services provided, taking into account the particular barriers to an incarcerated or institutionalized parent or legal guardian’s access to those court-mandated services and ability to maintain contact with his or her child and shall make appropriate findings pursuant to subdivision (a) of Section 366.
Regardless of whether the child is returned to his or her parent or legal guardian, the court shall specify the factual basis for its decision. If the child is not returned to a parent or legal guardian, the court shall specify the factual basis for its conclusion that the return would be detrimental. The court also shall make a finding pursuant to subdivision (a) of Section 366. If the child is not returned to his or her parent or legal guardian, the court shall consider, and state for the record, in-state and out-of-state placement options. If the child is placed out of the state, the court shall make a determination whether the out-of-state placement continues to be appropriate and in the best interests of the child.
(g) If the time period in which the court-ordered services were provided has met or exceeded the time period set forth in subparagraph (A), (B), or (C) of paragraph (1) of subdivision (a) of Section 361.5, as appropriate, and a child is not returned to the custody of a parent or legal guardian at the permanency hearing held pursuant to subdivision (f), the court shall do one of the following:
(1) Continue the case for up to six months for a permanency review hearing, provided that the hearing shall occur within 18 months of the date the child was originally taken from the physical custody of his or her parent or legal guardian. The court shall continue the case only if it finds that there is a substantial probability that the child will be returned to the physical custody of his or her parent or legal guardian and safely maintained in the home within the extended period of time or that reasonable services have not been provided to the parent or legal guardian. For the purposes of this section, in order to find a substantial probability that the child will be returned to the physical custody of his or her parent or legal guardian and safely maintained in the home within the extended period of time, the court shall be required to find all of the following:
(A) That the parent or legal guardian has consistently and regularly contacted and visited with the child.
(B) That the parent or legal guardian has made significant progress in resolving problems that led to the child’s removal from the home.
(C) The parent or legal guardian has demonstrated the capacity and ability both to complete the objectives of his or her treatment plan and to provide for the child’s safety, protection, physical and emotional well-being, and special needs.
For purposes of this subdivision, the court’s decision to continue the case based on a finding or substantial probability that the child will be returned to the physical custody of his or her parent or legal guardian is a compelling reason for determining that a hearing held pursuant to Section 366.26 is not in the best interests of the child.
The court shall inform the parent or legal guardian that if the child cannot be returned home by the next permanency review hearing, a proceeding pursuant to Section 366.26 may be instituted. The court may not order that a hearing pursuant to Section 366.26 be held unless there is clear and convincing evidence that reasonable services have been provided or offered to the parent or legal guardian.
(2) Order that a hearing be held within 120 days, pursuant to Section 366.26, but only if the court does not continue the case to the permanency planning review hearing and there is clear and convincing evidence that reasonable services have been provided or offered to the parents or legal guardians. On and after January 1, 2012, a hearing pursuant to Section 366.26 shall not be ordered if the child is a nonminor dependent.
(3) Order that the child remain in long-term foster care, but only if the court finds by clear and convincing evidence, based upon the evidence already presented to it, including a recommendation by the State Department of Social Services when it is acting as an adoption agency in counties that are not served by a county adoption agency or by a licensed county adoption agency, that there is a compelling reason for determining that a hearing held pursuant to Section 366.26 is not in the best interest of the child because the child is not a proper subject for adoption and has no one willing to accept legal guardianship. For purposes of this section, a recommendation by the State Department of Social Services when it is acting as an adoption agency in counties that are not served by a county adoption agency or by a licensed county adoption agency that adoption is not in the best interest of the child shall constitute a compelling reason for the court’s determination. That recommendation shall be based on the present circumstances of the child and shall not preclude a different recommendation at a later date if the child’s circumstances change. On and after January 1, 2012, the nonminor dependent’s legal status as an adult is in and of itself a compelling reason not to hold a hearing pursuant to Section 366.26. The court may order that a nonminor dependent who otherwise is eligible pursuant to Section 11403 remain in a planned, permanent living arrangement.
If the court orders that a child who is 10 years of age or older remain in long-term foster care, the court shall determine whether the agency has made reasonable efforts to maintain the child’s relationships with individuals other than the child’s siblings who are important to the child, consistent with the child’s best interests, and may make any appropriate order to ensure that those relationships are maintained.
If the child is not returned to his or her parent or legal guardian, the court shall consider, and state for the record, in-state and out-of-state options for permanent placement. If the child is placed out of the state, the court shall make a determination whether the out-of-state placement continues to be appropriate and in the best interests of the child.
(h) In any case in which the court orders that a hearing pursuant to Section 366.26 shall be held, it shall also order the termination of reunification services to the parent or legal guardian. The court shall continue to permit the parent or legal guardian to visit the child pending the hearing unless it finds that visitation would be detrimental to the child. The court shall make any other appropriate orders to enable the child to maintain relationships with individuals, other than the child’s siblings, who are important to the child, consistent with the child’s best interests.
(i) (1) Whenever a court orders that a hearing pursuant to Section 366.26, including, when, in consultation with the child’s tribe, tribal customary adoption is recommended, shall be held, it shall direct the agency supervising the child and the licensed county adoption agency, or the State Department of Social Services when it is acting as an adoption agency in counties that are not served by a county adoption agency, to prepare an assessment that shall include:
(A) Current search efforts for an absent parent or parents or legal guardians.
(B) A review of the amount of and nature of any contact between the child and his or her parents or legal guardians and other members of his or her extended family since the time of placement. Although the extended family of each child shall be reviewed on a case-by-case basis, “extended family” for the purpose of this subparagraph shall include, but not be limited to, the child’s siblings, grandparents, aunts, and uncles.
(C) An evaluation of the child’s medical, developmental, scholastic, mental, and emotional status.
(D) A preliminary assessment of the eligibility and commitment of any identified prospective adoptive parent or legal guardian, including the prospective tribal customary adoptive parent, particularly the caretaker, to include a social history including screening for criminal records and prior referrals for child abuse or neglect, the capability to meet the child’s needs, and the understanding of the legal and financial rights and responsibilities of adoption and guardianship. If a proposed guardian is a relative of the minor, the assessment shall also consider, but need not be limited to, all of the factors specified in subdivision (a) of Section 361.3 and in Section 361.4.
(E) The relationship of the child to any identified prospective adoptive parent or legal guardian, the duration and character of the relationship, the degree of attachment of the child to the prospective relative guardian or adoptive parent, the relative’s or adoptive parent’s strong commitment to caring permanently for the child, the motivation for seeking adoption or guardianship, a statement from the child concerning placement and the adoption or guardianship, and whether the child, if over 12 years of age, has been consulted about the proposed relative guardianship arrangements, unless the child’s age or physical, emotional, or other condition precludes his or her meaningful response, and if so, a description of the condition.
(F) A description of efforts to be made to identify a prospective adoptive parent or legal guardian, including, but not limited to, child-specific recruitment and listing on an adoption exchange within the state or out of the state.
(G) An analysis of the likelihood that the child will be adopted if parental rights are terminated.
(H) In the case of an Indian child, in addition to subparagraphs (A) to (G), inclusive, an assessment of the likelihood that the child will be adopted, when, in consultation with the child’s tribe, a customary tribal adoption, as defined in Section 366.24, is recommended. If tribal customary adoption is recommended, the assessment shall include an analysis of both of the following:
(i) Whether tribal customary adoption would or would not be detrimental to the Indian child and the reasons for reaching that conclusion.
(ii) Whether the Indian child cannot or should not be returned to the home of the Indian parent or Indian custodian and the reasons for reaching that conclusion.
(2) (A) A relative caregiver’s preference for legal guardianship over adoption, if it is due to circumstances that do not include an unwillingness to accept legal or financial responsibility for the child, shall not constitute the sole basis for recommending removal of the child from the relative caregiver for purposes of adoptive placement.
(B) A relative caregiver shall be given information regarding the permanency options of guardianship and adoption, including the long-term benefits and consequences of each option, prior to establishing legal guardianship or pursuing adoption.
(j) If, at any hearing held pursuant to Section 366.26, a guardianship is established for the minor with an approved relative caregiver, and juvenile court dependency is subsequently dismissed, the minor shall be eligible for aid under the Kin-GAP Program, as provided for in Article 4.5 (commencing with Section 11360) or Article 4.7 (commencing with Section 11385), as applicable, of Chapter 2 of Part 3 of Division 9.
(k) As used in this section, “relative” means an adult who is related to the minor by blood, adoption, or affinity within the fifth degree of kinship, including stepparents, stepsiblings, and all relatives whose status is preceded by the words “great,” “great-great,” or “grand,” or the spouse of any of those persons even if the marriage was terminated by death or dissolution.
(l) For purposes of this section, evidence of any of the following circumstances may not, in and of itself, be deemed a failure to provide or offer reasonable services:
(1) The child has been placed with a foster family that is eligible to adopt a child, or has been placed in a preadoptive home.
(2) The case plan includes services to make and finalize a permanent placement for the child if efforts to reunify fail.
(3) Services to make and finalize a permanent placement for the child, if efforts to reunify fail, are provided concurrently with services to reunify the family.
(m) The implementation and operation of the amendments to subdivisions (c) and (g) enacted at the 2005–06 Regular Session shall be subject to appropriation through the budget process and by phase, as provided in Section 366.35.
(n) This section shall remain in effect only until January 1, 2014, and as of that date is repealed, unless a later enacted statute, that is enacted before January 1, 2014, deletes or extends that date.

SEC. 17.

 Section 366.21 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, as added by Section 9 of Chapter 287 of the Statutes of 2009, is amended to read:

366.21.
 (a) Every hearing conducted by the juvenile court reviewing the status of a dependent child shall be placed on the appearance calendar. The court shall advise all persons present at the hearing of the date of the future hearing and of their right to be present and represented by counsel.
(b) Except as provided in Sections 294 and 295, notice of the hearing shall be provided pursuant to Section 293.
(c) At least 10 calendar days prior to the hearing, the social worker shall file a supplemental report with the court regarding the services provided or offered to the parent or legal guardian to enable him or her to assume custody and the efforts made to achieve legal permanence for the child if efforts to reunify fail, including, but not limited to, efforts to maintain relationships between a child who is 10 years of age or older and has been in out-of-home placement for six months or longer and individuals who are important to the child, consistent with the child’s best interests; the progress made; and, where relevant, the prognosis for return of the child to the physical custody of his or her parent or legal guardian; and shall make his or her recommendation for disposition. If the child is a member of a sibling group described in subparagraph (C) of paragraph (1) of subdivision (a) of Section 361.5, the report and recommendation may also take into account those factors described in subdivision (e) relating to the child’s sibling group. If the recommendation is not to return the child to a parent or legal guardian, the report shall specify why the return of the child would be detrimental to the child. The social worker shall provide the parent or legal guardian, counsel for the child, and any court-appointed child advocate with a copy of the report, including his or her recommendation for disposition, at least 10 calendar days prior to the hearing. In the case of a child removed from the physical custody of his or her parent or legal guardian, the social worker shall, at least 10 calendar days prior to the hearing, provide a summary of his or her recommendation for disposition to any foster parents, relative caregivers, and certified foster parents who have been approved for adoption by the State Department of Social Services when it is acting as an adoption agency in counties that are not served by a county adoption agency or by a licensed county adoption agency, community care facility, or foster family agency having the physical custody of the child. The social worker shall include a copy of the Judicial Council Caregiver Information Form (JV-290) with the summary of recommendations to the child’s foster parents, relative caregivers, or foster parents approved for adoption, in the caregiver’s primary language when available, along with information on how to file the form with the court.
(d) Prior to any hearing involving a child in the physical custody of a community care facility or a foster family agency that may result in the return of the child to the physical custody of his or her parent or legal guardian, or in adoption or the creation of a legal guardianship, the facility or agency shall file with the court a report, or a Judicial Council Caregiver Information Form (JV-290), containing its recommendation for disposition. Prior to the hearing involving a child in the physical custody of a foster parent, a relative caregiver, or a certified foster parent who has been approved for adoption by the State Department of Social Services when it is acting as an adoption agency or by a licensed adoption agency, the foster parent, relative caregiver, or the certified foster parent who has been approved for adoption by the State Department of Social Services when it is acting as an adoption agency in counties that are not served by a county adoption agency or by a licensed county adoption agency, may file with the court a report containing his or her recommendation for disposition. The court shall consider the report and recommendation filed pursuant to this subdivision prior to determining any disposition.
(e) At the review hearing held six months after the initial dispositional hearing, but no later than 12 months after the date the child entered foster care as determined in Section 361.49, whichever occurs earlier, the court shall order the return of the child to the physical custody of his or her parent or legal guardian unless the court finds, by a preponderance of the evidence, that the return of the child to his or her parent or legal guardian would create a substantial risk of detriment to the safety, protection, or physical or emotional well-being of the child. The social worker shall have the burden of establishing that detriment. At the hearing, the court shall consider the criminal history, obtained pursuant to paragraph (1) of subdivision (f) of Section 16504.5, of the parent or legal guardian subsequent to the child’s removal to the extent that the criminal record is substantially related to the welfare of the child or the parent’s or guardian’s ability to exercise custody and control regarding his or her child, provided the parent or legal guardian agreed to submit fingerprint images to obtain criminal history information as part of the case plan. The failure of the parent or legal guardian to participate regularly and make substantive progress in court-ordered treatment programs shall be prima facie evidence that return would be detrimental. In making its determination, the court shall review and consider the social worker’s report and recommendations and the report and recommendations of any child advocate appointed pursuant to Section 356.5; and shall consider the efforts or progress, or both, demonstrated by the parent or legal guardian and the extent to which he or she availed himself or herself to services provided, taking into account the particular barriers to an incarcerated or institutionalized parent or legal guardian’s access to those court-mandated services and ability to maintain contact with his or her child.
Regardless of whether the child is returned to a parent or legal guardian, the court shall specify the factual basis for its conclusion that the return would be detrimental or would not be detrimental. The court also shall make appropriate findings pursuant to subdivision (a) of Section 366; and, where relevant, shall order any additional services reasonably believed to facilitate the return of the child to the custody of his or her parent or legal guardian. The court shall also inform the parent or legal guardian that if the child cannot be returned home by the 12-month permanency hearing, a proceeding pursuant to Section 366.26 may be instituted. This section does not apply in a case where, pursuant to Section 361.5, the court has ordered that reunification services shall not be provided.
If the child was under three years of age on the date of the initial removal, or is a member of a sibling group described in subparagraph (C) of paragraph (1) of subdivision (a) of Section 361.5, and the court finds by clear and convincing evidence that the parent failed to participate regularly and make substantive progress in a court-ordered treatment plan, the court may schedule a hearing pursuant to Section 366.26 within 120 days. If, however, the court finds there is a substantial probability that the child, who was under three years of age on the date of initial removal or is a member of a sibling group described in subparagraph (C) of paragraph (1) of subdivision (a) of Section 361.5, may be returned to his or her parent or legal guardian within six months or that reasonable services have not been provided, the court shall continue the case to the 12-month permanency hearing.
For the purpose of placing and maintaining a sibling group together in a permanent home, the court, in making its determination to schedule a hearing pursuant to Section 366.26 for some or all members of a sibling group, as described in subparagraph (C) of paragraph (1) of subdivision (a) of Section 361.5, shall review and consider the social worker’s report and recommendations. Factors the report shall address, and the court shall consider, may include, but need not be limited to, whether the sibling group was removed from parental care as a group, the closeness and strength of the sibling bond, the ages of the siblings, the appropriateness of maintaining the sibling group together, the detriment to the child if sibling ties are not maintained, the likelihood of finding a permanent home for the sibling group, whether the sibling group is currently placed together in a preadoptive home or has a concurrent plan goal of legal permanency in the same home, the wishes of each child whose age and physical and emotional condition permits a meaningful response, and the best interest of each child in the sibling group. The court shall specify the factual basis for its finding that it is in the best interest of each child to schedule a hearing pursuant to Section 366.26 in 120 days for some or all of the members of the sibling group.
If the child was removed initially under subdivision (g) of Section 300 and the court finds by clear and convincing evidence that the whereabouts of the parent are still unknown, or the parent has failed to contact and visit the child, the court may schedule a hearing pursuant to Section 366.26 within 120 days. The court shall take into account any particular barriers to a parent’s ability to maintain contact with his or her child due to the parent’s incarceration or institutionalization. If the court finds by clear and convincing evidence that the parent has been convicted of a felony indicating parental unfitness, the court may schedule a hearing pursuant to Section 366.26 within 120 days.
If the child had been placed under court supervision with a previously noncustodial parent pursuant to Section 361.2, the court shall determine whether supervision is still necessary. The court may terminate supervision and transfer permanent custody to that parent, as provided for by paragraph (1) of subdivision (b) of Section 361.2.
In all other cases, the court shall direct that any reunification services previously ordered shall continue to be offered to the parent or legal guardian pursuant to the time periods set forth in subdivision (a) of Section 361.5, provided that the court may modify the terms and conditions of those services.
If the child is not returned to his or her parent or legal guardian, the court shall determine whether reasonable services that were designed to aid the parent or legal guardian in overcoming the problems that led to the initial removal and the continued custody of the child have been provided or offered to the parent or legal guardian. The court shall order that those services be initiated, continued, or terminated.
(f) The permanency hearing shall be held no later than 12 months after the date the child entered foster care, as that date is determined pursuant to Section 361.49. At the permanency hearing, the court shall determine the permanent plan for the child, which shall include a determination of whether the child will be returned to the child’s home and, if so, when, within the time limits of subdivision (a) of Section 361.5. The court shall order the return of the child to the physical custody of his or her parent or legal guardian unless the court finds, by a preponderance of the evidence, that the return of the child to his or her parent or legal guardian would create a substantial risk of detriment to the safety, protection, or physical or emotional well-being of the child. The social worker shall have the burden of establishing that detriment. At the permanency hearing, the court shall consider the criminal history, obtained pursuant to paragraph (1) of subdivision (f) of Section 16504.5, of the parent or legal guardian subsequent to the child’s removal to the extent that the criminal record is substantially related to the welfare of the child or the parent or legal guardian’s ability to exercise custody and control regarding his or her child, provided that the parent or legal guardian agreed to submit fingerprint images to obtain criminal history information as part of the case plan. The court shall also determine whether reasonable services that were designed to aid the parent or legal guardian to overcome the problems that led to the initial removal and continued custody of the child have been provided or offered to the parent or legal guardian. For each youth 16 years of age and older, the court shall also determine whether services have been made available to assist him or her in making the transition from foster care to independent living. The failure of the parent or legal guardian to participate regularly and make substantive progress in court-ordered treatment programs shall be prima facie evidence that return would be detrimental. In making its determination, the court shall review and consider the social worker’s report and recommendations and the report and recommendations of any child advocate appointed pursuant to Section 356.5, shall consider the efforts or progress, or both, demonstrated by the parent or legal guardian and the extent to which he or she availed himself or herself of services provided, taking into account the particular barriers to an incarcerated or institutionalized parent or legal guardian’s access to those court-mandated services and ability to maintain contact with his or her child and shall make appropriate findings pursuant to subdivision (a) of Section 366.
Regardless of whether the child is returned to his or her parent or legal guardian, the court shall specify the factual basis for its decision. If the child is not returned to a parent or legal guardian, the court shall specify the factual basis for its conclusion that the return would be detrimental. The court also shall make a finding pursuant to subdivision (a) of Section 366. If the child is not returned to his or her parent or legal guardian, the court shall consider, and state for the record, in-state and out-of-state placement options. If the child is placed out of the state, the court shall make a determination whether the out-of-state placement continues to be appropriate and in the best interests of the child.
(g) If the time period in which the court-ordered services were provided has met or exceeded the time period set forth in subparagraph (A), (B), or (C) of paragraph (1) of subdivision (a) of Section 361.5, as appropriate, and a child is not returned to the custody of a parent or legal guardian at the permanency hearing held pursuant to subdivision (f), the court shall do one of the following:
(1) Continue the case for up to six months for a permanency review hearing, provided that the hearing shall occur within 18 months of the date the child was originally taken from the physical custody of his or her parent or legal guardian. The court shall continue the case only if it finds that there is a substantial probability that the child will be returned to the physical custody of his or her parent or legal guardian and safely maintained in the home within the extended period of time or that reasonable services have not been provided to the parent or legal guardian. For the purposes of this section, in order to find a substantial probability that the child will be returned to the physical custody of his or her parent or legal guardian and safely maintained in the home within the extended period of time, the court shall be required to find all of the following:
(A) That the parent or legal guardian has consistently and regularly contacted and visited with the child.
(B) That the parent or legal guardian has made significant progress in resolving problems that led to the child’s removal from the home.
(C) The parent or legal guardian has demonstrated the capacity and ability both to complete the objectives of his or her treatment plan and to provide for the child’s safety, protection, physical and emotional well-being, and special needs.
For purposes of this subdivision, the court’s decision to continue the case based on a finding or substantial probability that the child will be returned to the physical custody of his or her parent or legal guardian is a compelling reason for determining that a hearing held pursuant to Section 366.26 is not in the best interests of the child.
The court shall inform the parent or legal guardian that if the child cannot be returned home by the next permanency review hearing, a proceeding pursuant to Section 366.26 may be instituted. The court may not order that a hearing pursuant to Section 366.26 be held unless there is clear and convincing evidence that reasonable services have been provided or offered to the parent or legal guardian.
(2) Order that a hearing be held within 120 days, pursuant to Section 366.26, but only if the court does not continue the case to the permanency planning review hearing and there is clear and convincing evidence that reasonable services have been provided or offered to the parents or legal guardians. On or after January 1, 2012, a hearing pursuant to Section 366.26 shall not be ordered if the child is a nonminor dependent.
(3) Order that the child remain in long-term foster care, but only if the court finds by clear and convincing evidence, based upon the evidence already presented to it, including a recommendation by the State Department of Social Services when it is acting as an adoption agency in counties that are not served by a county adoption agency or by a licensed county adoption agency, that there is a compelling reason for determining that a hearing held pursuant to Section 366.26 is not in the best interest of the child because the child is not a proper subject for adoption and has no one willing to accept legal guardianship. For purposes of this section, a recommendation by the State Department of Social Services when it is acting as an adoption agency in counties that are not served by a county adoption agency or by a licensed county adoption agency that adoption is not in the best interest of the child shall constitute a compelling reason for the court’s determination. That recommendation shall be based on the present circumstances of the child and shall not preclude a different recommendation at a later date if the child’s circumstances change. On and after January 1, 2012, the nonminor dependent’s legal status as an adult is in and of itself a compelling reason not to hold a hearing pursuant to Section 366.26. The court may order that a nonminor dependent who otherwise is eligible pursuant to Section 11403 remain in a planned, permanent living arrangement.
If the court orders that a child who is 10 years of age or older remain in long-term foster care, the court shall determine whether the agency has made reasonable efforts to maintain the child’s relationships with individuals other than the child’s siblings who are important to the child, consistent with the child’s best interests, and may make any appropriate order to ensure that those relationships are maintained.
If the child is not returned to his or her parent or legal guardian, the court shall consider, and state for the record, in-state and out-of-state options for permanent placement. If the child is placed out of the state, the court shall make a determination whether the out-of-state placement continues to be appropriate and in the best interests of the child.
(h) In any case in which the court orders that a hearing pursuant to Section 366.26 shall be held, it shall also order the termination of reunification services to the parent or legal guardian. The court shall continue to permit the parent or legal guardian to visit the child pending the hearing unless it finds that visitation would be detrimental to the child. The court shall make any other appropriate orders to enable the child to maintain relationships with individuals, other than the child’s siblings, who are important to the child, consistent with the child’s best interests.
(i) (1) Whenever a court orders that a hearing pursuant to Section 366.26 shall be held, it shall direct the agency supervising the child and the licensed county adoption agency, or the State Department of Social Services when it is acting as an adoption agency in counties that are not served by a county adoption agency, to prepare an assessment that shall include:
(A) Current search efforts for an absent parent or parents or legal guardians.
(B) A review of the amount of and nature of any contact between the child and his or her parents or legal guardians and other members of his or her extended family since the time of placement. Although the extended family of each child shall be reviewed on a case-by-case basis, “extended family” for the purpose of this subparagraph shall include, but not be limited to, the child’s siblings, grandparents, aunts, and uncles.
(C) An evaluation of the child’s medical, developmental, scholastic, mental, and emotional status.
(D) A preliminary assessment of the eligibility and commitment of any identified prospective adoptive parent or legal guardian, particularly the caretaker, to include a social history including screening for criminal records and prior referrals for child abuse or neglect, the capability to meet the child’s needs, and the understanding of the legal and financial rights and responsibilities of adoption and guardianship. If a proposed guardian is a relative of the minor, the assessment shall also consider, but need not be limited to, all of the factors specified in subdivision (a) of Section 361.3 and in Section 361.4.
(E) The relationship of the child to any identified prospective adoptive parent or legal guardian, the duration and character of the relationship, the degree of attachment of the child to the prospective relative guardian or adoptive parent, the relative’s or adoptive parent’s strong commitment to caring permanently for the child, the motivation for seeking adoption or guardianship, a statement from the child concerning placement and the adoption or guardianship, and whether the child, if over 12 years of age, has been consulted about the proposed relative guardianship arrangements, unless the child’s age or physical, emotional, or other condition precludes his or her meaningful response, and if so, a description of the condition.
(F) A description of efforts to be made to identify a prospective adoptive parent or legal guardian, including, but not limited to, child-specific recruitment and listing on an adoption exchange within the state or out of the state.
(G) An analysis of the likelihood that the child will be adopted if parental rights are terminated.
(2) (A) A relative caregiver’s preference for legal guardianship over adoption, if it is due to circumstances that do not include an unwillingness to accept legal or financial responsibility for the child, shall not constitute the sole basis for recommending removal of the child from the relative caregiver for purposes of adoptive placement.
(B) A relative caregiver shall be given information regarding the permanency options of guardianship and adoption, including the long-term benefits and consequences of each option, prior to establishing legal guardianship or pursuing adoption.
(j) If, at any hearing held pursuant to Section 366.26, a guardianship is established for the minor with a an approved relative caregiver, and juvenile court dependency is subsequently dismissed, the minor shall be eligible for aid under the Kin-GAP Program, as provided for in Article 4.5 (commencing with Section 11360) or Article 4.7 (commencing with Section 11385), as applicable, of Chapter 2 of Part 3 of Division 9.
(k) As used in this section, “relative” means an adult who is related to the minor by blood, adoption, or affinity within the fifth degree of kinship, including stepparents, stepsiblings, and all relatives whose status is preceded by the words “great,” “great-great,” or “grand,” or the spouse of any of those persons even if the marriage was terminated by death or dissolution.
(l) For purposes of this section, evidence of any of the following circumstances may not, in and of itself, be deemed a failure to provide or offer reasonable services:
(1) The child has been placed with a foster family that is eligible to adopt a child, or has been placed in a preadoptive home.
(2) The case plan includes services to make and finalize a permanent placement for the child if efforts to reunify fail.
(3) Services to make and finalize a permanent placement for the child, if efforts to reunify fail, are provided concurrently with services to reunify the family.
(m) The implementation and operation of the amendments to subdivisions (c) and (g) enacted at the 2005–06 Regular Session shall be subject to appropriation through the budget process and by phase, as provided in Section 366.35.
(n) This section shall become operative on January 1, 2014.

SEC. 18.

 Section 366.22 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, as amended by Section 10 of Chapter 287 of the Statutes of 2009, is amended to read:

366.22.
 (a) When a case has been continued pursuant to paragraph (1) of subdivision (g) of Section 366.21, the permanency review hearing shall occur within 18 months after the date the child was originally removed from the physical custody of his or her parent or legal guardian. The court shall order the return of the child to the physical custody of his or her parent or legal guardian unless the court finds, by a preponderance of the evidence, that the return of the child to his or her parent or legal guardian would create a substantial risk of detriment to the safety, protection, or physical or emotional well-being of the child. The social worker shall have the burden of establishing that detriment. At the permanency review hearing, the court shall consider the criminal history, obtained pursuant to paragraph (1) of subdivision (f) of Section 16504.5, of the parent or legal guardian subsequent to the child’s removal, to the extent that the criminal record is substantially related to the welfare of the child or the parent’s or legal guardian’s ability to exercise custody and control regarding his or her child, provided that the parent or legal guardian agreed to submit fingerprint images to obtain criminal history information as part of the case plan. The failure of the parent or legal guardian to participate regularly and make substantive progress in court-ordered treatment programs shall be prima facie evidence that return would be detrimental. In making its determination, the court shall review and consider the social worker’s report and recommendations and the report and recommendations of any child advocate appointed pursuant to Section 356.5; shall consider the efforts or progress, or both, demonstrated by the parent or legal guardian and the extent to which he or she availed himself or herself of services provided, taking into account the particular barriers of an incarcerated or institutionalized parent or legal guardian’s access to those court-mandated services and ability to maintain contact with his or her child; and shall make appropriate findings pursuant to subdivision (a) of Section 366.
Whether or not the child is returned to his or her parent or legal guardian, the court shall specify the factual basis for its decision. If the child is not returned to a parent or legal guardian, the court shall specify the factual basis for its conclusion that return would be detrimental. If the child is not returned to his or her parent or legal guardian, the court shall consider, and state for the record, in-state and out-of-state options for the child’s permanent placement. If the child is placed out of the state, the court shall make a determination whether the out-of-state placement continues to be appropriate and in the best interests of the child.
Unless the conditions in subdivision (b) are met and the child is not returned to a parent or legal guardian at the permanency review hearing, the court shall order that a hearing be held pursuant to Section 366.26 in order to determine whether adoption, or, in the case of an Indian child, in consultation with the child’s tribe, tribal customary adoption, guardianship, or long-term foster care is the most appropriate plan for the child. On and after January 1, 2012, a hearing pursuant to Section 366.26 shall not be ordered if the child is a nonminor dependent. However, if the court finds by clear and convincing evidence, based on the evidence already presented to it, including a recommendation by the State Department of Social Services when it is acting as an adoption agency in counties that are not served by a county adoption agency or by a licensed county adoption agency, that there is a compelling reason, as described in paragraph (3) of subdivision (g) of Section 366.21, for determining that a hearing held under Section 366.26 is not in the best interest of the child because the child is not a proper subject for adoption and has no one willing to accept legal guardianship, then the court may, only under these circumstances, order that the child remain in long-term foster care. On and after January 1, 2012, the nonminor dependent’s legal status as an adult is in and of itself a compelling reason not to hold a hearing pursuant to Section 366.26. The court may order that a nonminor dependent who otherwise is eligible pursuant to Section 11403 remain in a planned, permanent living arrangement. If the court orders that a child who is 10 years of age or older remain in long-term foster care, the court shall determine whether the agency has made reasonable efforts to maintain the child’s relationships with individuals other than the child’s siblings who are important to the child, consistent with the child’s best interests, and may make any appropriate order to ensure that those relationships are maintained. The hearing shall be held no later than 120 days from the date of the permanency review hearing. The court shall also order termination of reunification services to the parent or legal guardian. The court shall continue to permit the parent or legal guardian to visit the child unless it finds that visitation would be detrimental to the child. The court shall determine whether reasonable services have been offered or provided to the parent or legal guardian. For purposes of this subdivision, evidence of any of the following circumstances shall not, in and of themselves, be deemed a failure to provide or offer reasonable services:
(1) The child has been placed with a foster family that is eligible to adopt a child, or has been placed in a preadoptive home.
(2) The case plan includes services to make and finalize a permanent placement for the child if efforts to reunify fail.
(3) Services to make and finalize a permanent placement for the child, if efforts to reunify fail, are provided concurrently with services to reunify the family.
(b) If the child is not returned to a parent or legal guardian at the permanency review hearing and the court determines by clear and convincing evidence that the best interests of the child would be met by the provision of additional reunification services to a parent or legal guardian who is making significant and consistent progress in a court-ordered residential substance abuse treatment program, or a parent recently discharged from incarceration or institutionalization and making significant and consistent progress in establishing a safe home for the child’s return, the court may continue the case for up to six months for a subsequent permanency review hearing, provided that the hearing shall occur within 24 months of the date the child was originally taken from the physical custody of his or her parent or legal guardian. The court shall continue the case only if it finds that there is a substantial probability that the child will be returned to the physical custody of his or her parent or legal guardian and safely maintained in the home within the extended period of time or that reasonable services have not been provided to the parent or legal guardian. For the purposes of this section, in order to find a substantial probability that the child will be returned to the physical custody of his or her parent or legal guardian and safely maintained in the home within the extended period of time, the court shall be required to find all of the following:
(1) That the parent or legal guardian has consistently and regularly contacted and visited with the child.
(2) That the parent or legal guardian has made significant and consistent progress in the prior 18 months in resolving problems that led to the child’s removal from the home.
(3) The parent or legal guardian has demonstrated the capacity and ability both to complete the objectives of his or her substance abuse treatment plan as evidenced by reports from a substance abuse provider as applicable, or complete a treatment plan postdischarge from incarceration or institutionalization, and to provide for the child’s safety, protection, physical and emotional well-being, and special needs.
For purposes of this subdivision, the court’s decision to continue the case based on a finding or substantial probability that the child will be returned to the physical custody of his or her parent or legal guardian is a compelling reason for determining that a hearing held pursuant to Section 366.26 is not in the best interests of the child.
The court shall inform the parent or legal guardian that if the child cannot be returned home by the subsequent permanency review hearing, a proceeding pursuant to Section 366.26 may be instituted. The court may not order that a hearing pursuant to Section 366.26 be held unless there is clear and convincing evidence that reasonable services have been provided or offered to the parent or legal guardian.
(c) (1) Whenever a court orders that a hearing pursuant to Section 366.26, including when a tribal customary adoption is recommended, shall be held, it shall direct the agency supervising the child and the licensed county adoption agency, or the State Department of Social Services when it is acting as an adoption agency in counties that are not served by a county adoption agency, to prepare an assessment that shall include:
(A) Current search efforts for an absent parent or parents.
(B) A review of the amount of and nature of any contact between the child and his or her parents and other members of his or her extended family since the time of placement. Although the extended family of each child shall be reviewed on a case-by-case basis, “extended family” for the purposes of this subparagraph shall include, but not be limited to, the child’s siblings, grandparents, aunts, and uncles.
(C) An evaluation of the child’s medical, developmental, scholastic, mental, and emotional status.
(D)  A preliminary assessment of the eligibility and commitment of any identified prospective adoptive parent or legal guardian, particularly the caretaker, to include a social history including screening for criminal records and prior referrals for child abuse or neglect, the capability to meet the child’s needs, and the understanding of the legal and financial rights and responsibilities of adoption and guardianship. If a proposed legal guardian is a relative of the minor, the assessment shall also consider, but need not be limited to, all of the factors specified in subdivision (a) of Section 361.3 and Section 361.4.
(E) The relationship of the child to any identified prospective adoptive parent or legal guardian, the duration and character of the relationship, the degree of attachment of the child to the prospective relative guardian or adoptive parent, the relative’s or adoptive parent’s strong commitment to caring permanently for the child, the motivation for seeking adoption or legal guardianship, a statement from the child concerning placement and the adoption or legal guardianship, and whether the child, if over 12 years of age, has been consulted about the proposed relative guardianship arrangements, unless the child’s age or physical, emotional, or other condition precludes his or her meaningful response, and if so, a description of the condition.
(F) An analysis of the likelihood that the child will be adopted if parental rights are terminated.
(G) In the case of an Indian child, in addition to subparagraphs (A) to (F), inclusive, an assessment of the likelihood that the child will be adopted, when, in consultation with the child’s tribe, a customary tribal adoption, as defined in Section 366.24, is recommended. If tribal customary adoption is recommended, the assessment shall include an analysis of both of the following:
(i) Whether tribal customary adoption would or would not be detrimental to the Indian child and the reasons for reaching that conclusion.
(ii) Whether the Indian child cannot or should not be returned to the home of the Indian parent or Indian custodian and the reasons for reaching that conclusion.
(2) (A) A relative caregiver’s preference for legal guardianship over adoption, if it is due to circumstances that do not include an unwillingness to accept legal or financial responsibility for the child, shall not constitute the sole basis for recommending removal of the child from the relative caregiver for purposes of adoptive placement.
(B) A relative caregiver shall be given information regarding the permanency options of guardianship and adoption, including the long-term benefits and consequences of each option, prior to establishing legal guardianship or pursuing adoption.
(d) This section shall become operative January 1, 1999. If at any hearing held pursuant to Section 366.26, a legal guardianship is established for the minor with an approved relative caregiver, and juvenile court dependency is subsequently dismissed, the minor shall be eligible for aid under the Kin-GAP Program, as provided for in Article 4.5 (commencing with Section 11360) or Article 4.7 (commencing with Section 11385), as applicable, of Chapter 2 of Part 3 of Division 9.
(e) As used in this section, “relative” means an adult who is related to the child by blood, adoption, or affinity within the fifth degree of kinship, including stepparents, stepsiblings, and all relatives whose status is preceded by the words “great,” “great-great,” or “grand,” or the spouse of any of those persons even if the marriage was terminated by death or dissolution.
(f) The implementation and operation of the amendments to subdivision (a) enacted at the 2005–06 Regular Session shall be subject to appropriation through the budget process and by phase, as provided in Section 366.35.
(g) This section shall remain in effect only until January 1, 2014, and as of that date is repealed, unless a later enacted statute, that is enacted before January 1, 2014, deletes or extends that date.

SEC. 19.

 Section 366.22 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, as added by Section 11 of Chapter 287 of the Statutes of 2009, is amended to read:

366.22.
 (a) When a case has been continued pursuant to paragraph (1) of subdivision (g) of Section 366.21, the permanency review hearing shall occur within 18 months after the date the child was originally removed from the physical custody of his or her parent or legal guardian. The court shall order the return of the child to the physical custody of his or her parent or legal guardian unless the court finds, by a preponderance of the evidence, that the return of the child to his or her parent or legal guardian would create a substantial risk of detriment to the safety, protection, or physical or emotional well-being of the child. The social worker shall have the burden of establishing that detriment. At the permanency review hearing, the court shall consider the criminal history, obtained pursuant to paragraph (1) of subdivision (f) of Section 16504.5, of the parent or legal guardian subsequent to the child’s removal, to the extent that the criminal record is substantially related to the welfare of the child or the parent’s or legal guardian’s ability to exercise custody and control regarding his or her child, provided that the parent or legal guardian agreed to submit fingerprint images to obtain criminal history information as part of the case plan. The failure of the parent or legal guardian to participate regularly and make substantive progress in court-ordered treatment programs shall be prima facie evidence that return would be detrimental. In making its determination, the court shall review and consider the social worker’s report and recommendations and the report and recommendations of any child advocate appointed pursuant to Section 356.5; shall consider the efforts or progress, or both, demonstrated by the parent or legal guardian and the extent to which he or she availed himself or herself of services provided, taking into account the particular barriers of an incarcerated or institutionalized parent or legal guardian’s access to those court-mandated services and ability to maintain contact with his or her child; and shall make appropriate findings pursuant to subdivision (a) of Section 366.
Whether or not the child is returned to his or her parent or legal guardian, the court shall specify the factual basis for its decision. If the child is not returned to a parent or legal guardian, the court shall specify the factual basis for its conclusion that return would be detrimental. If the child is not returned to his or her parent or legal guardian, the court shall consider, and state for the record, in-state and out-of-state options for the child’s permanent placement. If the child is placed out of the state, the court shall make a determination whether the out-of-state placement continues to be appropriate and in the best interests of the child.
Unless the conditions in subdivision (b) are met and the child is not returned to a parent or legal guardian at the permanency review hearing, the court shall order that a hearing be held pursuant to Section 366.26 in order to determine whether adoption, guardianship, or long-term foster care is the most appropriate plan for the child. On and after January 1, 2012, a hearing pursuant to Section 366.26 shall not be ordered if the child is a nonminor dependent. However, if the court finds by clear and convincing evidence, based on the evidence already presented to it, including a recommendation by the State Department of Social Services when it is acting as an adoption agency in counties that are not served by a county adoption agency or by a licensed county adoption agency, that there is a compelling reason, as described in paragraph (3) of subdivision (g) of Section 366.21, for determining that a hearing held under Section 366.26 is not in the best interest of the child because the child is not a proper subject for adoption and has no one willing to accept legal guardianship, then the court may, only under these circumstances, order that the child remain in long-term foster care. On and after January 1, 2012, the nonminor dependent’s legal status as an adult is in and of itself a compelling reason not to hold a hearing pursuant to Section 366.26. The court may order that a nonminor dependent who otherwise is eligible pursuant to Section 11403 remain in a planned, permanent living arrangement. If the court orders that a child who is 10 years of age or older remain in long-term foster care, the court shall determine whether the agency has made reasonable efforts to maintain the child’s relationships with individuals other than the child’s siblings who are important to the child, consistent with the child’s best interests, and may make any appropriate order to ensure that those relationships are maintained. The hearing shall be held no later than 120 days from the date of the permanency review hearing. The court shall also order termination of reunification services to the parent or legal guardian. The court shall continue to permit the parent or legal guardian to visit the child unless it finds that visitation would be detrimental to the child. The court shall determine whether reasonable services have been offered or provided to the parent or legal guardian. For purposes of this subdivision, evidence of any of the following circumstances shall not, in and of themselves, be deemed a failure to provide or offer reasonable services:
(1) The child has been placed with a foster family that is eligible to adopt a child, or has been placed in a preadoptive home.
(2) The case plan includes services to make and finalize a permanent placement for the child if efforts to reunify fail.
(3) Services to make and finalize a permanent placement for the child, if efforts to reunify fail, are provided concurrently with services to reunify the family.
(b) If the child is not returned to a parent or legal guardian at the permanency review hearing and the court determines by clear and convincing evidence that the best interests of the child would be met by the provision of additional reunification services to a parent or legal guardian who is making significant and consistent progress in a court-ordered residential substance abuse treatment program, or a parent recently discharged from incarceration or institutionalization and making significant and consistent progress in establishing a safe home for the child’s return, the court may continue the case for up to six months for a subsequent permanency review hearing, provided that the hearing shall occur within 24 months of the date the child was originally taken from the physical custody of his or her parent or legal guardian. The court shall continue the case only if it finds that there is a substantial probability that the child will be returned to the physical custody of his or her parent or legal guardian and safely maintained in the home within the extended period of time or that reasonable services have not been provided to the parent or legal guardian. For the purposes of this section, in order to find a substantial probability that the child will be returned to the physical custody of his or her parent or legal guardian and safely maintained in the home within the extended period of time, the court shall be required to find all of the following:
(1) That the parent or legal guardian has consistently and regularly contacted and visited with the child.
(2) That the parent or legal guardian has made significant and consistent progress in the prior 18 months in resolving problems that led to the child’s removal from the home.
(3) The parent or legal guardian has demonstrated the capacity and ability both to complete the objectives of his or her substance abuse treatment plan as evidenced by reports from a substance abuse provider as applicable, or complete a treatment plan postdischarge from incarceration or institutionalization, and to provide for the child’s safety, protection, physical and emotional well-being, and special needs.
For purposes of this subdivision, the court’s decision to continue the case based on a finding or substantial probability that the child will be returned to the physical custody of his or her parent or legal guardian is a compelling reason for determining that a hearing held pursuant to Section 366.26 is not in the best interests of the child.
The court shall inform the parent or legal guardian that if the child cannot be returned home by the subsequent permanency review hearing, a proceeding pursuant to Section 366.26 may be instituted. The court may not order that a hearing pursuant to Section 366.26 be held unless there is clear and convincing evidence that reasonable services have been provided or offered to the parent or legal guardian.
(c) (1) Whenever a court orders that a hearing pursuant to Section 366.26 shall be held, it shall direct the agency supervising the child and the licensed county adoption agency, or the State Department of Social Services when it is acting as an adoption agency in counties that are not served by a county adoption agency, to prepare an assessment that shall include:
(A) Current search efforts for an absent parent or parents.
(B) A review of the amount of and nature of any contact between the child and his or her parents and other members of his or her extended family since the time of placement. Although the extended family of each child shall be reviewed on a case-by-case basis, “extended family” for the purposes of this subparagraph shall include, but not be limited to, the child’s siblings, grandparents, aunts, and uncles.
(C) An evaluation of the child’s medical, developmental, scholastic, mental, and emotional status.
(D) A preliminary assessment of the eligibility and commitment of any identified prospective adoptive parent or legal guardian, particularly the caretaker, to include a social history including screening for criminal records and prior referrals for child abuse or neglect, the capability to meet the child’s needs, and the understanding of the legal and financial rights and responsibilities of adoption and guardianship. If a proposed legal guardian is a relative of the minor, the assessment shall also consider, but need not be limited to, all of the factors specified in subdivision (a) of Section 361.3 and Section 361.4.
(E) The relationship of the child to any identified prospective adoptive parent or legal guardian, the duration and character of the relationship, the degree of attachment of the child to the prospective relative guardian or adoptive parent, the relative’s or adoptive parent’s strong commitment to caring permanently for the child, the motivation for seeking adoption or legal guardianship, a statement from the child concerning placement and the adoption or legal guardianship, and whether the child, if over 12 years of age, has been consulted about the proposed relative guardianship arrangements, unless the child’s age or physical, emotional, or other condition precludes his or her meaningful response, and if so, a description of the condition.
(F) An analysis of the likelihood that the child will be adopted if parental rights are terminated.
(2) (A) A relative caregiver’s preference for legal guardianship over adoption, if it is due to circumstances that do not include an unwillingness to accept legal or financial responsibility for the child, shall not constitute the sole basis for recommending removal of the child from the relative caregiver for purposes of adoptive placement.
(B) A relative caregiver shall be given information regarding the permanency options of guardianship and adoption, including the long-term benefits and consequences of each option, prior to establishing legal guardianship or pursuing adoption.
(d) This section shall become operative January 1, 1999. If at any hearing held pursuant to Section 366.26, a legal guardianship is established for the minor with an approved relative caregiver, and juvenile court dependency is subsequently dismissed, the minor shall be eligible for aid under the Kin-GAP Program, as provided for in Article 4.5 (commencing with Section 11360) or Article 4.7 (commencing with Section 11385), as applicable, of Chapter 2 of Part 3 of Division 9.
(e) As used in this section, “relative” means an adult who is related to the child by blood, adoption, or affinity within the fifth degree of kinship, including stepparents, stepsiblings, and all relatives whose status is preceded by the words “great,” “great-great,” or “grand,” or the spouse of any of those persons even if the marriage was terminated by death or dissolution.
(f) The implementation and operation of the amendments to subdivision (a) enacted at the 2005–06 Regular Session shall be subject to appropriation through the budget process and by phase, as provided in Section 366.35.
(g) This section shall become operative on January 1, 2014.

SEC. 20.

 Section 366.25 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, as amended by Section 13 of Chapter 287 of the Statutes of 2009, is amended to read:

366.25.
 (a) (1) When a case has been continued pursuant to subdivision (b) of Section 366.22, the subsequent permanency review hearing shall occur within 24 months after the date the child was originally removed from the physical custody of his or her parent or legal guardian. The court shall order the return of the child to the physical custody of his or her parent or legal guardian unless the court finds, by a preponderance of the evidence, that the return of the child to his or her parent or legal guardian would create a substantial risk of detriment to the safety, protection, or physical or emotional well-being of the child. The social worker shall have the burden of establishing that detriment. At the subsequent permanency review hearing, the court shall consider the criminal history, obtained pursuant to paragraph (1) of subdivision (f) of Section 16504.5, of the parent or legal guardian subsequent to the child’s removal to the extent that the criminal record is substantially related to the welfare of the child or parent or legal guardian’s ability to exercise custody and control regarding his or her child provided that the parent or legal guardian agreed to submit fingerprint images to obtain criminal history information as part of the case plan. The failure of the parent or legal guardian to participate regularly and make substantive progress in court-ordered treatment programs shall be prima facie evidence that return would be detrimental. In making its determination, the court shall review and consider the social worker’s report and recommendations and the report and recommendations of any child advocate appointed pursuant to Section 356.5; shall consider the efforts or progress, or both, demonstrated by the parent or legal guardian and the extent to which he or she availed himself or herself of services provided; and shall make appropriate findings pursuant to subdivision (a) of Section 366.
(2) Whether or not the child is returned to his or her parent or legal guardian, the court shall specify the factual basis for its decision. If the child is not returned to a parent or legal guardian, the court shall specify the factual basis for its conclusion that return would be detrimental. If the child is not returned to his or her parents or legal guardian, the court shall consider and state for the record, in-state and out-of-state options for the child’s permanent placement. If the child is placed out of the state, the court shall make a determination whether the out-of-state placement continues to be appropriate and in best interests of the child.
(3) If the child is not returned to a parent or legal guardian at the subsequent permanency review hearing, the court shall order that a hearing be held pursuant to Section 366.26 in order to determine whether adoption, or, in the case of an Indian child, tribal customary adoption, guardianship, or long-term foster care is the most appropriate plan for the child. On and after January 1, 2012, a hearing pursuant to Section 366.26 shall not be ordered if the child is a nonminor dependent. However, if the court finds by clear and convincing evidence, based on the evidence already presented to it, including a recommendation by the State Department of Social Services when it is acting as an adoption agency in counties that are not served by a county adoption agency or by a licensed county adoption agency, that there is a compelling reason, as described in paragraph (3) of subdivision (g) of Section 366.21, for determining that a hearing held under Section 366.26 is not in the best interest of the child because the child is not a proper subject for adoption or, in the case of an Indian child, tribal customary adoption, and has no one willing to accept legal guardianship, then the court may, only under these circumstances, order that the child remain in long-term foster care. On and after January 1, 2012, the nonminor dependent’s legal status as an adult is in and of itself a compelling reason not to hold a hearing pursuant to Section 366.26. The court may order that a nonminor dependent who otherwise is eligible pursuant to Section 11403 remain in a planned, permanent living arrangement. If the court orders that a child who is 10 years of age or older remain in long-term foster care, the court shall determine whether the agency has made reasonable efforts to maintain the child’s relationships with individuals other than the child’s siblings who are important to the child, consistent with the child’s best interests, and may make any appropriate order to ensure that those relationships are maintained. The hearing shall be held no later than 120 days from the date of the subsequent permanency review hearing. The court shall also order termination of reunification services to the parent or legal guardian. The court shall continue to permit the parent or legal guardian to visit the child unless it finds that visitation would be detrimental to the child. The court shall determine whether reasonable services have been offered or provided to the parent or legal guardian. For purposes of this subdivision, evidence of any of the following circumstances shall not, in and of themselves, be deemed a failure to provide or offer reasonable services:
(A) The child has been placed with a foster family that is eligible to adopt a child, or has been placed in a preadoptive home.
(B) The case plan includes services to make and finalize a permanent placement for the child if efforts to reunify fail.
(C) Services to make and finalize a permanent placement for the child, if efforts to reunify fail, are provided concurrently with services to reunify the family.
(b) (1) Whenever a court orders that a hearing pursuant to Section 366.26 shall be held, it shall direct the agency supervising the child and the licensed county adoption agency, or the State Department of Social Services when it is acting as an adoption agency in counties that are not served by a county adoption agency, to prepare an assessment that shall include:
(A) Current search efforts for an absent parent or parents.
(B) A review of the amount of, and nature of, any contact between the child and his or her parents and other members of his or her extended family since the time of placement. Although the extended family of each child shall be reviewed on a case-by-case basis, “extended family” for the purposes of this paragraph shall include, but not be limited to, the child’s siblings, grandparents, aunts, and uncles.
(C) An evaluation of the child’s medical, developmental, scholastic, mental, and emotional status.
(D) A preliminary assessment of the eligibility and commitment of any identified prospective adoptive parent or legal guardian, including a prospective tribal customary adoptive parent, particularly the caretaker, to include a social history including screening for criminal records and prior referrals for child abuse or neglect, the capability to meet the child’s needs, and the understanding of the legal and financial rights and responsibilities of adoption and guardianship. If a proposed legal guardian is a relative of the minor, the assessment shall also consider, but need not be limited to, all of the factors specified in subdivision (a) of Section 361.3 and in Section 361.4.
(E) The relationship of the child to any identified prospective adoptive parent or legal guardian, including a prospective tribal customary adoptive parent, the duration and character of the relationship, the degree of attachment of the child to the prospective relative guardian or adoptive parent, the relative’s or adoptive parent’s strong commitment to caring permanently for the child, the motivation for seeking adoption or legal guardianship, a statement from the child concerning placement and the adoption or legal guardianship, and whether the child, if over 12 years of age, has been consulted about the proposed relative guardianship arrangements, unless the child’s age or physical, emotional, or other condition precludes his or her meaningful response, and if so, a description of the condition.
(F) An analysis of the likelihood that the child will be adopted if parental rights are terminated.
(G) In the case of an Indian child, in addition to subparagraphs (A) to (F), inclusive, an assessment of the likelihood that the child will be adopted, when, in consultation with the child’s tribe, a customary tribal adoption, as defined in Section 366.24, is recommended. If tribal customary adoption is recommended, the assessment shall include an analysis of both of the following:
(i) Whether tribal customary adoption would or would not be detrimental to the Indian child and the reasons for reaching that conclusion.
(ii) Whether the Indian child cannot or should not be returned to the home of the Indian parent or Indian custodian and the reasons for reaching that conclusion.
(2) (A) A relative caregiver’s preference for legal guardianship over adoption, if it is due to circumstances that do not include an unwillingness to accept legal or financial responsibility for the child, shall not constitute the sole basis for recommending removal of the child from the relative caregiver for purposes of adoptive placement.
(B) A relative caregiver shall be given information regarding the permanency options of guardianship and adoption, including the long-term benefits and consequences of each option, prior to establishing legal guardianship or pursuing adoption.
(c) If, at any hearing held pursuant to Section 366.26, a guardianship is established for the minor with an approved relative caregiver, and juvenile court dependency is subsequently dismissed, the minor shall be eligible for aid under the Kin-GAP Program, as provided for in Article 4.5 (commencing with Section 11360) or Article 4.7 (commencing with Section 11385), as applicable, of Chapter 2 of Part 3 of Division 9.
(d) As used in this section, “relative” means an adult who is related to the minor by blood, adoption, or affinity within the fifth degree of kinship, including stepparents, stepsiblings, and all relatives whose status is preceded by the words “great,” “great-great,” or “grand,” or the spouse of any of those persons even if the marriage was terminated by death or dissolution.
(e) The implementation and operation of subdivision (a) enacted at the 2005–06 Regular Session shall be subject to appropriation through the budget process and by phase, as provided in Section 366.35.
(f) This section shall remain in effect only until January 1, 2014, and as of that date is repealed, unless a later enacted statute, that is enacted before January 1, 2014, deletes or extends that date.

SEC. 21.

 Section 366.25 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, as added by Section 14 of Chapter 287 of the Statutes of 2009, is amended to read:

366.25.
 (a) (1) When a case has been continued pursuant to subdivision (b) of Section 366.22, the subsequent permanency review hearing shall occur within 24 months after the date the child was originally removed from the physical custody of his or her parent or legal guardian. The court shall order the return of the child to the physical custody of his or her parent or legal guardian unless the court finds, by a preponderance of the evidence, that the return of the child to his or her parent or legal guardian would create a substantial risk of detriment to the safety, protection, or physical or emotional well-being of the child. The social worker shall have the burden of establishing that detriment. At the subsequent permanency review hearing, the court shall consider the criminal history, obtained pursuant to paragraph (1) of subdivision (f) of Section 16504.5, of the parent or legal guardian subsequent to the child’s removal to the extent that the criminal record is substantially related to the welfare of the child or parent or legal guardian’s ability to exercise custody and control regarding his or her child provided that the parent or legal guardian agreed to submit fingerprint images to obtain criminal history information as part of the case plan. The failure of the parent or legal guardian to participate regularly and make substantive progress in court-ordered treatment programs shall be prima facie evidence that return would be detrimental. In making its determination, the court shall review and consider the social worker’s report and recommendations and the report and recommendations of any child advocate appointed pursuant to Section 356.5; shall consider the efforts or progress, or both, demonstrated by the parent or legal guardian and the extent to which he or she availed himself or herself of services provided; and shall make appropriate findings pursuant to subdivision (a) of Section 366.
(2) Whether or not the child is returned to his or her parent or legal guardian, the court shall specify the factual basis for its decision. If the child is not returned to a parent or legal guardian, the court shall specify the factual basis for its conclusion that return would be detrimental. If the child is not returned to his or her parents or legal guardian, the court shall consider and state for the record, in-state and out-of-state options for the child’s permanent placement. If the child is placed out of the state, the court shall make a determination whether the out-of-state placement continues to be appropriate and in best interests of the child.
(3) If the child is not returned to a parent or legal guardian at the subsequent permanency review hearing, the court shall order that a hearing be held pursuant to Section 366.26 in order to determine whether adoption, guardianship, or long-term foster care is the most appropriate plan for the child. On and after January 1, 2012, a hearing pursuant to Section 366.26 shall not be ordered if the child is a nonminor dependent. However, if the court finds by clear and convincing evidence, based on the evidence already presented to it, including a recommendation by the State Department of Social Services when it is acting as an adoption agency in counties that are not served by a county adoption agency or by a licensed county adoption agency, that there is a compelling reason, as described in paragraph (3) of subdivision (g) of Section 366.21, for determining that a hearing held under Section 366.26 is not in the best interest of the child because the child is not a proper subject for adoption and has no one willing to accept legal guardianship, then the court may, only under these circumstances, order that the child remain in long-term foster care. On and after January 1, 2012, the nonminor dependent’s legal status as an adult is in and of itself a compelling reason not to hold a hearing pursuant to Section 366.26. The court may order that a nonminor dependent who otherwise is eligible pursuant to Section 11403 remain in a planned, permanent living arrangement. If the court orders that a child who is 10 years of age or older remain in long-term foster care, the court shall determine whether the agency has made reasonable efforts to maintain the child’s relationships with individuals other than the child’s siblings who are important to the child, consistent with the child’s best interests, and may make any appropriate order to ensure that those relationships are maintained. The hearing shall be held no later than 120 days from the date of the subsequent permanency review hearing. The court shall also order termination of reunification services to the parent or legal guardian. The court shall continue to permit the parent or legal guardian to visit the child unless it finds that visitation would be detrimental to the child. The court shall determine whether reasonable services have been offered or provided to the parent or legal guardian. For purposes of this subdivision, evidence of any of the following circumstances shall not, in and of themselves, be deemed a failure to provide or offer reasonable services:
(A) The child has been placed with a foster family that is eligible to adopt a child, or has been placed in a preadoptive home.
(B) The case plan includes services to make and finalize a permanent placement for the child if efforts to reunify fail.
(C) Services to make and finalize a permanent placement for the child, if efforts to reunify fail, are provided concurrently with services to reunify the family.
(b) (1) Whenever a court orders that a hearing pursuant to Section 366.26 shall be held, it shall direct the agency supervising the child and the licensed county adoption agency, or the State Department of Social Services when it is acting as an adoption agency in counties that are not served by a county adoption agency, to prepare an assessment that shall include:
(A) Current search efforts for an absent parent or parents.
(B) A review of the amount of, and nature of, any contact between the child and his or her parents and other members of his or her extended family since the time of placement. Although the extended family of each child shall be reviewed on a case-by-case basis, “extended family” for the purposes of this paragraph shall include, but not be limited to, the child’s siblings, grandparents, aunts, and uncles.
(C) An evaluation of the child’s medical, developmental, scholastic, mental, and emotional status.
(D) A preliminary assessment of the eligibility and commitment of any identified prospective adoptive parent or legal guardian, particularly the caretaker, to include a social history including screening for criminal records and prior referrals for child abuse or neglect, the capability to meet the child’s needs, and the understanding of the legal and financial rights and responsibilities of adoption and guardianship. If a proposed legal guardian is a relative of the minor, the assessment shall also consider, but need not be limited to, all of the factors specified in subdivision (a) of Section 361.3 and in Section 361.4.
(E) The relationship of the child to any identified prospective adoptive parent or legal guardian, the duration and character of the relationship, the degree of attachment of the child to the prospective relative guardian or adoptive parent, the relative’s or adoptive parent’s strong commitment to caring permanently for the child, the motivation for seeking adoption or legal guardianship, a statement from the child concerning placement and the adoption or legal guardianship, and whether the child, if over 12 years of age, has been consulted about the proposed relative guardianship arrangements, unless the child’s age or physical, emotional, or other condition precludes his or her meaningful response, and if so, a description of the condition.
(F) An analysis of the likelihood that the child will be adopted if parental rights are terminated.
(2) (A) A relative caregiver’s preference for legal guardianship over adoption, if it is due to circumstances that do not include an unwillingness to accept legal or financial responsibility for the child, shall not constitute the sole basis for recommending removal of the child from the relative caregiver for purposes of adoptive placement.
(B) A relative caregiver shall be given information regarding the permanency options of guardianship and adoption, including the long-term benefits and consequences of each option, prior to establishing legal guardianship or pursuing adoption.
(c) If, at any hearing held pursuant to Section 366.26, a guardianship is established for the minor with an approved relative caregiver, and juvenile court dependency is subsequently dismissed, the minor shall be eligible for aid under the Kin-GAP Program, as provided for in Article 4.5 (commencing with Section 11360) or Article 4.7 (commencing with Section 11385), as applicable, of Chapter 2 of Part 3 of Division 9.
(d) As used in this section, “relative” means an adult who is related to the minor by blood, adoption, or affinity within the fifth degree of kinship, including stepparents, stepsiblings, and all relatives whose status is preceded by the words “great,” “great-great,” or “grand,” or the spouse of any of those persons even if the marriage was terminated by death or dissolution.
(e) The implementation and operation of subdivision (a) enacted at the 2005–06 Regular Session shall be subject to appropriation through the budget process and by phase, as provided in Section 366.35.
(f) This section shall become operative on January 1, 2014.

SEC. 22.

 Section 366.3 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, as amended by Section 17 of Chapter 287 of the Statutes of 2009, is amended to read:

366.3.
 (a) If a juvenile court orders a permanent plan of adoption, tribal customary adoption, or legal guardianship pursuant to Section 360 or 366.26, the court shall retain jurisdiction over the child until the child is adopted or the legal guardianship is established, except as provided for in Section 366.29 or, on and after January 1, 2012, Section 366.31. The status of the child shall be reviewed every six months to ensure that the adoption or legal guardianship is completed as expeditiously as possible. When the adoption of the child has been granted, or in the case of a tribal customary adoption, when the tribal customary adoption order has been afforded full faith and credit and the petition for adoption has been granted, the court shall terminate its jurisdiction over the child. Following establishment of a legal guardianship, the court may continue jurisdiction over the child as a dependent child of the juvenile court or may terminate its dependency jurisdiction and retain jurisdiction over the child as a ward of the legal guardianship, as authorized by Section 366.4. If, however, a relative of the child is appointed the legal guardian of the child and the child has been placed with the relative for at least six months, the court shall, except if the relative guardian objects, or upon a finding of exceptional circumstances, terminate its dependency jurisdiction and retain jurisdiction over the child as a ward of the guardianship, as authorized by Section 366.4. Following a termination of parental rights, the parent or parents shall not be a party to, or receive notice of, any subsequent proceedings regarding the child.
(b) If the court has dismissed dependency jurisdiction following the establishment of a legal guardianship, or no dependency jurisdiction attached because of the granting of a legal guardianship pursuant to Section 360, and the legal guardianship is subsequently revoked or otherwise terminated, the county department of social services or welfare department shall notify the juvenile court of this fact. The court may vacate its previous order dismissing dependency jurisdiction over the child.
Notwithstanding Section 1601 of the Probate Code, the proceedings to terminate a legal guardianship that has been granted pursuant to Section 360 or 366.26 shall be held either in the juvenile court that retains jurisdiction over the guardianship as authorized by Section 366.4 or the juvenile court in the county where the guardian and child currently reside, based on the best interests of the child, unless the termination is due to the emancipation or adoption of the child. The juvenile court having jurisdiction over the guardianship shall receive notice from the court in which the petition is filed within five calendar days of the filing. Prior to the hearing on a petition to terminate legal guardianship pursuant to this subdivision, the court shall order the county department of social services or welfare department having jurisdiction or jointly with the county department where the guardian and child currently reside to prepare a report, for the court’s consideration, that shall include an evaluation of whether the child could safely remain in, or be returned to, the legal guardian’s home, without terminating the legal guardianship, if services were provided to the child or legal guardian. If applicable, the report shall also identify recommended family maintenance or reunification services to maintain the legal guardianship and set forth a plan for providing those services. If the petition to terminate legal guardianship is granted, either juvenile court may resume dependency jurisdiction over the child, and may order the county department of social services or welfare department to develop a new permanent plan, which shall be presented to the court within 60 days of the termination. If no dependency jurisdiction has attached, the social worker shall make any investigation he or she deems necessary to determine whether the child may be within the jurisdiction of the juvenile court, as provided in Section 328.
Unless the parental rights of the child’s parent or parents have been terminated, they shall be notified that the legal guardianship has been revoked or terminated and shall be entitled to participate in the new permanency planning hearing. The court shall try to place the child in another permanent placement. At the hearing, the parents may be considered as custodians but the child shall not be returned to the parent or parents unless they prove, by a preponderance of the evidence, that reunification is the best alternative for the child. The court may, if it is in the best interests of the child, order that reunification services again be provided to the parent or parents.
(c) If, following the establishment of a legal guardianship, the county welfare department becomes aware of changed circumstances that indicate adoption or, for an Indian child, tribal customary adoption, may be an appropriate plan for the child, the department shall so notify the court. The court may vacate its previous order dismissing dependency jurisdiction over the child and order that a hearing be held pursuant to Section 366.26 to determine whether adoption or continued legal guardianship is the most appropriate plan for the child. The hearing shall be held no later than 120 days from the date of the order. If the court orders that a hearing shall be held pursuant to Section 366.26, the court shall direct the agency supervising the child and the licensed county adoption agency, or the State Department of Social Services if it is acting as an adoption agency in counties that are not served by a county adoption agency, to prepare an assessment under subdivision (b) of Section 366.22.
(d) If the child or, on and after January 1, 2012, nonminor dependent is in a placement other than the home of a legal guardian and jurisdiction has not been dismissed, the status of the child shall be reviewed at least every six months. The review of the status of a child for whom the court has ordered parental rights terminated and who has been ordered placed for adoption shall be conducted by the court. The review of the status of a child or, on and after January 1, 2012, nonminor dependent for whom the court has not ordered parental rights terminated and who has not been ordered placed for adoption may be conducted by the court or an appropriate local agency. The court shall conduct the review under the following circumstances:
(1) Upon the request of the child’s parents or legal guardians.
(2) Upon the request of the child or, on and after January 1, 2012, nonminor dependent.
(3) It has been 12 months since a hearing held pursuant to Section 366.26 or an order that the child remain in long-term foster care pursuant to Section 366.21, 366.22, 366.25, 366.26, or subdivision (h).
(4) It has been 12 months since a review was conducted by the court.
The court shall determine whether or not reasonable efforts to make and finalize a permanent placement for the child have been made.
(e) Except as provided in subdivision (g), at the review held every six months pursuant to subdivision (d), the reviewing body shall inquire about the progress being made to provide a permanent home for the child, shall consider the safety of the child, and shall determine all of the following:
(1) The continuing necessity for, and appropriateness of, the placement.
(2) Identification of individuals other than the child’s siblings who are important to a child who is 10 years of age or older and has been in out-of-home placement for six months or longer, and actions necessary to maintain the child’s relationship with those individuals, provided that those relationships are in the best interest of the child. The social worker shall ask every child who is 10 years of age or older and who has been in out-of-home placement for six months or longer to identify individuals other than the child’s siblings who are important to the child, and may ask any other child to provide that information, as appropriate. The social worker shall make efforts to identify other individuals who are important to the child, consistent with the child’s best interests.
(3) The continuing appropriateness and extent of compliance with the permanent plan for the child, including efforts to maintain relationships between a child who is 10 years of age or older and who has been in out-of-home placement for six months or longer and individuals who are important to the child and efforts to identify a prospective adoptive parent or legal guardian, including, but not limited to, child-specific recruitment efforts and listing on an adoption exchange.
(4) The extent of the agency’s compliance with the child welfare services case plan in making reasonable efforts either to return the child to the safe home of the parent or to complete whatever steps are necessary to finalize the permanent placement of the child. If the reviewing body determines that a second period of reunification services is in the child’s best interests, and that there is a significant likelihood of the child’s return to a safe home due to changed circumstances of the parent, pursuant to subdivision (f), the specific reunification services required to effect the child’s return to a safe home shall be described.
(5) Whether there should be any limitation on the right of the parent or guardian to make educational decisions for the child. That limitation shall be specifically addressed in the court order and may not exceed what is necessary to protect the child. If the court specifically limits the right of the parent or guardian to make educational decisions for the child, the court shall at the same time appoint a responsible adult to make educational decisions for the child pursuant to Section 361.
(6) The adequacy of services provided to the child. The court shall consider the progress in providing the information and documents to the child, as described in Section 391. The court shall also consider the need for, and progress in providing, the assistance and services described in Section 391.
(7) The extent of progress the parents or legal guardians have made toward alleviating or mitigating the causes necessitating placement in foster care.
(8) The likely date by which the child may be returned to, and safely maintained in, the home, placed for adoption, legal guardianship, in another planned permanent living arrangement, or, for an Indian child, in consultation with the child’s tribe, placed for tribal customary adoption.
(9) Whether the child has any siblings under the court’s jurisdiction, and, if any siblings exist, all of the following:
(A) The nature of the relationship between the child and his or her siblings.
(B) The appropriateness of developing or maintaining the sibling relationships pursuant to Section 16002.
(C) If the siblings are not placed together in the same home, why the siblings are not placed together and what efforts are being made to place the siblings together, or why those efforts are not appropriate.
(D) If the siblings are not placed together, the frequency and nature of the visits between siblings.
(E) The impact of the sibling relationships on the child’s placement and planning for legal permanence.
The factors the court may consider as indicators of the nature of the child’s sibling relationships include, but are not limited to, whether the siblings were raised together in the same home, whether the siblings have shared significant common experiences or have existing close and strong bonds, whether either sibling expresses a desire to visit or live with his or her sibling, as applicable, and whether ongoing contact is in the child’s best emotional interests.
(10) For a child who is 16 years of age or older, and, effective January 1, 2012, for a nonminor dependent, the services needed to assist the child or nonminor dependent to make the transition from foster care to independent living.
The reviewing body shall determine whether or not reasonable efforts to make and finalize a permanent placement for the child have been made.
Each licensed foster family agency shall submit reports for each child in its care, custody, and control to the court concerning the continuing appropriateness and extent of compliance with the child’s permanent plan, the extent of compliance with the case plan, and the type and adequacy of services provided to the child.
(f) Unless their parental rights have been permanently terminated, the parent or parents of the child are entitled to receive notice of, and participate in, those hearings. It shall be presumed that continued care is in the best interests of the child, unless the parent or parents prove, by a preponderance of the evidence, that further efforts at reunification are the best alternative for the child. In those cases, the court may order that further reunification services to return the child to a safe home environment be provided to the parent or parents up to a period of six months, and family maintenance services, as needed for an additional six months in order to return the child to a safe home environment. On and after January 1, 2012, this subdivision shall not apply to the parents of a nonminor dependent.
(g) At the review conducted by the court and held at least every six months, regarding a child for whom the court has ordered parental rights terminated and who has been ordered placed for adoption, or, for an Indian child for whom parental rights are not being terminated and a tribal customary adoption is being considered, the county welfare department shall prepare and present to the court a report describing the following:
(1) The child’s present placement.
(2) The child’s current physical, mental, emotional, and educational status.
(3) If the child has not been placed with a prospective adoptive parent or guardian, identification of individuals, other than the child’s siblings, who are important to the child and actions necessary to maintain the child’s relationship with those individuals, provided that those relationships are in the best interest of the child. The agency shall ask every child who is 10 years of age or older to identify any individuals who are important to him or her, consistent with the child’s best interest, and may ask any child who is younger than 10 years of age to provide that information as appropriate. The agency shall make efforts to identify other individuals who are important to the child.
(4) Whether the child has been placed with a prospective adoptive parent or parents.
(5) Whether an adoptive placement agreement has been signed and filed.
(6) If the child has not been placed with a prospective adoptive parent or parents, the efforts made to identify an appropriate prospective adoptive parent or legal guardian, including, but not limited to, child-specific recruitment efforts and listing on an adoption exchange.
(7) Whether the final adoption order should include provisions for postadoptive sibling contact pursuant to Section 366.29.
(8) The progress of the search for an adoptive placement if one has not been identified.
(9) Any impediments to the adoption or the adoptive placement.
(10) The anticipated date by which the child will be adopted or placed in an adoptive home.
(11) The anticipated date by which an adoptive placement agreement will be signed.
(12) Recommendations for court orders that will assist in the placement of the child for adoption or in the finalization of the adoption.
The court shall determine whether or not reasonable efforts to make and finalize a permanent placement for the child have been made.
The court shall make appropriate orders to protect the stability of the child and to facilitate and expedite the permanent placement and adoption of the child.
(h) At the review held pursuant to subdivision (d) for a child in long-term foster care, the court shall consider all permanency planning options for the child including whether the child should be returned to the home of the parent, placed for adoption, or, for an Indian child, in consultation with the child’s tribe, placed for tribal customary adoption, or appointed a legal guardian, or, if compelling reasons exist for finding that none of the foregoing options are in the best interest of the child, whether the child should be placed in another planned permanent living arrangement. The court shall order that a hearing be held pursuant to Section 366.26, unless it determines by clear and convincing evidence that there is a compelling reason for determining that a hearing held pursuant to Section 366.26 is not in the best interest of the child because the child is being returned to the home of the parent, the child is not a proper subject for adoption, or no one is willing to accept legal guardianship. If the licensed county adoption agency, or the department when it is acting as an adoption agency in counties that are not served by a county adoption agency, has determined it is unlikely that the child will be adopted or one of the conditions described in paragraph (1) of subdivision (c) of Section 366.26 applies, that fact shall constitute a compelling reason for purposes of this subdivision. Only upon that determination may the court order that the child remain in long-term foster care, without holding a hearing pursuant to Section 366.26. On and after January 1, 2012, the nonminor dependent’s legal status as an adult is in and of itself a compelling reason not to hold a hearing pursuant to Section 366.26.
(i) If, as authorized by subdivision (h), the court orders a hearing pursuant to Section 366.26, the court shall direct the agency supervising the child and the licensed county adoption agency, or the State Department of Social Services when it is acting as an adoption agency in counties that are not served by a county adoption agency, to prepare an assessment as provided for in subdivision (i) of Section 366.21 or subdivision (b) of Section 366.22. A hearing held pursuant to Section 366.26 shall be held no later than 120 days from the date of the 12-month review at which it is ordered, and at that hearing the court shall determine whether adoption, tribal customary adoption, legal guardianship, or long-term foster care is the most appropriate plan for the child. On and after January 1, 2012, a hearing pursuant to Section 366.26 shall not be ordered if the child is a nonminor dependent. The court may order that a nonminor dependent who otherwise is eligible pursuant to Section 11403 remain in a planned, permanent living arrangement.
(j) The implementation and operation of the amendments to subdivision (e) enacted at the 2005–06 Regular Session shall be subject to appropriation through the budget process and by phase, as provided in Section 366.35.
(k) The reviews conducted pursuant to subdivision (a) or (d) may be conducted earlier than every six months if the court determines that an earlier review is in the best interests of the child or as court rules prescribe.
(l) On and after January 1, 2012, at the review hearing that occurs in the six-month period prior to the minor’s attaining 18 years of age, and at every subsequent review hearing for the nonminor dependent, the report shall describe all of the following:
(1) The minor’s or nonminor dependent’s plans to remain in foster care and plans to meet one or more of the criteria as described in subdivision (b) of Section 11403 to continue to receive AFDC-FC benefits.
(2) The efforts made and assistance provided to the minor or nonminor dependent by the social worker or the probation officer so that the minor or nonminor dependent will be able to meet the criteria.
(3) Efforts toward completing the items described in paragraph (2) of subdivision (e) of Section 391.
(m) On and after January 1, 2012, the reviews conducted pursuant to subdivisions (e) and (h) for any nonminor dependent shall be conducted in a manner that respects the nonminor’s status as a legal adult, be focused on the goals and services described in the youth’s transitional independent living case plan, including efforts made to achieve permanence, including maintaining or obtaining permanent connections with caring and committed adults, and attended as appropriate by additional participants invited by the nonminor dependent. The review shall include all the issues in subdivision (e), except paragraph (5) of subdivision (e). The county child welfare or probation department, or Indian tribe that has entered into an agreement pursuant to Section 10553.1 shall prepare and present to the reviewing body a report that addresses the youth’s progress in meeting the goals in the transitional independent living case plan and propose modifications as necessary to further those goals. The report shall document that the nonminor has received all the information and documentation described in paragraph (2) of subdivision (e) of Section 391. If the court is considering terminating dependency jurisdiction for a nonminor dependent it shall first hold a hearing pursuant to Section 391.
(n) On and after January 1, 2012, if a review hearing pursuant to this section is the last review hearing to be held before the child attains 18 years of age, the court shall ensure all of the following:
(1) That the child’s transitional independent living case plan includes a plan for the child to satisfy one or more of the criteria set forth in subdivision (b) of Section 11403, so that the child is eligible to remain a nonminor dependent.
(2) That the child has been informed of his or her right to seek termination of dependency jurisdiction pursuant to Section 391, and understands the potential benefits of continued dependency.
(3) That the child is informed of his or her right to have dependency reinstated pursuant to subdivision (e) of Section 388, and understands the potential benefits of continued dependency.
(o) This section shall remain in effect only until January 1, 2014, and as of that date is repealed, unless a later enacted statute, that is enacted before January 1, 2014, deletes or extends that date.

SEC. 23.

 Section 366.3 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, as added by Section 18 of Chapter 287 of the Statutes of 2009, is amended to read:

366.3.
 (a) If a juvenile court orders a permanent plan of adoption or legal guardianship pursuant to Section 360 or 366.26, the court shall retain jurisdiction over the child until the child is adopted or the legal guardianship is established, except as provided for in Section 366.29 or, on and after January 1, 2012, Section 366.31. The status of the child shall be reviewed every six months to ensure that the adoption or legal guardianship is completed as expeditiously as possible. When the adoption of the child has been granted, the court shall terminate its jurisdiction over the child. Following establishment of a legal guardianship, the court may continue jurisdiction over the child as a dependent child of the juvenile court or may terminate its dependency jurisdiction and retain jurisdiction over the child as a ward of the legal guardianship, as authorized by Section 366.4. If, however, a relative of the child is appointed the legal guardian of the child and the child has been placed with the relative for at least six months, the court shall, except if the relative guardian objects, or upon a finding of exceptional circumstances, terminate its dependency jurisdiction and retain jurisdiction over the child as a ward of the guardianship, as authorized by Section 366.4. Following a termination of parental rights, the parent or parents shall not be a party to, or receive notice of, any subsequent proceedings regarding the child.
(b) If the court has dismissed dependency jurisdiction following the establishment of a legal guardianship, or no dependency jurisdiction attached because of the granting of a legal guardianship pursuant to Section 360, and the legal guardianship is subsequently revoked or otherwise terminated, the county department of social services or welfare department shall notify the juvenile court of this fact. The court may vacate its previous order dismissing dependency jurisdiction over the child.
Notwithstanding Section 1601 of the Probate Code, the proceedings to terminate a legal guardianship that has been granted pursuant to Section 360 or 366.26 shall be held either in the juvenile court that retains jurisdiction over the guardianship as authorized by Section 366.4 or the juvenile court in the county where the guardian and child currently reside, based on the best interests of the child, unless the termination is due to the emancipation or adoption of the child. The juvenile court having jurisdiction over the guardianship shall receive notice from the court in which the petition is filed within five calendar days of the filing. Prior to the hearing on a petition to terminate legal guardianship pursuant to this subdivision, the court shall order the county department of social services or welfare department having jurisdiction or jointly with the county department where the guardian and child currently reside to prepare a report, for the court’s consideration, that shall include an evaluation of whether the child could safely remain in, or be returned to, the legal guardian’s home, without terminating the legal guardianship, if services were provided to the child or legal guardian. If applicable, the report shall also identify recommended family maintenance or reunification services to maintain the legal guardianship and set forth a plan for providing those services. If the petition to terminate legal guardianship is granted, either juvenile court may resume dependency jurisdiction over the child, and may order the county department of social services or welfare department to develop a new permanent plan, which shall be presented to the court within 60 days of the termination. If no dependency jurisdiction has attached, the social worker shall make any investigation he or she deems necessary to determine whether the child may be within the jurisdiction of the juvenile court, as provided in Section 328.
Unless the parental rights of the child’s parent or parents have been terminated, they shall be notified that the legal guardianship has been revoked or terminated and shall be entitled to participate in the new permanency planning hearing. The court shall try to place the child in another permanent placement. At the hearing, the parents may be considered as custodians but the child shall not be returned to the parent or parents unless they prove, by a preponderance of the evidence, that reunification is the best alternative for the child. The court may, if it is in the best interests of the child, order that reunification services again be provided to the parent or parents.
(c) If, following the establishment of a legal guardianship, the county welfare department becomes aware of changed circumstances that indicate adoption may be an appropriate plan for the child, the department shall so notify the court. The court may vacate its previous order dismissing dependency jurisdiction over the child and order that a hearing be held pursuant to Section 366.26 to determine whether adoption or continued legal guardianship is the most appropriate plan for the child. The hearing shall be held no later than 120 days from the date of the order. If the court orders that a hearing shall be held pursuant to Section 366.26, the court shall direct the agency supervising the child and the licensed county adoption agency, or the State Department of Social Services if it is acting as an adoption agency in counties that are not served by a county adoption agency, to prepare an assessment under subdivision (b) of Section 366.22.
(d) If the child or, on and after January 1, 2012, nonminor dependent is in a placement other than the home of a legal guardian and jurisdiction has not been dismissed, the status of the child shall be reviewed at least every six months. The review of the status of a child for whom the court has ordered parental rights terminated and who has been ordered placed for adoption shall be conducted by the court. The review of the status of a child or, on and after January 1, 2012, nonminor dependent for whom the court has not ordered parental rights terminated and who has not been ordered placed for adoption may be conducted by the court or an appropriate local agency. The court shall conduct the review under the following circumstances:
(1) Upon the request of the child’s parents or legal guardians.
(2) Upon the request of the child or, on and after January 1, 2012, nonminor dependent.
(3) It has been 12 months since a hearing held pursuant to Section 366.26 or an order that the child remain in long-term foster care pursuant to Section 366.21, 366.22, 366.25, 366.26, or subdivision (h).
(4) It has been 12 months since a review was conducted by the court.
The court shall determine whether or not reasonable efforts to make and finalize a permanent placement for the child have been made.
(e) Except as provided in subdivision (g), at the review held every six months pursuant to subdivision (d), the reviewing body shall inquire about the progress being made to provide a permanent home for the child, shall consider the safety of the child, and shall determine all of the following:
(1) The continuing necessity for, and appropriateness of, the placement.
(2) Identification of individuals other than the child’s siblings who are important to a child who is 10 years of age or older and has been in out-of-home placement for six months or longer, and actions necessary to maintain the child’s relationship with those individuals, provided that those relationships are in the best interest of the child. The social worker shall ask every child who is 10 years of age or older and who has been in out-of-home placement for six months or longer to identify individuals other than the child’s siblings who are important to the child, and may ask any other child to provide that information, as appropriate. The social worker shall make efforts to identify other individuals who are important to the child, consistent with the child’s best interests.
(3) The continuing appropriateness and extent of compliance with the permanent plan for the child, including efforts to maintain relationships between a child who is 10 years of age or older and who has been in out-of-home placement for six months or longer and individuals who are important to the child and efforts to identify a prospective adoptive parent or legal guardian, including, but not limited to, child-specific recruitment efforts and listing on an adoption exchange.
(4) The extent of the agency’s compliance with the child welfare services case plan in making reasonable efforts either to return the child to the safe home of the parent or to complete whatever steps are necessary to finalize the permanent placement of the child. If the reviewing body determines that a second period of reunification services is in the child’s best interests, and that there is a significant likelihood of the child’s return to a safe home due to changed circumstances of the parent, pursuant to subdivision (f), the specific reunification services required to effect the child’s return to a safe home shall be described.
(5) Whether there should be any limitation on the right of the parent or guardian to make educational decisions for the child. That limitation shall be specifically addressed in the court order and may not exceed what is necessary to protect the child. If the court specifically limits the right of the parent or guardian to make educational decisions for the child, the court shall at the same time appoint a responsible adult to make educational decisions for the child pursuant to Section 361.
(6) The adequacy of services provided to the child. The court shall consider the progress in providing the information and documents to the child, as described in Section 391. The court shall also consider the need for, and progress in providing, the assistance and services described in Section 391.
(7) The extent of progress the parents or legal guardians have made toward alleviating or mitigating the causes necessitating placement in foster care.
(8) The likely date by which the child may be returned to, and safely maintained in, the home, placed for adoption, legal guardianship, or in another planned permanent living arrangement.
(9) Whether the child has any siblings under the court’s jurisdiction, and, if any siblings exist, all of the following:
(A) The nature of the relationship between the child and his or her siblings.
(B) The appropriateness of developing or maintaining the sibling relationships pursuant to Section 16002.
(C) If the siblings are not placed together in the same home, why the siblings are not placed together and what efforts are being made to place the siblings together, or why those efforts are not appropriate.
(D) If the siblings are not placed together, the frequency and nature of the visits between siblings.
(E) The impact of the sibling relationships on the child’s placement and planning for legal permanence.
The factors the court may consider as indicators of the nature of the child’s sibling relationships include, but are not limited to, whether the siblings were raised together in the same home, whether the siblings have shared significant common experiences or have existing close and strong bonds, whether either sibling expresses a desire to visit or live with his or her sibling, as applicable, and whether ongoing contact is in the child’s best emotional interests.
(10) For a child who is 16 years of age or older, and, effective January 1, 2012, for a nonminor dependent, the services needed to assist the child or nonminor dependent to make the transition from foster care to independent living.
The reviewing body shall determine whether or not reasonable efforts to make and finalize a permanent placement for the child have been made.
Each licensed foster family agency shall submit reports for each child in its care, custody, and control to the court concerning the continuing appropriateness and extent of compliance with the child’s permanent plan, the extent of compliance with the case plan, and the type and adequacy of services provided to the child.
(f) Unless their parental rights have been permanently terminated, the parent or parents of the child are entitled to receive notice of, and participate in, those hearings. It shall be presumed that continued care is in the best interests of the child, unless the parent or parents prove, by a preponderance of the evidence, that further efforts at reunification are the best alternative for the child. In those cases, the court may order that further reunification services to return the child to a safe home environment be provided to the parent or parents up to a period of six months, and family maintenance services, as needed for an additional six months in order to return the child to a safe home environment.
(g) At the review conducted by the court and held at least every six months, regarding a child for whom the court has ordered parental rights terminated and who has been ordered placed for adoption, the county welfare department shall prepare and present to the court a report describing the following:
(1) The child’s present placement.
(2) The child’s current physical, mental, emotional, and educational status.
(3) If the child has not been placed with a prospective adoptive parent or guardian, identification of individuals, other than the child’s siblings, who are important to the child and actions necessary to maintain the child’s relationship with those individuals, provided that those relationships are in the best interest of the child. The agency shall ask every child who is 10 years of age or older to identify any individuals who are important to him or her, consistent with the child’s best interest, and may ask any child who is younger than 10 years of age to provide that information as appropriate. The agency shall make efforts to identify other individuals who are important to the child.
(4) Whether the child has been placed with a prospective adoptive parent or parents.
(5) Whether an adoptive placement agreement has been signed and filed.
(6) If the child has not been placed with a prospective adoptive parent or parents, the efforts made to identify an appropriate prospective adoptive parent or legal guardian, including, but not limited to, child-specific recruitment efforts and listing on an adoption exchange.
(7) Whether the final adoption order should include provisions for postadoptive sibling contact pursuant to Section 366.29.
(8) The progress of the search for an adoptive placement if one has not been identified.
(9) Any impediments to the adoption or the adoptive placement.
(10) The anticipated date by which the child will be adopted or placed in an adoptive home.
(11) The anticipated date by which an adoptive placement agreement will be signed.
(12) Recommendations for court orders that will assist in the placement of the child for adoption or in the finalization of the adoption.
The court shall determine whether or not reasonable efforts to make and finalize a permanent placement for the child have been made.
The court shall make appropriate orders to protect the stability of the child and to facilitate and expedite the permanent placement and adoption of the child.
(h) At the review held pursuant to subdivision (d) for a child in long-term foster care, the court shall consider all permanency planning options for the child including whether the child should be returned to the home of the parent, placed for adoption, or appointed a legal guardian, or, if compelling reasons exist for finding that none of the foregoing options are in the best interest of the child, whether the child should be placed in another planned permanent living arrangement. The court shall order that a hearing be held pursuant to Section 366.26, unless it determines by clear and convincing evidence that there is a compelling reason for determining that a hearing held pursuant to Section 366.26 is not in the best interest of the child because the child is being returned to the home of the parent, the child is not a proper subject for adoption, or no one is willing to accept legal guardianship. If the licensed county adoption agency, or the department when it is acting as an adoption agency in counties that are not served by a county adoption agency, has determined it is unlikely that the child will be adopted or one of the conditions described in paragraph (1) of subdivision (c) of Section 366.26 applies, that fact shall constitute a compelling reason for purposes of this subdivision. Only upon that determination may the court order that the child remain in foster care, without holding a hearing pursuant to Section 366.26. On and after January 1, 2012, the nonminor dependent’s legal status as an adult is in and of itself a compelling reason not to hold a hearing pursuant to Section 366.26.
(i) If, as authorized by subdivision (h), the court orders a hearing pursuant to Section 366.26, the court shall direct the agency supervising the child and the licensed county adoption agency, or the State Department of Social Services when it is acting as an adoption agency in counties that are not served by a county adoption agency, to prepare an assessment as provided for in subdivision (i) of Section 366.21 or subdivision (b) of Section 366.22. A hearing held pursuant to Section 366.26 shall be held no later than 120 days from the date of the 12-month review at which it is ordered, and at that hearing the court shall determine whether adoption, legal guardianship, or long-term foster care is the most appropriate plan for the child. On and after January 1, 2012, a hearing pursuant to Section 366.26 shall not be ordered if the child is a nonminor dependent. The court may order that a nonminor dependent who otherwise is eligible pursuant to Section 11403 remain in a planned, permanent living arrangement.
(j) The implementation and operation of the amendments to subdivision (e) enacted at the 2005–06 Regular Session shall be subject to appropriation through the budget process and by phase, as provided in Section 366.35.
(k) The reviews conducted pursuant to subdivision (a) or (d) may be conducted earlier than every six months if the court determines that an earlier review is in the best interests of the child or as court rules prescribe.
(l) On and after October 1, 2012, at the review hearing that occurs in the six-month period prior to the minor’s attaining 18 years of age, and at every subsequent review hearing, the report shall describe all of the following:
(1) The minor’s plans to remain in foster care and plans to meet one or more of the criteria as described in subdivision (b) of Section 11403 to continue to receive AFDC-FC benefits.
(2) The efforts made and assistance provided to the minor by the social worker or the probation officer so that the minor will be able to meet the criteria.
(3) Efforts toward completing the items described in paragraph (2) of subdivision (e) of Section 391.
(m) On and after January 1, 2012, the reviews conducted pursuant to subdivisions (e) and (h) for any nonminor dependent shall be conducted in a manner that respects the nonminor’s status as a legal adult, be focused on the goals and services described in the youth’s transitional independent living case plan, including efforts made to maintain connections with caring and permanently committed adults, and attended as appropriate by additional participants invited by the nonminor dependent. The review shall include all the issues in subdivision (e), except paragraph (5) of subdivision (e). The county child welfare or probation department, or Indian tribe that has entered into an agreement pursuant to Section 10553.1 shall prepare and present to the reviewing body a report that addresses the youth’s progress in meeting the goals in the transitional independent living case plan and propose modifications as necessary to further those goals. The report shall document that the nonminor has received all the information and documentation described in paragraph (2) of subdivision (e) of Section 391. If the court is considering terminating dependency jurisdiction for a nonminor dependent it shall first hold a hearing pursuant to Section 391.
(n) On and after January 1, 2012, if a review hearing pursuant to this section is the last review hearing to be held before the child attains 18 years of age, the court shall ensure all of the following:
(1) That the child’s transitional independent living case plan includes a plan for the child to satisfy one or more of the criteria set forth in subdivision (b) of Section 11403, so that the child is eligible to remain a nonminor dependent.
(2) That the child has been informed of his or her right to seek termination of dependency jurisdiction pursuant to Section 391, and understands the potential benefits of continued dependency.
(3) That the child is informed of his or her right to have dependency reinstated pursuant to subdivision (e) of Section 388, and understands the potential benefits of continued dependency.
(o) This section shall become operative on January 1, 2014.

SEC. 24.

 Section 366.31 is added to the Welfare and Institutions Code, to read:

366.31.
 (a) On and after January 1, 2012, with respect to a nonminor dependent, as defined in subdivision (v) of Section 11400, who has a permanent plan of long-term foster care that was ordered pursuant to Section 366.21, 366.22, 366.25, or 366.26 the court may continue jurisdiction of the nonminor as a dependent of the juvenile court or may dismiss dependency jurisdiction pursuant to Section 391.
(b) If the court continues dependency jurisdiction of the nonminor as a dependent of the juvenile court, the court shall order the development of a planned permanent living arrangement, which may include continued placement with the current caregiver or another licensed or approved caregiver or placement under a mutual agreement pursuant to Section 11403, or in supervised independent living, consistent with the youth’s transitional independent living case plan.
(c) If the court terminates its dependency jurisdiction over a nonminor dependent pursuant to subdivision (a), it shall retain jurisdiction over the youth pursuant to Section 303. Consistent with paragraph (e) of Section 1356.21 of Title 45 of the Code of Federal Regulations, the court shall authorize a trial period of independence away from foster care as defined in subdivision (y) of Section 11400. The court shall set the end date of the trial period of Independence away from foster care to be the day prior to the day the nonminor attains 21 years of age, unless to do so is not in the nonminor’s best interests. If the court has dismissed dependency jurisdiction pursuant to subdivision (d) of Section 391, the nonminor, who has not attained 21 years of age, may subsequently file a petition pursuant to subdivision (e) of Section 388 to have dependency jurisdiction resumed and the court may vacate its previous order dismissing dependency jurisdiction over the nonminor dependent.

SEC. 25.

 Section 366.4 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

366.4.
 (a) Any minor for whom a guardianship has been established resulting from the selection or implementation of a permanency plan pursuant to Section 366.26, or for whom a related guardianship has been established pursuant to Section 360, or, on and after the date that the director executes a declaration pursuant to Section 11217, a nonminor who is receiving Kin-GAP payments pursuant to Section 11363 11386, or, on or after January 1, 2012, a nonminor former dependent child of the juvenile court who is receiving AFDC-FC benefits pursuant to Section 11405, is within the jurisdiction of the juvenile court. For those minors, Part 2 (commencing with Section 1500) of Division 4 of the Probate Code, relating to guardianship, shall not apply. If no specific provision of this code or the California Rules of Court is applicable, the provisions applicable to the administration of estates under Part 4 (commencing with Section 2100) of Division 4 of the Probate Code govern so far as they are applicable to like situations.
(b) Nonrelated legal guardians of the person of a guardianship pursuant to Section 360 or 366.26 shall be exempt from the provisions of Sections 2850 and 2851 of the Probate Code.

SEC. 26.

 Section 388 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

388.
 (a) Any parent or other person having an interest in a child who is a dependent child of the juvenile court or the child himself or herself through a properly appointed guardian may, upon grounds of change of circumstance or new evidence, petition the court in the same action in which the child was found to be a dependent child of the juvenile court or in which a guardianship was ordered pursuant to Section 360 for a hearing to change, modify, or set aside any order of court previously made or to terminate the jurisdiction of the court. The petition shall be verified and, if made by a person other than the child, shall state the petitioner’s relationship to or interest in the child and shall set forth in concise language any change of circumstance or new evidence that are alleged to require the change of order or termination of jurisdiction.
(b) Any person, including a child who is a dependent of the juvenile court, may petition the court to assert a relationship as a sibling related by blood, adoption, or affinity through a common legal or biological parent to a child who is, or is the subject of a petition for adjudication as, a dependent of the juvenile court, and may request visitation with the dependent child, placement with or near the dependent child, or consideration when determining or implementing a case plan or permanent plan for the dependent child or make any other request for an order which may be shown to be in the best interest of the dependent child. The court may appoint a guardian ad litem to file the petition for the dependent child asserting the sibling relationship if the court determines that the appointment is necessary for the best interests of the dependent child. The petition shall be verified and shall set forth the following:
(1) Through which parent he or she is related to the dependent child.
(2) Whether he or she is related to the dependent child by blood, adoption, or affinity.
(3) The request or order that the petitioner is seeking.
(4) Why that request or order is in the best interest of the dependent child.
(c) (1) Any party, including a child who is a dependent of the juvenile court, may petition the court, prior to the hearing set pursuant to subdivision (f) of Section 366.21 for a child described by subparagraph (A) of paragraph (1) of subdivision (a) of Section 361.5, or prior to the hearing set pursuant to subdivision (e) of Section 366.21 for a child described by subparagraph (B) or (C) of paragraph (1) of subdivision (a) of Section 361.5, to terminate court-ordered reunification services provided under subdivision (a) of Section 361.5 only if one of the following conditions exists:
(A) It appears that a change of circumstance or new evidence exists that satisfies a condition set forth in subdivision (b) or (e) of Section 361.5 justifying termination of court-ordered reunification services.
(B) The action or inaction of the parent or guardian creates a substantial likelihood that reunification will not occur, including, but not limited to, the parent or guardian’s failure to visit the child, or the failure of the parent or guardian to participate regularly and make substantive progress in a court-ordered treatment plan.
(2) In determining whether the parent or guardian has failed to visit the child or participate regularly or make progress in the treatment plan, the court shall consider factors including, but not limited to, the parent or guardian’s incarceration, institutionalization, or participation in a court-ordered residential substance abuse treatment program.
(3) The court shall terminate reunification services during the above-described time periods only upon a finding by a preponderance of evidence that reasonable services have been offered or provided, and upon a finding of clear and convincing evidence that one of the conditions in subparagraph (A) or (B) of paragraph (1) exists.
(4) If the court terminates reunification services, it shall order that a hearing pursuant to Section 366.26 be held within 120 days.
(d) If it appears that the best interests of the child may be promoted by the proposed change of order, recognition of a sibling relationship, termination of jurisdiction, or clear and convincing evidence supports revocation or termination of court-ordered reunification services, the court shall order that a hearing be held and shall give prior notice, or cause prior notice to be given, to the persons and by the means prescribed by Section 386, and, in those instances in which the means of giving notice is not prescribed by those sections, then by means the court prescribes.
(e) (1) On and after January 1, 2012, a nonminor who has not attained 19 years of age, or, commencing January 1, 2013, 20 years of age, or, commencing January 1, 2014, 21 years of age, for whom the court has dismissed dependency jurisdiction pursuant to Section 391, or delinquency jurisdiction pursuant to subdivision (e) of Section 785, but has retained general jurisdiction under Section 303, and has ordered a period of trial independence may petition the court in the same action in which the child was found to be a dependent or delinquent child of the juvenile court for a hearing to resume the dependency or delinquency jurisdiction of the court. The petition shall be filed within the trial period of independence.
(2) The petition to resume dependency or delinquency jurisdiction may be filed in the juvenile court that retains jurisdiction under subdivision (b) of Section 303 or the juvenile court in the county where the youth resides. The juvenile court having jurisdiction under Section 303 shall receive the petition from the court in which the petition is filed within five court days of the filing if the petition is filed in the county of residence. Upon filing of the petition, the court shall order that a hearing be held, if there is a prima facie showing that the nonminor satisfies at least one of the conditions in subdivision (b) of Section 11403. Upon ordering a hearing, the court shall give prior notice, or cause prior notice to be given, to the persons and by the means prescribed by Section 386, except that notice to parents or former guardians shall not be provided if the nonminor objects, in writing, on the face of the petition.
(3) The Judicial Council, by January 1, 2012, shall adopt rules of court to allow for telephonic appearances by nonminor former dependents or delinquents in these proceedings.
(4) Prior to the hearing on a petition to resume dependency jurisdiction, the court shall order the county child welfare or probation department or Indian tribe that has entered into an agreement pursuant to Section 10553.1 to prepare a report for the court addressing whether the nonminor is able to meet at least one of the criteria set forth in subdivision (b) of Section 11403. When the recommendation is for the nonminor dependent to be placed in a setting where minor dependents also reside, the results of a background check of the petitioning nonminor conducted pursuant to Section 16504.5, used by the placing agency to determine appropriate placement options for the nonminor. The existence of a criminal conviction is not a bar to eligibility for reentry or resumption of dependency jurisdiction of a nonminor.
(5) The court, if it finds that the nonminor is able to meet at least one of the criteria set forth in subdivision (b) of Section 11403, shall resume dependency or delinquency jurisdiction and order the county child welfare or probation department or tribe to develop a new transitional independent living case plan with the youth, which shall be presented to the court within 60 days of the resumption of the dependency or delinquency jurisdiction.
(f) A parent or other person having an interest in a child who was removed from his or her parents or guardian and placed in foster care under jurisdiction established pursuant to Section 601 or 602, which is to be terminated, may file a supplemental petition with the court, consistent with subdivision (d) of Section 241.1, to modify the court’s jurisdiction in order to establish jurisdiction pursuant to Section 300, if the child appears to come within the description of Section 300 and cannot be returned home safely.

SEC. 27.

 Section 391 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

391.
 (a) At any hearing to terminate jurisdiction over a dependent child who has reached the age of majority, the county welfare department shall do all of the following:
(1) Ensure that the child is present in court, unless the child does not wish to appear in court, or document efforts by the county welfare department to locate the child when the child is not available.
(2) Submit a report verifying that the following information, documents, and services have been provided to the child:
(A) Written information concerning the child’s dependency case, including any known information regarding the child’s Indian heritage or tribal connections, if applicable, his or her family history and placement history, any photographs of the child or his or her family in the possession of the county welfare department, other than forensic photographs, the whereabouts of any siblings under the jurisdiction of the juvenile court, unless the court determines that sibling contact would jeopardize the safety or welfare of the sibling, directions on how to access the documents the child is entitled to inspect under Section 827, and the date on which the jurisdiction of the juvenile court would be terminated.
(B) The following documents:
(i) Social security card.
(ii) Certified birth certificate.
(iii) Health and education summary, as described in subdivision (a) of Section 16010.
(iv) Driver’s license, as described in Section 12500 of the Vehicle Code, or identification card, as described in Section 13000 of the Vehicle Code.
(v) A letter prepared by the county welfare department that includes the following information:
(I) The child’s name and date of birth.
(II) The dates during which the child was within the jurisdiction of the juvenile court.
(III) A statement that the child was a foster youth in compliance with state and federal financial aid documentation requirements.
(vi) If applicable, the death certificate of the parent or parents.
(vii) If applicable, proof of the child’s citizenship or legal residence.
(C) Assistance in completing an application for Medi-Cal or assistance in obtaining other health insurance; referral to transitional housing, if available, or assistance in securing other housing; and assistance in obtaining employment or other financial support.
(D) Assistance in applying for admission to college or to a vocational training program or other educational institution and in obtaining financial aid, where appropriate.
(E) Assistance in maintaining relationships with individuals who are important to a child who has been in out-of-home placement for six months or longer from the date the child entered foster care, based on the child’s best interests.
(3) The court may continue jurisdiction if it finds that the county welfare department has not met the requirements of paragraph (2) of subdivision (a) and that termination of jurisdiction would be harmful to the best interests of the child. If the court determines that continued jurisdiction is warranted pursuant to this section, the continuation shall only be ordered for that period of time necessary for the county welfare department to meet the requirements of paragraph (2) of subdivision (a). This section shall not be construed to limit the discretion of the juvenile court to continue jurisdiction for other reasons. The court may terminate jurisdiction if the county welfare department has offered the required services, and the child either has refused the services or, after reasonable efforts by the county welfare department, cannot be located.
(b) The Judicial Council shall develop and implement standards, and develop and adopt appropriate forms, necessary to implement this section.
(c) This section shall remain in effect only until January 1, 2012, and as of that date is repealed, unless a later enacted statute, that is enacted before January 1, 2012, deletes or extends that date.

SEC. 28.

 Section 391 is added to the Welfare and Institutions Code, to read:

391.
 (a) The court shall not terminate jurisdiction over a dependent youth who has reached 18 years of age unless a hearing is conducted pursuant to this section.
(b) At any hearing for a dependent youth who has attained 18 years of age at which the court is considering termination of the jurisdiction of the juvenile court and the accompanying foster care services as described in Section 11403, the county welfare department shall do all of the following:
(1) Ensure that the dependent is present in court, unless the dependent does not wish to appear in court, or document efforts by the county welfare department to locate the child when the child is not available.
(2) Submit a report describing whether it is in the youth’s best interests to remain under the court’s dependency jurisdiction, which includes a recommended transitional independent living case plan for any youth who is continuing dependency as a nonminor.
(3) If the dependent has indicated that he or she does not want dependency jurisdiction to continue, the report shall address the advisability of a court-ordered trial discharge from foster care.
(c) The court shall continue dependency jurisdiction for a nonminor dependent, as defined in subdivision (v) of Section 11400, who is eligible pursuant to Section 11403 unless the court finds that after reasonable and documented efforts the nonminor cannot be located or does not wish to remain subject to dependency jurisdiction. In making this finding, the court shall ensure that the nonminor has been informed of his or her options including the right to file a petition pursuant to Section 388 to resume dependency jurisdiction, and had an opportunity to confer with his or her counsel if counsel has been appointed pursuant to Section 317. The court shall terminate dependency jurisdiction for a nonminor dependent if it finds that the nonminor dependent is not eligible pursuant to subdivision (b) of Section 11403.
(d) If the court terminates dependency jurisdiction, the nonminor shall remain within the jurisdiction of the court until the nonminor attains 21 years of age, although no review proceedings shall be required. As authorized in paragraph (e) of Section 1356.21 of Title 45 of the Code of Federal Regulations, the court shall authorize a trial period of departure from foster care as defined in subdivision (y) of Section 11400. In order to ensure eligibility for federal financial participation, the court shall set the end date of the trial period of departure from foster care to be the day prior to the day the nonminor attains 21 years of age, unless to do so is not in the nonminor’s best interests. A nonminor may petition the court pursuant to subdivision (e) of Section 388 to resume dependency jurisdiction at any time before attaining 21 years of age.
(e) Unless the nonminor does not wish to remain under the dependency or delinquency jurisdiction of the court, or, after reasonable efforts by the county welfare department the nonminor cannot be located, the court shall not terminate dependency or delinquency jurisdiction over a nonminor dependent who has reached 18 years of age until a hearing is conducted pursuant to this section and the department has submitted a report verifying that the following information, documents, and services have been provided to the child:
(1) Written information concerning the child’s dependency case, including any known information regarding the child’s Indian heritage or tribal connections, if applicable, his or her family history and placement history, any photographs of the child or his or her family in the possession of the county welfare department, other than forensic photographs, the whereabouts of any siblings under the jurisdiction of the juvenile court, unless the court determines that sibling contact would jeopardize the safety or welfare of the sibling, directions on how to access the documents the child is entitled to inspect under Section 827, and the date on which the jurisdiction of the juvenile court would be terminated.
(2) The following documents:
(A) Social security card.
(B) Certified copy of his or her birth certificate.
(C) Health and education summary, as described in subdivision (a) of Section 16010.
(D) Driver’s license, as described in Section 12500 of the Vehicle Code, or identification card, as described in Section 13000 of the Vehicle Code.
(E) A letter prepared by the county welfare department that includes the following information:
(i) The child’s name and date of birth.
(ii) The dates during which the child was within the jurisdiction of the juvenile court.
(iii) A statement that the child was a foster youth in compliance with state and federal financial aid documentation requirements.
(F) If applicable, the death certificate of the parent or parents.
(G) If applicable, proof of the child’s citizenship or legal residence.
(3) Assistance in completing an application for Medi-Cal or assistance in obtaining other health insurance.
(4) Referrals to transitional housing, if available, or assistance in securing other housing.
(5) Assistance in obtaining employment or other financial support.
(6) Assistance in applying for admission to college or to a vocational training program or other educational institution and in obtaining financial aid, where appropriate.
(7) Assistance in maintaining relationships with individuals who are important to a child who has been in out-of-home placement for six months or longer from the date the child entered foster care, based on the child’s best interests.
(8) For nonminors between 18 and 21 years of age, assistance in accessing the Independent Living Aftercare Program in the nonminor’s county of residence.
(f) At the hearing closest to and before a dependent child’s 18th birthday and every review hearing thereafter, the department shall submit a report describing efforts toward completing the items described in paragraph (2) of subdivision (e).
(g) The Judicial Council shall develop and implement standards, and develop and adopt appropriate forms necessary to implement this provision.
(h) This section shall become operative on January 1, 2012.

SEC. 29.

 Section 727.2 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

727.2.
 The purpose of this section is to provide a means to monitor the safety and well-being of every minor in foster care who has been declared a ward of the juvenile court pursuant to Section 601 or 602 and to ensure that everything reasonably possible is done to facilitate the safe and early return of the minor to his or her home or to establish an alternative permanent plan for the minor.
(a) If the court orders the care, custody, and control of the minor to be under the supervision of the probation officer for placement pursuant to subdivision (a) of Section 727, the juvenile court shall order the probation department to ensure the provision of reunification services to facilitate the safe return of the minor to his or her home or the permanent placement of the minor, and to address the needs of the minor while in foster care, except as provided in subdivision (b).
(b) Reunification services need not be provided to a parent or legal guardian if the court finds by clear and convincing evidence that one or more of the following is true:
(1) Reunification services were previously terminated for that parent or guardian, pursuant to Section 366.21 or 366.22, or not offered, pursuant to subdivision (b) of Section 361.5, in reference to the same minor.
(2) The parent has been convicted of any of the following:
(A) Murder of another child of the parent.
(B) Voluntary manslaughter of another child of the parent.
(C) Aiding or abetting, attempting, conspiring, or soliciting to commit that murder or manslaughter described in subparagraph (A) or (B).
(D) A felony assault that results in serious bodily injury to the minor or another child of the parent.
(3) The parental rights of the parent with respect to a sibling have been terminated involuntarily, and it is not in the best interest of the minor to reunify with his or her parent or legal guardian.
If no reunification services are offered to the parent or guardian, the permanency planning hearing, as described in Section 727.3, shall occur within 30 days of the date of the hearing at which the decision is made not to offer services.
(c) The status of every minor declared a ward and ordered to be placed in foster care shall be reviewed by the court no less frequently than once every six months. The six-month time periods shall be calculated from the date the minor entered foster care, as defined in paragraph (4) of subdivision (d) of Section 727.4. If the court so elects, the court may declare the hearing at which the court orders the care, custody, and control of the minor to be under the supervision of the probation officer for foster care placement pursuant to subdivision (a) of Section 727 at the first status review hearing. It shall be the duty of the probation officer to prepare a written social study report including an updated case plan, pursuant to subdivision (b) of Section 706.5, and submit the report to the court prior to each status review hearing, pursuant to subdivision (b) of Section 727.4. The social study report shall include all reports the probation officer relied upon in making his or her recommendations.
(d) Prior to any status review hearing involving a minor in the physical custody of a community care facility or foster family agency, the facility or agency may provide the probation officer with a report containing its recommendations. Prior to any status review hearing involving the physical custody of a foster parent, relative caregiver, preadoptive parent, or legal guardian, that person may present to the court a report containing his or her recommendations. The court shall consider all reports and recommendations filed pursuant to subdivision (c) and pursuant to this subdivision.
(e) At any status review hearing prior to the first permanency planning hearing, the court shall consider the safety of the minor and make findings and orders which determine the following:
(1) The continuing necessity for and appropriateness of the placement.
(2) The extent of the probation department’s compliance with the case plan in making reasonable efforts to safely return the minor to the minor’s home or to complete whatever steps are necessary to finalize the permanent placement of the minor.
(3) Whether there should be any limitation on the right of the parent or guardian to make educational decisions for the minor. That limitation shall be specifically addressed in the court order and may not exceed what is necessary to protect the minor. If the court specifically limits the right of the parent or guardian to make educational decisions for the minor, the court shall at the same time appoint a responsible adult to make educational decisions for the minor pursuant to Section 726.
(4) The extent of progress that has been made by the minor and parent or guardian toward alleviating or mitigating the causes necessitating placement in foster care.
(5) The likely date by which the minor may be returned to and safely maintained in the home or placed for adoption, appointed a legal guardian, permanently placed with a fit and willing relative or referred to another planned permanent living arrangement.
(6) In the case of a minor who has reached 16 years of age, the court shall, in addition, determine the services needed to assist the minor to make the transition from foster care to independent living.
The court shall make these determinations on a case-by-case basis and reference in its written findings the probation officer’s report and any other evidence relied upon in reaching its decision.
(f) At any status review hearing prior to the first permanency hearing, the court shall order return of the minor to the physical custody of his or her parent or legal guardian unless the court finds, by a preponderance of evidence, that the return of the minor to his or her parent or legal guardian would create a substantial risk of detriment to the safety, protection, or physical or emotional well-being of the minor. The probation department shall have the burden of establishing that detriment. In making its determination, the court shall review and consider the social study report, recommendations, and the case plan pursuant to subdivision (b) of Section 706.5, the report and recommendations of any child advocate appointed for the minor in the case, and any other reports submitted to the court pursuant to subdivision (d), and shall consider the efforts or progress, or both, demonstrated by the minor and family and the extent to which the minor availed himself or herself of the services provided.
(g) At all status review hearings subsequent to the first permanency planning hearing, the court shall consider the safety of the minor and make the findings and orders as described in paragraphs (1) to (4), inclusive, and (6) of subdivision (e). The court shall either make a finding that the previously ordered permanent plan continues to be appropriate or shall order that a new permanent plan be adopted pursuant to subdivision (b) of Section 727.3. However, the court shall not order a permanent plan of “return to the physical custody of the parent or legal guardian after further reunification services are offered,” as described in paragraph (2) of subdivision (b) of Section 727.3.
(h) The status review hearings required by subdivision (c) may be heard by an administrative review panel, provided that the administrative panel meets all of the requirements listed in subparagraph (B) of paragraph (7) of subdivision (d) of Section 727.4.
(i) On and after January 1, 2012, at any status review hearing at which a recommendation to terminate delinquency jurisdiction is being considered, or at the status review hearing held closest to the ward attaining 18 years of age, but no fewer than 60 days before the ward’s 18th birthday, the court shall consider whether to modify its jurisdiction pursuant to Section 601 or 602 and assume jurisdiction over the child as a dependent pursuant to Section 300. The probation department shall address this issue in its report to the court and make a recommendation as to whether dependency jurisdiction is appropriate for the child. If the court finds that the ward no longer requires delinquency supervision, but is at risk of abuse or neglect and cannot be returned home safely, the court shall set a hearing pursuant to Section 241.1 to determine whether a modification of its jurisdiction, as described in subdivision (d) of Section 241.1, is appropriate.
(j) On and after January 1, 2012, if a review hearing pursuant to this section is the last review hearing to be held before the minor attains 18 years of age, the court shall ensure that the minor’s transitional independent living case plan includes a plan for the minor to meet one or more of the criteria in Section 11403, so that the minor can become a nonminor dependent, and that the minor has been informed of his or her right to decline to become a nonminor dependent and to seek termination of the court’s jurisdiction pursuant to Section 785.

SEC. 29.5.

 Section 785 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

785.
 (a) Where a minor is a ward of the juvenile court, the wardship did not result in the minor’s commitment to the Youth Authority, and the minor is found not to be a fit and proper subject to be dealt with under the juvenile court law with respect to a subsequent allegation of criminal conduct, any parent or other person having an interest in the minor, or the minor, through a properly appointed guardian, the prosecuting attorney, or probation officer, may petition the court in the same action in which the minor was found to be a ward of the juvenile court for a hearing for an order to terminate or modify the jurisdiction of the juvenile court. The court shall order that a hearing be held and shall give prior notice, or cause prior notice to be given, to those persons and by the means prescribed by Sections 776 and 779, or where the means of giving notice is not prescribed by those sections, then by such means as the court prescribes.
(b) The petition shall be verified and shall state why jurisdiction should be terminated or modified in concise language.
(c) In determining whether or not the wardship shall terminate or be modified, the court shall be guided by the policies set forth in Section 202.
(d) On and after January 1, 2012, at any hearing pursuant to this section involving a minor who was removed from the physical custody of his or her parent or guardian and placed in foster care at the time the court adjudged the child a delinquent ward, or who was removed from his or her parents or guardian and placed in foster care as a dependent child immediately prior to the court adjudging the child a delinquent ward, the court shall consider, as an alternative to terminating jurisdiction, whether to modify its jurisdiction and declare the minor to be a dependent child, pursuant to Section 300. If the court finds that the ward no longer requires delinquency supervision, but is at risk of abuse or neglect and cannot be returned home safely, the court shall set a hearing pursuant to Section 241.1 to determine whether a modification of its jurisdiction as described in subdivision (d) of Section 241.1 is appropriate.
(e) On and after January 1, 2012, the court shall continue delinquency jurisdiction for a nonminor dependent, as defined in subdivision (v) of Section 11400, who is eligible to remain in foster care pursuant to Section 11403, unless the court finds that after reasonable and documented efforts, the nonminor cannot be located or does not wish to remain a nonminor dependent. In making this finding, the court shall ensure that the nonminor has been informed of his or her options, including the right to file a petition pursuant to Section 388 to resume delinquency jurisdiction, and has had an opportunity to confer with his or her counsel. As authorized in paragraph (e) of Section 1356.21 of Title 45 of the Code of Federal Regulations, the court shall authorize a trial period of departure from foster care as defined in subdivision (y) of Section 11400. In order to ensure eligibility for federal financial participation, the court shall set the end date of the trial period of departure from foster care to be the day before the nonminor attains 21 years of age unless it is not in the nonminor’s best interests.
(f) In addition to its authority under this chapter, the Judicial Council shall adopt rules providing criteria for the consideration of the juvenile court in determining whether or not to terminate or modify jurisdiction pursuant to this section.

SEC. 29.6.

 Section 10101.2 is added to the Welfare and Institutions Code, to read:

10101.2.
 The state’s share of the costs for the support and care of former dependent children who have been made wards of related guardians under Article 4.5 (commencing with Section 11360), or Article 4.7 (commencing with Section 11385), of Chapter 2 of Part 3, shall be 79 percent of the nonfederal share of the amounts as specified in Sections 11364 and 11387.

SEC. 30.

 Section 10609.4 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

10609.4.
 (a) On or before July 1, 2000, the State Department of Social Services, in consultation with county and state representatives, foster youth, and advocates, shall do both of the following:
(1) Develop statewide standards for the implementation and administration of the Independent Living Program established pursuant to the federal Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1985 (Public Law 99-272).
(2) Define the outcomes for the Independent Living Program and the characteristics of foster youth enrolled in the program for data collection purposes.
(b) Each county department of social services shall include in its annual Independent Living Program report both of the following:
(1) An accounting of federal and state funds allocated for implementation of the program. Expenditures shall be related to the specific purposes of the program. Program purposes may include, but are not limited to, all of the following:
(A) Enabling participants to seek a high school diploma or its equivalent or to take part in appropriate vocational training, and providing job readiness training and placement services, or building work experience and marketable skills, or both.
(B) Providing training in daily living skills, budgeting, locating and maintaining housing, and career planning.
(C) Providing for individual and group counseling.
(D) Integrating and coordinating services otherwise available to participants.
(E) Providing each participant with a written transitional independent living plan that will be based on an assessment of his or her needs, that includes information provided by persons who have been identified by the participant as important to the participant in cases in which the participant has been in out-of-home placement for six months or longer from the date the participant entered foster care, consistent with the participant’s best interests, and that will be incorporated into his or her case plan.
(F) Providing participants who are within 90 days of attaining 18 years of age, or older as the state may elect under Section 475(8)(B)(iii) of the federal Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. Sec. 675(8)(B)(iii)), including those former foster care youth receiving Independent Living Program Aftercare Services, the opportunity to complete the exit transition plan as required by paragraph (16) of subdivision (f) of Section 16501.1.
(G) Providing participants with other services and assistance designed to improve independent living.
(H) Convening persons who have been identified by the participant as important to him or her for the purpose of providing information to be included in his or her written transitional independent living plan.
(2) A detail of the characteristics of foster youth enrolled in their independent living programs and the outcomes achieved based on the information developed by the department pursuant to subdivision (a).
(c) The county department of social services in a county that provides transitional housing placement services pursuant to paragraph (2) of subdivision (a) of Section 11403.2 shall include in its annual Independent Living Program report a description of currently available transitional housing resources in relation to the number of emancipating pregnant or parenting foster youth in the county, and a plan for meeting any unmet transitional housing needs of the emancipating pregnant or parenting foster youth.
(d) In consultation with the department, a county may use different methods and strategies to achieve the standards and outcomes of the Independent Living Program developed pursuant to subdivision (a).
(e) In consultation with the County Welfare Directors Association, the California Youth Connection, and other stakeholders, the department shall develop and adopt emergency regulations, no later than July 1, 2012, in accordance with Section 11346.1 of the Government Code that counties shall be required to meet when administering the Independent Living Program and that are achievable within existing program resources and any federal funds available for case management and case plan review functions for nonminor dependents, as provided for in the federal Fostering Connections to Success and Increasing Adoptions Act of 2008 (Public Law 110-351). The initial adoption of emergency regulations and one readoption of the initial regulations shall be deemed to be an emergency and necessary for the immediate preservation of the public peace, health and safety, or general welfare. Initial emergency regulations and the first readoption of those regulations shall be exempt from review by the Office of Administrative Law. The initial emergency regulations and the first readoption of those regulations authorized by this subdivision shall be submitted to the Office of Administrative Law for filing with the Secretary of State and each shall remain in effect for no more than 180 days.
(f) The department, in consultation with representatives of the Legislature, the County Welfare Directors Association, the Chief Probation Officers of California, the Judicial Council, representatives of tribes, the California Youth Connection, former foster youth, child advocacy organizations, labor organizations, dependency counsel for children, juvenile justice advocacy organizations, foster caregiver organizations, and researchers, shall review and develop modifications needed to the Independent Living Program to also serve the needs of nonminor dependents, as defined in subdivision (v) of Section 11400, eligible for services pursuant to Section 11403. These modifications shall include the exit transition plan required to be completed within the 90-day period immediately prior to the date the nonminor participant attains the age that would qualify the participant for federal financial participation, as described in Section 11403, pursuant to Section 675(5)(H) of Title 42 of the United States Code. Notwithstanding the Administrative Procedure Act, Chapter 3.5 (commencing with Section 11340) of Part 1 of Division 3 of Title 2 of the Government Code, through June 30, 2012, the department shall prepare for implementation of the applicable provisions of this section by publishing all-county letters or similar instructions from the director by October 1, 2011, to be effective January 1, 2012.

SEC. 31.

 Section 11008.15 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

11008.15.
 Notwithstanding Sections 11008.14 and 11267, the department shall exercise the options of disregarding earned income of a dependent child or ward of the juvenile court derived from participation in the Job Training Partnership Act of 1982 (Public Law 97-300), a dependent child or ward of the juvenile court who is a full-time student pursuant to the Deficit Reduction Act of 1984 (Public Law 97-369), a dependent child or ward of the juvenile court 16 years of age or older who is a participant in the Independent Living Program pursuant to the Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1985 (Public Law 99-272), and, on and after January 1, 2012, a nonminor dependent, as defined in subdivision (v) of Section 11400 who is participating in a transitional independent living case plan pursuant to the federal Fostering Connections to Success and Increasing Adoptions Act of 2008 (Public Law 110-351), provided that the child’s Independent Living Program case plan states that the purpose of the employment is to enable the child to gain knowledge of needed work skills, work habits, and the responsibilities of maintaining employment.

SEC. 32.

 Section 11155.5 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

11155.5.
 (a) In addition to the personal property permitted by other provisions of this part, a child declared a ward or dependent child of the juvenile court, who is 16 years of age or older, or, on and after January 1, 2012 a nonminor dependent, as defined in subdivision (v) of Section 11400, who is participating in a transitional independent living case plan pursuant to the federal Fostering Connections to Success and Increasing Adoptions Act of 2008 (Public Law 110-351), may retain resources with a combined value of not more than ten thousand dollars ($10,000), consistent with Section 472(a) of the federal Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. Sec. 672(a)) as contained in the federal Foster Care Independence Act of 1999 (Public Law 106-169) and the child’s transitional independent living plan. Any cash savings shall be the child’s own money and shall be deposited by the child or on behalf of the child in any bank or savings and loan institution whose deposits are insured by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or the Federal Savings and Loan Insurance Corporation. The cash savings shall be for the child’s use for purposes directly related to the child’s or nonminor dependents’ transitional independent living case plan goals.
(b) The withdrawal of the savings by a child shall require the written approval of the child’s probation officer or social worker and shall be directly related to the goal of emancipation. This written approval is not required for withdrawals by a nonminor dependent.

SEC. 32.5.

 Section 11217 is added to the Welfare and Institutions Code, to read:

11217.
 (a) The Director of Social Services shall execute a declaration stating that increased federal financial participation in the Emergency Contingency Fund for State Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) Programs is no longer available pursuant to the federal American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) (Public Law 111-5) or subsequent federal legislation, including an amendment to the ARRA, that maintains or extends increased federal financial participation.
(b) The director shall provide a copy of the declaration to the appropriate policy and fiscal committees of the Legislature.

SEC. 33.

 Section 11253 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

11253.
 (a) Except as provided in subdivision (b), aid shall not be granted under this chapter to or on behalf of any child who has attained 18 years of age unless all of the following apply:
(1)  The child is less than 19 years of age and is attending high school or the equivalent level of vocational or technical training on a full-time basis.
(2) The child can reasonably be expected to complete the educational or training program before his or her 19th birthday.
(b) On and after January 1, 2012, aid shall be granted under this chapter to or on behalf of any nonminor dependent, as defined in subdivision (v) of Section 11400, if the nonminor dependent is placed in the approved home of a relative under the supervision of the county child welfare or probation department or Indian tribe that has entered into an agreement pursuant to Section 10553.1, and the nonminor dependent otherwise is eligible pursuant to Section 11403.

SEC. 33.5.

 Section 11253.3 is added to the Welfare and Institutions Code, to read:

(a) On and after the effective dates of the age extensions provided in subdivision (k) of Section 11403, a nonminor dependent, as defined in subdivision (v) of Section 11400, who was receiving CalWORKs aid and was placed in the approved home of a relative under the supervision of the county child welfare or probation department or Indian tribe that has entered into an agreement pursuant to Section 10553.1, and who has become eligible for continued receipt of CalWORKs pursuant to Section 11403, shall not be subject to this chapter, except as specified in subdivision (b).

11253.3.
 (b) The nonminor dependent shall continue to receive the same grant amount as a CalWORKs grant recipient in an assistance unit of one, pursuant to the amount set forth in Section 11450. Any changes to the CalWORKs grant amount shall also apply to the nonminor dependent’s grant.

SEC. 34.

 Article 4.5 (commencing with Section 11360) is added to Chapter 2 of Part 3 of Division 9 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, to read:
Article  4.5. Kinship Guardianship Assistance Payment Program

11360.
 Effective on the date that the director executes a declaration pursuant to Section 11217, the department shall establish a state-funded Kinship Guardianship Assistance Payment Program as specified in this article.

11361.
 The Legislature finds and declares that the continuation of the state-funded Kinship Guardianship Assistance Payment Program is intended to enhance family preservation and stability by recognizing that some dependent children and wards of the juvenile court who are not otherwise eligible under Subtitle IV-E (commencing with Section 470) of the federal Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. Sec. 670 et seq.) are in long-term, stable placements with relatives funded under the CalWORKs program pursuant to Section 11450, that these placements are the permanent plan for the child, that dependencies can be dismissed pursuant to Section 366.3 with legal guardianship granted to the relative, and that there is no need for continued governmental intervention in the family life through ongoing, scheduled court and social services supervision of the placement. Continuation of the state-funded Kin-GAP Program is necessary to ensure that wards and dependent children of the juvenile court whose placement in the home of an approved relative is funded under the CalWORKs program are equally eligible for the benefits derived from legal permanency with the related guardian and that the state can maximize improvements to federal permanency outcome measures by exiting nonfederally eligible youth to the state’s subsidized kinship guardianship program.

11362.
 For purposes of this article, the following definitions shall apply:
(a) “Kinship Guardianship Assistance Payments (Kin-GAP)” means the state-funded aid provided under the terms of this article on behalf of children in kinship care who are not eligible for federally funded Kin-GAP pursuant to Section 11385.
(b) “Kinship guardian” means a person who (1) has been appointed the legal guardian of a dependent child pursuant to Section 360 or 366.26, or a ward of the juvenile court pursuant to subdivision (d) of Section 728 and (2) is a relative of the child.
(c) “Relative” means an adult who is related to the child by blood, adoption, or affinity within the fifth degree of kinship, including stepparents, stepsiblings, and all relatives whose status is preceded by the words “great,” “great-great,” or “grand” or the spouse of any of those persons even if the marriage was terminated by death or dissolution.

11363.
 (a) Aid in the form of state-funded Kin-GAP shall be provided under this article on behalf of any child under 18 years of age and to any eligible youth under 19 years of age as provided in Section 11403, who meets all of the following conditions:
(1) Has been adjudged a dependent child of the juvenile court pursuant to Section 300, or, effective October 1, 2006, a ward of the juvenile court pursuant to Section 601 or 602.
(2) Has been residing for at least six consecutive months in the approved home of the prospective relative guardian while under the jurisdiction of the juvenile court or a voluntary placement agreement.
(3) Has had a kinship guardianship established pursuant to Section 360 or 366.26.
(4) Has had his or her dependency jurisdiction terminated after January 1, 2000, pursuant to Section 366.3, or his or her wardship terminated pursuant to subdivision (e) of Section 728, concurrently or subsequently to the establishment of the kinship guardianship.
(b) If the conditions specified in subdivision (a) are met and, subsequent to the termination of dependency jurisdiction, any parent or person having an interest files with the juvenile court a petition pursuant to Section 388 to change, modify, or set aside an order of the court, Kin-GAP payments shall continue unless and until the juvenile court, after holding a hearing, orders the child removed from the home of the guardian, terminates the guardianship, or maintains dependency jurisdiction after the court concludes the hearing on the petition filed under Section 388.
(c) A child or nonminor shall be eligible for Kin-GAP payments if he or she meets one of the following age criteria:
(1) He or she is under 18 years of age.
(2) He or she is under 21 years of age and has a physical or mental disability that warrants the continuation of assistance.
(3) Through December 31, 2011, he or she meets the conditions of Section 11403.
(4) He or she meets the conditions as described in subdivision (d).
(d) Commencing January 1, 2012, state-funded Kin-GAP payments shall continue for youths who have attained 18 years of age and are under 19 years of age if they attained 16 years of age before the Kin-GAP aid payments commenced. Effective January 1, 2013, Kin-GAP payments shall continue for youths who have attained 18 years of age and who are under 20 years of age, if they reached 16 years of age before the Kin-GAP negotiated payments commenced. Effective January 1, 2014, Kin-GAP payments shall continue for youths who have attained 18 years of age and are under 21 years of age, if they reached 16 years of age before the Kin-GAP negotiated payments commenced. To be eligible for continued payments, the youth shall meet one or more of the conditions specified in subdivision (b) of Section 11403. Payments made to a nonminor pursuant to the conditions specified in subdivision (b) of Section 11403 may be paid in whole or part to the eligible youth directly, as specified in subdivision (d) of Section 11403.
(e) Termination of the guardianship with a kinship guardian shall terminate eligibility for Kin-GAP unless the conditions in Section 11403 apply; provided, however, that if an alternate guardian or coguardian is appointed pursuant to Section 366.3 who is also a kinship guardian, the alternate or coguardian shall be entitled to receive Kin-GAP on behalf of the child pursuant to this article. A new period of six months of placement with the alternate guardian or coguardian shall not be required if that alternate guardian or coguardian has been assessed pursuant to Sections 361.3 and 361.4 and the court terminates dependency jurisdiction.

11364.
 (a) In order to receive payments under this article, the county child welfare agency, probation department, or Indian tribe that has entered into an agreement pursuant to Section 10553.1, shall negotiate and enter into a written, binding, kinship guardianship assistance agreement with the relative guardian of an eligible child, and provide the relative guardian with a copy of the agreement.
(b) The agreement shall specify, at a minimum, all of the following:
(1) The amount of and manner in which the kinship guardianship assistance payment will be provided under the agreement, and the manner in which the agreement may be adjusted periodically, but no less frequently than every two years, in consultation with the relative guardian, based on the circumstances of the relative guardian and the needs of the child.
(2) Additional services and assistance for which the child and relative guardian will be eligible under the agreement.
(3) A procedure by which the relative guardian may apply for additional services, as needed, including the filing of a petition under Section 388 to have dependency jurisdiction resumed pursuant to subdivision (b) of Section 366.3.
(4) That the agreement shall remain in effect regardless of the state of residency of the relative guardian.
(c) In accordance with the Kin-GAP agreement, the relative guardian shall be paid an amount of aid based on the child’s needs otherwise covered in AFDC-FC payments and the circumstances of the relative guardian, but that shall not exceed the foster care maintenance payment that would have been paid based on the age-related state-approved foster family home care rate and any applicable specialized care increment for a child placed in a licensed or approved family home pursuant to subdivisions (a) to (d), inclusive, of Section 11461. In addition, the rate paid for a child eligible for a Kin-GAP payment shall include an amount equal to the clothing allowance, as set forth in subdivision (f) of Section 11461, including any applicable rate adjustments. For a child eligible for a Kin-GAP payment who is a teen parent, the rate shall include the two hundred dollar ($200) monthly payment made to the relative caregiver in a whole family foster home pursuant to paragraph (3) of subdivision (d) of Section 11465.
(d) The county child welfare agency, probation department, or Indian tribe that entered into an agreement pursuant to Section 10553.1 shall provide the relative guardian with information, in writing, on the availability of the Kin-GAP program with an explanation of the difference between these benefits and Adoption Assistance Program benefits and AFDC-FC benefits. The agency shall also provide the relative guardian with information on the availability of mental health services through the Medi-Cal program or other programs.
(e) The Kin-GAP agreement shall also specify the responsibility of the relative guardian for reporting changes in the needs of the child or the circumstances of the relative guardian that affect payment.
(f) The county child welfare agency, probation department, or Indian tribe, as appropriate, shall assess the needs of the child and the circumstances of the related guardian and is responsible for determining that the child meets the eligibility criteria for payment.
(g) Payments on behalf of a child who is a recipient of Kin-GAP benefits and who is also a consumer of regional center services shall be based on the rates established by the State Department of Social Services pursuant to Section 11464.

11365.
 State-funded Kin-GAP benefits shall be paid to the kinship guardian on a per child basis. If the conditions in Section 11403 apply, the payment in whole or in part may be paid to the eligible nonminor directly, as specified in subdivision (d) of Section 11403.

11366.
 A child who is eligible to receive Medi-Cal benefits with no share of cost shall maintain that eligibility notwithstanding the receipt of state-funded Kin-GAP by his or her kinship guardian.

11367.
 The supplemental clothing allowance shall be paid pursuant to paragraph (5) of subdivision (f) of Section 11461.

11369.
 (a) Notwithstanding the Administrative Procedure Act, Chapter 3.5 (commencing with Section 11340) of Part 1 of Division 3 of Title 2 of the Government Code, the department may implement the applicable provisions of the state-funded Kin-GAP Program through all-county letters or similar instructions from the director.
(b) The director shall adopt regulations as otherwise necessary, to implement the applicable provisions of the Kin-GAP Program. Emergency regulations to implement the applicable provisions of this act may be adopted by the director in accordance with the Administrative Procedure Act. The initial adoption of the emergency regulations and one readoption of the initial regulations shall be deemed to be an emergency and necessary for the immediate preservation of the public peace, health, safety or general welfare. Initial emergency regulations and the first readoption of those emergency regulations shall be exempt from review by the Office of Administrative Law. The emergency regulations authorized by this section shall be submitted to the Office of Administrative Law for filing with the Secretary of State and shall remain in effect for no more than 180 days.

11370.
 The county welfare department or probation department or Indian tribe, as appropriate, at the time of the Kin-GAP annual redetermination, shall meet with the relative guardian and the nonfederally eligible child and enter into a written agreement for the state-funded Kin-GAP program as described in Section 11364. This process shall continue for at least 12 calendar months or until all state-funded Kin-GAP cases as of the effective date described have been processed.

11371.
 Income to the child, including the state-funded Kin-GAP payment, shall not be considered income to the kinship guardian for purposes of determining the kinship guardian’s eligibility for any other aid program, unless required by federal law as a condition of the receipt of federal financial participation.

11372.
 (a) Notwithstanding any other provision of law, the state-funded Kinship Guardianship Assistance Payment Program implemented under this article is exempt from the provisions of Chapter 2 (commencing with Section 11200) of Part 3.
(b) A person who is a kinship guardian under this article, and who has met the requirements of Section 361.4, shall be exempt from Chapter 4.6 (commencing with Section 10830) of Part 2 governing the statewide fingerprint imaging system. A guardian who is also an applicant for or a recipient of benefits under the CalWORKs program, Chapter 2 (commencing with Section 11200) of Part 3, or the Food Stamp program, Chapter 10 (commencing with Section 18900) of Part 6 shall comply with the statewide fingerprint imaging system requirements applicable to those programs.
(c) Any exemptions exercised pursuant to this section shall be implemented in accordance with Section 11369.

11374.
 (a) Each county that formally had court ordered jurisdiction under Section 300, 601, or 602 over a child receiving benefits under the state-funded Kin-GAP program shall be responsible for paying the child’s aid regardless of where the child actually resides.
(b) Notwithstanding any other provision of law, when a child receiving benefits under the CalWORKs program becomes eligible for benefits under the state-funded Kin-GAP program during any month, the child shall continue to receive benefits under the CalWORKs program, as appropriate, to the end of that calendar month, and Kin-GAP payments shall begin the first day of the following month.

11375.
 The following shall apply to any child or nonminor in receipt of state-funded Kin-GAP benefits:
(a) He or she is eligible to request and receive independent living services pursuant to Section 10609.3.
(b) He or she may retain cash savings, not to exceed ten thousand dollars ($10,000), including interest, in addition to any other property accumulated pursuant to Section 11257 or 11257.5.
(c) He or she shall have earned income disregarded pursuant to Section 11008.15.

11376.
 A foster child who has become the subject of a legal guardianship, who is receiving assistance under the Kin-GAP Program under this article or under Article 4.7 (commencing with Section 11385), including Medi-Cal, and whose foster care court supervision has been terminated, shall be provided medically necessary specialty mental health services by the local mental health plan in the county of residence of his or her legal guardian, pursuant to all of the following:
(a) The host county mental health plan shall be responsible for submitting the treatment authorization request (TAR) to the mental health plan in the county of origin.
(b) The requesting public or private service provider shall prepare the TAR.
(c) The county of origin shall retain responsibility for authorization and reauthorization of services utilizing an expedited TAR process.

11378.
 (a) It is the intent of the Legislature to provide a seamless and minimally intrusive process to allow an otherwise federally eligible child who is receiving assistance payments under this article to access the benefits of federally funded Kin-GAP pursuant to Article 4.7 (commencing with Section 11385). The transition to federally funded Kin-GAP shall be accomplished with minimal disruption to the existing relative guardian and the child, and with no break in the continuity of assistance payments.
(b) Effective on the date that the director executes the declaration described in Section 11379, at the time of the annual redetermination of the state-funded Kin-GAP benefits, the county shall determine whether the child was receiving federal AFDC-FC payments prior to receiving Kin-GAP, while a dependent child or ward of the juvenile court. Those children determined to have previously received AFDC-FC payments shall be reassigned to the county social worker, who shall inform the relative guardian, and the child if over 12 years of age, of the benefits of transitioning to federal Kin-GAP and the process for making the transition. The process described in this subdivision shall continue for at least 12 calendar months, or until all state-funded Kin-GAP cases as of the effective date described in this subdivision have been processed.
(c) Upon completion of the negotiated Kin-GAP agreement and confirmation that the child satisfies the conditions for federal financial participation, the child shall be eligible for federally funded Kin-GAP pursuant to Article 4.7 (commencing with Section 11385).
(d) The county shall terminate the state-funded Kin-GAP payment made pursuant to the former Article 4.5 (commencing with Section 11360), and with no break in the continuity of aid, shall commence payments under the federal Kin-GAP program pursuant to Article 4.7 (commencing with Section 11385).

11379.
 This article shall become operative on the date that the Director of Social Services executes the declaration required pursuant to Section 11217, stating that increased federal financial participation from the Emergency Contingency Fund for State Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) Programs is no longer available pursuant to the federal American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) (Public Law 111-5) or subsequent federal legislation, including an amendment to the ARRA, that maintains or extends increased federal financial participation.

SEC. 35.

 Section 11363 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

11363.
 (a) Aid in the form of Kin-GAP shall be provided under this article on behalf of any child under 18 years of age who meets all of the following conditions:
(1) Has been adjudged a dependent child of the juvenile court pursuant to Section 300, or, effective October 1, 2006, a ward of the juvenile court pursuant to Section 601 or 602.
(2) Has been living with a relative for at least six consecutive months.
(3) Has had a kinship guardianship with that relative established as the result of the implementation of a permanent plan pursuant to Section 366.26.
(4) Has had his or her dependency dismissed after January 1, 2000, pursuant to Section 366.3, or his or her wardship terminated pursuant to subdivision (e) of Section 728, concurrently or subsequently to the establishment of the kinship guardianship.
(b) Kin-GAP payments shall continue after the child’s 18th birthday if the conditions specified in Section 11403 are met.
(c) Termination of the guardianship with a kinship guardian shall terminate eligibility for Kin-GAP; provided, however, that if an alternate guardian or coguardian is appointed pursuant to Section 366.3 who is also a kinship guardian, the alternate or coguardian shall be entitled to receive Kin-GAP on behalf of the child pursuant to this article. A new period of six months of placement with the alternate guardian or coguardian shall not be required if that alternate guardian or coguardian has been assessed pursuant to Section 361.3 and the court terminates dependency jurisdiction.
(d) If the conditions specified in subdivisions (a) to (c), inclusive, are met and, subsequent to the termination of dependency jurisdiction, a parent or person having an interest files with the juvenile court a petition pursuant to Section 388 to change, modify, or set aside an order of the court, Kin-GAP payments shall continue unless and until the juvenile court orders the child removed from the home of the guardian, terminates the guardianship, or otherwise grants the relief requested in the petition, after holding a hearing.

SEC. 36.

 Section 11376 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

11376.
 A foster child who has become the subject of a legal guardianship, who is receiving assistance under the Kin-Gap Program, including Medi-Cal, and whose foster care court supervision has been terminated, shall be provided medically necessary specialty mental health services by the local mental health plan in the county of residence of his or her legal guardian, pursuant to all of the following:
(a) The host county mental health plan shall be responsible for submitting the treatment authorization request (TAR) to the mental health plan in the county of origin.
(b) The requesting public or private service provider shall prepare the TAR.
(c) The county of origin shall retain responsibility for authorization and reauthorization of services utilizing an expedited TAR process.
(d) This article shall become inoperative on the date that the Director of Social Services executes the declaration required pursuant to Section 11217, stating that increased federal financial participation in the Emergency Contingency Fund for State Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) Programs is no longer available pursuant to the federal American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) (Public Law 111-5) or subsequent federal legislation, including an amendment to the ARRA, that maintains or extends increased federal financial participation and as of the January 1 immediately following that date is repealed.

SEC. 37.

 Article 4.7 (commencing with Section 11385) is added to Chapter 2 of Part 3 of Division 9 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, to read:
Article  4.7. Kinship Guardianship Assistance Payments for Children

11385.
 (a) On and after the date that the director executes a declaration pursuant to Section 11217, the State Department of Social Services shall exercise its option under Section 671(a)(28) of Title 42 of the United States Code to enter into kinship guardianship assistance agreements to provide federally funded kinship guardianship assistance payments on behalf of children to grandparents and other relatives who have assumed legal guardianship of the children for whom they have cared as approved relative caregivers and for whom they have committed to care on a permanent basis, as provided in Section 673(d) of Title 42 of the United States Code.
(b) A kinship guardianship assistance payment made under this article on behalf of a child shall not exceed the rate for children placed in a licensed or approved home pursuant to Section 11461.
(c) It is the intent of the Legislature to ensure that relative guardians of children in long-term, stable placements who previously were receiving kinship guardianship assistance payments on behalf of those children under Article 4.5 (commencing with Section 11360) shall instead receive assistance under this article to the extent that those children are otherwise eligible under Subtitle IV-E (commencing with Section 470 of the federal Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. Sec. 670 et seq.)).
(d) It is the intent of the Legislature that no county currently participating in the Child Welfare Demonstration Capped Allocation Project be adversely impacted by the department’s exercise of its option under Section 671(a)(28) of Title 42 of the United States Code to enter into kinship assistance agreements as provided in Section 673(d) of Title 42 of the United States Code. Therefore, the department shall negotiate with the United States Department of Health and Human Services on behalf of those counties that are currently participating in the demonstration project to ensure that those counties receive reimbursement for these new programs outside of the provisions of those counties’ waiver under Subtitle IV-E (commencing with Section 470 of the federal Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. Sec. 670 et seq.)).

11386.
 Aid shall be provided under this article on behalf of a child under 18 years of age, and to any eligible youth under 19 years of age, as provided in Section 11403, under all of the following conditions:
(a) The child meets both of the following requirements:
(1) He or she has been removed from his or her home pursuant to a voluntary placement agreement, or as a result of judicial determination, including being adjudged a dependent child of the court, pursuant to Section 300, or a ward of the court, pursuant to Section 601 or 602, to the effect that continuation in the home would be contrary to the welfare of the child.
(2) He or she has been eligible for federal foster care maintenance payments under Article 5 (commencing with Section 11400) while residing for at least six consecutive months in the approved home of the prospective relative guardian while under the jurisdiction of the juvenile court or a voluntary placement agreement.
(b) Being returned to the parental home or adopted are not appropriate permanency options for the child.
(c) The child demonstrates a strong attachment to the relative guardian, and the relative guardian has a strong commitment to caring permanently for the child and, with respect to the child who has attained 12 years of age, the child has been consulted regarding the kinship guardianship arrangement.
(d) The child has had a kinship guardianship established pursuant to Section 360 or Section 366.26.
(e) The child has had his or her dependency jurisdiction terminated pursuant to Section 366.3, or his or her wardship terminated pursuant to subdivision (e) of Section 728, concurrently or subsequently to the establishment of the kinship guardianship.
(f) If the conditions specified in subdivisions (a) through (e), inclusive, are met and, subsequent to the termination of dependency jurisdiction, any parent or person having an interest files with the juvenile court a petition pursuant to Section 388 to change, modify, or set aside an order of the court, Kin-GAP payments shall continue unless and until the juvenile court orders the child removed from the home of the guardian, terminates the guardianship, or maintains dependency jurisdiction after the court concludes the hearing on the petition filed under Section 388.
(g) A child or nonminor shall be eligible for Kin-GAP payments if he or she meets one of the following age criteria:
(1) He or she is under 18 years of age.
(2) He or she is under 21 years of age and has a physical or mental disability that warrants the continuation of assistance.
(3) Through December 31, 2011, he or she meets the conditions of Section 11403.
(4) He or she meets the conditions as described in subdivision (h).
(h) Effective January 1, 2012, Kin-GAP payments shall continue for youths who have attained 18 years of age and are under 19 years of age if they attained 16 years of age before the Kin-GAP negotiated agreement payments commenced. Effective January 1, 2013, Kin-GAP payments shall continue for youths who have attained 18 years of age and are under 20 years of age, if they reached 16 years of age before the Kin-GAP negotiated payments commenced. Effective January 1, 2014, Kin-GAP payments shall continue for youths who have attained 18 years of age and are under 21 years of age, if they reached 16 years of age before the Kin-GAP negotiated payments commenced. To be eligible for continued payments, the youth shall meet one or more of the conditions specified in subdivision (b) of Section 11403.
Payments made to a nonminor pursuant to the conditions specified in Section 11403 may be paid in whole or part to the eligible youth directly, as specified in subdivision (d) of Section 11403.
(i) Termination of the guardianship with a kinship guardian shall terminate eligibility for Kin-GAP, unless the conditions of Section 11403 apply, provided, however, that if an alternate guardian or coguardian is appointed pursuant to Section 366.3 who is also a kinship guardian, the alternate or coguardian shall be entitled to receive Kin-GAP on behalf of the child pursuant to this article. A new period of six months of placement with the alternate guardian or coguardian shall not be required if that alternate guardian or coguardian has been assessed pursuant to Section 361.3 and Section 361.4 and the court terminates dependency jurisdiction, subject to available federal funding.

11387.
 (a) In order to receive federal financial participation for payments under this article, the county child welfare agency or probation department or Indian tribe that entered into an agreement pursuant to Section 10553.1 shall negotiate and enter into a written, binding, kinship guardianship assistance agreement with the relative guardian of an eligible child, and provide the relative guardian with a copy of the agreement.
(b) The agreement shall specify, at a minimum, all of the following:
(1) The amount of and manner in which the kinship guardianship assistance payment will be provided under the agreement, and the manner in which the agreement may be adjusted periodically, but no less frequently than every two years, in consultation with the relative guardian, based on the circumstances of the relative guardian and the needs of the child.
(2) Additional services and assistance for which the child and relative guardian will be eligible under the agreement.
(3) A procedure by which the relative guardian may apply for additional services, as needed, including, but not limited to, the filing of a petition under Section 388 to have dependency jurisdiction resumed pursuant to subdivision (b) of Section 366.3.
(c) The agreement shall provide that it shall remain in effect regardless of the state of residency of the relative guardian.
(d) In accordance with the Kin-GAP agreement, the relative guardian shall be paid an amount of aid based on the child’s needs otherwise covered in AFDC-FC payments and the circumstances of the relative guardian but that shall not exceed the foster care maintenance payment that would have been paid based on the age-related state-approved foster family home care rate and any applicable specialized care increment for a child placed in a licensed or approved family home pursuant to subdivisions (a) to (d), inclusive, of Section 11461. In addition, the rate paid for a child eligible for a Kin-GAP payment shall include an amount equal to the clothing allowance, as set forth in subdivision (f) of Section 11461, including any applicable rate adjustments. For a child eligible for a Kin-GAP payment who is a teen parent, the rate shall include the two hundred dollar ($200) monthly payment made to the relative caregiver in a whole family foster home pursuant to paragraph (3) of subdivision (d) of Section 11465.
(e) The county child welfare agency or probation department or Indian tribe that entered into an agreement pursuant to Section 10553.1 shall provide the relative guardian with information, in writing, on the availability of the federal Kin-GAP program with an explanation of the difference between these benefits and Adoption Assistance Program benefits and AFDC-FC benefits. The agency shall also provide the relative guardian with information on the availability of mental health services through the Medi-Cal program or other programs.
(f) The Kin-GAP agreement shall also specify the responsibility of the relative guardian for reporting changes in the needs of the child or the circumstances of the relative guardian that affect payment.
(g) The county child welfare agency, probation department, or Indian tribe, as appropriate, shall assess the needs of the child and the circumstances of the related guardian and is responsible for determining that the child meets the eligibility criteria for payment.
(h) Payments on behalf of a child who is a recipient of Kin-GAP benefits and who is also a consumer of regional center services shall be based on the rates established by the State Department of Social Services pursuant to Section 11464.

11388.
 If a federally eligible child described in Section 11386 has one or more siblings who are not so described, the child and any sibling of the child may be placed in the same kinship guardianship arrangement, in accordance with Section 671(a)(31) of Title 42 of the United States Code, if the county child welfare department or probation department or Indian tribe that entered into an agreement pursuant to Section 10553.1 and the prospective relative guardian agree on the appropriateness of the arrangement for the siblings. Kinship guardianship assistance payments may be paid on behalf of each sibling, at a per-child rate, placed in accordance with this section.

11389.
 A child eligible for a Kin-GAP payment under this article is categorically eligible for Medi-Cal at no share of cost pursuant to Section 473(b)(3) of the federal Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. Sec. 673(b)(3)).

11390.
 (a) A person who is a kinship guardian under this article, and who has met the requirements of Section 361.4, shall be exempt from Chapter 4.6 (commencing with Section 10830) of Part 2 governing the statewide fingerprint imaging system. A guardian who is also an applicant for or a recipient of benefits under the CalWORKS program, Chapter 2 (commencing with Section 11200) of Part 3, or the Food Stamp program, Chapter 10 (commencing with Section 18900) of Part 6 shall comply with the statewide fingerprint imaging system requirements applicable to those programs.
(b) Any exemptions exercised pursuant to this section shall be implemented in accordance with Section 11393.
(c) Income to the child, including the Kin-GAP payment, shall not be considered income to the kinship guardian for purposes of determining the kinship guardian’s eligibility for any other aid program, unless required by federal law as a condition of the receipt of federal financial participation.
(d) Each county that formally had court-ordered jurisdiction under Section 300 or Section 601 or 602 over a child receiving benefits under the Kin-GAP Program shall be responsible for paying the child’s aid regardless of where the child actually resides.
(e) Notwithstanding any other provision of law, when a child receiving benefits under the AFDC-FC foster care program becomes eligible for benefits under the Kin-GAP Program during any month, the child shall continue to receive benefits under the AFDC-FC foster care program, as appropriate, to the end of that calendar month, and Kin-GAP payments shall begin the first day of the following month.
(f) All of the following shall apply to any child or nonminor in receipt of Kin-GAP benefits:
(1) He or she is eligible to request and receive independent living services pursuant to Section 10609.3.
(2) He or she may retain cash savings, not to exceed ten thousand dollars ($10,000), including interest, pursuant to Section 11155.5.
(3) He or she shall have earned income disregarded pursuant to Section 11008.15.

11391.
 For purposes of this article, the following definitions shall apply:
(a) “Kinship Guardianship Assistance Payments (Kin-GAP)” means the aid provided on behalf of children eligible for federal financial participation under Section 671(a)(28) of Title 42 of the United States Code in kinship care under the terms of this article.
(b) “Kinship guardian” means a person who meets both of the following criteria:
(1) He or she has been appointed the legal guardian of a dependent child pursuant to Section 366.26 or Section 360 or a ward of the juvenile court pursuant to subdivision (d) of Section 728.
(2) He or she is a relative of the child.
(c) “Relative” means an adult who is related to the child by blood, adoption, or affinity within the fifth degree of kinship, including stepparents, stepsiblings, and all relatives whose status is preceded by the words “great,” “great-great,” or “grand” or the spouse of any of those persons even if the marriage was terminated by death or dissolution.
(d) “Sibling” means a child related to the identified eligible child by blood, adoption or affinity through a common legal or biological parent.

11392.
 On and after the date that the director executes a declaration pursuant to Section 11217, for purposes of eligibility under this article, children who are currently receiving Kin-GAP pursuant to Article 4.5 (commencing with Section 11360) and who were determined eligible under Subtitle IV-E (commencing with Section 470 of the federal Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. Sec. 670 et seq.)) as dependent children of the juvenile court placed in foster care with an approved relative and who remain under the court’s jurisdiction pursuant to Section 366.4 shall be deemed to meet the eligibility criteria as described in Section 673(d) of Title 42 of the United States Code. On and after the date that the director executes a declaration pursuant to Section 11217, the county child welfare department, probation department, or Indian tribe, as appropriate, at the time of each Subtitle IV-E eligible child’s Kin-GAP annual redetermination, shall meet with the relative guardian and child and enter into the written negotiated agreement as described in Section 11387.

11393.
 (a) Notwithstanding the Administrative Procedure Act (Chapter 3.5 (commencing with Section 11340) of Part 1 of Division 3 of Title 2 of the Government Code) the department may implement the applicable provisions of the federally funded Kin-GAP Program through all-county letters or similar instructions from the director.
(b) The department shall develop both the all-county letter instructions and regulations in consultation with concerned stakeholders, including, but not limited to, the County Welfare Directors Association, the Chief Probation Officers of California, representatives of California Indian tribes, the California Youth Connection, former foster youth, child advocacy organizations, labor organizations, foster caregiver organizations, and researchers.
(c) The director shall adopt regulations as otherwise necessary, to implement the applicable provisions of the federally funded Kin-GAP Program. Emergency regulations to implement the applicable provisions of this act may be adopted by the director in accordance with the Administrative Procedure Act. The initial adoption of the emergency regulations and one readoption of the initial regulations shall be deemed to be an emergency and necessary for the immediate preservation of the public peace, health, safety, or general welfare. Initial emergency regulations and the first readoption of those emergency regulations shall be exempt from review by the Office of Administrative Law. The emergency regulations authorized by this section shall be submitted to the Office of Administrative Law for filing with the Secretary of State and shall remain in effect for no more than 180 days.

SEC. 38.

 Section 11400 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

11400.
 For the purposes of this article, the following definitions shall apply:
(a) “Aid to Families with Dependent Children-Foster Care (AFDC-FC)” means the aid provided on behalf of needy children in foster care under the terms of this division.
(b) “Case plan” means a written document that, at a minimum, specifies the type of home in which the child shall be placed, the safety of that home, and the appropriateness of that home to meet the child’s needs. It shall also include the agency’s plan for ensuring that the child receive proper care and protection in a safe environment, and shall set forth the appropriate services to be provided to the child, the child’s family, and the foster parents, in order to meet the child’s needs while in foster care, and to reunify the child with the child’s family. In addition, the plan shall specify the services that will be provided or steps that will be taken to facilitate an alternate permanent plan if reunification is not possible.
(c) “Certified family home” means a family residence certified by a licensed foster family agency and issued a certificate of approval by that agency as meeting licensing standards, and used only by that foster family agency for placements.
(d) “Family home” means the family residency of a licensee in which 24-hour care and supervision are provided for children.
(e) “Small family home” means any residential facility, in the licensee’s family residence, which provides 24-hour care for six or fewer foster children who have mental disorders or developmental or physical disabilities and who require special care and supervision as a result of their disabilities.
(f) “Foster care” means the 24-hour out-of-home care provided to children whose own families are unable or unwilling to care for them, and who are in need of temporary or long-term substitute parenting.
(g) “Foster family agency” means any individual or organization engaged in the recruiting, certifying, and training of, and providing professional support to, foster parents, or in finding homes or other places for placement of children for temporary or permanent care who require that level of care as an alternative to a group home. Private foster family agencies shall be organized and operated on a nonprofit basis.
(h) “Group home” means a nondetention privately operated residential home, organized and operated on a nonprofit basis only, of any capacity, or a nondetention licensed residential care home operated by the County of San Mateo with a capacity of up to 25 beds, that provides services in a group setting to children in need of care and supervision, as required by paragraph (1) of subdivision (a) of Section 1502 of the Health and Safety Code.
(i) “Periodic review” means review of a child’s status by the juvenile court or by an administrative review panel, that shall include a consideration of the safety of the child, a determination of the continuing need for placement in foster care, evaluation of the goals for the placement and the progress toward meeting these goals, and development of a target date for the child’s return home or establishment of alternative permanent placement.
(j) “Permanency planning hearing” means a hearing conducted by the juvenile court in which the child’s future status, including whether the child shall be returned home or another permanent plan shall be developed, is determined.
(k) “Placement and care” refers to the responsibility for the welfare of a child vested in an agency or organization by virtue of the agency or organization having (1) been delegated care, custody, and control of a child by the juvenile court, (2) taken responsibility, pursuant to a relinquishment or termination of parental rights on a child, (3) taken the responsibility of supervising a child detained by the juvenile court pursuant to Section 319 or 636, or (4) signed a voluntary placement agreement for the child’s placement; or to the responsibility designated to an individual by virtue of his or her being appointed the child’s legal guardian.
(l) “Preplacement preventive services” means services that are designed to help children remain with their families by preventing or eliminating the need for removal.
(m) “Relative” means an adult who is related to the child by blood, adoption, or affinity within the fifth degree of kinship, including stepparents, stepsiblings, and all relatives whose status is preceded by the words “great,” “great-great,” or “grand” or the spouse of any of these persons even if the marriage was terminated by death or dissolution.
(n) “Nonrelative extended family member” means an adult caregiver who has an established familial or mentoring relationship with the child, as described in Section 362.7.
(o) “Voluntary placement” means an out-of-home placement of a child by (1) the county welfare department, probation department, or Indian tribe that has entered into an agreement pursuant to Section 10553.1, after the parents or guardians have requested the assistance of the county welfare department and have signed a voluntary placement agreement; or (2) the county welfare department licensed public or private adoption agency, or the department acting as an adoption agency, after the parents have requested the assistance of either the county welfare department, the licensed public or private adoption agency, or the department acting as an adoption agency for the purpose of adoption planning, and have signed a voluntary placement agreement.
(p) “Voluntary placement agreement” means a written agreement between either the county welfare department, probation department, or Indian tribe that has entered into an agreement pursuant to Section 10553.1, licensed public or private adoption agency, or the department acting as an adoption agency, and the parents or guardians of a child that specifies, at a minimum, the following:
(1) The legal status of the child.
(2) The rights and obligations of the parents or guardians, the child, and the agency in which the child is placed.
(q) “Original placement date” means the most recent date on which the court detained a child and ordered an agency to be responsible for supervising the child or the date on which an agency assumed responsibility for a child due to termination of parental rights, relinquishment, or voluntary placement.
(r) “Transitional housing placement facility” means either of the following:
(1) A community care facility licensed by the State Department of Social Services pursuant to Section 1559.110 of the Health and Safety Code to provide transitional housing opportunities to persons at least 16 years of age, and not more than 18 years of age unless they satisfy the requirements of Section 11403, who are in out-of-home placement under the supervision of the county department of social services or the county probation department, and who are participating in an independent living program.
(2) A facility certified to provide transitional housing services pursuant to subdivision (e) of Section 1559.110 of the Health and Safety Code.
(s) “Transitional housing placement program” means a program that provides supervised housing opportunities to eligible youth and nonminor dependents pursuant to Article 4 (commencing with Section 16522) of Chapter 5 of Part 4.
(t) “Whole family foster home” means a new or existing family home, approved relative caregiver or nonrelative extended family member’s home, the home of a nonrelated legal guardian whose guardianship was established pursuant to Section 366.26 or 360, certified family home that provides foster care for a minor or nonminor dependent parent and his or her child, and is specifically recruited and trained to assist the minor or nonminor dependent parent in developing the skills necessary to provide a safe, stable, and permanent home for his or her child. The child of the minor or nonminor dependent parent need not be the subject of a petition filed pursuant to Section 300 to qualify for placement in a whole family foster home.
(u) “Mutual agreement” means an agreement of consent for placement in a supervised setting between a minor or, on and after January 1, 2012, a nonminor dependent, and the agency responsible for the foster care placement, that documents the nonminor’s continued need for supervised out-of-home placement and the nonminor’s and social worker’s or probation officer’s agreement to work together to facilitate implementation of the mutually developed supervised placement agreement and transitional living plan.
(v) “Nonminor dependent” means, on and after January 1, 2012, a foster child, as described in Section 675(8)(B) of Title 42 of the United States Code under the federal Social Security Act who is a current or former dependent child or ward of the juvenile court who satisfies all of the following criteria:
(1) He or she has attained 18 years of age but is less than 21 years of age.
(2) He or she is in foster care under the responsibility of the county welfare department, county probation department, or Indian tribe that entered into an agreement pursuant to Section 10553.1.
(3) He or she is participating in a transitional independent living case plan pursuant to Section 475(8) of the federal Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. Sec. 675(8)), as contained in the Fostering Connections to Success and Increasing Adoptions Act of 2008 (Public Law 110-351).
(w) “Supervised independent living setting” means, on and after January 1, 2012, a supervised setting, as specified in a nonminor dependent’s transitional independent living case plan, in which the youth is living independently, pursuant to Section 472(c)(2) of the Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. Sec. 672(c)(2)).
(x) “THP-Plus Foster Care” means, on and after January 1, 2012, a placement that offers supervised housing opportunities and supportive services to eligible nonminor dependents at least 18 years of age, on and after January 1, 2013, 19 years of age, and on and after January 1, 2014, 20 years of age, and not more than 21 years of age, who are in out-of-home placement under the supervision of the county department of social services or the county probation department or Indian tribe that entered into an agreement pursuant to Section 10553.1, and who are described in paragraph (3) of subdivision (a) of Section 11403.2.
(y) “Trial independence” means, on or after January 1, 2012, consistent with paragraph (e) of Section 1356.21 of Title 45 of the Code of Federal Regulations, a period not to exceed six months, unless the juvenile court authorizes a longer period, during which the court may terminate and subsequently resume the nonminor’s dependency jurisdiction, and the nonminor’s Title IV-E foster care benefits may be resumed if the nonminor otherwise is eligible pursuant to Section 11403. Operation of this subdivision shall be contingent upon receipt of all necessary federal approvals.

SEC. 39.

 Section 11401 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, as amended by Section 2 of Chapter 4 of the Eighth Extraordinary Session of the Statutes of 2010, is amended to read:

11401.
 Aid in the form of AFDC-FC shall be provided under this chapter on behalf of any child under 18 years of age, and, on and after January 1, 2012, to any nonminor dependent, except as provided in Section 11403, who meets the conditions of subdivision (a), (b), (c), (d), (e), (f), (g), or (h):
(a) The child has been relinquished, for purposes of adoption, to a licensed adoption agency, or the department, or the parental rights of either or both of his or her parents have been terminated after an action under the Family Code has been brought by a licensed adoption agency or the department, provided that the licensed adoption agency or the department, if responsible for placement and care, provides to those children all services as required by the department to children in foster care.
(b) The child has been removed from the physical custody of his or her parent, relative, or guardian as a result of a voluntary placement agreement or a judicial determination that continuance in the home would be contrary to the child’s welfare and that, if the child was placed in foster care, reasonable efforts were made, consistent with Chapter 5 (commencing with Section 16500) of Part 4, to prevent or eliminate the need for removal of the child from his or her home and to make it possible for the child to return to his or her home, and any of the following applies:
(1) The child has been adjudged a dependent child of the court on the grounds that he or she is a person described by Section 300.
(2) The child has been adjudged a ward of the court on the grounds that he or she is a person described by Sections 601 and 602.
(3) The child has been detained under a court order, pursuant to Section 319 or 636, that remains in effect.
(4) The child’s dependency jurisdiction has resumed pursuant to Section 387, or subdivision (a) or (e) of Section 388.
(c) The child has been voluntarily placed by his or her parent or guardian pursuant to Section 11401.1.
(d) The child is living in the home of a nonrelated legal guardian.
(e) On and after January 1, 2012, the child is a nonminor dependent who is placed pursuant to a mutual agreement as set forth in subdivision (d) of Section 11403, under the responsibility of the county welfare department, an Indian tribe that entered into an agreement pursuant to Section 10553.1, or the county probation department.
(f) The child has been placed in foster care under the federal Indian Child Welfare Act. Sections 11402, 11404, and 11405 shall not be construed as limiting payments to Indian children, as defined in the federal Indian Child Welfare Act, placed in accordance with that act.
(g) To be eligible for federal financial participation, the conditions described in paragraph (1), (2), (3), or (4) shall be satisfied:
(1) (A) The child meets the conditions of subdivision (b).
(B) The child has been deprived of parental support or care for any of the reasons set forth in Section 11250.
(C) The child has been removed from the home of a relative as defined in Section 233.90(c)(1) of Title 45 of the Code of Federal Regulations, as amended.
(D) The requirements of Sections 671 and 672 of Title 42 of the United States Code, as amended, have been met.
(2) (A) The child meets the requirements of subdivision (h).
(B) The requirements of Sections 671 and 672 of Title 42 of the United States Code, as amended, have been met.
(C) This paragraph shall be implemented only if federal financial participation is available for the children described in this paragraph.
(3) (A) The child has been removed from the custody of his or her parent, relative, or guardian as a result of a voluntary placement agreement or a judicial determination that continuance in the home would be contrary to the child’s welfare and that, if the child was placed in foster care, reasonable efforts were made, consistent with Chapter 5 (commencing with Section 16500) of Part 4, to prevent or eliminate the need for removal of the child from his or her home and to make it possible for the child to return to his or her home, and any of the following applies:
(i) The child has been adjudged a dependent child of the court on the grounds that he or she is a person described by Section 300.
(ii) The child has been adjudged a ward of the court on the grounds that he or she is a person described by Sections 601 and 602.
(iii) The child has been detained under a court order, pursuant to Section 319 or 636, that remains in effect.
(iv) The child’s dependency jurisdiction has resumed pursuant to Section 387.
(B) The child has been placed in an eligible foster care placement, as set forth in Section 11402.
(C) The requirements of Sections 671 and 672 of Title 42 of the United States Code have been satisfied.
(D) This paragraph shall be implemented only if federal financial participation is available for the children described in this paragraph.
(4) With respect to a nonminor dependent, in addition to meeting the conditions specified in paragraph (1), the requirements of Section 675(8)(B) of Title 42 of the United States Code have been satisfied.
(h) The child meets all of the following conditions:
(1) The child has been adjudged to be a dependent child or ward of the court on the grounds that he or she is a person described in Section 300, 601, or 602.
(2) The child’s parent also has been adjudged to be a dependent child or nonminor dependent of the court on the grounds that he or she is a person described by Section 300, 601, or 602 and is receiving benefits under this chapter.
(3) The child is placed in the same licensed or approved foster care facility in which his or her parent is placed and the child’s parent is receiving reunification services with respect to that child.

SEC. 40.

 Section 11401.05 is added to the Welfare and Institutions Code, to read:

11401.05.
 The department shall amend the foster care state plan required under Subtitle IV-E (commencing with Section 470 of the federal Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. Sec. 670 et seq.)), to extend benefits under this article, commencing January 1, 2012, to an individual who is in foster care under the responsibility of the state, or with respect to whom an adoption assistance agreement or a kinship guardianship assistance agreement is in effect, in accordance with the federal Fostering Connections to Success and Increasing Adoptions Act of 2008 (Public Law 110-351).

SEC. 41.

 Section 11401.1 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

11401.1.
 (a) Otherwise eligible children placed voluntarily prior to January 1, 1981, may remain eligible for AFDC-FC payments.
(b) Beginning on January 1, 1982, AFDC-FC payments for children placed voluntarily on or after January 1, 1981, shall be limited to a period of up to 180 days under conditions specified by departmental regulations, and may be extended an additional six months pursuant to Section 16507.3 and departmental regulations.
This section shall become operative on January 1, 1984.

SEC. 42.

 Section 11401.4 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

11401.4.
 A child living with his or her parent who is a minor or, on and after January 1, 2012, a nonminor dependent and a recipient of AFDC-FC benefits shall be deemed a child with respect to whom AFDC-FC payments are made.

SEC. 43.

 Section 11401.5 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is repealed.

SEC. 43.5.

 Section 11401.5 is added to the Welfare and Institutions Code, to read:

11401.5.
 The county shall review the child’s or nonminor dependent’s payment amount annually. The review shall include an examination of any circumstances of a foster child or nonminor dependent that are subject to change and could affect the child’s or nonminor dependent’s potential eligibility or payment amount, including, but not limited to, authority for placement, eligible facility, and age.

SEC. 44.

 Section 11402 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, as amended by Section 7 of Chapter 288 of the Statutes of 2007, is amended to read:

11402.
 In order to be eligible for AFDC-FC, a child shall be placed in one of the following:
(a) The approved home of a relative, provided the child is otherwise eligible for federal financial participation in the AFDC-FC payment.
(b) (1) The licensed family home of a nonrelative.
(2) The approved home of a nonrelative extended family member as described in Section 362.7.
(c) A licensed group home, as defined in subdivision (h) of Section 11400, provided that the placement worker has documented that the placement is necessary to meet the treatment needs of the child and that the facility offers those treatment services.
(d) The home of a nonrelated legal guardian or the home of a former nonrelated legal guardian when the guardianship of a child who is otherwise eligible for AFDC-FC has been dismissed due to the child’s attaining 18 years of age.
(e) An exclusive-use home.
(f) A licensed transitional housing placement facility, as described in Section 1559.110 of the Health and Safety Code, and as defined in subdivision (r) of Section 11400, or a transitional housing placement program, as defined in subdivision (s) of Section 11400.
(g) An out-of-state group home, provided that the placement worker, in addition to complying with all other statutory requirements for placing a minor in an out-of-state group home, documents that the requirements of Section 7911.1 of the Family Code have been met.
(h) A licensed crisis nursery, as described in Section 1516 of the Health and Safety Code, and as defined in subdivision (a) of Section 11400.1.
(i) A supervised independent living setting for nonminor dependents, as defined in Section 11400.
(j) An approved THP-Plus Foster Care placement for nonminor dependents, as defined in subdivision (x) of Section 11400.
(k) This section shall remain in effect only until July 1, 2011, and as of that date is repealed, unless a later enacted statute, that is enacted before July 1, 2011, deletes or extends that date.

SEC. 44.1.

 Section 11402 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, as amended by Section 7 of Chapter 288 of the Statutes of 2007, is amended to read:

11402.
 In order to be eligible for AFDC-FC, a child shall be placed in one of the following:
(a) The approved home of a relative, provided the child is otherwise eligible for federal financial participation in the AFDC-FC payment.
(b) (1) The licensed family home of a nonrelative.
(2) The approved home of a nonrelative extended family member as described in Section 362.7.
(c) A licensed group home, as defined in subdivision (h) of Section 11400, provided that the placement worker has documented that the placement is necessary to meet the treatment needs of the child and that the facility offers those treatment services.
(d) The home of a nonrelated legal guardian or the home of a former nonrelated legal guardian when the guardianship of a child who is otherwise eligible for AFDC-FC has been dismissed due to the child’s attaining 18 years of age.
(e) An exclusive-use home.
(f) A licensed transitional housing placement facility, as described in Section 1559.110 of the Health and Safety Code, and as defined in subdivision (r) of Section 11400, or a transitional housing placement program, as defined in subdivision (s) of Section 11400.
(g) An out-of-state group home, provided that the placement worker, in addition to complying with all other statutory requirements for placing a minor in an out-of-state group home, documents that the requirements of Section 7911.1 of the Family Code have been met.
(h) A licensed crisis nursery, as described in Section 1516 of the Health and Safety Code, and as defined in subdivision (a) of Section 11400.1.
(i) A supervised independent living setting for nonminor dependents, as defined in Section 11400.
(j) An approved THP-Plus Foster Care placement for nonminor dependents, as defined in subdivision (x) of Section 11400.
(k) This section shall remain in effect only until July 1, 2012, and as of that date is repealed, unless a later enacted statute, that is enacted before July 1, 2012, deletes or extends that date.

SEC. 45.

 Section 11402 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, as amended by Section 8 of Chapter 288 of the Statutes of 2007, is amended to read:

11402.
 In order to be eligible for AFDC-FC, a child shall be placed in one of the following:
(a) The approved home of a relative, provided the child is otherwise eligible for federal financial participation in the AFDC-FC payment.
(b) (1) The licensed family home of a nonrelative.
(2) The approved home of a nonrelative extended family member as described in Section 362.7.
(c) A licensed group home, as defined in subdivision (h) of Section 11400, provided that the placement worker has documented that the placement is necessary to meet the treatment needs of the child and that the facility offers those treatment services.
(d) The home of a nonrelated legal guardian or the home of a former nonrelated legal guardian when the guardianship of a child who is otherwise eligible for AFDC-FC has been dismissed due to the child’s attaining 18 years of age.
(e) An exclusive-use home.
(f) A licensed transitional housing placement facility as described in Section 1559.110 of the Health and Safety Code and as defined in subdivision (r) of Section 11400, or a transitional housing placement program, as defined in subdivision (s) of Section 11400.
(g) An out-of-state group home, provided that the placement worker, in addition to complying with all other statutory requirements for placing a minor in an out-of-state group home, documents that the requirements of Section 7911.1 of the Family Code have been met.
(h) A supervised independent living setting for nonminor dependents, as defined in Section 11400.
(i) An approved THP-Plus Foster Care placement for nonminor dependents, as defined in subdivision (x) of Section 11400.
(j) This section shall become operative on July 1, 2011.

SEC. 45.1.

 Section 11402 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, as amended by Section 8 of Chapter 288 of the Statutes of 2007, is amended to read:

11402.
 In order to be eligible for AFDC-FC, a child shall be placed in one of the following:
(a) The approved home of a relative, provided the child is otherwise eligible for federal financial participation in the AFDC-FC payment.
(b) (1) The licensed family home of a nonrelative.
(2) The approved home of a nonrelative extended family member as described in Section 362.7.
(c) A licensed group home, as defined in subdivision (h) of Section 11400, provided that the placement worker has documented that the placement is necessary to meet the treatment needs of the child and that the facility offers those treatment services.
(d) The home of a nonrelated legal guardian or the home of a former nonrelated legal guardian when the guardianship of a child who is otherwise eligible for AFDC-FC has been dismissed due to the child’s attaining 18 years of age.
(e) An exclusive-use home.
(f) A licensed transitional housing placement facility as described in Section 1559.110 of the Health and Safety Code and as defined in subdivision (r) of Section 11400, or a transitional housing placement program, as defined in subdivision (s) of Section 11400.
(g) An out-of-state group home, provided that the placement worker, in addition to complying with all other statutory requirements for placing a minor in an out-of-state group home, documents that the requirements of Section 7911.1 of the Family Code have been met.
(h) A supervised independent living setting for nonminor dependents, as defined in Section 11400.
(i) An approved THP-Plus Foster Care placement for nonminor dependents, as defined in subdivision (x) of Section 11400.
(j) This section shall become operative on July 1, 2012.

SEC. 45.5.

 Section 11402.2 is added to the Welfare and Institutions Code, to read:

11402.2.
 Recognizing that transitions to independence involve self-initiated changes in placements, it is the intent of the Legislature that regulations developed regarding the approval of the supervised independent living setting, as defined in subdivision (w) of Section 11400, shall ensure continuity of placement and payment while the nonminor dependent is temporarily absent from an approved placement while awaiting approval of his or her new supervised independent living setting.

SEC. 46.

 Section 11403 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

(a) A child who is in foster care and receiving aid pursuant to this chapter and who is attending high school or the equivalent level of vocational or technical training on a full-time basis, or who is in the process of pursuing a high school equivalency certificate, prior to his or her 18th birthday, may continue to receive aid following his or her 18th birthday so long as the child continues to reside in foster care placement, remains otherwise eligible for AFDC-FC payments, and continues to attend high school or the equivalent level of vocational or technical training on a full-time basis, or continues to pursue a high school equivalency certificate, and the child may reasonably be expected to complete the educational or training program or to receive a high school equivalency certificate, before his or her 19th birthday. Aid shall be provided to an individual pursuant to this section provided both the individual and the agency responsible for the foster care placement have signed a mutual agreement, if the individual is capable of making an informed agreement, which documents the continued need for out-of-home placement.

11403.
 (b) This section shall remain in effect only until January 1, 2012, and as of that date is repealed, unless a later enacted statute, that is enacted before January 1, 2012, deletes or extends that date.

SEC. 47.

 Section 11403 is added to the Welfare and Institutions Code, to read:

11403.
 (a) It is the intent of the Legislature to exercise the option afforded states under Section 475(8) (42 U.S.C. Sec. 675(8)), and Section 473(a)(4) (42 U.S.C. Sec. 673(a)(4)) of the federal Social Security Act, as contained in the Fostering Connections to Success and Increasing Adoptions Act of 2008 (Public Law 110-351), to receive federal financial participation for current or former dependent children or wards of the juvenile court who meet the conditions of subdivision (b), consistent with their transitional living case plan. Effective January 1, 2012, these nonminor dependents shall be eligible to receive support up to 19 years of age, effective January 1, 2013, up to 20 years of age, and effective January 1, 2014, up to 21 years of age, consistent with their transitional independent living case plan. It is the intent of the Legislature both at the time of initial determination of the nonminor dependent’s eligibility and throughout the time the nonminor dependent is eligible for aid pursuant to this section, that the social worker or probation officer or Indian tribe and the nonminor dependent shall work together to ensure the nonminor dependent’s ongoing eligibility. All case planning shall be a collaborative effort between the nonminor dependent and the social worker, probation officer, or Indian tribe, with the nonminor dependent assuming increasing levels of responsibility and independence.
(b) A nonminor dependent receiving aid pursuant to this chapter, who satisfies the age criteria set forth in subdivision (a), shall continue to receive aid so long as the nonminor has signed a mutual agreement as set forth in subdivision (d), and is otherwise eligible for AFDC-FC payments pursuant to Section 11401 or CalWORKs payments pursuant to Section 11253 or aid pursuant to Kin-GAP under Article 4.5 (commencing with Section 11360) or Article 4.7 (commencing with Section 11385) or adoption assistance payments as specified in Chapter 2.1 (commencing with Section 16115) of Part 4. Effective January 1, 2012, a nonminor former dependent child of the juvenile court who is receiving AFDC-FC benefits pursuant to Section 11405 shall be eligible to continue to receive aid up to 19 years of age, effective January 1, 2013, up to 20 years of age, and effective January 1, 2014, up to 21 years of age, as long as the nonminor is otherwise eligible for AFDC-FC benefits under this subdivision. This subdivision shall apply when one or more of the following conditions exist:
(1) The nonminor is completing secondary education or a program leading to an equivalent credential.
(2) The nonminor is enrolled in an institution which provides postsecondary or vocational education.
(3) The nonminor is participating in a program or activity designed to promote, or remove barriers to employment.
(4) The nonminor is employed for at least 80 hours per month.
(5) The nonminor is incapable of doing any of the activities described in subparagraphs (1) to (4), inclusive, due to a medical condition, and that incapability is supported by regularly updated information in the case plan of the nonminor.
(c) The county child welfare or probation department or Indian tribe that has entered into an agreement pursuant to Section 10553.1, shall work together with a nonminor dependent who is in foster care on his or her 18th birthday and thereafter or a nonminor former dependent receiving aid pursuant to Section 11405, to meet one or more of the conditions described in paragraphs (1) to (5), inclusive, of subdivision (b) and shall certify the nonminor’s applicable condition or conditions in the nonminor’s six-month transitional independent living case plan update, and provide the certification to the eligibility worker and to the court at each six-month case plan review hearing for the nonminor dependent. Relative guardians who receive Kin-GAP payments and adoptive parents who receive adoption assistance payments shall be responsible for reporting to the county welfare agency that the nonminor does not satisfy at least one of the conditions described in subdivision (b). The social worker, probation officer, or tribe shall verify and obtain assurances that the nonminor dependent continues to meet at least one of the conditions in paragraphs (1) to (5), inclusive, of subdivision (b) at each six-month transitional independent living case plan update. The six-month case plan update shall certify the nonminor’s eligibility pursuant to subdivision (b) for the next six-month period. During the six-month certification period, the payee and nonminor shall report any change in placement or other relevant changes in circumstances that may affect payment. The nonminor dependent or a nonminor former dependent receiving aid pursuant to Section 11405, shall be afforded all due process requirements in accordance with state and federal law prior to an involuntary termination of aid. The nonminor dependent or nonminor former dependent receiving aid pursuant to Section 11405 shall be informed of all due process requirements, in accordance with state and federal law, prior to an involuntary termination of aid, and shall simultaneously be provided with a written explanation of how to exercise his or her due process rights and obtain referrals to legal assistance. Any notices of action regarding eligibility shall be sent to the nonminor dependent or former dependent, his or her counsel, and the placing worker, in addition to any other payee.
(d) A nonminor dependent may receive all or a portion of the payment directly provided that the nonminor is living independently in a supervised setting, and that both the youth and the agency responsible for the foster care placement have signed a mutual agreement, as defined in subdivision (u) of Section 11400, if the youth is capable of making an informed agreement, that documents the continued need for supervised out-of-home placement, and the nonminor’s and social worker’s or probation officer’s agreement to work together to facilitate implementation of the mutually developed supervised placement agreement and transitional living plan.
(e) Eligibility for aid under this section shall not terminate until the nonminor attains 21 years of age but aid may be suspended and resumed at request of the nonminor pursuant to subdivision (e) of Section 388 or after a court terminates dependency jurisdiction pursuant to Section 391, or delinquency jurisdiction pursuant to Section 785. Consistent with paragraph (e) of Section 1356.21 of Title 45 of the Code of Federal Regulations, for the nonminor who returns to supervised placement within the six-month trial period, or if the court authorized a trial period of departure from foster care that exceeded six months in duration and ends prior to the day before the nonminor attains 21 years of age, the county welfare department is not required to establish a new Title IV-E eligibility determination for the nonminor for whom dependency jurisdiction is resumed by the court. The county welfare department, tribe, or county probation department shall provide a nonminor dependent who wishes to continue receiving aid with the assistance necessary to meet and maintain eligibility.
(f) (1) The county having jurisdiction of the nonminor dependent shall remain the county of payment under this section regardless of the youth’s physical residence. Nonminor dependents receiving aid pursuant to Section 11405 shall be paid by their county of residence. Counties may develop courtesy supervision agreements to provide case management and independent living services by the county of residence pursuant to the youth’s transitional independent living case plan. Placements made out of state are subject to the requirements of the Interstate Compact on Placement of Children, pursuant to Part 5 (commencing with Section 7900) of Division 12 of the Family Code.
(2) The county welfare department, tribe, or county probation department shall notify all foster youth who attain 16 years of age and are under the jurisdiction of that county or tribe, including those receiving Kin-GAP, and AAP, of the existence of the aid prescribed by this section.
(3) Aid under this section shall be paid on the first of the month for that month. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, when a child attains 18 years of age those payments shall continue to the end of that calendar month and the AFDC-FC, Kin-GAP, or AAP payments under this section shall begin the first day of the following month.
(4) The department shall seek any waiver to amend its Title IV-E State Plan with the Secretary of the United States Department of Health and Human Services necessary to implement this section.
(g) (1) Subject to paragraph (3), a county shall contribute to the cost of extending aid pursuant to this section to eligible nonminor dependents who have reached 18 years of age and who are under the jurisdiction of the county, including AFDC-FC payments pursuant to Section 11401, CalWORKs payments pursuant to Section 11253, aid pursuant to Kin-GAP under Article 4.5 (commencing with Section 11360) or Article 4.7 (commencing with Section 11385), adoption assistance payments as specified in Chapter 2.1 (commencing with Section 16115) of Part 4, and aid pursuant to Section 11405 for nonminor dependents who are residing in the county as provided in paragraph (1) of subdivision (f), at the statutory sharing ratios for each of these programs in effect on January 1, 2012.
(2) Subject to paragraph (3), a county shall contribute to the cost of providing permanent placement services pursuant to subdivision (c) of Section 16508 and administering the Aid to Families with Dependent Children Foster Care program pursuant to Section 15204.9 at the statutory sharing ratio for these services in effect on January 1, 2012. For purposes of budgeting, the department shall use a standard for the permanent placement services that is equal to the midpoint between the budgeting standards for family maintenance services and family reunification services.
(3) Notwithstanding any other provision of law, a county’s total contribution pursuant to paragraphs (1) and (2) shall not exceed the savings in Kin-GAP assistance grant expenditures realized by the county from the receipt of federal funds due to the implementation of Article 4.7 (commencing with Section 11385). The department shall work with the County Welfare Directors Association to determine a methodology for calculating each county’s costs and savings pursuant to this section.
(h) It is the intent of the Legislature that no county currently participating in the Child Welfare Demonstration Capped Allocation Project be adversely impacted by the department’s exercise of its option to extend foster care benefits pursuant to Section 673(a)(4) and Section 675(8) of Title 42 of the United States Code in the federal Social Security Act, as contained in the Fostering Connections to Success and Increasing Adoptions Act of 2008 (Public Law 110-351). Therefore, the department shall negotiate with the United States Department of Health and Human Services on behalf of those counties that are currently participating in the demonstration project to ensure that those counties receive reimbursement for these new programs outside of the provisions of those counties’ waiver under Subtitle IV-E (commencing with Section 470) of the federal Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. Sec. 670 et seq.).
(i) The department, on or before July 1, 2012, shall develop regulations to implement this section in consultation with concerned stakeholders, including, but not limited to, representatives of the Legislature, the County Welfare Directors Association, the Chief Probation Officers of California, the Judicial Council, representatives of Indian tribes, the California Youth Connection, former foster youth, child advocacy organizations, labor organizations, juvenile justice advocacy organizations, foster caregiver organizations, and researchers. In the development of these regulations, the department shall consider its Manual of Policy and Procedures, Division 30, Chapter 30-912, 913, 916, and 917, as guidelines for developing regulations that are appropriate for young adults who can exercise incremental responsibility concurrently with their growth and development. The department, in its consultation with stakeholders, shall take into consideration the impact to the Automated Child Welfare Services Case Management Services (CWS-CMS) and required modifications needed to accommodate eligibility determination under this section, benefit issuance, case management across counties, and recognition of the legal status of nonminor dependents as adults, as well as changes to data tracking and reporting requirements as required by the Child Welfare System Improvement and Accountability Act as specified in Section 10601.2, and federal outcome measures as required by the John H. Chafee Foster Care Independence Program (42 U.S.C. Sec. 677(f)). In addition, the department, in its consultation with stakeholders, shall define the supervised independent living setting which shall include, but not be limited to, apartment living, room and board arrangements, college or university dormitories, and shared roommate settings, and define how those settings meet health and safety standards suitable for nonminors. The department, in its consultation with stakeholders, shall define the six-month certification of the conditions of eligibility pursuant to subdivision (b) to be consistent with the flexibility provided by federal policy guidance, to ensure that there are ample supports for a nonminor to achieve the goals of his or her transition independent living case plan. The department, in its consultation with stakeholders, shall ensure that notices of action and other forms created to inform the nonminor of due process rights and how to access them shall be developed, using language consistent with the special needs of the nonminor dependent population.
(j) Notwithstanding the Administrative Procedure Act, Chapter 3.5 (commencing with Section 11340) of Part 1 of Division 3 of Title 2 of the Government Code, the department shall prepare for implementation of the applicable provisions of this section by publishing, after consultation with the stakeholders listed in subdivision (i), all-county letters or similar instructions from the director by October 1, 2011, to be effective January 1, 2012. Emergency regulations to implement the applicable provisions of this act may be adopted by the director in accordance with the Administrative Procedure Act. The initial adoption of the emergency regulations and one readoption of the emergency regulations shall be deemed to be an emergency and necessary for the immediate preservation of the public peace, health, safety, or general welfare. Initial emergency regulations and the first readoption of those emergency regulations shall be exempt from review by the Office of Administrative Law. The emergency regulations authorized by this section shall be submitted to the Office of Administrative Law for filing with the Secretary of State and shall remain in effect for no more than 180 days.
(k)  Notwithstanding any other provision of law, the extension of benefits to nonminor dependents between 20 and 21 years of age, as provided for in this section, shall be contingent upon an appropriation by the Legislature.
(l) This section shall become operative on January 1, 2012.

SEC. 48.

 Section 11403.2 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

11403.2.
 (a) The following persons shall be eligible for transitional housing placement program services provided pursuant to Article 4 (commencing with Section 16522) of Chapter 5 of Part 4:
(1) Any minor at least 16 years of age and not more than 18 years of age, and, on or after January 1, 2012, any nonminor dependent who is less than 21 years of age, who is eligible for AFDC-FC benefits as provided in subdivision (b) of Section 11403, and who also meets the requirements in Section 16522.2.
(2) Any person less than 24 years of age who has emancipated from a county that has elected to participate in a transitional housing placement program for youths who are at least 18 years of age and under 24 years of age, as described in subdivision (r) of Section 11400, provided he or she has not received services under this paragraph for more than a total of 24 months, whether or not consecutive. If the person participating in a transitional housing placement program is not receiving aid under Section 11403.1, he or she, as a condition of participation, shall enter into, and execute the provisions of, a transitional independent living plan that shall be mutually agreed upon, and annually reviewed, by the emancipated foster youth and the county welfare or probation department or independent living program coordinator. The youth participating under this paragraph shall inform the county of any changes to conditions specified in the agreed-upon plan that affect eligibility, including changes in address, living circumstances, and the educational or training program.
(3) It is the intent of the Legislature to create a new placement option, known as THP-Plus-Foster Care. On and after January 1, 2012, THP-Plus-Foster Care, as described in subdivision (x) of Section 11400, is an eligible facility for purposes of AFDC-FC payments for placement of nonminor dependents, and shall offer the same housing models and supportive services as are available through the standard THP-Plus program available to emancipated foster youths pursuant to paragraph (2). In creating the new THP-Plus-Foster Care placement option, it is the intent of the Legislature to preserve the THP-Plus program, as it is described in subdivision (e) of Section 1559.110 of the Health and Safety Code, for former emancipated foster youth who have attained 21 years of age, but are under 24 years of age, and for former emancipated foster youth who have attained 18 years of age but are under 21 years of age, whose dependency or delinquency jurisdiction has been terminated by the court, and for whom reentry into foster care under subdivision (e) of Section 388 is not an appropriate or viable option.
(4) On and after January 1, 2012, any nonminor dependent at least 18 years of age, and on January 1, 2013, 19 years of age, and on January 1, 2014, 20 years of age, and not more than 21 years of age, as described in subdivision (v) of Section 11400, pursuant to subdivision (x) of Section 11400, and who is eligible pursuant to subdivision (b) of Section 11403.
(b) Payment on behalf of an eligible person receiving transitional housing services pursuant to paragraph (1) of subdivision (a) shall be made to the transitional housing placement program pursuant to the conditions and limitations set forth in Section 11403.3. Notwithstanding Section 11403.3, the department, in consultation with concerned stakeholders, including, but not limited to, representatives of the Legislature, the County Welfare Directors Association, the Chief Probation Officers of California, the Judicial Council, representatives of Indian tribes, the California Youth Connection, former foster youth, child advocacy organizations, labor organizations, juvenile justice advocacy organizations, foster caregiver organizations, researchers, and transitional housing program providers, shall convene a workgroup to establish a new rate structure for the Title IV-E funded THP-Plus-Foster Care placement option for nonminor dependents. The workgroup shall also consider application of this new rate structure to the transitional housing placement program, as described in paragraph (2) of subdivision (a) of Section 11403.3. In developing the new rate structure pursuant to this subdivision, the department shall consider the average rates in effect and being paid by counties to current transitional housing placement programs.
(c) On and after January 1, 2012, with respect to nonminor dependents under 21 years of age, the approval standards for these legal adults placed in the THP-Plus-Foster Care shall be developed in accordance with Section 1502.7 of the Health and Safety Code. When developing regulations for the THP-Plus programs, the department shall consider the development of an application fee process for the programs, similar to the fee schedule as described in Section 1523.1 of the Health and Safety Code. An approved THP-Plus program shall certify facilities or sites to provide transitional housing services to nonminor dependents pursuant to subdivision (e) of Section 1559.110 of the Health and Safety Code.
(d) (1) For budgeting purposes, and to achieve the intent of the Legislature as described in paragraph (3) of subdivision (a), the department, in consultation with stakeholders and pursuant to subdivision (c) of Section 11403.3, shall allocate 70 percent of the amount payable to placements of nonminor dependents under the THP-Plus-Foster Care program. The remaining 30 percent of the amount payable shall be available for THP-Plus placement for both those former emancipated foster youth who have attained 21 years of age, but are under 24 years of age, and for former emancipated foster youth who have attained 18 years of age but who are under 21 years of age, whose dependency or delinquency jurisdiction has been terminated by the court, and for whom reentry into foster care under subdivision (e) of Section 388 is not an appropriate or viable option.
(2) Each county shall submit to the department a plan that sets forth how the county will provide for the THP-Plus-Foster Care population, as well as assurances that up to 30 percent of the placements will be set aside for the THP-Plus population. The county plan shall also include a contingency for how THP-Plus placements will be reallocated in the event that there is not sufficient demand in either the THP-Plus-Foster Care Program or the THP-Plus programs to fill the beds allocated for these populations.

SEC. 49.

 Section 11405 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

11405.
 (a) AFDC-FC benefits shall be paid to an otherwise eligible child living with a nonrelated legal guardian, provided that the legal guardian cooperates with the county welfare department in all of the following:
(1) Developing a written assessment of the child’s needs.
(2) Updating the assessment no less frequently than once every six months.
(3) Carrying out the case plan developed by the county.
(b) When AFDC-FC is applied for on behalf of a child living with a nonrelated legal guardian the county welfare department shall do all of the following:
(1) Develop a written assessment of the child’s needs.
(2) Update those assessments no less frequently than once every six months.
(3) Develop a case plan that specifies how the problems identified in the assessment are to be addressed.
(4) Make visits to the child as often as appropriate, but in no event less often than once every six months.
(c) Where the child is a parent and has a child living with him or her in the same eligible facility, the assessment required by paragraph (1) of subdivision (a) shall include the needs of his or her child.
(d) Nonrelated legal guardians of eligible children who are in receipt of AFDC-FC payments described in this section shall be exempt from the requirement to register with the Statewide Registry of Private Professional Guardians pursuant to Sections 2850 and 2851 of the Probate Code.
(e) On and after January 1, 2012, a nonminor youth whose nonrelated guardianship was ordered in juvenile court pursuant to Section 360 or 366.26, and whose dependency was dismissed, shall remain eligible for AFDC-FC benefits until the youth attains 19 years of age, effective January 1, 2013, until the youth attains 20 years of age, and effective January 1, 2014, until the youth attains 21 years of age, provided that the youth enters into a mutual agreement with the agency responsible for his or her guardianship, and the youth is meeting the conditions of eligibility, as described in Section 11403.

SEC. 50.

 Section 11450 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

11450.
 (a) (1) Aid shall be paid for each needy family, which shall include all eligible brothers and sisters of each eligible applicant or recipient child and the parents of the children, but shall not include unborn children, or recipients of aid under Chapter 3 (commencing with Section 12000), qualified for aid under this chapter. In determining the amount of aid paid, and notwithstanding the minimum basic standards of adequate care specified in Section 11452, the family’s income, exclusive of any amounts considered exempt as income or paid pursuant to subdivision (e) or Section 11453.1, averaged for the prospective quarter pursuant to Sections 11265.2 and 11265.3, and then calculated pursuant to Section 11451.5, shall be deducted from the sum specified in the following table, as adjusted for cost-of-living increases pursuant to Section 11453 and paragraph (2). In no case shall the amount of aid paid for each month exceed the sum specified in the following table, as adjusted for cost-of-living increases pursuant to Section 11453 and paragraph (2), plus any special needs, as specified in subdivisions (c), (e), and (f):
Number of
 eligible needy
persons in
the same home
Maximum
aid
 1 ........................
$  326
 2 ........................
   535
 3 ........................
   663
 4 ........................
   788
 5 ........................
   899
 6 ........................
 1,010
 7 ........................
 1,109
 8 ........................
 1,209
 9 ........................
 1,306
10 or more ........................
 1,403
If, when, and during those times that the United States government increases or decreases its contributions in assistance of needy children in this state above or below the amount paid on July 1, 1972, the amounts specified in the above table shall be increased or decreased by an amount equal to that increase or decrease by the United States government, provided that no increase or decrease shall be subject to subsequent adjustment pursuant to Section 11453.
(2) The sums specified in paragraph (1) shall not be adjusted for cost of living for the 1990–91, 1991–92, 1992–93, 1993–94, 1994–95, 1995–96, 1996–97, and 1997–98 fiscal years, and through October 31, 1998, nor shall that amount be included in the base for calculating any cost-of-living increases for any fiscal year thereafter. Elimination of the cost-of-living adjustment pursuant to this paragraph shall satisfy the requirements of Section 11453.05, and no further reduction shall be made pursuant to that section.
(b) When the family does not include a needy child qualified for aid under this chapter, aid shall be paid to a pregnant mother for the month in which the birth is anticipated and for the three-month period immediately prior to the month in which the birth is anticipated in the amount that would otherwise be paid to one person, as specified in subdivision (a), if the mother, and child, if born, would have qualified for aid under this chapter. Verification of pregnancy shall be required as a condition of eligibility for aid under this subdivision. Aid shall also be paid to a pregnant woman with no other children in the amount which would otherwise be paid to one person under subdivision (a) at any time after verification of pregnancy if the pregnant woman is also eligible for the Cal-Learn Program described in Article 3.5 (commencing with Section 11331) and if the mother, and child, if born, would have qualified for aid under this chapter.
(c) The amount of forty-seven dollars ($47) per month shall be paid to pregnant mothers qualified for aid under subdivision (a) or (b) to meet special needs resulting from pregnancy if the mother, and child, if born, would have qualified for aid under this chapter. County welfare departments shall refer all recipients of aid under this subdivision to a local provider of the Women, Infants and Children program. If that payment to pregnant mothers qualified for aid under subdivision (a) is considered income under federal law in the first five months of pregnancy, payments under this subdivision shall not apply to persons eligible under subdivision (a), except for the month in which birth is anticipated and for the three-month period immediately prior to the month in which delivery is anticipated, if the mother, and the child, if born, would have qualified for aid under this chapter.
(d) For children receiving AFDC-FC under this chapter, there shall be paid, exclusive of any amount considered exempt as income, an amount of aid each month which, when added to the child’s income, is equal to the rate specified in Section 11460, 11461, 11462, 11462.1, or 11463. In addition, the child shall be eligible for special needs, as specified in departmental regulations.
(e) In addition to the amounts payable under subdivision (a) and Section 11453.1, a family shall be entitled to receive an allowance for recurring special needs not common to a majority of recipients. These recurring special needs shall include, but not be limited to, special diets upon the recommendation of a physician for circumstances other than pregnancy, and unusual costs of transportation, laundry, housekeeping services, telephone, and utilities. The recurring special needs allowance for each family per month shall not exceed that amount resulting from multiplying the sum of ten dollars ($10) by the number of recipients in the family who are eligible for assistance.
(f) After a family has used all available liquid resources, both exempt and nonexempt, in excess of one hundred dollars ($100), with the exception of funds deposited in a restricted account described in subdivision (a) of Section 11155.2, the family shall also be entitled to receive an allowance for nonrecurring special needs.
(1) An allowance for nonrecurring special needs shall be granted for replacement of clothing and household equipment and for emergency housing needs other than those needs addressed by paragraph (2). These needs shall be caused by sudden and unusual circumstances beyond the control of the needy family. The department shall establish the allowance for each of the nonrecurring special need items. The sum of all nonrecurring special needs provided by this subdivision shall not exceed six hundred dollars ($600) per event.
(2) Homeless assistance is available to a homeless family seeking shelter when the family is eligible for aid under this chapter. Homeless assistance for temporary shelter is also available to homeless families which are apparently eligible for aid under this chapter. Apparent eligibility exists when evidence presented by the applicant, or which is otherwise available to the county welfare department, and the information provided on the application documents indicate that there would be eligibility for aid under this chapter if the evidence and information were verified. However, an alien applicant who does not provide verification of his or her eligible alien status, or a woman with no eligible children who does not provide medical verification of pregnancy, is not apparently eligible for purposes of this section.
A family is considered homeless, for the purpose of this section, when the family lacks a fixed and regular nighttime residence; or the family has a primary nighttime residence that is a supervised publicly or privately operated shelter designed to provide temporary living accommodations; or the family is residing in a public or private place not designed for, or ordinarily used as, a regular sleeping accommodation for human beings. A family is also considered homeless for the purpose of this section if the family has received a notice to pay rent or quit. The family shall demonstrate that the eviction is the result of a verified financial hardship as a result of extraordinary circumstances beyond their control, and not other lease or rental violations, and that the family is experiencing a financial crisis that could result in homelessness if preventative assistance is not provided.
(A) (i) A nonrecurring special need of sixty-five dollars ($65) a day shall be available to families of up to four members for the costs of temporary shelter, subject to the requirements of this paragraph. The fifth and additional members of the family shall each receive fifteen dollars ($15) per day, up to a daily maximum of one hundred twenty-five dollars ($125). County welfare departments may increase the daily amount available for temporary shelter as necessary to secure the additional bedspace needed by the family.
(ii) This special need shall be granted or denied immediately upon the family’s application for homeless assistance, and benefits shall be available for up to three working days. The county welfare department shall verify the family’s homelessness within the first three working days and if the family meets the criteria of questionable homelessness established by the department, the county welfare department shall refer the family to its early fraud prevention and detection unit, if the county has such a unit, for assistance in the verification of homelessness within this period.
(iii) After homelessness has been verified, the three-day limit shall be extended for a period of time which, when added to the initial benefits provided, does not exceed a total of 16 calendar days. This extension of benefits shall be done in increments of one week and shall be based upon searching for permanent housing which shall be documented on a housing search form; good cause; or other circumstances defined by the department. Documentation of a housing search shall be required for the initial extension of benefits beyond the three-day limit and on a weekly basis thereafter as long as the family is receiving temporary shelter benefits. Good cause shall include, but is not limited to, situations in which the county welfare department has determined that the family, to the extent it is capable, has made a good faith but unsuccessful effort to secure permanent housing while receiving temporary shelter benefits.
(B) A nonrecurring special need for permanent housing assistance is available to pay for last month’s rent and security deposits when these payments are reasonable conditions of securing a residence, or to pay for up to two months of rent arrearages, when these payments are a reasonable condition of preventing eviction.
The last month’s rent or monthly arrearage portion of the payment (i) shall not exceed 80 percent of the family’s total monthly household income without the value of food stamps or special needs for a family of that size and (ii) shall only be made to families that have found permanent housing costing no more than 80 percent of the family’s total monthly household income without the value of food stamps or special needs for a family of that size.
However, if the county welfare department determines that a family intends to reside with individuals who will be sharing housing costs, the county welfare department shall, in appropriate circumstances, set aside the condition specified in clause (ii) of the preceding paragraph.
(C) The nonrecurring special need for permanent housing assistance is also available to cover the standard costs of deposits for utilities which are necessary for the health and safety of the family.
(D) A payment for or denial of permanent housing assistance shall be issued no later than one working day from the time that a family presents evidence of the availability of permanent housing. If an applicant family provides evidence of the availability of permanent housing before the county welfare department has established eligibility for aid under this chapter, the county welfare department shall complete the eligibility determination so that the denial of or payment for permanent housing assistance is issued within one working day from the submission of evidence of the availability of permanent housing, unless the family has failed to provide all of the verification necessary to establish eligibility for aid under this chapter.
(E) (i) Except as provided in clauses (ii) and (iii), eligibility for the temporary shelter assistance and the permanent housing assistance pursuant to this paragraph shall be limited to one period of up to 16 consecutive calendar days of temporary assistance and one payment of permanent assistance. Any family that includes a parent or nonparent caretaker relative living in the home who has previously received temporary or permanent homeless assistance at any time on behalf of an eligible child shall not be eligible for further homeless assistance. Any person who applies for homeless assistance benefits shall be informed that the temporary shelter benefit of up to 16 consecutive days is available only once in a lifetime, with certain exceptions, and that a break in the consecutive use of the benefit constitutes permanent exhaustion of the temporary benefit.
(ii) A family that becomes homeless as a direct and primary result of a state or federally declared natural disaster shall be eligible for temporary and permanent homeless assistance.
(iii) A family shall be eligible for temporary and permanent homeless assistance when homelessness is a direct result of domestic violence by a spouse, partner, or roommate; physical or mental illness that is medically verified that shall not include a diagnosis of alcoholism, drug addiction, or psychological stress; or, the uninhabitability of the former residence caused by sudden and unusual circumstances beyond the control of the family including natural catastrophe, fire, or condemnation. These circumstances shall be verified by a third-party governmental or private health and human services agency, except that domestic violence may also be verified by a sworn statement by the victim, as provided under Section 11495.25. Homeless assistance payments based on these specific circumstances may not be received more often than once in any 12-month period. In addition, if the domestic violence is verified by a sworn statement by the victim, the homeless assistance payments shall be limited to two periods of not more than 16 consecutive calendar days of temporary assistance and two payments of permanent assistance. A county may require that a recipient of homeless assistance benefits who qualifies under this paragraph for a second time in a 24-month period participate in a homelessness avoidance case plan as a condition of eligibility for homeless assistance benefits. The county welfare department shall immediately inform recipients who verify domestic violence by a sworn statement pursuant to clause (iii) of the availability of domestic violence counseling and services, and refer those recipients to services upon request.
(iv) If a county requires a recipient who verifies domestic violence by a sworn statement to participate in a homelessness avoidance case plan pursuant to clause (iii), the plan shall include the provision of domestic violence services, if appropriate.
(v) If a recipient seeking homeless assistance based on domestic violence pursuant to clause (iii) has previously received homeless avoidance services based on domestic violence, the county shall review whether services were offered to the recipient and consider what additional services would assist the recipient in leaving the domestic violence situation.
(vi) The county welfare department shall report to the department through a statewide homeless assistance payment indicator system, necessary data, as requested by the department, regarding all recipients of aid under this paragraph.
(F) The county welfare departments, and all other entities participating in the costs of the AFDC program, have the right in their share to any refunds resulting from payment of the permanent housing. However, if an emergency requires the family to move within the 12-month period specified in subparagraph (E), the family shall be allowed to use any refunds received from its deposits to meet the costs of moving to another residence.
(G) Payments to providers for temporary shelter and permanent housing and utilities shall be made on behalf of families requesting these payments.
(H) The daily amount for the temporary shelter special need for homeless assistance may be increased if authorized by the current year’s Budget Act by specifying a different daily allowance and appropriating the funds therefor.
(I) No payment shall be made pursuant to this paragraph unless the provider of housing is a commercial establishment, shelter, or person in the business of renting properties who has a history of renting properties.
(g) The department shall establish rules and regulations ensuring the uniform application statewide of this subdivision.
(h) The department shall notify all applicants and recipients of aid through the standardized application form that these benefits are available and shall provide an opportunity for recipients to apply for the funds quickly and efficiently.
(i) Except for the purposes of Section 15200, the amounts payable to recipients pursuant to Section 11453.1 shall not constitute part of the payment schedule set forth in subdivision (a).
The amounts payable to recipients pursuant to Section 11453.1 shall not constitute income to recipients of aid under this section.
(j) For children receiving Kin-GAP pursuant to Article 4.5 (commencing with Section 11360) or Article 4.7 (commencing with Section 11385) there shall be paid, exclusive of any amount considered exempt as income, an amount of aid each month, which, when added to the child’s income, is equal to the rate specified in Sections 11364 and 11387.

SEC. 51.

 Section 11450.16 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

11450.16.
 (a) For purposes of determining eligibility under this chapter, and for computing the amount of aid payment under Section 11450, families shall be grouped into assistance units.
(b) Every assistance unit shall include at least one of the following persons:
(1) One of each of the following:
(A) An eligible child.
(B) The caretaker relative of an otherwise eligible child who is not receiving aid under Section 11250 because that child is receiving benefits under Title XVI of the Social Security Act (Subchapter 16 (commencing with Section 1381) of Chapter 7 of Title 42 of the United States Code), or Kin-GAP payments under Section 11364 or 11387, or foster care payments under Section 11461.
(2) A pregnant woman who is eligible for payments under subdivision (c) of Section 11450.
(c) Every assistance unit shall, in addition to the requirements of subdivision (b), include the eligible parents of the eligible child and the eligible siblings, including half-siblings, of the eligible child when those persons reside in the same home as the eligible child. This subdivision shall not apply to any convicted offender who is permitted to reside at the home of the eligible child as part of a court-imposed sentence and who is considered an absent parent under Section 11250.
(d) An assistance unit may, at the option of the family comprising the assistance unit, also include the nonparent caretaker relative of the eligible child, the spouse of the parent of the eligible child, otherwise eligible nonsibling children in the care of the caretaker relative of the eligible child, and the alternatively sentenced offender parent exempted under subdivision (c).
(e) If two or more assistance units reside in the same home, they shall be combined into one assistance unit when any of the following circumstances occurs:
(1) There is a common caretaker relative for the eligible children.
(2) One caretaker relative marries another caretaker relative.
(3) Two caretaker relatives are the parents of an eligible child.
(f) For purposes of this section, “caretaker relative” means the parent or other relative, as defined by regulations adopted by the department, who exercises responsibility and control of a child.

SEC. 52.

 Section 11454.5 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

11454.5.
 (a) Any month in which the following conditions exist shall not be counted as a month of receipt of aid for the purposes of subdivision (a) of Section 11454:
(1) The recipient is exempt from participation under Article 3.2 (commencing with Section 11320) due to disability, or advanced age in accordance with paragraph (3) of subdivision (b) of Section 11320.3, or due to caretaking responsibilities that impair the recipient’s ability to be regularly employed, in accordance with paragraph (4) or (5) of subdivision (b) of Section 11320.3.
(2) The recipient is eligible for, participating in, or exempt from, the Cal-Learn Program provided for pursuant to Article 3.5 (commencing with Section 11331), is participating in another teen parent program approved by the department, or, on or after January 1, 2012, is a nonminor dependent under the supervision of the county welfare or probation department who is placed in an approved relative’s home and is eligible for aid under this section because he or she satisfies the conditions described in Section 11403.
(3) The cost of the cash aid provided to the recipient for the month is fully reimbursed by child support, whether collected in that month or any subsequent month.
(4) The family is a former recipient of cash aid under this chapter and currently receives only child care, case management, or supportive services pursuant to Section 11323.2 or Article 15.5 (commencing with Section 8350) of Chapter 2 of Part 6 of the Education Code.
(5) To the extent provided by federal law, the recipient lived in Indian country, as defined by federal law, or an Alaskan native village in which at least 50 percent of the adults living in the Indian country or in the village are not employed.
(6) The recipient has been excused from participation for good cause pursuant to paragraph (1) of subdivision (f) of Section 11320.3. This paragraph shall become inoperative on July 1, 2011.
(7) The recipient is exempt from participation due to caretaking responsibilities that impair the recipient’s ability to be regularly employed, or is otherwise exempt, in accordance with paragraph (7) of subdivision (b) of Section 11320.3. This paragraph shall become inoperative on July 1, 2011.
(b) In cases where a lump-sum diversion payment is provided in lieu of cash aid under Section 11266.5, the month in which the payment is made or the months calculated pursuant to subdivision (f) of Section 11266.5 shall count against the limits specified in Section 11454.

SEC. 53.

 Section 11461 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

11461.
 (a) For children or, on and after January 1, 2012, nonminor dependents placed in a licensed or approved family home with a capacity of six or less, or in an approved home of a relative or nonrelated legal guardian, or the approved home of a nonrelative extended family member as described in Section 362.7, or, on and after January 1, 2012, a supervised independent living setting, as defined in subdivision (w) of Section 11400, the per child per month rates in the following schedule shall be in effect for the period July 1, 1989, through December 31, 1989:
Age
Basic rate
 0–4 ........................
$  294
 5–8 ........................
319
 9–11 ........................
340
12–14 ........................
378
15–20 ........................
412
(b) (1) Any county that, as of October 1, 1989, has in effect a basic rate that is at the levels set forth in the schedule in subdivision (a), shall continue to receive state participation, as specified in subdivision (c) of Section 15200, at these levels.
(2) Any county that, as of October 1, 1989, has in effect a basic rate that exceeds a level set forth in the schedule in subdivision (a), shall continue to receive the same level of state participation as it received on October 1, 1989.
(c) The amounts in the schedule of basic rates in subdivision (a) shall be adjusted as follows:
(1) Effective January 1, 1990, the amounts in the schedule of basic rates in subdivision (a) shall be increased by 12 percent.
(2) Effective May 1, 1990, any county that did not increase the basic rate by 12 percent on January 1, 1990, shall do both of the following:
(A) Increase the basic rate in effect December 31, 1989, for which state participation is received by 12 percent.
(B) Increase the basic rate, as adjusted pursuant to subparagraph (A), by an additional 5 percent.
(3) (A) Except as provided in subparagraph (B), effective July 1, 1990, for the 1990–91 fiscal year, the amounts in the schedule of basic rates in subdivision (a) shall be increased by an additional 5 percent.
(B) The rate increase required by subparagraph (A) shall not be applied to rates increased May 1, 1990, pursuant to paragraph (2).
(4) Effective July 1, 1998, the amounts in the schedule of basic rates in subdivision (a) shall be increased by 6 percent. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, the 6-percent increase provided for in this paragraph shall, retroactive to July 1, 1998, apply to every county, including any county to which paragraph (2) of subdivision (b) applies, and shall apply to foster care for every age group.
(5) Notwithstanding any other provision of law, any increase that takes effect after July 1, 1998, shall apply to every county, including any county to which paragraph (2) of subdivision (b) applies, and shall apply to foster care for every age group.
(6) The increase in the basic foster family home rate shall apply only to children placed in a licensed foster family home receiving the basic rate or in an approved home of a relative or nonrelative extended family member, as described in Section 362.7, a supervised independent living setting, as defined in subdivision (w) of Section 11400, or a nonrelated legal guardian receiving the basic rate. The increased rate shall not be used to compute the monthly amount that may be paid to licensed foster family agencies for the placement of children in certified foster homes.
(d) (1) (A) Beginning with the 1991–92 fiscal year, the schedule of basic rates in subdivision (a) shall be adjusted by the percentage changes in the California Necessities Index, computed pursuant to the methodology described in Section 11453, subject to the availability of funds.
(B) In addition to the adjustment in subparagraph (A) effective January 1, 2000, the schedule of basic rates in subdivision (a) shall be increased by 2.36 percent rounded to the nearest dollar.
(C) Effective January 1, 2008, the schedule of basic rates in subdivision (a), as adjusted pursuant to subparagraph (B), shall be increased by 5 percent, rounded to the nearest dollar. The increased rate shall not be used to compute the monthly amount that may be paid to licensed foster family agencies for the placement of children in certified foster family homes, and shall not be used to recompute the foster care maintenance payment that would have been paid based on the age-related, state-approved foster family home care rate and any applicable specialized care increment, for any adoption assistance agreement entered into prior to October 1, 1992, or in any subsequent reassessment for adoption assistance agreements executed before January 1, 2008.
(2) (A) Any county that, as of the 1991–92 fiscal year, receives state participation for a basic rate that exceeds the amount set forth in the schedule of basic rates in subdivision (a) shall receive an increase each year in state participation for that basic rate of one-half of the percentage adjustments specified in paragraph (1) until the difference between the county’s adjusted state participation level for its basic rate and the adjusted schedule of basic rates is eliminated.
(B) Notwithstanding subparagraph (A), all counties for the 1999–2000 fiscal year and the 2007–08 fiscal year shall receive an increase in state participation for the basic rate of the entire percentage adjustment described in paragraph (1).
(3) If a county has, after receiving the adjustments specified in paragraph (2), a state participation level for a basic rate that is below the amount set forth in the adjusted schedule of basic rates for that fiscal year, the state participation level for that rate shall be further increased to the amount specified in the adjusted schedule of basic rates.
(e) (1) As used in this section, “specialized care increment” means an approved amount paid with state participation on behalf of an AFDC-FC child requiring specialized care to a home listed in subdivision (a) in addition to the basic rate. Notwithstanding subdivision (a), the specialized care increment shall not be paid to a nonminor dependent placed in a supervised independent living setting as defined in subdivision (w) of Section 11403. On the effective date of this section, the department shall continue and maintain the current ratesetting system for specialized care.
(2) Any county that, as of the effective date of this section, has in effect specialized care increments that have been approved by the department, shall continue to receive state participation for those payments.
(3) Any county that, as of the effective date of this section, has in effect specialized care increments that exceed the amounts that have been approved by the department, shall continue to receive the same level of state participation as it received on the effective date of this section.
(4) (A) Except for subparagraph (B), beginning January 1, 1990, specialized care increments shall be adjusted in accordance with the methodology for the schedule of basic rates described in subdivisions (c) and (d). No county shall receive state participation for any increases in a specialized care increment which exceeds the adjustments made in accordance with this methodology.
(B) Notwithstanding subdivision (e) of Section 11460, for the 1993–94 fiscal year, an amount equal to 5 percent of the State Treasury appropriation for family homes shall be added to the total augmentation for the AFDC-FC program in order to provide incentives and assistance to counties in the area of specialized care. This appropriation shall be used, but not limited to, encouraging counties to implement or expand specialized care payment systems, to recruit and train foster parents for the placement of children with specialized care needs, and to develop county systems to encourage the placement of children in family homes. It is the intent of the Legislature that in the use of these funds, federal financial participation shall be claimed whenever possible.
(f) (1) As used in this section, “clothing allowance” means the amount paid with state participation in addition to the basic rate for the provision of additional clothing for an AFDC-FC child, including, but not limited to, an initial supply of clothing and school or other uniforms.
(2) Any county that, as of the effective date of this section, has in effect clothing allowances, shall continue to receive the same level as it received on the effective date of this section.
(3) (A) Commencing in the 2007–08 fiscal year, for children whose foster care payment is the responsibility of Colusa, Plumas, and Tehama Counties, the amount of the clothing allowance may be up to two hundred seventy-four dollars ($274) per child per year.
(B)  Each county listed in subparagraph (A) that elects to receive the clothing allowance shall submit a Clothing Allowance Program Notification to the department within 60 days after the effective date of the act that adds this paragraph.
(C) The Clothing Allowance Program Notification shall identify the specific amounts to be paid and the disbursement schedule for these clothing allowance payments.
(4) Beginning January 1, 1990, except as provided in paragraph (5), clothing allowances shall be adjusted annually in accordance with the methodology for the schedule of basic rates described in subdivisions (c) and (d). No county shall be reimbursed for any increases in clothing allowances which exceed the adjustments made in accordance with this methodology.
(5) For the 2000–01 fiscal year and each fiscal year thereafter, without a county share of cost, notwithstanding subdivision (c) of Section 15200, each child shall be entitled to receive a supplemental clothing allowance of one hundred dollars ($100) per year subject to the availability of funds. The clothing allowance shall be used to supplement, and not supplant, the clothing allowance specified in paragraph (1).

SEC. 54.

 Section 11464 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

11464.
 (a) The Legislature finds and declares all of the following:
(1) Children who are consumers of regional center services and also receiving Aid to Families with Dependent Children-Foster Care (AFDC-FC), Kinship Guardianship Assistance Payment (Kin-GAP) benefits, or Adoption Assistance Program (AAP) benefits have special needs that can require care and supervision beyond that typically provided to children in foster care. Clarifying the roles of the child welfare and developmental disabilities services systems will ensure that these children receive the services and support they need in a timely manner and encourage the successful adoption of these children, where appropriate.
(2) To address the extraordinary care and supervision needs of children who are consumers of regional center services and also receiving AFDC-FC, Kin-GAP, or AAP benefits, it is necessary to provide a rate for care and supervision of these children that is higher than the average rate they would otherwise receive through the foster care system and higher than the rate other children with medical and other significant special needs receive.
(3) Despite the enhanced rate provided in this section, some children who are consumers of regional center services and also receiving AFDC-FC, Kin-GAP, or AAP benefits may have care and supervision needs that are so extraordinary that they cannot be addressed within that rate. In these limited circumstances, a process should be established whereby a supplement may be provided in addition to the enhanced rate.
(4) Children who receive rates pursuant to this section shall be afforded the same due process rights as all children who apply for AFDC-FC, Kin-GAP, and AAP benefits pursuant to Section 10950.
(b) Rates for children who are both regional center consumers and recipients of AFDC-FC or Kin-GAP benefits under this chapter shall be determined as provided in Section 4684 and this section.
(c) (1) The rate to be paid for 24-hour out-of-home care and supervision provided to children who are both consumers of regional center services pursuant to subdivision (d) of Section 4512 and recipients of AFDC-FC and Kin-GAP benefits under this chapter shall be two thousand six dollars ($2,006) per child per month.
(2) (A) The county, at its sole discretion, may authorize a supplement of up to one thousand dollars ($1,000) to the rate for children three years of age and older, if it determines the child has the need for extraordinary care and supervision that cannot be met within the rate established pursuant to paragraph (1). The State Department of Social Services and the State Department of Developmental Services, in consultation with stakeholders representing county child welfare agencies, regional centers, and children who are both consumers of regional center services and recipients of AFDC-FC, Kin-GAP, or AAP benefits, shall develop objective criteria to be used by counties in determining eligibility for and the level of the supplements provided pursuant to this paragraph. The State Department of Social Services shall issue an all-county letter to implement these criteria within 120 days of the effective date of this act. The criteria shall take into account the extent to which the child has any of the following:
(i) Severe impairment in physical coordination and mobility.
(ii) Severe deficits in self-help skills.
(iii) Severely disruptive or self-injurious behavior.
(iv) A severe medical condition.
(B) The caregiver may request the supplement described in subparagraph (A) directly or upon referral by a regional center. Referral by a regional center shall not create the presumption of eligibility for the supplement.
(C) When assessing a request for the supplement, the county shall seek information from the consumer’s regional center to assist in the assessment. The county shall issue a determination of eligibility for the supplement within 90 days of receipt of the request. The county shall report to the State Department of Social Services the number and level of rate supplements issued pursuant to this paragraph.
(d) (1) The rate to be paid for 24-hour out-of-home care and supervision provided for children who are receiving services under the California Early Start Intervention Services Act, are not yet determined by their regional center to have a developmental disability, as defined in subdivisions (a) and (l) of Section 4512, and are receiving AFDC-FC or Kin-GAP benefits under this chapter, shall be eight hundred ninety-eight dollars ($898) per child per month. If a regional center subsequently determines that the child is an individual with a developmental disability as that term is defined by subdivisions (a) and (l) of Section 4512, the rate to be paid from the date of that determination shall be consistent with subdivision (c).
(2) The rates to be paid for 24-hour out-of-home nonmedical care and supervision for children who are recipients of AFDC-FC or Kin-GAP and consumers of regional center services from a community care facility licensed pursuant to Chapter 3 (commencing with Section 1500) of Division 2 of the Health and Safety Code and vendored by a regional center pursuant to Section 56004 of Title 17 of the California Code of Regulations, shall be the facility rate established by the State Department of Developmental Services.
(e) Rates paid pursuant to this section are subject to all of the following requirements:
(1) The rates paid to the foster care provider under subdivision (c) and paragraph (1) of subdivision (d) are only for the care and supervision of the child, as defined in subdivision (b) of Section 11460 and shall not be applicable to facilities described in paragraph (2) of subdivision (d).
(2) Regional centers shall separately purchase or secure the services that are contained in the child’s Individualized Family Service Plan (IFSP) or Individual Program Plan (IPP), pursuant to Section 4684.
(3) In the event that the schedule of basic foster care rates, as specified in Section 11461, is increased on or after July 1, 2008, the rates in subdivisions (c), (d), and (f) shall be similarly adjusted. No county shall be reimbursed for any increase in this rate that exceeds the adjustments made in accordance with this methodology.
(f) (1) The AFDC-FC rates paid on behalf of a regional center consumer who is a recipient of AFDC-FC prior to July 1, 2007, shall remain in effect unless a change in the placement warrants redetermination of the rate or if the child is no longer AFDC-FC eligible. However, AFDC-FC rates paid on behalf of these children that are lower than the rates specified in paragraph (1) of subdivision (c) or paragraph (1) of subdivision (d), respectively, shall be increased as appropriate to the amount set forth in paragraph (1) of subdivision (c) or paragraph (1) of subdivision (d), effective July 1, 2007, and shall remain in effect unless a change in the placement or a change in AFDC-FC eligibility of the child warrants redetermination of the rate.
(2) For a child who is receiving AFDC-FC benefits or for whom a foster care eligibility determination is pending, and for whom an eligibility determination for regional center services pursuant to subdivision (a) of Section 4512 is pending or approved, and for whom, prior to July 1, 2007, a State Department of Developmental Services facility rate determination request has been made and is pending, the rate shall be the State Department of Developmental Services facility rate determined by the regional center through an individualized assessment, or the rate established in paragraph (1) of subdivision (c), whichever is greater. The rate shall remain in effect until the child is no longer eligible to receive AFDC-FC, or, if still AFDC-FC eligible, is found ineligible for regional center services as an individual described in subdivision (a) of Section 4512. Other than the circumstances described in this section, regional centers shall not establish facility rates for AFDC-FC purposes.
(g) (1) The department shall adopt emergency regulations in accordance with Chapter 3.5 (commencing with Section 11340) of Part 1 of Division 3 of Title 2 of the Government Code, and for the purposes of that chapter, including Section 11349.6 of the Government Code, on or before July 1, 2009.
(2)  The adoption of regulations pursuant to paragraph (1) shall be deemed an emergency and necessary for the immediate preservation of the public peace, health, safety, and general welfare. The regulations authorized by this subdivision shall remain in effect for no more than 180 days, by which time final regulations shall be adopted.
(h) (1) The State Department of Social Services and the State Department of Developmental Services shall provide to the Joint legislative Budget Committee, on a semiannual basis, the data set forth in paragraph (2) to facilitate legislative review of the outcomes of the changes made by the addition of this section and the amendments made to Sections 4684 and 16121 by the act adding this section. The first report shall be submitted on October 1, 2007, with subsequent reports submitted on March 1 and October 1 of each year.
(2) The following data shall be provided pursuant to this subdivision:
(A) The number of, and services provided to, children who are consumers of regional center services and who are receiving AAP, Kin-GAP, or AFDC-FC, broken out by children receiving the amount pursuant to paragraph (1) of subdivision (c), the amount pursuant to paragraph (1) of subdivision (d), and the level of supplement pursuant to subparagraph (A) of paragraph (2) of subdivision (c).
(B) A comparison of services provided to these children and similar children who are regional center consumers who do not receive AFDC-FC, Kin-GAP, or AAP benefits, broken out by children receiving the amount pursuant to paragraph (1) of subdivision (c), the amount pursuant to paragraph (1) of subdivision (d), and the level of supplement pursuant to subparagraph (A) of paragraph (2) of subdivision (c).
(C) The number and nature of appeals filed regarding services provided or secured by regional centers for these children, consistent with Section 4714, broken out by children receiving the amount pursuant to paragraph (1) of subdivision (c), the amount pursuant to paragraph (1) of subdivision (d), and the level of supplement pursuant to subparagraph (A) of paragraph (2) of subdivision (c).
(D) The number of these children who are adopted before and after the act adding this section, broken out by children receiving the amount pursuant to paragraph (1) of subdivision (c), the amount pursuant to paragraph (1) of subdivision (d), and the level of supplement pursuant to subparagraph (A) of paragraph (2) of subdivision (c).
(E) The number and levels of supplements requested pursuant to subparagraph (B) of paragraph (2) of subdivision (c).
(F) The number of appeals requested of the decision by counties to deny the request for the supplement pursuant to subparagraph (A) of paragraph (2) of subdivision (c).
(G) The total number and levels of supplements authorized pursuant to subparagraph (A) of paragraph (2) of subdivision (c) and the number of these supplements authorized upon appeal.
(i) Commencing January 1, 2012, the rate described in subdivision (c) shall be paid for an eligible nonminor dependent who is under 21 years of age, is receiving AFDC-FC or Kin-GAP benefits pursuant to Section 11403, and is a consumer of regional center services.

SEC. 55.

 Section 11465 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

11465.
 (a) When a child is living with a parent who receives AFDC-FC or Kin-GAP benefits, the rate paid to the provider on behalf of the parent shall include an amount for care and supervision of the child.
(b) For each category of eligible licensed community care facility, as defined in Section 1502 of the Health and Safety Code, the department shall adopt regulations setting forth a uniform rate to cover the cost of care and supervision of the child in each category of eligible licensed community care facility.
(c) (1) On and after July 1, 1998, the uniform rate to cover the cost of care and supervision of a child pursuant to this section shall be increased by 6 percent, rounded to the nearest dollar. The resultant amounts shall constitute the new uniform rate.
(2) (A) On and after July 1, 1999, the uniform rate to cover the cost of care and supervision of a child pursuant to this section shall be adjusted by an amount equal to the California Necessities Index computed pursuant to Section 11453, rounded to the nearest dollar. The resultant amounts shall constitute the new uniform rate, subject to further adjustment pursuant to subparagraph (B).
(B) In addition to the adjustment specified in subparagraph (A), on and after January 1, 2000, the uniform rate to cover the cost of care and supervision of a child pursuant to this section shall be increased by 2.36 percent, rounded to the nearest dollar. The resultant amounts shall constitute the new uniform rate.
(3) Subject to the availability of funds, for the 2000–01 fiscal year and annually thereafter, these rates shall be adjusted for cost of living pursuant to procedures in Section 11453.
(4) On and after January 1, 2008, the uniform rate to cover the cost of care and supervision of a child pursuant to this section shall be increased by 5 percent, rounded to the nearest dollar. The resulting amount shall constitute the new uniform rate.
(d) (1) Notwithstanding subdivisions (a) to (c), inclusive, the payment made pursuant to this section for care and supervision of a child who is living with a teen parent in a whole family foster home, as defined in Section 11400, shall equal the basic rate for children placed in a licensed or approved home as specified in subdivisions (a) to (d), inclusive, of Section 11461.
(2) The amount paid for care and supervision of a dependent infant living with a dependent teen parent receiving AFDC-FC benefits in a group home placement shall equal the infant supplement rate for group home placements.
(3) The caregiver shall provide the county child welfare agency or probation department with a copy of the shared responsibility plan developed pursuant to Section 16501.25 and shall advise the county child welfare agency or probation department of any subsequent changes to the plan. Once the plan has been completed and provided to the appropriate agencies, the payment made pursuant to this section shall be increased by an additional two hundred dollars ($200) per month to reflect the increased care and supervision while he or she is placed in the whole family foster home.
(4) In any year in which the payment provided pursuant to this section is adjusted for the cost of living as provided in paragraph (1) of subdivision (c), the payments provided for in this subdivision shall also be increased by the same procedures.
(5) A Kin-GAP relative who, immediately prior to entering the Kin-GAP program, was designated as a whole family foster home shall receive the same payment amounts for the care and supervision of a child who is living with a teen parent they received in foster care as a whole family foster home.
(6) On and after January 1, 2012, the rate paid for a child living with a teen parent in a whole family foster home as defined in Section 11400 shall also be paid for a child living with a nonminor dependent parent who is eligible to receive AFDC-FC or Kin-GAP pursuant to Section 11403.

SEC. 56.

 Section 11466.23 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

11466.23.
 (a) It is the intent of the Legislature to comply with the federal requirements of the Improper Payments Act of 2002 with respect to the remittance of the federal share of foster care overpayments.
(b) For the purposes of this section, a federal foster care or adoption assistance overpayment is defined as any amount of aid paid to which a foster care provider or adoption assistance recipient was not entitled, including any overpayment identified by a foster care provider as described in Section 11400, or federal Adoption Assistance Program recipient as described in Chapter 2.1 (commencing with Section 16115) of Part 4, and on and after the date that the director executes a declaration pursuant to Section 11217, any federal Kin-GAP aid paid to which a related guardian was not entitled, including any overpayment identified by a federal Kin-GAP recipient as described in Article 4.7 (commencing with Section 11385).
(c) Counties shall be required to remit the appropriate amount of federal funds upon identification of the overpayment, following the completion of due process.
(1) Counties shall not be required to repay the overpayment when any of the following occurs:
(A) The amount is legally uncollectible, including any amount legally uncollectible pursuant to Section 11466.24.
(B) The cost of collection exceeds the overpayment.
(C) The foster family agency or group home is no longer in business or licensed by the department.
(2) Remittance of overpayments of federal AFDC-FC funds, federal Kin-GAP, and federal AAP funds not excluded by paragraph (1) shall be shared by the state and the counties based on a 40-percent state, 60-percent county sharing ratio. Upon actual collection of any overpayments from providers or recipients, the county shall ensure that the total amount reimbursed to the state reflects the federal and state share of the overpayment costs, as specified. All overpayments of federal AFDC-FC funds, federal Kin-GAP, and federal AAP funds included in paragraph (1) shall be repaid completely with state funds.
(3) Nothing in this section shall inhibit existing county authority to collect overpayments.
(4) Nothing in this section shall inhibit existing county responsibility to remit voluntary overpayments upon collection.
(d) (1) The department shall adopt regulations to implement this section by December 31, 2008. Notwithstanding Chapter 3.5 (commencing with Section 11340) of Part 1 of Division 3 of Title 2 of the Government Code, the department, in consultation and coordination with the County Welfare Directors Association, may adopt emergency regulations to implement this section.
(2) The adoption of emergency regulations pursuant to subdivision (a) shall be deemed to be an emergency and necessary for the immediate preservation of the public peace, health, safety, or general welfare. The emergency regulations authorized by this section shall be submitted to the Office of Administrative Law for filing with the Secretary of State and shall remain in effect for no more than 180 days, by which time final regulations shall be adopted.
(e) The department may only require counties to remit payment of the federal share for overpayments upon identification that occur on or after the effective date of regulations adopted pursuant to this section.

SEC. 57.

 Section 11466.24 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

11466.24.
 (a) In accordance with this section, a county shall collect an overpayment, discovered on or after January 1, 1999, made to a foster family home, an approved home of a relative, including, on and after the date that the director executes a declaration pursuant to Section 11217, the home of a Kin-GAP guardian, an approved home of a nonrelative extended family member, or an approved home of a nonrelative legal guardian, or, on and after January 1, 2012, the supervised independent living setting where a nonminor dependent resides, for any period of time in which the foster child was not cared for in that home, unless any of the following conditions exist, in which case a county shall not collect the overpayment:
(1) The cost of the collection exceeds that amount of the overpayment that is likely to be recovered by the county. The cost of collecting the overpayment and the likelihood of collection shall be documented by the county. Costs that the county shall consider when determining the cost-effectiveness to collect are total administrative, personnel, legal filing fee, and investigative costs, and any other applicable costs.
(2) The child was temporarily removed from the home and payment was owed to the provider to maintain the child’s placement, or the child was temporarily absent from the provider’s home, or on runaway status and subsequently returned, and payment was made to the provider to meet the child’s needs.
(3) The overpayment was exclusively the result of a county administrative error or both the county welfare department and the provider or nonminor dependent were unaware of the information that would establish that the foster child or nonminor dependent was not eligible for foster care benefits.
(4) The provider or nonminor dependent did not have knowledge of, and did not contribute to, the cause of the overpayment.
(b) (1) After notification by a county of an overpayment to a foster family home, an approved home of a relative, including the home of a Kin-GAP guardian, or a nonrelative extended family member, approved home of a nonrelative legal guardian, or the supervised independent living setting where the nonminor dependent resides, and a demand letter for repayment, the foster parent, approved relative, approved nonrelative legal guardian, or nonminor dependent may request the county welfare department to review the overpayment determination in an informal hearing, or may file with the department a request for a hearing to appeal the overpayment determination. Requesting an informal hearing shall not preclude a payee from seeking a formal hearing at a later date. The county welfare department shall dismiss the overpayment repayment request if it determines the action to be incorrect through an initial review prior to a state hearing, or through a review in an informal hearing held at the request of the foster parent, relative, nonrelative legal guardian, or nonminor dependent.
(2) If an informal hearing does not result in the dismissal of the overpayment, or a formal appeal hearing is not requested, or on the 30th day following a formal appeal hearing decision, whichever is later, the foster family provider overpayment shall be sustained for collection purposes.
(3) The department shall adopt regulations that ensure that the best interests of the child or nonminor dependent shall be the primary concern of the county welfare director in any repayment agreement.
(c) (1) The department shall develop regulations for recovery of overpayments made to any foster family home, approved home of a relative, including the home of a Kin-GAP guardian, approved home of a nonrelative legal guardian, or supervised independent living setting where a nonminor dependent resides. The regulations shall prioritize collection methods, that shall include voluntary repayment agreement procedures and involuntary overpayment collection procedures. These procedures shall take into account the amount of the overpayment and a minimum required payment amount.
(2) A county shall not collect an overpayment through the use of an involuntary payment agreement unless a foster family home, an approved home of a relative, including the home of a Kin-GAP guardian, approved home of a nonrelative legal guardian, or supervised independent living setting where a nonminor dependent resides has rejected the offer of a voluntary overpayment agreement, or has failed to comply with the terms of the voluntary overpayment agreement.
(3) A county shall not be permitted to collect an overpayment through the offset of payments due to a foster family home, an approved home of a relative, including the home of a Kin-GAP guardian, approved home of a nonrelative legal guardian or supervised independent living setting where a nonminor dependent resides, unless this method of repayment is requested by the provider or nonminor dependent in a voluntary repayment agreement, or other circumstances defined by the department by regulation.
(d) If a provider or nonminor dependent is successful in its appeal of a collected overpayment, it shall be repaid the collected overpayment plus simple interest based on the Surplus Money Investment Fund.
(e) A county may not collect interest on the repayment of an overpayment.
(f) There shall be a one-year statute of limitations from the date upon which the county determined that there was an overpayment.

SEC. 57.3.

 Section 13754 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

13754.
 (a) It is the intent of the Legislature that nothing in this section shall be interpreted to preclude a nonminor dependent from accessing the same benefits, services, and supports, and exercise the same choices available to all nonminor dependents. It is further the intent of the Legislature that nonminor dependents who receive federal Supplemental Security Income benefits can serve as their own payee, if it is determined that the nonminor dependent satisfies the criteria established by the Social Security Administration, and should be assisted in receiving direct payment by the county child welfare department. It is further the intent of the Legislature that individuals who have had their eligibility for federal Supplemental Security Income benefits established pursuant to Section 13757 be able to maintain that eligibility even when they remain in the state’s care as a nonminor dependent. In order to facilitate this, it is the intent of the Legislature that the county child welfare agency ensure that the youth receives an SSI payment during at least one month of each 12-month period while the youth is a nonminor dependent. It is further the intent of the Legislature that the county child welfare agency may supplement the SSI payment that a youth receives during this one-month period with state-only AFDC-FC or state-only Kin-GAP benefits.
(b) (1) The county shall apply to be appointed representative payee on behalf of a child beneficiary in its custody when no other appropriate party is available to serve.
(2) When a child beneficiary reaches 18 years of age and elects to remain in the custody of the county as a nonminor dependent, the county shall provide information to the youth regarding the process for becoming his or her own payee and shall assist the youth in becoming his or her own payee pursuant to Section 13753, unless becoming his or her own payee is contrary to the best interests of the youth. In the event that a youth is unable to serve as his or her payee after attaining 18 years of age, the county shall assist the youth in finding and designating an appropriate representative payee.
(c) In its capacity as representative payee, the county shall do all of the following:
(1) Establish a no-cost, interest-bearing maintenance account for each child in the department’s custody for whom the department serves as representative payee. Interest earned shall be credited to the account. The county shall keep an itemized current account, in the manner required by federal law, of all income and expense items for each child’s maintenance account.
(2) Establish procedures for disbursing money from the accounts, including disbursing the net balance to the beneficiary upon release from care. The county shall use social security and SSI/SSP benefits only for the following purposes:
(A) For the use and benefit of the child.
(B) For purposes determined by the county to be in the child’s best interest.
(3) Establish and maintain a dedicated account in a financial institution for past-due monthly benefits that exceed six times the maximum monthly benefit payable, in accordance with federal law. The representative payee may deposit into the account established under this section any other funds representing past due benefits to the eligible individual, provided that the amount of the past due benefits is equal to or exceeds the maximum monthly benefit payable. Funds from the dedicated account shall not be used for basic maintenance costs. The use of funds from the dedicated account must be for the benefit of the child and are limited to expenditures for the following purposes:
(A) Medical treatment.
(B) Education or job skills training.
(C) Personal needs assistance.
(D) Special equipment.
(E) Housing modification.
(F) Therapy or rehabilitation.
(G) Other items or services, deemed appropriate by the Social Security Administration.

SEC. 57.5.

 Section 13757 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

13757.
 (a) (1) Subject to paragraph (2), every youth who is in foster care and nearing emancipation shall be screened by the county for potential eligibility for the federal Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program utilizing the best practice guidelines developed pursuant to Section 13752.
(2) The screening required in paragraph (1) shall only occur when the foster youth is at least 16 years and six months of age and not older than 17 years and six months of age. An application shall be submitted to the federal Social Security Administration on behalf of a youth who is screened as being likely to be eligible for federal Supplemental Security Income benefits. To the extent possible, the application shall be timed to allow for a determination of eligibility by the Social Security Administration prior to the youth’s emancipation from care including, if appropriate, the suspension of Supplemental Security Income benefits for no more than 12 months.
(b) In carrying out the requirements of subdivision (a) for a youth receiving federally funded AFDC-FC benefits, the county shall, if necessary, forego federally funded AFDC-FC and instead use state AFDC-FC resources to fund the placement in the month of application or in the month after making an application, and to subsequently reclaim federally funded AFDC-FC, in order to ensure that the youth meets all of the SSI eligibility requirements in a single month while the application is pending, as provided by federal law and regulation. Notwithstanding subdivision (a) of Section 11402, this section shall apply to a foster youth regardless of his or her federal AFDC-FC eligibility.
(c) Prior to the implementation of subdivision (b), the State Department of Social Services shall obtain clarification from the Social Security Administration and the United States Department of Health and Human Services by January 1, 2008, that the funding mechanism described in subdivision (b) is consistent with federal law and regulation.
(d) When a nonminor dependent has been approved for SSI payments pursuant to this section but is receiving an AFDC-FC or Kin-GAP benefit that includes federal financial participation in an amount that exceeds the SSI payment, causing the SSI payment to be placed in suspense, the county child welfare agency, during at least one month of every 12-month period, beginning with the date that the SSI benefit is placed in suspense, shall forego the federally funded AFDC-FC or Kin-GAP benefits and instead shall use state AFDC-FC or Kin-GAP resources to supplement the SSI benefit that the youth receives during that month. The county shall inform the Social Security Administration that the youth is not receiving any federal financial participation during that month in order to permit the nonminor dependent to receive an SSI benefit during a single month of every 12-month period. The county shall subsequently reclaim the federally funded AFDC-FC benefit or Kin-GAP benefit in the following month.

SEC. 58.

 Section 16120 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, as amended by Section 19 of Chapter 287 of the Statutes of 2009, is amended to read:

16120.
 A child shall be eligible for Adoption Assistance Program benefits if all of the conditions specified in subdivisions (a) to (l), inclusive, are met or if the conditions specified in subdivision (m) are met.
(a) It has been determined that the child cannot or should not be returned to the home of his or her parents as evidenced by a petition for termination of parental rights, a court order terminating parental rights, or a signed relinquishment, or, in the case of a tribal customary adoption, if the court has given full faith and credit to a tribal customary adoption order as provided for pursuant to paragraph (2) of subdivision (e) of Section 366.26.
(b) The child has at least one of the following characteristics that are barriers to his or her adoption:
(1) Adoptive placement without financial assistance is unlikely because of membership in a sibling group that should remain intact or by virtue of race, ethnicity, color, language, three years of age or older, or parental background of a medical or behavioral nature that can be determined to adversely affect the development of the child.
(2) Adoptive placement without financial assistance is unlikely because the child has a mental, physical, emotional, or medical disability that has been certified by a licensed professional competent to make an assessment and operating within the scope of his or her profession. This paragraph shall also apply to children with a developmental disability, as defined in subdivision (a) of Section 4512, including those determined to require out-of-home nonmedical care, as described in Section 11464.
(c) The need for adoption subsidy is evidenced by an unsuccessful search for an adoptive home to take the child without financial assistance, as documented in the case file of the prospective adoptive child. The requirement for this search shall be waived when it would be against the best interest of the child because of the existence of significant emotional ties with prospective adoptive parents while in the care of these persons as a foster child.
(d) The child satisfies any of the following criteria:
(1) He or she is under 18 years of age.
(2) He or she is under 21 years of age and has a mental or physical handicap that warrants the continuation of assistance.
(3) Effective January 1, 2012, he or she is under 19 years of age, effective January 1, 2013, he or she is under 20 years of age, and effective January 1, 2014, he or she is under 21 years of age and attained 16 years of age before the adoption assistance agreement became effective, and one or more of the conditions specified in subdivision (b) of Section 11403.
(e) The adoptive family is responsible for the child pursuant to the terms of an adoptive placement agreement or a final decree of adoption and has signed an adoption assistance agreement.
(f) The adoptive family is legally responsible for the support of the child and the child is receiving support from the adoptive parent.
(g) The department or the county responsible for determining the child’s Adoption Assistance Program eligibility status and for providing financial aid, and the prospective adoptive parent, prior to or at the time the adoption decree is issued by the court, have signed an adoption assistance agreement that stipulates the need for, and the amount of, Adoption Assistance Program benefits.
(h) The prospective adoptive parent or any adult living in the prospective adoptive home has completed the criminal background check requirements pursuant to Section 671(a)(20)(A) and (C) of Title 42 of the United States Code.
(i) To be eligible for state funding, the child is the subject of an agency adoption, as defined in Section 8506 of the Family Code and was any of the following:
(1) Under the supervision of a county welfare department as the subject of a legal guardianship or juvenile court dependency.
(2) Relinquished for adoption to a licensed California private or public adoption agency, or another public agency operating a Title IV-E program on behalf of the state, and would have otherwise been at risk of dependency as certified by the responsible public child welfare agency.
(3) Committed to the care of the department pursuant to Section 8805 or 8918 of the Family Code.
(4) The child is an Indian child and the subject of an order of adoption based on tribal customary adoption of an Indian child, as described in Section 366.24. Notwithstanding Section 8600.5 of the Family Code, for purposes of this subdivision a tribal customary adoption shall be considered an agency adoption.
(j) To be eligible for federal funding, in the case of a child who is not an applicable child for the federal fiscal year as defined in subdivision (n), the child satisfies any of the following criteria:
(1) Prior to the finalization of an agency adoption, as defined in Section 8506 of the Family Code, or an independent adoption, as defined in Section 8524 of the Family Code, is filed, the child has met the requirements to receive federal supplemental security income benefits pursuant to Subchapter 16 (commencing with Section 1381) of Chapter 7 of Title 42 of the United States Code, as determined and documented by the federal Social Security Administration.
(2) The child was removed from the home of a specified relative and the child would have been AFDC-eligible in the home of removal according to Section 606(a) or 607 of Title 42 of the United States Code, as those sections were in effect on July 16, 1996, in the month of the voluntary placement agreement or in the month court proceedings are initiated to remove the child, resulting in a judicial determination that continuation in the home would be contrary to the child’s welfare. The child must have been living with the specified relative from whom he or she was removed within six months of the month the voluntary placement agreement was signed or the petition to remove was filed.
(3) The child was voluntarily relinquished to a licensed public or private adoption agency, or another public agency operating a Title IV-E program on behalf of the state, and there is a petition to the court to remove the child from the home within six months of the time the child lived with a specified relative and a subsequent judicial determination that remaining in the home would be contrary to the child’s welfare.
(4) Title IV-E foster care maintenance was paid on behalf of the child’s minor parent and covered the cost of the minor parent’s child while the child was in the foster family home or child care institution with the minor parent.
(5) The child is an Indian child and the subject of an order of adoption based on tribal customary adoption of an Indian child, as described in Section 366.24.
(k) To be eligible for federal funding, in the case of a child who is an applicable child for the federal fiscal year, as defined in subdivision (n), the child meets any of the following criteria:
(1) At the time of initiation of adoptive proceedings was in the care of a public or licensed private child placement agency or Indian tribal organization pursuant to either of the following:
(A) An involuntary removal of the child from the home in accordance with a judicial determination to the effect that continuation in the home would be contrary to the welfare of the child.
(B) A voluntary placement agreement or a voluntary relinquishment.
(2) He or she meets all medical or disability requirements of Title XVI with respect to eligibility for supplemental security income benefits.
(3) He or she was residing in a foster family home or a child care institution with the child’s minor parent, and the child’s minor parent was in the foster family home or child care institution pursuant to either of the following:
(A) An involuntary removal of the child from the home in accordance with a judicial determination to the effect that continuation in the home would be contrary to the welfare of the child.
(B) A voluntary placement agreement or voluntary relinquishment.
(4) The child is an Indian child and the subject of an order of adoption based on tribal customary adoption of an Indian child, as described in Section 366.24.
(l) The child is a citizen of the United States or a qualified alien as defined in Section 1641 of Title 8 of the United States Code. If the child is a qualified alien who entered the United States on or after August 22, 1996, and is placed with an unqualified alien, the child must meet the five-year residency requirement pursuant to Section 673(a)(2)(B) of Title 42 of the United States Code, unless the child is a member of one of the excepted groups pursuant to Section 1612(b) of Title 8 of the United States Code.
(m) A child shall be eligible for Adoption Assistance Program benefits if the following conditions are met:
(1) The child received Adoption Assistance Program benefits with respect to a prior adoption and the child is again available for adoption because the prior adoption was dissolved and the parental rights of the adoptive parents were terminated or because the child’s adoptive parents died and the child meets the special needs criteria described in subdivisions (a) to (c), inclusive.
(2) To receive federal funding, the citizenship requirements in subdivision (l).
(n) (1) Except as provided in this subdivision, “applicable child” means a child for whom an adoption assistance agreement is entered into under this section during any federal fiscal year described in this subdivision if the child attained the applicable age for that federal fiscal year before the end of that federal fiscal year.
(A) For federal fiscal year 2010, the applicable age is 16 years.
(B) For federal fiscal year 2011, the applicable age is 14 years.
(C) For federal fiscal year 2012, the applicable age is 12 years.
(D) For federal fiscal year 2013, the applicable age is 10 years.
(E) For federal fiscal year 2014, the applicable age is eight years.
(F) For federal fiscal year 2015, the applicable age is six years.
(G) For federal fiscal year 2016, the applicable age is four years.
(H) For federal fiscal year 2017, the applicable age is two years.
(I) For federal fiscal year 2018 and thereafter, any age.
(2) Beginning with the 2010 federal fiscal year, the term “applicable child” shall include a child of any age on the date on which an adoption assistance agreement is entered into on behalf of the child under this section if the child meets both of the following criteria:
(A) He or she has been in foster care under the responsibility of the state for at least 60 consecutive months.
(B) He or she meets the requirements of subdivision (k).
(3) Beginning with the 2010 federal fiscal year, an applicable child shall include a child of any age on the date that an adoption assistance agreement is entered into on behalf of the child under this section, without regard to whether the child is described in paragraph (2), if the child meets all of the following criteria:
(A) He or she is a sibling of a child who is an applicable child for the federal fiscal year, under subdivision (n) or paragraph (2).
(B) He or she is to be placed in the same adoption placement as an “applicable child” for the federal fiscal year who is their sibling.
(C) He or she meets the requirements of subdivision (k).
(o) This section shall remain in effect only until January 1, 2014, and as of that date is repealed, unless a later enacted statute, that is enacted before January 1, 2014, deletes or extends that date.

SEC. 59.

 Section 16120 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, as added by Section 20 of Chapter 287 of the Statutes of 2009, is amended to read:

16120.
 A child shall be eligible for Adoption Assistance Program benefits if all of the conditions specified in subdivisions (a) to (l), inclusive, are met or if the conditions specified in subdivision (m) are met.
(a) It has been determined that the child cannot or should not be returned to the home of his or her parents as evidenced by a petition for termination of parental rights, a court order terminating parental rights, or a signed relinquishment.
(b) The child has at least one of the following characteristics that are barriers to his or her adoption:
(1) Adoptive placement without financial assistance is unlikely because of membership in a sibling group that should remain intact or by virtue of race, ethnicity, color, language, three years of age or older, or parental background of a medical or behavioral nature that can be determined to adversely affect the development of the child.
(2) Adoptive placement without financial assistance is unlikely because the child has a mental, physical, emotional, or medical disability that has been certified by a licensed professional competent to make an assessment and operating within the scope of his or her profession. This paragraph shall also apply to children with a developmental disability, as defined in subdivision (a) of Section 4512, including those determined to require out-of-home nonmedical care, as described in Section 11464.
(c) The need for adoption subsidy is evidenced by an unsuccessful search for an adoptive home to take the child without financial assistance, as documented in the case file of the prospective adoptive child. The requirement for this search shall be waived when it would be against the best interest of the child because of the existence of significant emotional ties with prospective adoptive parents while in the care of these persons as a foster child.
(d) The child satisfies any of the following criteria:
(1) He or she is under 18 years of age.
(2) He or she is under 21 years of age and has a mental or physical handicap that warrants the continuation of assistance.
(3) Effective January 1, 2012, he or she is under 19 years of age, effective January 1, 2013, he or she is under 20 years of age, and effective January 1, 2014, he or she is under 21 years of age and attained 16 years of age before the adoption assistance agreement became effective, and one or more of the conditions specified in subdivision (b) of Section 11403.
(e) The adoptive family is responsible for the child pursuant to the terms of an adoptive placement agreement or a final decree of adoption and has signed an adoption assistance agreement.
(f) The adoptive family is legally responsible for the support of the child and the child is receiving support from the adoptive parent.
(g) The department or the county responsible for determining the child’s Adoption Assistance Program eligibility status and for providing financial aid, and the prospective adoptive parent, prior to or at the time the adoption decree is issued by the court, have signed an adoption assistance agreement that stipulates the need for, and the amount of, Adoption Assistance Program benefits.
(h) The prospective adoptive parent or any adult living in the prospective adoptive home has completed the criminal background check requirements pursuant to Section 671(a)(20)(A) and (C) of Title 42 of the United States Code.
(i) To be eligible for state funding, the child is the subject of an agency adoption, as defined in Section 8506 of the Family Code and was any of the following:
(1) Under the supervision of a county welfare department as the subject of a legal guardianship or juvenile court dependency.
(2) Relinquished for adoption to a licensed California private or public adoption agency, or another public agency operating a Title IV-E program on behalf of the state, and would have otherwise been at risk of dependency as certified by the responsible public child welfare agency.
(3) Committed to the care of the department pursuant to Section 8805 or 8918 of the Family Code.
(j) To be eligible for federal funding, in the case of a child who is not an applicable child for the federal fiscal year as defined in subdivision (n), the child satisfies any of the following criteria:
(1) Prior to the finalization of an agency adoption, as defined in Section 8506 of the Family Code, or an independent adoption, as defined in Section 8524 of the Family Code, is filed, the child has met the requirements to receive federal supplemental security income benefits pursuant to Subchapter 16 (commencing with Section 1381) of Chapter 7 of Title 42 of the United States Code, as determined and documented by the federal Social Security Administration.
(2) The child was removed from the home of a specified relative and the child would have been AFDC-eligible in the home of removal according to Section 606(a) or 607 of Title 42 of the United States Code, as those sections were in effect on July 16, 1996, in the month of the voluntary placement agreement or in the month court proceedings are initiated to remove the child, resulting in a judicial determination that continuation in the home would be contrary to the child’s welfare. The child must have been living with the specified relative from whom he or she was removed within six months of the month the voluntary placement agreement was signed or the petition to remove was filed.
(3) The child was voluntarily relinquished to a licensed public or private adoption agency, or another public agency operating a Title IV-E program on behalf of the state, and there is a petition to the court to remove the child from the home within six months of the time the child lived with a specified relative and a subsequent judicial determination that remaining in the home would be contrary to the child’s welfare.
(4) Title IV-E foster care maintenance was paid on behalf of the child’s minor parent and covered the cost of the minor parent’s child while the child was in the foster family home or child care institution with the minor parent.
(k) To be eligible for federal funding, in the case of a child who is an applicable child for the federal fiscal year, as defined in subdivision (n), the child meets any of the following criteria:
(1) At the time of initiation of adoptive proceedings was in the care of a public or licensed private child placement agency or Indian tribal organization pursuant to either of the following:
(A) An involuntary removal of the child from the home in accordance with a judicial determination to the effect that continuation in the home would be contrary to the welfare of the child.
(B) A voluntary placement agreement or a voluntary relinquishment.
(2) He or she meets all medical or disability requirements of Title XVI with respect to eligibility for supplemental security income benefits.
(3) He or she was residing in a foster family home or a child care institution with the child’s minor parent, and the child’s minor parent was in the foster family home or child care institution pursuant to either of the following:
(A) An involuntary removal of the child from the home in accordance with a judicial determination to the effect that continuation in the home would be contrary to the welfare of the child.
(B) A voluntary placement agreement or voluntary relinquishment.
(l) The child is a citizen of the United States or a qualified alien as defined in Section 1641 of Title 8 of the United States Code. If the child is a qualified alien who entered the United States on or after August 22, 1996, and is placed with an unqualified alien, the child must meet the five-year residency requirement pursuant to Section 673(a)(2)(B) of Title 42 of the United States Code, unless the child is a member of one of the excepted groups pursuant to Section 1612(b) of Title 8 of the United States Code.
(m) A child shall be eligible for Adoption Assistance Program benefits if the following conditions are met:
(1) The child received Adoption Assistance Program benefits with respect to a prior adoption and the child is again available for adoption because the prior adoption was dissolved and the parental rights of the adoptive parents were terminated or because the child’s adoptive parents died and the child meets the special needs criteria described in subdivisions (a) to (c), inclusive.
(2) To receive federal funding, the citizenship requirements in subdivision (l).
(n) (1) Except as provided in this subdivision, “applicable child” means a child for whom an adoption assistance agreement is entered into under this section during any federal fiscal year described in this subdivision if the child attained the applicable age for that federal fiscal year before the end of that federal fiscal year.
(A) For federal fiscal year 2010, the applicable age is 16 years.
(B) For federal fiscal year 2011, the applicable age is 14 years.
(C) For federal fiscal year 2012, the applicable age is 12 years.
(D) For federal fiscal year 2013, the applicable age is 10 years.
(E) For federal fiscal year 2014, the applicable age is eight years.
(F) For federal fiscal year 2015, the applicable age is six years.
(G) For federal fiscal year 2016, the applicable age is four years.
(H) For federal fiscal year 2017, the applicable age is two years.
(I) For federal fiscal year 2018 and thereafter, any age.
(2) Beginning with the 2010 federal fiscal year, the term “applicable child” shall include a child of any age on the date on which an adoption assistance agreement is entered into on behalf of the child under this section if the child meets both of the following criteria:
(A) He or she has been in foster care under the responsibility of the state for at least 60 consecutive months.
(B) He or she meets the requirements of subdivision (k).
(3) Beginning with the 2010 federal fiscal year, an applicable child shall include a child of any age on the date that an adoption assistance agreement is entered into on behalf of the child under this section, without regard to whether the child is described in paragraph (2), if the child meets all of the following criteria:
(A) He or she is a sibling of a child who is an applicable child for the federal fiscal year, under subdivision (n) or paragraph (2).
(B) He or she is to be placed in the same adoption placement as an applicable child for the federal fiscal year who is his or her sibling.
(C) He or she meets the requirements of subdivision (k).
(o) This section shall become operative on January 1, 2014.

SEC. 60.

 Section 16123 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

16123.
 The provisions of Section 16120, permitting the payment of adoption assistance until a child attains the age of 18 or 21 if the child has mental or physical handicaps, or effective January 1, 2012, up to 21 years of age, if the child meets the criteria specified in paragraph (3) of subdivision (d) of Section 16120, shall be effective as long as federal funds are available under Title IV-E of the federal Social Security Act (Part E (commencing with Section 670) of Subchapter 4 of Chapter 7 of Title 42 of the United States Code), and the state continues to exercise its option to extend payments up to 21 years of age, pursuant to Section 473(a)(4) of the federal Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. Sec. 673(a)(4)). When those funds cease to be available, the maximum length for payment of the Adoption Assistance Program shall be five years except in instances in which there is a continuing need, related to a chronic health condition of the child which necessitated the initial financial assistance. In those cases, a parent may, until October 1, 1992, petition the department or licensed adoption agency to continue financial assistance up to age of majority. On and after October 1, 1992, the parent may petition the department or the responsible county to continue financial assistance up to the age of majority.

SEC. 61.

 Section 16501 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

16501.
 (a) As used in this chapter, “child welfare services” means public social services which are directed toward the accomplishment of any or all of the following purposes: protecting and promoting the welfare of all children, including handicapped, homeless, dependent, or neglected children; preventing or remedying, or assisting in the solution of problems which may result in, the neglect, abuse, exploitation, or delinquency of children; preventing the unnecessary separation of children from their families by identifying family problems, assisting families in resolving their problems, and preventing breakup of the family where the prevention of child removal is desirable and possible; restoring to their families children who have been removed, by the provision of services to the child and the families; identifying children to be placed in suitable adoptive homes, in cases where restoration to the biological family is not possible or appropriate; and ensuring adequate care of children away from their homes, in cases where the child cannot be returned home or cannot be placed for adoption.
“Child welfare services” also means services provided on behalf of children alleged to be the victims of child abuse, neglect, or exploitation. The child welfare services provided on behalf of each child represent a continuum of services, including emergency response services, family preservation services, family maintenance services, family reunification services, and permanent placement services, including transitional independent living services. The individual child’s case plan is the guiding principle in the provision of these services. The case plan shall be developed within a maximum of 60 days of the initial removal of the child or of the in-person response required under subdivision (f) if the child has not been removed from his or her home, or by the date of the dispositional hearing pursuant to Section 358, whichever comes first.
(1) Child welfare services may include, but are not limited to, a range of service-funded activities, including case management, counseling, emergency shelter care, emergency in-home caretakers, temporary in-home caretakers, respite care, therapeutic day services, teaching and demonstrating homemakers, parenting training, substance abuse testing, and transportation. These service-funded activities shall be available to children and their families in all phases of the child welfare program in accordance with the child’s case plan and departmental regulations. Funding for services is limited to the amount appropriated in the annual Budget Act and other available county funds.
(2) Service-funded activities to be provided may be determined by each county, based upon individual child and family needs as reflected in the service plan.
(3) As used in this chapter, “emergency shelter care” means emergency shelter provided to children who have been removed pursuant to Section 300 from their parent or parents or their guardian or guardians. The department may establish, by regulation, the time periods for which emergency shelter care shall be funded. For the purposes of this paragraph, “emergency shelter care” may include “transitional shelter care facilities” as defined in paragraph (11) of subdivision (a) of Section 1502 of the Health and Safety Code.
(b) As used in this chapter, “respite care” means temporary care for periods not to exceed 72 hours. This care may be provided to the child’s parents or guardians. This care shall not be limited by regulation to care over 24 hours. These services shall not be provided for the purpose of routine, ongoing child care.
(c) The county shall provide child welfare services as needed pursuant to an approved service plan and in accordance with regulations promulgated, in consultation with the counties, by the department. Counties may contract for service-funded activities as defined in paragraph (1) of subdivision (a). Each county shall use available private child welfare resources prior to developing new county-operated resources when the private child welfare resources are of at least equal quality and lesser or equal cost as compared with county-operated resources. Counties shall not contract for needs assessment, client eligibility determination, or any other activity as specified by regulations of the State Department of Social Services, except as specifically authorized in Section 16100.
(d) Nothing in this chapter shall be construed to affect duties which are delegated to probation officers pursuant to Sections 601 and 654.
(e) Any county may utilize volunteer individuals to supplement professional child welfare services by providing ancillary support services in accordance with regulations adopted by the State Department of Social Services.
(f) As used in this chapter, emergency response services consist of a response system providing in-person response, 24 hours a day, seven days a week, to reports of abuse, neglect, or exploitation, as required by Article 2.5 (commencing with Section 11164) of Chapter 2 of Title 1 of Part 4 of the Penal Code for the purpose of investigation pursuant to Section 11166 of the Penal Code and to determine the necessity for providing initial intake services and crisis intervention to maintain the child safely in his or her own home or to protect the safety of the child. County welfare departments shall respond to any report of imminent danger to a child immediately and all other reports within 10 calendar days. An in-person response is not required when the county welfare department, based upon an evaluation of risk, determines that an in-person response is not appropriate. This evaluation includes collateral, contacts, a review of previous referrals, and other relevant information, as indicated.
(g) As used in this chapter, family maintenance services are activities designed to provide in-home protective services to prevent or remedy neglect, abuse, or exploitation, for the purposes of preventing separation of children from their families.
(h) As used in this chapter, family reunification services are activities designed to provide time-limited foster care services to prevent or remedy neglect, abuse, or exploitation, when the child cannot safely remain at home, and needs temporary foster care, while services are provided to reunite the family.
(i) As used in this chapter, permanent placement services are activities designed to provide an alternate permanent family structure for children who because of abuse, neglect, or exploitation cannot safely remain at home and who are unlikely to ever return home. These services shall be provided on behalf of children for whom there has been a judicial determination of a permanent plan for adoption, legal guardianship, or long-term foster care, and, as needed, shall include transitional independent living services.
(j) As used in this chapter, family preservation services include those services specified in Section 16500.5 to avoid or limit out-of-home placement of children, and may include those services specified in that section to place children in the least restrictive environment possible.
(k) (1) (A) In any county electing to implement this subdivision, all county welfare department employees who have frequent and routine contact with children shall, by February 1, 1997, and all welfare department employees who are expected to have frequent and routine contact with children and who are hired on or after January 1, 1996, and all such employees whose duties change after January 1, 1996, to include frequent and routine contact with children, shall, if the employees provide services to children who are alleged victims of abuse, neglect, or exploitation, sign a declaration under penalty of perjury regarding any prior criminal conviction, and shall provide a set of fingerprints to the county welfare director.
(B) The county welfare director shall secure from the Department of Justice a criminal record to determine whether the employee has ever been convicted of a crime other than a minor traffic violation. The Department of Justice shall deliver the criminal record to the county welfare director.
(C) If it is found that the employee has been convicted of a crime, other than a minor traffic violation, the county welfare director shall determine whether there is substantial and convincing evidence to support a reasonable belief that the employee is of good character so as to justify frequent and routine contact with children.
(D) No exemption shall be granted pursuant to subparagraph (C) if the person has been convicted of a sex offense against a minor, or has been convicted of an offense specified in Section 220, 243.4, 264.1, 273d, 288, or 289 of the Penal Code, or in paragraph (1) of Section 273a of, or subdivision (a) or (b) of Section 368 of, the Penal Code, or has been convicted of an offense specified in subdivision (c) of Section 667.5 of the Penal Code. The county welfare director shall suspend such a person from any duties involving frequent and routine contact with children.
(E) Notwithstanding subparagraph (D), the county welfare director may grant an exemption if the employee or prospective employee, who was convicted of a crime against an individual specified in paragraph (1) or (7) of subdivision (c) of Section 667.5 of the Penal Code, has been rehabilitated as provided in Section 4852.03 of the Penal Code and has maintained the conduct required in Section 4852.05 of the Penal Code for at least 10 years and has the recommendation of the district attorney representing the employee’s or prospective employee’s county of residence, or if the employee or prospective employee has received a certificate of rehabilitation pursuant to Chapter 3.5 (commencing with Section 4852.01) of Title 6 of Part 3 of the Penal Code. In that case, the county welfare director may give the employee or prospective employee an opportunity to explain the conviction and shall consider that explanation in the evaluation of the criminal conviction record.
(F) If no criminal record information has been recorded, the county welfare director shall cause a statement of that fact to be included in that person’s personnel file.
(2) For purposes of this subdivision, a conviction means a plea or verdict of guilty or a conviction following a plea of nolo contendere. Any action which the county welfare director is permitted to take following the establishment of a conviction may be taken when the time for appeal has elapsed, or the judgment of conviction has been affirmed on appeal or when an order granting probation is made suspending the imposition of sentence, notwithstanding a subsequent order pursuant to Sections 1203.4 and 1203.4a of the Penal Code permitting the person to withdraw his or her plea of guilty and to enter a plea of not guilty, or setting aside the verdict of guilty, or dismissing the accusation, information, or indictment. For purposes of this subdivision, the record of a conviction, or a copy thereof certified by the clerk of the court or by a judge of the court in which the conviction occurred, shall be conclusive evidence of the conviction.

SEC. 62.

 Section 16501.1 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

16501.1.
 (a) (1) The Legislature finds and declares that the foundation and central unifying tool in child welfare services is the case plan.
(2) The Legislature further finds and declares that a case plan ensures that the child receives protection and safe and proper care and case management, and that services are provided to the child and parents or other caretakers, as appropriate, in order to improve conditions in the parent’s home, to facilitate the safe return of the child to a safe home or the permanent placement of the child, and to address the needs of the child while in foster care.
(b) (1) A case plan shall be based upon the principles of this section and shall document that a preplacement assessment of the service needs of the child and family, and preplacement preventive services, have been provided, and that reasonable efforts to prevent out-of-home placement have been made.
(2) In determining the reasonable services to be offered or provided, the child’s health and safety shall be the paramount concerns.
(3) (A) In determining the reasonable services to be offered or provided, the case plan shall include information, to the extent possible, about a parent’s incarceration in a county jail or the state prison during the time that a minor child of that parent is involved in dependency care. Once a consistent data entry field or fields have been designated in the statewide child welfare database, social workers shall make reasonable efforts to collect and update necessary data regarding a child’s incarcerated parent or parents.
(B) In order to further the goals of this paragraph, the Legislature encourages the State Department of Social Services to consult with the county welfare directors regarding the best way to incorporate the information specified in subparagraph (A) as a required field in the statewide database. The Legislature also encourages the Department of Justice, the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, county welfare departments, and county sheriffs to develop protocols for facilitating the exchange of information regarding the location and sentencing of the incarcerated parent or parents of a minor child who is in dependency care.
(C) Nothing in this paragraph shall be interpreted to require the department to create a new dedicated field in the statewide database for incorporating the information specified in subparagraph (A).
(4) Reasonable services shall be offered or provided to make it possible for a child to return to a safe home environment, unless, pursuant to subdivisions (b) and (e) of Section 361.5, the court determines that reunification services shall not be provided.
(5) If reasonable services are not ordered, or are terminated, reasonable efforts shall be made to place the child in a timely manner in accordance with the permanent plan and to complete all steps necessary to finalize the permanent placement of the child.
(c) (1) If out-of-home placement is used to attain case plan goals, the decision regarding choice of placement shall be based upon selection of a safe setting that is the least restrictive or most family-like and the most appropriate setting that is available and in close proximity to the parent’s home, proximity to the child’s school, consistent with the selection of the environment best suited to meet the child’s special needs and best interests, or both. The selection shall consider, in order of priority, placement with relatives, tribal members, and foster family, group care, and residential treatment pursuant to Section 7950 of the Family Code. On or after January 1, 2012, for a nonminor dependent, as defined in subdivision (v) of Section 11400, who is receiving AFDC-FC benefits up to 21 years of age pursuant to Section 11403, in addition to the above requirements, the selection of the placement, including a supervised independent living setting, as described in Section 11400, shall also be based upon the developmental needs of young adults by providing opportunities to have incremental responsibilities that prepare a nonminor dependent to transition to independent living. If admission to, or continuation in, a group home placement is being considered for a nonminor dependent, the group home placement approval decision shall include a youth-driven, team-based case planning process, as defined by the department, in consultation with stakeholders. The case plan shall consider the full range of placement options, and shall specify why admission to, or continuation in, a group home placement is the best alternative available at the time to meet the special needs or well-being of the nonminor dependent, and how the placement will contribute to the nonminor dependent’s transition to independent living. The case plan shall specify the treatment strategies that will be used to prepare the nonminor dependent for discharge to a less restrictive and more family-like setting, including a target date for discharge from the group home placement. The placement shall be reviewed and updated on a regular, periodic basis to ensure that continuation in the group home remains in the best interests of the nonminor dependent and that progress is being made in achieving case plan goals leading to independent living. The group home placement planning process shall begin as soon as it becomes clear to the county welfare department or probation office that a foster child in group home placement is likely to remain in group home placement on his or her 18th birthday, in order to expedite the transition to a less restrictive and more family-like setting if he or she becomes a nonminor dependent. The case planning process shall include informing the youth of all of his or her options, including, but not limited to, admission to or continuation in a group home placement. Consideration for continuation of existing group home placement for a nonminor dependent under 19 years of age may include the need to stay in the same placement in order to complete high school. After a nonminor dependent either completes high school or attains his or her 19th birthday, whichever is earlier, continuation in or admission to a group home is prohibited unless the nonminor dependent satisfies the conditions of paragraph (5) of subdivision (b) of Section 11403, and group home placement functions as a short-term transition to the appropriate system of care.
(2) In addition to the requirements of paragraph (1), and taking into account other statutory considerations regarding placement, the selection of the most appropriate home that will meet the child’s special needs and best interests shall also promote educational stability by taking into consideration proximity to the child’s school attendance area.
(d) A written case plan shall be completed within a maximum of 60 days of the initial removal of the child or of the in-person response required under subdivision (f) of Section 16501 if the child has not been removed from his or her home, or by the date of the dispositional hearing pursuant to Section 358, whichever occurs first. The case plan shall be updated, as the service needs of the child and family dictate. At a minimum, the case plan shall be updated in conjunction with each status review hearing conducted pursuant to Section 366.21, and the hearing conducted pursuant to Section 366.26, but no less frequently than once every six months. Each updated case plan shall include a description of the services that have been provided to the child under the plan and an evaluation of the appropriateness and effectiveness of those services.
(1) It is the intent of the Legislature that extending the maximum time available for preparing a written case plan from 30 to 60 days will afford caseworkers time to actively engage families, and to solicit and integrate into the case plan the input of the child and the child’s family, as well as the input of relatives and other interested parties.
(2) The extension of the maximum time available for preparing a written case plan from the 30 to 60 days shall be effective 90 days after the date that the department gives counties written notice that necessary changes have been made to the Child Welfare Services Case Management System to account for the 60-day timeframe for preparing a written case plan.
(e) The child welfare services case plan shall be comprehensive enough to meet the juvenile court dependency proceedings requirements pursuant to Article 6 (commencing with Section 300) of Chapter 2 of Part 1 of Division 2.
(f) The case plan shall be developed as follows:
(1) The case plan shall be based upon an assessment of the circumstances that required child welfare services intervention. The child shall be involved in developing the case plan as age and developmentally appropriate.
(2) The case plan shall identify specific goals and the appropriateness of the planned services in meeting those goals.
(3) The case plan shall identify the original allegations of abuse or neglect, as defined in Article 2.5 (commencing with Section 11164) of Chapter 2 of Title 1 of Part 4 of the Penal Code, or the conditions cited as the basis for declaring the child a dependent of the court pursuant to Section 300, or all of these, and the other precipitating incidents that led to child welfare services intervention.
(4) The case plan shall include a description of the schedule of the social worker contacts with the child and the family or other caretakers. The frequency of these contacts shall be in accordance with regulations adopted by the State Department of Social Services. If the child has been placed in foster care out of state, the county social worker or a social worker on the staff of the social services agency in the state in which the child has been placed shall visit the child in a foster family home or the home of a relative, consistent with federal law and in accordance with the department’s approved state plan. For children in out-of-state group home facilities, visits shall be conducted at least monthly, pursuant to Section 16516.5. At least once every six months, at the time of a regularly scheduled social worker contact with the foster child, the child’s social worker shall inform the child of his or her rights as a foster child, as specified in Section 16001.9. The social worker shall provide the information to the child in a manner appropriate to the age or developmental level of the child.
(5) (A) When out-of-home services are used, the frequency of contact between the natural parents or legal guardians and the child shall be specified in the case plan. The frequency of those contacts shall reflect overall case goals, and consider other principles outlined in this section.
(B) Information regarding any court-ordered visitation between the child and the natural parents or legal guardians, and the terms and conditions needed to facilitate the visits while protecting the safety of the child, shall be provided to the child’s out-of-home caregiver as soon as possible after the court order is made.
(6) When out-of-home placement is made, the case plan shall include provisions for the development and maintenance of sibling relationships as specified in subdivisions (b), (c), and (d) of Section 16002. If appropriate, when siblings who are dependents of the juvenile court are not placed together, the social worker for each child, if different, shall communicate with each of the other social workers and ensure that the child’s siblings are informed of significant life events that occur within their extended family. Unless it has been determined that it is inappropriate in a particular case to keep siblings informed of significant life events that occur within the extended family, the social worker shall determine the appropriate means and setting for disclosure of this information to the child commensurate with the child’s age and emotional well-being. These significant life events shall include, but shall not be limited to, the following:
(A) The death of an immediate relative.
(B) The birth of a sibling.
(C) Significant changes regarding a dependent child, unless the child objects to the sharing of the information with his or her siblings, including changes in placement, major medical or mental health diagnoses, treatments, or hospitalizations, arrests, and changes in the permanent plan.
(7) If out-of-home placement is made in a foster family home, group home, or other child care institution that is either a substantial distance from the home of the child’s parent or out of state, the case plan shall specify the reasons why that placement is in the best interest of the child. When an out-of-state group home placement is recommended or made, the case plan shall, in addition, specify compliance with Section 7911.1 of the Family Code.
(8) Effective January 1, 2010, a case plan shall ensure the educational stability of the child while in foster care and shall include both of the following:
(A) An assurance that the placement takes into account the appropriateness of the current educational setting and the proximity to the school in which the child is enrolled at the time of placement.
(B) An assurance that the placement agency has coordinated with appropriate local educational agencies to ensure that the child remains in the school in which the child is enrolled at the time of placement, or, if remaining in that school is not in the best interests of the child, assurances by the placement agency and the local educational agency to provide immediate and appropriate enrollment in a new school and to provide all of the child’s educational records to the new school.
(9) (A) If out-of-home services are used, or if parental rights have been terminated and the case plan is placement for adoption, the case plan shall include a recommendation regarding the appropriateness of unsupervised visitation between the child and any of the child’s siblings. This recommendation shall include a statement regarding the child’s and the siblings’ willingness to participate in unsupervised visitation. If the case plan includes a recommendation for unsupervised sibling visitation, the plan shall also note that information necessary to accomplish this visitation has been provided to the child or to the child’s siblings.
(B) Information regarding the schedule and frequency of the visits between the child and siblings, as well as any court-ordered terms and conditions needed to facilitate the visits while protecting the safety of the child, shall be provided to the child’s out-of-home caregiver as soon as possible after the court order is made.
(10) If out-of-home services are used and the goal is reunification, the case plan shall describe the services to be provided to assist in reunification and the services to be provided concurrently to achieve legal permanency if efforts to reunify fail. The plan shall also consider in-state and out-of-state placements, the importance of developing and maintaining sibling relationships pursuant to Section 16002, and the desire and willingness of the caregiver to provide legal permanency for the child if reunification is unsuccessful.
(11) If out-of-home services are used, the child has been in care for at least 12 months, and the goal is not adoptive placement, the case plan shall include documentation of the compelling reason or reasons why termination of parental rights is not in the child’s best interest. A determination completed or updated within the past 12 months by the department when it is acting as an adoption agency or by a licensed adoption agency that it is unlikely that the child will be adopted, or that one of the conditions described in paragraph (1) of subdivision (c) of Section 366.26 applies, shall be deemed a compelling reason.
(12) (A) Parents and legal guardians shall have an opportunity to review the case plan, and to sign it whenever possible, and then shall receive a copy of the plan. In any voluntary service or placement agreement, the parents or legal guardians shall be required to review and sign the case plan. Whenever possible, parents and legal guardians shall participate in the development of the case plan. Commencing January 1, 2012, for nonminor dependents, as defined in subdivision (v) of Section 11400, who are receiving AFDC-FC up to 21 years of age pursuant to Section 11403, the case plan shall be developed with, and signed by, the nonminor.
(B) Parents and legal guardians shall be advised that, pursuant to Section 1228.1 of the Evidence Code, neither their signature on the child welfare services case plan nor their acceptance of any services prescribed in the child welfare services case plan shall constitute an admission of guilt or be used as evidence against the parent or legal guardian in a court of law. However, they shall also be advised that the parent’s or guardian’s failure to cooperate, except for good cause, in the provision of services specified in the child welfare services case plan may be used in any hearing held pursuant to Section 366.21 or 366.22 as evidence.
(13) A child shall be given a meaningful opportunity to participate in the development of the case plan and state his or her preference for foster care placement. A child who is 12 years of age or older and in a permanent placement shall also be given the opportunity to review the case plan, sign the case plan, and receive a copy of the case plan.
(14) The case plan shall be included in the court report and shall be considered by the court at the initial hearing and each review hearing. Modifications to the case plan made during the period between review hearings need not be approved by the court if the casework supervisor for that case determines that the modifications further the goals of the plan. If out-of-home services are used with the goal of family reunification, the case plan shall consider and describe the application of subdivision (b) of Section 11203.
(15) If the case plan has as its goal for the child a permanent plan of adoption or placement in another permanent home, it shall include a statement of the child’s wishes regarding their permanent placement plan and an assessment of those stated wishes. The agency shall also include documentation of the steps the agency is taking to find an adoptive family or other permanent living arrangements for the child; to place the child with an adoptive family, an appropriate and willing relative, a legal guardian, or in another planned permanent living arrangement; and to finalize the adoption or legal guardianship. At a minimum, the documentation shall include child-specific recruitment efforts, such as the use of state, regional, and national adoption exchanges, including electronic exchange systems, when the child has been freed for adoption. If the plan is for kinship guardianship, the case plan shall document how the child meets the kinship guardianship eligibility requirements.
(16) (A) When appropriate, for a child who is 16 years of age or older and, commencing January 1, 2012, for a nonminor dependent, the case plan shall include a written description of the programs and services that will help the child, consistent with the child’s best interests, prepare for the transition from foster care to independent living, and whether the youth has an in-progress application pending for Title XVI Supplemental Security Income benefits or for Special Juvenile Immigration Status or other applicable application for legal residency and an active dependency case is required for that application. When appropriate, for a nonminor dependent, the case plan shall include a written description of the program and services that will help the nonminor dependent, consistent with his or her best interests, to prepare for transition from foster care and assist the youth in meeting the eligibility criteria set forth in Section 11403. If applicable, the case plan shall describe the individualized supervision provided in the supervised independent living setting as defined, in subdivision (w) of Section 11400. The case plan shall be developed with the child or nonminor dependent and individuals identified as important to the child or nonminor dependent, and shall include steps the agency is taking to ensure that the child or nonminor dependent achieves permanence, including maintaining or obtaining permanent connections to caring and committed adults.
(B) During the 90-day period prior to the participant attaining 18 years of age or older as the state may elect under Section 475(8)(B)(iii) (42 U.S.C. Sec. 675(8)(B)(iii)) of the federal Social Security Act, whether during that period foster care maintenance payments are being made on the child’s behalf or the child is receiving benefits or services under Section 477 (42 U.S.C. Sec. 677) of the federal Social Security Act, a caseworker or other appropriate agency staff or probation officer and other representatives of the participant, as appropriate, shall provide the youth or nonminor with assistance and support in developing the written 90-day transition plan, that is personalized at the direction of the child, information as detailed as the participant elects that shall include, but not be limited to, options regarding housing, health insurance, education, local opportunities for mentors and continuing support services, and workforce supports and employment services.
(g) If the court finds, after considering the case plan, that unsupervised sibling visitation is appropriate and has been consented to, the court shall order that the child or the child’s siblings, the child’s current caregiver, and the child’s prospective adoptive parents, if applicable, be provided with information necessary to accomplish this visitation. This section does not require or prohibit the social worker’s facilitation, transportation, or supervision of visits between the child and his or her siblings.
(h) The case plan documentation on sibling placements required under this section shall not require modification of existing case plan forms until the Child Welfare Services Case Management System is implemented on a statewide basis.
(i) When a child who is 10 years of age or older and who has been in out-of-home placement for six months or longer, the case plan shall include an identification of individuals, other than the child’s siblings, who are important to the child and actions necessary to maintain the child’s relationship with those individuals, provided that those relationships are in the best interest of the child. The social worker shall ask every child who is 10 years of age or older and who has been in out-of-home placement for six months or longer to identify individuals other than the child’s siblings who are important to the child, and may ask any other child to provide that information, as appropriate. The social worker shall make efforts to identify other individuals who are important to the child, consistent with the child’s best interests.
(j) The child’s caregiver shall be provided a copy of a plan outlining the child’s needs and services.
(k) On or before June 30, 2008, the department, in consultation with the County Welfare Directors Association and other advocates, shall develop a comprehensive plan to ensure that 90 percent of foster children are visited by their caseworkers on a monthly basis by October 1, 2011, and that the majority of the visits occur in the residence of the child. The plan shall include any data reporting requirements necessary to comply with the provisions of the federal Child and Family Services Improvement Act of 2006 (Public Law 109-288).
(l) The implementation and operation of the amendments to subdivision (i) enacted at the 2005–06 Regular Session shall be subject to appropriation through the budget process and by phase, as provided in Section 366.35.

SEC. 62.1.

 Section 16501.1 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

16501.1.
 (a) (1) The Legislature finds and declares that the foundation and central unifying tool in child welfare services is the case plan.
(2) The Legislature further finds and declares that a case plan ensures that the child receives protection and safe and proper care and case management, and that services are provided to the child and parents or other caretakers, as appropriate, in order to improve conditions in the parent’s home, to facilitate the safe return of the child to a safe home or the permanent placement of the child, and to address the needs of the child while in foster care.
(b) (1) A case plan shall be based upon the principles of this section and shall document that a preplacement assessment of the service needs of the child and family, and preplacement preventive services, have been provided, and that reasonable efforts to prevent out-of-home placement have been made.
(2) In determining the reasonable services to be offered or provided, the child’s health and safety shall be the paramount concerns.
(3) Upon a determination pursuant to paragraph (1) of subdivision (e) of Section 361.5 that reasonable services will be offered to a parent who is incarcerated in a county jail or state prison, the case plan shall include information, to the extent possible, about a parent’s incarceration in a county jail or the state prison during the time that a minor child of that parent is involved in dependency care.
(4) Reasonable services shall be offered or provided to make it possible for a child to return to a safe home environment, unless, pursuant to subdivisions (b) and (e) of Section 361.5, the court determines that reunification services shall not be provided.
(5) If reasonable services are not ordered, or are terminated, reasonable efforts shall be made to place the child in a timely manner in accordance with the permanent plan and to complete all steps necessary to finalize the permanent placement of the child.
(c) (1) If out-of-home placement is used to attain case plan goals, the decision regarding choice of placement shall be based upon selection of a safe setting that is the least restrictive or most family-like and the most appropriate setting that is available and in close proximity to the parent’s home, proximity to the child’s school, consistent with the selection of the environment best suited to meet the child’s special needs and best interests, or both. The selection shall consider, in order of priority, placement with relatives, tribal members, and foster family, group care, and residential treatment pursuant to Section 7950 of the Family Code. On or after January 1, 2012, for a nonminor dependent, as defined in subdivision (v) of Section 11400, who is receiving AFDC-FC benefits up to 21 years of age pursuant to Section 11403, in addition to the above requirements, the selection of the placement, including a supervised independent living setting, as described in Section 11400, shall also be based upon the developmental needs of young adults by providing opportunities to have incremental responsibilities that prepare a nonminor dependent to transition to independent living. If admission to, or continuation in, a group home placement is being considered for a nonminor dependent, the group home placement approval decision shall include a youth-driven, team-based case planning process, as defined by the department, in consultation with stakeholders. The case plan shall consider the full range of placement options, and shall specify why admission to, or continuation in, a group home placement is the best alternative available at the time to meet the special needs or well-being of the nonminor dependent, and how the placement will contribute to the nonminor dependent’s transition to independent living. The case plan shall specify the treatment strategies that will be used to prepare the nonminor dependent for discharge to a less restrictive and more family-like setting, including a target date for discharge from the group home placement. The placement shall be reviewed and updated on a regular, periodic basis to ensure that continuation in the group home remains in the best interests of the nonminor dependent and that progress is being made in achieving case plan goals leading to independent living. The group home placement planning process shall begin as soon as it becomes clear to the county welfare department or probation office that a foster child in group home placement is likely to remain in group home placement on his or her 18th birthday, in order to expedite the transition to a less restrictive and more family-like setting if he or she becomes a nonminor dependent. The case planning process shall include informing the youth of all of his or her options, including, but not limited to, admission to or continuation in a group home placement. Consideration for continuation of existing group home placement for a nonminor dependent under 19 years of age may include the need to stay in the same placement in order to complete high school. After a nonminor dependent either completes high school or attains his or her 19th birthday, whichever is earlier, continuation in or admission to a group home is prohibited unless the nonminor dependent satisfies the conditions of paragraph (5) of subdivision (b) of Section 11403, and group home placement functions as a short-term transition to the appropriate system of care.
(2) In addition to the requirements of paragraph (1), and taking into account other statutory considerations regarding placement, the selection of the most appropriate home that will meet the child’s special needs and best interests shall also promote educational stability by taking into consideration proximity to the child’s school attendance area.
(d) A written case plan shall be completed within a maximum of 60 days of the initial removal of the child or of the in-person response required under subdivision (f) of Section 16501 if the child has not been removed from his or her home, or by the date of the dispositional hearing pursuant to Section 358, whichever occurs first. The case plan shall be updated, as the service needs of the child and family dictate. At a minimum, the case plan shall be updated in conjunction with each status review hearing conducted pursuant to Section 366.21, and the hearing conducted pursuant to Section 366.26, but no less frequently than once every six months. Each updated case plan shall include a description of the services that have been provided to the child under the plan and an evaluation of the appropriateness and effectiveness of those services.
(1) It is the intent of the Legislature that extending the maximum time available for preparing a written case plan from 30 to 60 days will afford caseworkers time to actively engage families, and to solicit and integrate into the case plan the input of the child and the child’s family, as well as the input of relatives and other interested parties.
(2) The extension of the maximum time available for preparing a written case plan from the 30 to 60 days shall be effective 90 days after the date that the department gives counties written notice that necessary changes have been made to the Child Welfare Services Case Management System to account for the 60-day timeframe for preparing a written case plan.
(e) The child welfare services case plan shall be comprehensive enough to meet the juvenile court dependency proceedings requirements pursuant to Article 6 (commencing with Section 300) of Chapter 2 of Part 1 of Division 2.
(f) The case plan shall be developed as follows:
(1) The case plan shall be based upon an assessment of the circumstances that required child welfare services intervention. The child shall be involved in developing the case plan as age and developmentally appropriate.
(2) The case plan shall identify specific goals and the appropriateness of the planned services in meeting those goals.
(3) The case plan shall identify the original allegations of abuse or neglect, as defined in Article 2.5 (commencing with Section 11164) of Chapter 2 of Title 1 of Part 4 of the Penal Code, or the conditions cited as the basis for declaring the child a dependent of the court pursuant to Section 300, or all of these, and the other precipitating incidents that led to child welfare services intervention.
(4) The case plan shall include a description of the schedule of the social worker contacts with the child and the family or other caretakers. The frequency of these contacts shall be in accordance with regulations adopted by the State Department of Social Services. If the child has been placed in foster care out of state, the county social worker or a social worker on the staff of the social services agency in the state in which the child has been placed shall visit the child in a foster family home or the home of a relative, consistent with federal law and in accordance with the department’s approved state plan. For children in out-of-state group home facilities, visits shall be conducted at least monthly, pursuant to Section 16516.5. At least once every six months, at the time of a regularly scheduled social worker contact with the foster child, the child’s social worker shall inform the child of his or her rights as a foster child, as specified in Section 16001.9. The social worker shall provide the information to the child in a manner appropriate to the age or developmental level of the child.
(5) (A) When out-of-home services are used, the frequency of contact between the natural parents or legal guardians and the child shall be specified in the case plan. The frequency of those contacts shall reflect overall case goals, and consider other principles outlined in this section.
(B) Information regarding any court-ordered visitation between the child and the natural parents or legal guardians, and the terms and conditions needed to facilitate the visits while protecting the safety of the child, shall be provided to the child’s out-of-home caregiver as soon as possible after the court order is made.
(6) When out-of-home placement is made, the case plan shall include provisions for the development and maintenance of sibling relationships as specified in subdivisions (b), (c), and (d) of Section 16002. If appropriate, when siblings who are dependents of the juvenile court are not placed together, the social worker for each child, if different, shall communicate with each of the other social workers and ensure that the child’s siblings are informed of significant life events that occur within their extended family. Unless it has been determined that it is inappropriate in a particular case to keep siblings informed of significant life events that occur within the extended family, the social worker shall determine the appropriate means and setting for disclosure of this information to the child commensurate with the child’s age and emotional well-being. These significant life events shall include, but shall not be limited to, the following:
(A) The death of an immediate relative.
(B) The birth of a sibling.
(C) Significant changes regarding a dependent child, unless the child objects to the sharing of the information with his or her siblings, including changes in placement, major medical or mental health diagnoses, treatments, or hospitalizations, arrests, and changes in the permanent plan.
(7) If out-of-home placement is made in a foster family home, group home, or other child care institution that is either a substantial distance from the home of the child’s parent or out of state, the case plan shall specify the reasons why that placement is in the best interest of the child. When an out-of-state group home placement is recommended or made, the case plan shall, in addition, specify compliance with Section 7911.1 of the Family Code.
(8) Effective January 1, 2010, a case plan shall ensure the educational stability of the child while in foster care and shall include both of the following:
(A) An assurance that the placement takes into account the appropriateness of the current educational setting and the proximity to the school in which the child is enrolled at the time of placement.
(B) An assurance that the placement agency has coordinated with appropriate local educational agencies to ensure that the child remains in the school in which the child is enrolled at the time of placement, or, if remaining in that school is not in the best interests of the child, assurances by the placement agency and the local educational agency to provide immediate and appropriate enrollment in a new school and to provide all of the child’s educational records to the new school.
(9) (A) If out-of-home services are used, or if parental rights have been terminated and the case plan is placement for adoption, the case plan shall include a recommendation regarding the appropriateness of unsupervised visitation between the child and any of the child’s siblings. This recommendation shall include a statement regarding the child’s and the siblings’ willingness to participate in unsupervised visitation. If the case plan includes a recommendation for unsupervised sibling visitation, the plan shall also note that information necessary to accomplish this visitation has been provided to the child or to the child’s siblings.
(B) Information regarding the schedule and frequency of the visits between the child and siblings, as well as any court-ordered terms and conditions needed to facilitate the visits while protecting the safety of the child, shall be provided to the child’s out-of-home caregiver as soon as possible after the court order is made.
(10) If out-of-home services are used and the goal is reunification, the case plan shall describe the services to be provided to assist in reunification and the services to be provided concurrently to achieve legal permanency if efforts to reunify fail. The plan shall also consider in-state and out-of-state placements, the importance of developing and maintaining sibling relationships pursuant to Section 16002, and the desire and willingness of the caregiver to provide legal permanency for the child if reunification is unsuccessful.
(11) If out-of-home services are used, the child has been in care for at least 12 months, and the goal is not adoptive placement, the case plan shall include documentation of the compelling reason or reasons why termination of parental rights is not in the child’s best interest. A determination completed or updated within the past 12 months by the department when it is acting as an adoption agency or by a licensed adoption agency that it is unlikely that the child will be adopted, or that one of the conditions described in paragraph (1) of subdivision (c) of Section 366.26 applies, shall be deemed a compelling reason.
(12) (A) Parents and legal guardians shall have an opportunity to review the case plan, and to sign it whenever possible, and then shall receive a copy of the plan. In any voluntary service or placement agreement, the parents or legal guardians shall be required to review and sign the case plan. Whenever possible, parents and legal guardians shall participate in the development of the case plan. Commencing January 1, 2012, for nonminor dependents, as defined in subdivision (v) of Section 11400, who are receiving AFDC-FC up to 21 years of age pursuant to Section 11403, the case plan shall be developed with, and signed by, the nonminor.
(B) Parents and legal guardians shall be advised that, pursuant to Section 1228.1 of the Evidence Code, neither their signature on the child welfare services case plan nor their acceptance of any services prescribed in the child welfare services case plan shall constitute an admission of guilt or be used as evidence against the parent or legal guardian in a court of law. However, they shall also be advised that the parent’s or guardian’s failure to cooperate, except for good cause, in the provision of services specified in the child welfare services case plan may be used in any hearing held pursuant to Section 366.21 or 366.22 as evidence.
(13) A child shall be given a meaningful opportunity to participate in the development of the case plan and state his or her preference for foster care placement. A child who is 12 years of age or older and in a permanent placement shall also be given the opportunity to review the case plan, sign the case plan, and receive a copy of the case plan.
(14) The case plan shall be included in the court report and shall be considered by the court at the initial hearing and each review hearing. Modifications to the case plan made during the period between review hearings need not be approved by the court if the casework supervisor for that case determines that the modifications further the goals of the plan. If out-of-home services are used with the goal of family reunification, the case plan shall consider and describe the application of subdivision (b) of Section 11203.
(15) If the case plan has as its goal for the child a permanent plan of adoption or placement in another permanent home, it shall include a statement of the child’s wishes regarding their permanent placement plan and an assessment of those stated wishes. The agency shall also include documentation of the steps the agency is taking to find an adoptive family or other permanent living arrangements for the child; to place the child with an adoptive family, an appropriate and willing relative, a legal guardian, or in another planned permanent living arrangement; and to finalize the adoption or legal guardianship. At a minimum, the documentation shall include child-specific recruitment efforts, such as the use of state, regional, and national adoption exchanges, including electronic exchange systems, when the child has been freed for adoption. If the plan is for kinship guardianship, the case plan shall document how the child meets the kinship guardianship eligibility requirements.
(16) (A) When appropriate, for a child who is 16 years of age or older and, commencing January 1, 2012, for a nonminor dependent, the case plan shall include a written description of the programs and services that will help the child, consistent with the child’s best interests, prepare for the transition from foster care to independent living, and whether the youth has an in-progress application pending for Title XVI Supplemental Security Income benefits or for Special Juvenile Immigration Status or other applicable application for legal residency and an active dependency case is required for that application. When appropriate, for a nonminor dependent, the case plan shall include a written description of the program and services that will help the nonminor dependent, consistent with his or her best interests, to prepare for transition from foster care and assist the youth in meeting the eligibility criteria set forth in Section 11403. If applicable, the case plan shall describe the individualized supervision provided in the supervised independent living setting as defined, in subdivision (w) of Section 11400. The case plan shall be developed with the child or nonminor dependent and individuals identified as important to the child or nonminor dependent, and shall include steps the agency is taking to ensure that the child or nonminor dependent achieves permanence, including maintaining or obtaining permanent connections to caring and committed adults.
(B) During the 90-day period prior to the participant attaining 18 years of age or older as the state may elect under Section 475(8)(B)(iii) (42 U.S.C. Sec. 675(8)(B)(iii)) of the federal Social Security Act, whether during that period foster care maintenance payments are being made on the child’s behalf or the child is receiving benefits or services under Section 477 (42 U.S.C. Sec. 677) of the federal Social Security Act, a caseworker or other appropriate agency staff or probation officer and other representatives of the participant, as appropriate, shall provide the youth or nonminor with assistance and support in developing the written 90-day transition plan, that is personalized at the direction of the child, information as detailed as the participant elects that shall include, but not be limited to, options regarding housing, health insurance, education, local opportunities for mentors and continuing support services, and workforce supports and employment services.
(g) If the court finds, after considering the case plan, that unsupervised sibling visitation is appropriate and has been consented to, the court shall order that the child or the child’s siblings, the child’s current caregiver, and the child’s prospective adoptive parents, if applicable, be provided with information necessary to accomplish this visitation. This section does not require or prohibit the social worker’s facilitation, transportation, or supervision of visits between the child and his or her siblings.
(h) The case plan documentation on sibling placements required under this section shall not require modification of existing case plan forms until the Child Welfare Services Case Management System is implemented on a statewide basis.
(i) When a child who is 10 years of age or older and who has been in out-of-home placement for six months or longer, the case plan shall include an identification of individuals, other than the child’s siblings, who are important to the child and actions necessary to maintain the child’s relationship with those individuals, provided that those relationships are in the best interest of the child. The social worker shall ask every child who is 10 years of age or older and who has been in out-of-home placement for six months or longer to identify individuals other than the child’s siblings who are important to the child, and may ask any other child to provide that information, as appropriate. The social worker shall make efforts to identify other individuals who are important to the child, consistent with the child’s best interests.
(j) The child’s caregiver shall be provided a copy of a plan outlining the child’s needs and services.
(k) On or before June 30, 2008, the department, in consultation with the County Welfare Directors Association and other advocates, shall develop a comprehensive plan to ensure that 90 percent of foster children are visited by their caseworkers on a monthly basis by October 1, 2011, and that the majority of the visits occur in the residence of the child. The plan shall include any data reporting requirements necessary to comply with the provisions of the federal Child and Family Services Improvement Act of 2006 (Public Law 109-288).
(l) The implementation and operation of the amendments to subdivision (i) enacted at the 2005–06 Regular Session shall be subject to appropriation through the budget process and by phase, as provided in Section 366.35.

SEC. 62.2.

 Section 16501.1 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

16501.1.
 (a) (1) The Legislature finds and declares that the foundation and central unifying tool in child welfare services is the case plan.
(2) The Legislature further finds and declares that a case plan ensures that the child receives protection and safe and proper care and case management, and that services are provided to the child and parents or other caretakers, as appropriate, in order to improve conditions in the parent’s home, to facilitate the safe return of the child to a safe home or the permanent placement of the child, and to address the needs of the child while in foster care.
(b) (1) A case plan shall be based upon the principles of this section and shall document that a preplacement assessment of the service needs of the child and family, and preplacement preventive services, have been provided, and that reasonable efforts to prevent out-of-home placement have been made.
(2) In determining the reasonable services to be offered or provided, the child’s health and safety shall be the paramount concerns.
(3) (A) In determining the reasonable services to be offered or provided, the case plan shall include information, to the extent possible, about a parent’s incarceration in a county jail or the state prison during the time that a minor child of that parent is involved in dependency care. Once a consistent data entry field or fields have been designated in the statewide child welfare database, social workers shall make reasonable efforts to collect and update necessary data regarding a child’s incarcerated parent or parents.
(B) In order to further the goals of this paragraph, the Legislature encourages the State Department of Social Services to consult with the county welfare directors regarding the best way to incorporate the information specified in subparagraph (A) as a required field in the statewide database. The Legislature also encourages the Department of Justice, the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, county welfare departments, and county sheriffs to develop protocols for facilitating the exchange of information regarding the location and sentencing of the incarcerated parent or parents of a minor child who is in dependency care.
(C) Nothing in this paragraph shall be interpreted to require the department to create a new dedicated field in the statewide database for incorporating the information specified in subparagraph (A).
(4) Reasonable services shall be offered or provided to make it possible for a child to return to a safe home environment, unless, pursuant to subdivisions (b) and (e) of Section 361.5, the court determines that reunification services shall not be provided.
(5) If reasonable services are not ordered, or are terminated, reasonable efforts shall be made to place the child in a timely manner in accordance with the permanent plan and to complete all steps necessary to finalize the permanent placement of the child.
(c) (1) If out-of-home placement is used to attain case plan goals, the decision regarding choice of placement shall be based upon selection of a safe setting that is the least restrictive or most family-like and the most appropriate setting that is available and in close proximity to the parent’s home, proximity to the child’s school, and consistent with the selection of the environment best suited to meet the child’s special needs and best interests. The selection shall consider, in order of priority, placement with relatives, tribal members, and foster family, group care, and residential treatment pursuant to Section 7950 of the Family Code. On or after January 1, 2012, for a nonminor dependent, as defined in subdivision (v) of Section 11400, who is receiving AFDC-FC benefits up to 21 years of age pursuant to Section 11403, in addition to the above requirements, the selection of the placement, including a supervised independent living setting, as described in Section 11400, shall also be based upon the developmental needs of young adults by providing opportunities to have incremental responsibilities that prepare a nonminor dependent to transition to independent living. If admission to, or continuation in, a group home placement is being considered for a nonminor dependent, the group home placement approval decision shall include a youth-driven, team-based case planning process, as defined by the department, in consultation with stakeholders. The case plan shall consider the full range of placement options, and shall specify why admission to, or continuation in, a group home placement is the best alternative available at the time to meet the special needs or well-being of the nonminor dependent, and how the placement will contribute to the nonminor dependent’s transition to independent living. The case plan shall specify the treatment strategies that will be used to prepare the nonminor dependent for discharge to a less restrictive and more family-like setting, including a target date for discharge from the group home placement. The placement shall be reviewed and updated on a regular, periodic basis to ensure that continuation in the group home remains in the best interests of the nonminor dependent and that progress is being made in achieving case plan goals leading to independent living. The group home placement planning process shall begin as soon as it becomes clear to the county welfare department or probation office that a foster child in group home placement is likely to remain in group home placement on his or her 18th birthday, in order to expedite the transition to a less restrictive and more family-like setting if he or she becomes a nonminor dependent. The case planning process shall include informing the youth of all of his or her options, including, but not limited to, admission to or continuation in a group home placement. Consideration for continuation of existing group home placement for a nonminor dependent under 19 years of age may include the need to stay in the same placement in order to complete high school. After a nonminor dependent either completes high school or attains his or her 19th birthday, whichever is earlier, continuation in or admission to a group home is prohibited unless the nonminor dependent satisfies the conditions of paragraph (5) of subdivision (b) of Section 11403, and group home placement functions as a short-term transition to the appropriate system of care.
(2) In addition to the requirements of paragraph (1), and taking into account other statutory considerations regarding placement, the selection of the most appropriate home that will meet the child’s special needs and best interests shall also promote educational stability by taking into consideration proximity to the child’s school of origin, and school attendance area, the number of school transfers the child has previously experienced, and the child’s school matriculation schedule, in addition to other indicators of educational stability that the Legislature hereby encourages the State Department of Social Services and the State Department of Education to develop.
(d) A written case plan shall be completed within a maximum of 60 days of the initial removal of the child or of the in-person response required under subdivision (f) of Section 16501 if the child has not been removed from his or her home, or by the date of the dispositional hearing pursuant to Section 358, whichever occurs first. The case plan shall be updated, as the service needs of the child and family dictate. At a minimum, the case plan shall be updated in conjunction with each status review hearing conducted pursuant to Section 366.21, and the hearing conducted pursuant to Section 366.26, but no less frequently than once every six months. Each updated case plan shall include a description of the services that have been provided to the child under the plan and an evaluation of the appropriateness and effectiveness of those services.
(1) It is the intent of the Legislature that extending the maximum time available for preparing a written case plan from 30 to 60 days will afford caseworkers time to actively engage families, and to solicit and integrate into the case plan the input of the child and the child’s family, as well as the input of relatives and other interested parties.
(2) The extension of the maximum time available for preparing a written case plan from the 30 to 60 days shall be effective 90 days after the date that the department gives counties written notice that necessary changes have been made to the Child Welfare Services Case Management System to account for the 60-day timeframe for preparing a written case plan.
(e) The child welfare services case plan shall be comprehensive enough to meet the juvenile court dependency proceedings requirements pursuant to Article 6 (commencing with Section 300) of Chapter 2 of Part 1 of Division 2.
(f) The case plan shall be developed as follows:
(1) The case plan shall be based upon an assessment of the circumstances that required child welfare services intervention. The child shall be involved in developing the case plan as age and developmentally appropriate.
(2) The case plan shall identify specific goals and the appropriateness of the planned services in meeting those goals.
(3) The case plan shall identify the original allegations of abuse or neglect, as defined in Article 2.5 (commencing with Section 11164) of Chapter 2 of Title 1 of Part 4 of the Penal Code, or the conditions cited as the basis for declaring the child a dependent of the court pursuant to Section 300, or all of these, and the other precipitating incidents that led to child welfare services intervention.
(4) The case plan shall include a description of the schedule of the social worker contacts with the child and the family or other caretakers. The frequency of these contacts shall be in accordance with regulations adopted by the State Department of Social Services. If the child has been placed in foster care out of state, the county social worker or a social worker on the staff of the social services agency in the state in which the child has been placed shall visit the child in a foster family home or the home of a relative, consistent with federal law and in accordance with the department’s approved state plan. For children in out-of-state group home facilities, visits shall be conducted at least monthly, pursuant to Section 16516.5. At least once every six months, at the time of a regularly scheduled social worker contact with the foster child, the child’s social worker shall inform the child of his or her rights as a foster child, as specified in Section 16001.9. The social worker shall provide the information to the child in a manner appropriate to the age or developmental level of the child.
(5) (A) When out-of-home services are used, the frequency of contact between the natural parents or legal guardians and the child shall be specified in the case plan. The frequency of those contacts shall reflect overall case goals, and consider other principles outlined in this section.
(B) Information regarding any court-ordered visitation between the child and the natural parents or legal guardians, and the terms and conditions needed to facilitate the visits while protecting the safety of the child, shall be provided to the child’s out-of-home caregiver as soon as possible after the court order is made.
(6) When out-of-home placement is made, the case plan shall include provisions for the development and maintenance of sibling relationships as specified in subdivisions (b), (c), and (d) of Section 16002. If appropriate, when siblings who are dependents of the juvenile court are not placed together, the social worker for each child, if different, shall communicate with each of the other social workers and ensure that the child’s siblings are informed of significant life events that occur within their extended family. Unless it has been determined that it is inappropriate in a particular case to keep siblings informed of significant life events that occur within the extended family, the social worker shall determine the appropriate means and setting for disclosure of this information to the child commensurate with the child’s age and emotional well-being. These significant life events shall include, but shall not be limited to, the following:
(A) The death of an immediate relative.
(B) The birth of a sibling.
(C) Significant changes regarding a dependent child, unless the child objects to the sharing of the information with his or her siblings, including changes in placement, major medical or mental health diagnoses, treatments, or hospitalizations, arrests, and changes in the permanent plan.
(7) If out-of-home placement is made in a foster family home, group home, or other child care institution that is either a substantial distance from the home of the child’s parent or out of state, the case plan shall specify the reasons why that placement is in the best interest of the child. When an out-of-state group home placement is recommended or made, the case plan shall, in addition, specify compliance with Section 7911.1 of the Family Code.
(8) Effective January 1, 2010, a case plan shall ensure the educational stability of the child while in foster care and shall include both of the following:
(A) An assurance that the placement takes into account the appropriateness of the current educational setting and the proximity to the school in which the child is enrolled at the time of placement.
(B) An assurance that the placement agency has coordinated with the person holding the right to make educational decisions for the child and appropriate local educational agencies to ensure that the child remains in the school in which the child is enrolled at the time of placement or, if remaining in that school is not in the best interests of the child, assurances by the placement agency and the local educational agency to provide immediate and appropriate enrollment in a new school and to provide all of the child’s educational records to the new school.
(9) (A) If out-of-home services are used, or if parental rights have been terminated and the case plan is placement for adoption, the case plan shall include a recommendation regarding the appropriateness of unsupervised visitation between the child and any of the child’s siblings. This recommendation shall include a statement regarding the child’s and the siblings’ willingness to participate in unsupervised visitation. If the case plan includes a recommendation for unsupervised sibling visitation, the plan shall also note that information necessary to accomplish this visitation has been provided to the child or to the child’s siblings.
(B) Information regarding the schedule and frequency of the visits between the child and siblings, as well as any court-ordered terms and conditions needed to facilitate the visits while protecting the safety of the child, shall be provided to the child’s out-of-home caregiver as soon as possible after the court order is made.
(10) If out-of-home services are used and the goal is reunification, the case plan shall describe the services to be provided to assist in reunification and the services to be provided concurrently to achieve legal permanency if efforts to reunify fail. The plan shall also consider in-state and out-of-state placements, the importance of developing and maintaining sibling relationships pursuant to Section 16002, and the desire and willingness of the caregiver to provide legal permanency for the child if reunification is unsuccessful.
(11) If out-of-home services are used, the child has been in care for at least 12 months, and the goal is not adoptive placement, the case plan shall include documentation of the compelling reason or reasons why termination of parental rights is not in the child’s best interest. A determination completed or updated within the past 12 months by the department when it is acting as an adoption agency or by a licensed adoption agency that it is unlikely that the child will be adopted, or that one of the conditions described in paragraph (1) of subdivision (c) of Section 366.26 applies, shall be deemed a compelling reason.
(12) (A) Parents and legal guardians shall have an opportunity to review the case plan, and to sign it whenever possible, and then shall receive a copy of the plan. In a voluntary service or placement agreement, the parents or legal guardians shall be required to review and sign the case plan. Whenever possible, parents and legal guardians shall participate in the development of the case plan. Commencing January 1, 2012, for nonminor dependents, as defined in subdivision (v) of Section 11400, who are receiving AFDC-FC up to 21 years of age pursuant to Section 11403, the case plan shall be developed with, and signed by, the nonminor.
(B) Parents and legal guardians shall be advised that, pursuant to Section 1228.1 of the Evidence Code, neither their signature on the child welfare services case plan nor their acceptance of any services prescribed in the child welfare services case plan shall constitute an admission of guilt or be used as evidence against the parent or legal guardian in a court of law. However, they shall also be advised that the parent’s or guardian’s failure to cooperate, except for good cause, in the provision of services specified in the child welfare services case plan may be used in any hearing held pursuant to Section 366.21 or 366.22 as evidence.
(13) A child shall be given a meaningful opportunity to participate in the development of the case plan and state his or her preference for foster care placement. A child who is 12 years of age or older and in a permanent placement shall also be given the opportunity to review the case plan, sign the case plan, and receive a copy of the case plan.
(14) The case plan shall be included in the court report and shall be considered by the court at the initial hearing and each review hearing. Modifications to the case plan made during the period between review hearings need not be approved by the court if the casework supervisor for that case determines that the modifications further the goals of the plan. If out-of-home services are used with the goal of family reunification, the case plan shall consider and describe the application of subdivision (b) of Section 11203.
(15) If the case plan has as its goal for the child a permanent plan of adoption or placement in another permanent home, it shall include a statement of the child’s wishes regarding their permanent placement plan and an assessment of those stated wishes. The agency shall also include documentation of the steps the agency is taking to find an adoptive family or other permanent living arrangements for the child; to place the child with an adoptive family, an appropriate and willing relative, a legal guardian, or in another planned permanent living arrangement; and to finalize the adoption or legal guardianship. At a minimum, the documentation shall include child-specific recruitment efforts, such as the use of state, regional, and national adoption exchanges, including electronic exchange systems, when the child has been freed for adoption. If the plan is for kinship guardianship, the case plan shall document how the child meets the kinship guardianship eligibility requirements.
(16) (A) When appropriate, for a child who is 16 years of age or older and, commencing January 1, 2012, for a nonminor dependent, the case plan shall include a written description of the programs and services that will help the child, consistent with the child’s best interests, prepare for the transition from foster care to independent living, and whether the youth has an in-progress application pending for Title XVI Supplemental Security Income benefits or for Special Juvenile Immigration Status or other applicable application for legal residency and an active dependency case is required for that application. When appropriate, for a nonminor dependent, the case plan shall include a written description of the program and services that will help the nonminor dependent, consistent with his or her best interests, to prepare for transition from foster care and assist the youth in meeting the eligibility criteria set forth in Section 11403. If applicable, the case plan shall describe the individualized supervision provided in the supervised independent living setting as defined, in subdivision (w) of Section 11400. The case plan shall be developed with the child or nonminor dependent and individuals identified as important to the child or nonminor dependent, and shall include steps the agency is taking to ensure that the child or nonminor dependent achieves permanence, including maintaining or obtaining permanent connections to caring and committed adults.
(B) During the 90-day period prior to the participant attaining 18 years of age or older as the state may elect under Section 475(8)(B)(iii) (42 U.S.C. Sec. 675(8)(B)(iii)) of the federal Social Security Act, whether during that period foster care maintenance payments are being made on the child’s behalf or the child is receiving benefits or services under Section 477 (42 U.S.C. Sec. 677) of the federal Social Security Act, a caseworker or other appropriate agency staff or probation officer and other representatives of the participant, as appropriate, shall provide the youth or nonminor with assistance and support in developing the written 90-day transition plan, that is personalized at the direction of the child, information as detailed as the participant elects that shall include, but not be limited to, options regarding housing, health insurance, education, local opportunities for mentors and continuing support services, and workforce supports and employment services.
(g) If the court finds, after considering the case plan, that unsupervised sibling visitation is appropriate and has been consented to, the court shall order that the child or the child’s siblings, the child’s current caregiver, and the child’s prospective adoptive parents, if applicable, be provided with information necessary to accomplish this visitation. This section does not require or prohibit the social worker’s facilitation, transportation, or supervision of visits between the child and his or her siblings.
(h) The case plan documentation on sibling placements required under this section shall not require modification of existing case plan forms until the Child Welfare Services Case Management System is implemented on a statewide basis.
(i) When a child who is 10 years of age or older and who has been in out-of-home placement for six months or longer, the case plan shall include an identification of individuals, other than the child’s siblings, who are important to the child and actions necessary to maintain the child’s relationship with those individuals, provided that those relationships are in the best interest of the child. The social worker shall ask every child who is 10 years of age or older and who has been in out-of-home placement for six months or longer to identify individuals other than the child’s siblings who are important to the child, and may ask any other child to provide that information, as appropriate. The social worker shall make efforts to identify other individuals who are important to the child, consistent with the child’s best interests.
(j) The child’s caregiver shall be provided a copy of a plan outlining the child’s needs and services.
(k) On or before June 30, 2008, the department, in consultation with the County Welfare Directors Association and other advocates, shall develop a comprehensive plan to ensure that 90 percent of foster children are visited by their caseworkers on a monthly basis by October 1, 2011, and that the majority of the visits occur in the residence of the child. The plan shall include any data reporting requirements necessary to comply with the provisions of the federal Child and Family Services Improvement Act of 2006 (Public Law 109-288).
(l) The implementation and operation of the amendments to subdivision (i) enacted at the 2005–06 Regular Session shall be subject to appropriation through the budget process and by phase, as provided in Section 366.35.

SEC. 62.3.

 Section 16501.1 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

16501.1.
 (a) (1) The Legislature finds and declares that the foundation and central unifying tool in child welfare services is the case plan.
(2) The Legislature further finds and declares that a case plan ensures that the child receives protection and safe and proper care and case management, and that services are provided to the child and parents or other caretakers, as appropriate, in order to improve conditions in the parent’s home, to facilitate the safe return of the child to a safe home or the permanent placement of the child, and to address the needs of the child while in foster care.
(b) (1) A case plan shall be based upon the principles of this section and shall document that a preplacement assessment of the service needs of the child and family, and preplacement preventive services, have been provided, and that reasonable efforts to prevent out-of-home placement have been made.
(2) In determining the reasonable services to be offered or provided, the child’s health and safety shall be the paramount concerns.
(3) Upon a determination pursuant to paragraph (1) of subdivision (e) of Section 361.5 that reasonable services will be offered to a parent who is incarcerated in a county jail or state prison, the case plan shall include information, to the extent possible, about a parent’s incarceration in a county jail or the state prison during the time that a minor child of that parent is involved in dependency care.
(4) Reasonable services shall be offered or provided to make it possible for a child to return to a safe home environment, unless, pursuant to subdivisions (b) and (e) of Section 361.5, the court determines that reunification services shall not be provided.
(5) If reasonable services are not ordered, or are terminated, reasonable efforts shall be made to place the child in a timely manner in accordance with the permanent plan and to complete all steps necessary to finalize the permanent placement of the child.
(c) (1) If out-of-home placement is used to attain case plan goals, the decision regarding choice of placement shall be based upon selection of a safe setting that is the least restrictive or most family-like and the most appropriate setting that is available and in close proximity to the parent’s home, proximity to the child’s school, and consistent with the selection of the environment best suited to meet the child’s special needs and best interests. The selection shall consider, in order of priority, placement with relatives, tribal members, and foster family, group care, and residential treatment pursuant to Section 7950 of the Family Code. On or after January 1, 2012, for a nonminor dependent, as defined in subdivision (v) of Section 11400, who is receiving AFDC-FC benefits up to 21 years of age pursuant to Section 11403, in addition to the above requirements, the selection of the placement, including a supervised independent living setting, as described in Section 11400, shall also be based upon the developmental needs of young adults by providing opportunities to have incremental responsibilities that prepare a nonminor dependent to transition to independent living. If admission to, or continuation in, a group home placement is being considered for a nonminor dependent, the group home placement approval decision shall include a youth-driven, team-based case planning process, as defined by the department, in consultation with stakeholders. The case plan shall consider the full range of placement options, and shall specify why admission to, or continuation in, a group home placement is the best alternative available at the time to meet the special needs or well-being of the nonminor dependent, and how the placement will contribute to the nonminor dependent’s transition to independent living. The case plan shall specify the treatment strategies that will be used to prepare the nonminor dependent for discharge to a less restrictive and more family-like setting, including a target date for discharge from the group home placement. The placement shall be reviewed and updated on a regular, periodic basis to ensure that continuation in the group home remains in the best interests of the nonminor dependent and that progress is being made in achieving case plan goals leading to independent living. The group home placement planning process shall begin as soon as it becomes clear to the county welfare department or probation office that a foster child in group home placement is likely to remain in group home placement on his or her 18th birthday, in order to expedite the transition to a less restrictive and more family-like setting if he or she becomes a nonminor dependent. The case planning process shall include informing the youth of all of his or her options, including, but not limited to, admission to or continuation in a group home placement. Consideration for continuation of existing group home placement for a nonminor dependent under 19 years of age may include the need to stay in the same placement in order to complete high school. After a nonminor dependent either completes high school or attains his or her 19th birthday, whichever is earlier, continuation in or admission to a group home is prohibited unless the nonminor dependent satisfies the conditions of paragraph (5) of subdivision (b) of Section 11403, and group home placement functions as a short-term transition to the appropriate system of care.
(2) In addition to the requirements of paragraph (1), and taking into account other statutory considerations regarding placement, the selection of the most appropriate home that will meet the child’s special needs and best interests shall also promote educational stability by taking into consideration proximity to the child’s school of origin, and school attendance area, the number of school transfers the child has previously experienced, and the child’s school matriculation schedule, in addition to other indicators of educational stability that the Legislature hereby encourages the State Department of Social Services and the State Department of Education to develop.
(d) A written case plan shall be completed within a maximum of 60 days of the initial removal of the child or of the in-person response required under subdivision (f) of Section 16501 if the child has not been removed from his or her home, or by the date of the dispositional hearing pursuant to Section 358, whichever occurs first. The case plan shall be updated, as the service needs of the child and family dictate. At a minimum, the case plan shall be updated in conjunction with each status review hearing conducted pursuant to Section 366.21, and the hearing conducted pursuant to Section 366.26, but no less frequently than once every six months. Each updated case plan shall include a description of the services that have been provided to the child under the plan and an evaluation of the appropriateness and effectiveness of those services.
(1) It is the intent of the Legislature that extending the maximum time available for preparing a written case plan from 30 to 60 days will afford caseworkers time to actively engage families, and to solicit and integrate into the case plan the input of the child and the child’s family, as well as the input of relatives and other interested parties.
(2) The extension of the maximum time available for preparing a written case plan from the 30 to 60 days shall be effective 90 days after the date that the department gives counties written notice that necessary changes have been made to the Child Welfare Services Case Management System to account for the 60-day timeframe for preparing a written case plan.
(e) The child welfare services case plan shall be comprehensive enough to meet the juvenile court dependency proceedings requirements pursuant to Article 6 (commencing with Section 300) of Chapter 2 of Part 1 of Division 2.
(f) The case plan shall be developed as follows:
(1) The case plan shall be based upon an assessment of the circumstances that required child welfare services intervention. The child shall be involved in developing the case plan as age and developmentally appropriate.
(2) The case plan shall identify specific goals and the appropriateness of the planned services in meeting those goals.
(3) The case plan shall identify the original allegations of abuse or neglect, as defined in Article 2.5 (commencing with Section 11164) of Chapter 2 of Title 1 of Part 4 of the Penal Code, or the conditions cited as the basis for declaring the child a dependent of the court pursuant to Section 300, or all of these, and the other precipitating incidents that led to child welfare services intervention.
(4) The case plan shall include a description of the schedule of the social worker contacts with the child and the family or other caretakers. The frequency of these contacts shall be in accordance with regulations adopted by the State Department of Social Services. If the child has been placed in foster care out of state, the county social worker or a social worker on the staff of the social services agency in the state in which the child has been placed shall visit the child in a foster family home or the home of a relative, consistent with federal law and in accordance with the department’s approved state plan. For children in out-of-state group home facilities, visits shall be conducted at least monthly, pursuant to Section 16516.5. At least once every six months, at the time of a regularly scheduled social worker contact with the foster child, the child’s social worker shall inform the child of his or her rights as a foster child, as specified in Section 16001.9. The social worker shall provide the information to the child in a manner appropriate to the age or developmental level of the child.
(5) (A) When out-of-home services are used, the frequency of contact between the natural parents or legal guardians and the child shall be specified in the case plan. The frequency of those contacts shall reflect overall case goals, and consider other principles outlined in this section.
(B) Information regarding any court-ordered visitation between the child and the natural parents or legal guardians, and the terms and conditions needed to facilitate the visits while protecting the safety of the child, shall be provided to the child’s out-of-home caregiver as soon as possible after the court order is made.
(6) When out-of-home placement is made, the case plan shall include provisions for the development and maintenance of sibling relationships as specified in subdivisions (b), (c), and (d) of Section 16002. If appropriate, when siblings who are dependents of the juvenile court are not placed together, the social worker for each child, if different, shall communicate with each of the other social workers and ensure that the child’s siblings are informed of significant life events that occur within their extended family. Unless it has been determined that it is inappropriate in a particular case to keep siblings informed of significant life events that occur within the extended family, the social worker shall determine the appropriate means and setting for disclosure of this information to the child commensurate with the child’s age and emotional well-being. These significant life events shall include, but shall not be limited to, the following:
(A) The death of an immediate relative.
(B) The birth of a sibling.
(C) Significant changes regarding a dependent child, unless the child objects to the sharing of the information with his or her siblings, including changes in placement, major medical or mental health diagnoses, treatments, or hospitalizations, arrests, and changes in the permanent plan.
(7) If out-of-home placement is made in a foster family home, group home, or other child care institution that is either a substantial distance from the home of the child’s parent or out of state, the case plan shall specify the reasons why that placement is in the best interest of the child. When an out-of-state group home placement is recommended or made, the case plan shall, in addition, specify compliance with Section 7911.1 of the Family Code.
(8) Effective January 1, 2010, a case plan shall ensure the educational stability of the child while in foster care and shall include both of the following:
(A) An assurance that the placement takes into account the appropriateness of the current educational setting and the proximity to the school in which the child is enrolled at the time of placement.
(B) An assurance that the placement agency has coordinated with the person holding the right to make educational decisions for the child and appropriate local educational agencies to ensure that the child remains in the school in which the child is enrolled at the time of placement or, if remaining in that school is not in the best interests of the child, assurances by the placement agency and the local educational agency to provide immediate and appropriate enrollment in a new school and to provide all of the child’s educational records to the new school.
(9) (A) If out-of-home services are used, or if parental rights have been terminated and the case plan is placement for adoption, the case plan shall include a recommendation regarding the appropriateness of unsupervised visitation between the child and any of the child’s siblings. This recommendation shall include a statement regarding the child’s and the siblings’ willingness to participate in unsupervised visitation. If the case plan includes a recommendation for unsupervised sibling visitation, the plan shall also note that information necessary to accomplish this visitation has been provided to the child or to the child’s siblings.
(B) Information regarding the schedule and frequency of the visits between the child and siblings, as well as any court-ordered terms and conditions needed to facilitate the visits while protecting the safety of the child, shall be provided to the child’s out-of-home caregiver as soon as possible after the court order is made.
(10) If out-of-home services are used and the goal is reunification, the case plan shall describe the services to be provided to assist in reunification and the services to be provided concurrently to achieve legal permanency if efforts to reunify fail. The plan shall also consider in-state and out-of-state placements, the importance of developing and maintaining sibling relationships pursuant to Section 16002, and the desire and willingness of the caregiver to provide legal permanency for the child if reunification is unsuccessful.
(11) If out-of-home services are used, the child has been in care for at least 12 months, and the goal is not adoptive placement, the case plan shall include documentation of the compelling reason or reasons why termination of parental rights is not in the child’s best interest. A determination completed or updated within the past 12 months by the department when it is acting as an adoption agency or by a licensed adoption agency that it is unlikely that the child will be adopted, or that one of the conditions described in paragraph (1) of subdivision (c) of Section 366.26 applies, shall be deemed a compelling reason.
(12) (A) Parents and legal guardians shall have an opportunity to review the case plan, and to sign it whenever possible, and then shall receive a copy of the plan. In a voluntary service or placement agreement, the parents or legal guardians shall be required to review and sign the case plan. Whenever possible, parents and legal guardians shall participate in the development of the case plan. Commencing January 1, 2012, for nonminor dependents, as defined in subdivision (v) of Section 11400, who are receiving AFDC-FC up to 21 years of age pursuant to Section 11403, the case plan shall be developed with, and signed by, the nonminor.
(B) Parents and legal guardians shall be advised that, pursuant to Section 1228.1 of the Evidence Code, neither their signature on the child welfare services case plan nor their acceptance of any services prescribed in the child welfare services case plan shall constitute an admission of guilt or be used as evidence against the parent or legal guardian in a court of law. However, they shall also be advised that the parent’s or guardian’s failure to cooperate, except for good cause, in the provision of services specified in the child welfare services case plan may be used in any hearing held pursuant to Section 366.21 or 366.22 as evidence.
(13) A child shall be given a meaningful opportunity to participate in the development of the case plan and state his or her preference for foster care placement. A child who is 12 years of age or older and in a permanent placement shall also be given the opportunity to review the case plan, sign the case plan, and receive a copy of the case plan.
(14) The case plan shall be included in the court report and shall be considered by the court at the initial hearing and each review hearing. Modifications to the case plan made during the period between review hearings need not be approved by the court if the casework supervisor for that case determines that the modifications further the goals of the plan. If out-of-home services are used with the goal of family reunification, the case plan shall consider and describe the application of subdivision (b) of Section 11203.
(15) If the case plan has as its goal for the child a permanent plan of adoption or placement in another permanent home, it shall include a statement of the child’s wishes regarding their permanent placement plan and an assessment of those stated wishes. The agency shall also include documentation of the steps the agency is taking to find an adoptive family or other permanent living arrangements for the child; to place the child with an adoptive family, an appropriate and willing relative, a legal guardian, or in another planned permanent living arrangement; and to finalize the adoption or legal guardianship. At a minimum, the documentation shall include child-specific recruitment efforts, such as the use of state, regional, and national adoption exchanges, including electronic exchange systems, when the child has been freed for adoption. If the plan is for kinship guardianship, the case plan shall document how the child meets the kinship guardianship eligibility requirements.
(16) (A) When appropriate, for a child who is 16 years of age or older and, commencing January 1, 2012, for a nonminor dependent, the case plan shall include a written description of the programs and services that will help the child, consistent with the child’s best interests, prepare for the transition from foster care to independent living, and whether the youth has an in-progress application pending for Title XVI Supplemental Security Income benefits or for Special Juvenile Immigration Status or other applicable application for legal residency and an active dependency case is required for that application. When appropriate, for a nonminor dependent, the case plan shall include a written description of the program and services that will help the nonminor dependent, consistent with his or her best interests, to prepare for transition from foster care and assist the youth in meeting the eligibility criteria set forth in Section 11403. If applicable, the case plan shall describe the individualized supervision provided in the supervised independent living setting as defined, in subdivision (w) of Section 11400. The case plan shall be developed with the child or nonminor dependent and individuals identified as important to the child or nonminor dependent, and shall include steps the agency is taking to ensure that the child or nonminor dependent achieves permanence, including maintaining or obtaining permanent connections to caring and committed adults.
(B) During the 90-day period prior to the participant attaining 18 years of age or older as the state may elect under Section 475(8)(B)(iii) (42 U.S.C. Sec. 675(8)(B)(iii)) of the federal Social Security Act, whether during that period foster care maintenance payments are being made on the child’s behalf or the child is receiving benefits or services under Section 477 (42 U.S.C. Sec. 677) of the federal Social Security Act, a caseworker or other appropriate agency staff or probation officer and other representatives of the participant, as appropriate, shall provide the youth or nonminor with assistance and support in developing the written 90-day transition plan, that is personalized at the direction of the child, information as detailed as the participant elects that shall include, but not be limited to, options regarding housing, health insurance, education, local opportunities for mentors and continuing support services, and workforce supports and employment services.
(g) If the court finds, after considering the case plan, that unsupervised sibling visitation is appropriate and has been consented to, the court shall order that the child or the child’s siblings, the child’s current caregiver, and the child’s prospective adoptive parents, if applicable, be provided with information necessary to accomplish this visitation. This section does not require or prohibit the social worker’s facilitation, transportation, or supervision of visits between the child and his or her siblings.
(h) The case plan documentation on sibling placements required under this section shall not require modification of existing case plan forms until the Child Welfare Services Case Management System is implemented on a statewide basis.
(i) When a child who is 10 years of age or older and who has been in out-of-home placement for six months or longer, the case plan shall include an identification of individuals, other than the child’s siblings, who are important to the child and actions necessary to maintain the child’s relationship with those individuals, provided that those relationships are in the best interest of the child. The social worker shall ask every child who is 10 years of age or older and who has been in out-of-home placement for six months or longer to identify individuals other than the child’s siblings who are important to the child, and may ask any other child to provide that information, as appropriate. The social worker shall make efforts to identify other individuals who are important to the child, consistent with the child’s best interests.
(j) The child’s caregiver shall be provided a copy of a plan outlining the child’s needs and services.
(k) On or before June 30, 2008, the department, in consultation with the County Welfare Directors Association and other advocates, shall develop a comprehensive plan to ensure that 90 percent of foster children are visited by their caseworkers on a monthly basis by October 1, 2011, and that the majority of the visits occur in the residence of the child. The plan shall include any data reporting requirements necessary to comply with the provisions of the federal Child and Family Services Improvement Act of 2006 (Public Law 109-288).
(l) The implementation and operation of the amendments to subdivision (i) enacted at the 2005–06 Regular Session shall be subject to appropriation through the budget process and by phase, as provided in Section 366.35.

SEC. 63.

 Section 16501.25 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

16501.25.
 (a) For the purposes of this section, “teen parent” means a child who has been adjudged to be a dependent child or ward of the court on the grounds that he or she is a person described under Section 300 or 602, or a ward of a nonrelated legal guardian whose guardianship was established pursuant to Section 360 or 366.26, living in out-of-home placement in a whole family foster home, as defined in subdivision (u) of Section 11400, who is a parent. Commencing January 1, 2012, “teen parent” also means a nonminor dependent, as defined in subdivision (v) of Section 11400, who is living in a whole family foster home, as defined in subdivision (t) of Section 11400, and is eligible for AFDC-FC or Kin-GAP payments pursuant to Section 11403.
(b) (1) When the child of a teen parent is not subject to the jurisdiction of the dependency court but is in the full or partial physical custody of the teen parent, a written shared responsibility plan shall be developed. The plan shall be developed between the teen parent, caregiver, and a representative of the county child welfare agency or probation department, and in the case of a certified home, a representative of the agency providing direct and immediate supervision to the caregiver. Additional input may be provided by any individuals identified by the teen parent, the other parent of the child, if appropriate, and other extended family members. The plan shall be developed as soon as is practicably possible. However, if one or more of the above stakeholders are not available to participate in the creation of the plan within the first 30 days of the teen parent’s placement, the teen parent and caregiver may enter into a plan for the purposes of fulfilling the requirements of paragraph (2) of subdivision (d) of Section 11465, which may be modified at a later time when the other individuals become available.
(2) The plan shall be designed to preserve and strengthen the teen parent family unit, as described in Section 16002.5, to assist the teen parent in meeting the goals outlined in Section 16002.5, to facilitate a supportive home environment for the teen parent and the child, and to ultimately enable the teen parent to independently provide a safe, stable, and permanent home for the child. The plan shall in no way limit the teen parent’s legal right to make decisions regarding the care, custody, and control of the child.
(3) The plan shall be written for the express purpose of aiding the teen parent and the caregiver to reach agreements aimed at reducing conflict and misunderstandings. The plan shall outline, with as much specificity as is practicable, the duties, rights, and responsibilities of both the teen parent and the caregiver with regard to the child, and identify supportive services to be offered to the teen parent by the caregiver or, in the case of a certified home, the agency providing direct and immediate supervision to the caregiver, or both. The plan shall be updated, as needed, to account for the changing needs of infants and toddlers, and in accordance with the teen parent’s changing school, employment, or other outside responsibilities. The plan shall not conflict with the teen parent’s case plan. Areas to be addressed by the plan include, but are not limited to, all of the following:
(A) Feeding.
(B) Clothing.
(C) Hygiene.
(D) Purchase of necessary items, including, but not limited to, safety items, food, clothing, and developmentally appropriate toys and books. This includes both one-time purchases and items needed on an ongoing basis.
(E) Health care.
(F) Transportation to health care appointments, child care, and school, as appropriate.
(G) Provision of child care and babysitting.
(H) Discipline.
(I) Sleeping arrangements.
(J) Visits among the child, his or her noncustodial parent, and other appropriate family members, including the responsibilities of the teen parent, the caregiver, and the foster family agency, as appropriate, for facilitating the visitation. The shared responsibility plan shall not conflict with the teen parent’s case plan and any visitation orders made by the court.
(c) Upon completion of the shared responsibility plan and any subsequent updates to the plan, a copy shall be provided to the teen parent and his or her attorney, the caregiver, the county child welfare agency or probation department and, in the case of a certified home, the agency providing direct and immediate supervision to the caregiver.
(d) The shared responsibility plan requirements shall no longer apply when the two hundred-dollar ($200) monthly payment is made under the Kin-GAP program pursuant to Article 4.5 (commencing with Section 11360) or Article 4.7 (commencing with Section 11385) of Chapter 2 of Part 3 to a former whole family foster home pursuant to subdivision (a) of Section 11465.

SEC. 64.

 Section 16503 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

16503.
 (a) Subsequent to completion of the hearing conducted pursuant to Section 366.26, the agency responsible for placement and care of a minor, or, on or after January 1, 2012, a nonminor dependent, as defined in subdivision (v) of Section 11400, shall ensure that a child in foster care shall receive administrative reviews periodically but no less frequently than once every six months. The administrative review shall determine the appropriateness of the placement, the continuing appropriateness and extent of compliance with the permanent plan for the child, the extent of compliance with the case plan, and adequacy of services provided to the child.
(b) The term “administrative review” means a review open to the participation of the parents of a child in foster care conducted by a panel of appropriate persons at least one of whom is not responsible for the case management of, or the delivery of services to, either the child or the parents who are the subject of the review. On and after January 1, 2012, administrative reviews held for nonminor dependents shall be conducted pursuant to subdivision (b) of Section 295 and subdivision (m) of Section 366.3.
(c) The department shall develop and implement regulations establishing processes, procedures, and standards for the conduct of administrative reviews that conform to Section 675.6 of Title 42 of the United States Code.
(d) The requirements of this section shall not be interpreted as requiring duplicate concurrent court and administrative reviews.

SEC. 64.5.

 Section 16504.5 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

16504.5.
 (a) (1) Notwithstanding any other provision of law, pursuant to subdivision (b) of Section 11105 of the Penal Code, a child welfare agency may secure from an appropriate governmental criminal justice agency the state summary criminal history information, as defined in subdivision (a) of Section 11105 of the Penal Code, through the California Law Enforcement Telecommunications System pursuant to subdivision (d) of Section 309, and subdivision (a) of Section 1522 of the Health and Safety Code for the following purposes:
(A) To conduct an investigation pursuant to Section 11166.3 of the Penal Code or an investigation involving a child in which the child is alleged to come within the jurisdiction of the juvenile court under Section 300.
(B) (i) To assess the appropriateness and safety of placing a child who has been detained or is a dependent of the court, in the home of a relative assessed pursuant to Section 309 or 361.4, or in the home of a nonrelative extended family member assessed as described in Section 362.7 during an emergency situation.
(ii) When a relative or nonrelative family member who has been assessed pursuant to clause (i) and approved as a caregiver moves to a different county and continued placement of the child with that person is intended, the move shall be considered an emergency situation for purposes of this subparagraph.
(C) To attempt to locate a parent or guardian pursuant to Section 311 of a child who is the subject of dependency court proceedings.
(D) To obtain information about the background of a nonminor who has petitioned to reenter foster care under subdivision (e) of Section 388, in order to assess the appropriateness and safety of placing the nonminor in a foster care or other placement setting with minor dependent children.
(2) Any time that a child welfare agency initiates a criminal background check through the California Law Enforcement Telecommunications System for the purpose described in subparagraph (B) of paragraph (1), the agency shall ensure that a state-level fingerprint check is initiated within 10 calendar days of the check, unless the whereabouts of the subject of the check are unknown or the subject of the check refuses to submit to the fingerprint check. The Department of Justice shall provide the requesting agency a copy of all criminal history information regarding an individual that it maintains pursuant to subdivision (b) of Section 11105 of the Penal Code.
(b) Criminal justice personnel shall cooperate with requests for criminal history information authorized pursuant to this section and shall provide the information to the requesting entity in a timely manner.
(c) Any law enforcement officer or person authorized by this section to receive the information who obtains the information in the record and knowingly provides the information to a person not authorized by law to receive the information is guilty of a misdemeanor as specified in Section 11142 of the Penal Code.
(d) Information obtained pursuant to this section shall not be used for any purposes other than those described in subdivision (a).
(e) Nothing in this section shall preclude anonminor petitioning to reenter foster care or a relative or other person living in a relative’s home from refuting any of the information obtained by law enforcement if the individual believes the state- or federal-level criminal records check revealed erroneous information.
(f) (1) A state or county welfare agency may submit to the Department of Justice fingerprint images and related information required by the Department of Justice of parents or legal guardians when determining their suitability for reunification with a dependent child subject to the jurisdiction of the juvenile court, for the purposes of obtaining information as to the existence and content of a record of state or federal convictions and state or federal arrests, as well as information as to the existence and content of a record of state or federal arrests for which the Department of Justice establishes that the person is free on bail or on his or her own recognizance pending trial or appeal. Of the information received by the Department of Justice pursuant to this subdivision, only the parent’s or legal guardian’s criminal history for the time period following the removal of the child from the parent or legal guardian shall be considered.
(2) A county welfare agency or county probation office may submit to the Department of Justice fingerprint images and related information required by the Department of Justice of nonminors petitioning to reenter foster care under Section 388, in order to assess the appropriateness and safety of placing the nonminor in a foster care or other placement setting with minor dependent children.
(3) When received, the Department of Justice shall forward to the Federal Bureau of Investigation requests for federal summary criminal history information received pursuant to this subdivision. The Department of Justice shall review the information returned from the Federal Bureau of Investigation and respond to the state or county welfare agency.
(4) The Department of Justice shall provide a response to the state or county welfare agency pursuant to subdivision (p) of Section 11105 of the Penal Code.
(5) The state or county welfare agency shall not request from the Department of Justice subsequent arrest notification service, as provided pursuant to Section 11105.2 of the Penal Code, for individuals described in this subdivision.
(6) The Department of Justice shall charge a fee sufficient to cover the costs of processing the request described in this subdivision.
(7) This subdivision shall become operative on July 1, 2007.
(g) A fee, determined by the Federal Bureau of Investigation and collected by the Department of Justice, shall be charged for each federal-level criminal offender record information request submitted pursuant to this section and Section 361.4.

SEC. 65.

 Section 16507.3 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

16507.3.
 (a) Beginning on October 1, 1982, child welfare services for children placed voluntarily after January 1, 1982, shall be limited to a period not to exceed 180 days. Subject to the availability of federal funding, voluntary placement services for federally eligible children may be extended for an additional six months, for a total period not to exceed 12 months for either of the following:
(1) Families who have a custodial parent or guardian in residential substance abuse treatment who is demonstrating progress that indicates the problems warranting the initial placement are likely to be resolved within the extended time period.
(2) Families whose minor child is seriously emotionally disturbed, who requires placement in a residential treatment facility, who otherwise would be likely to be found to fit the description in subdivision (c) of Section 300, and who reasonably may be expected to be returned home within the extended time period.
(b) Whenever a seriously emotionally disturbed child as described in paragraph (2) of subdivision (a) is initially voluntarily placed, the initial placement shall be made pursuant to the approval of an interagency administrative review board as described in paragraph (4) of subdivision (a) of Section 16507.6.
(c) The extension of voluntary placement services for an additional six months shall be subject to the approval of an administrative review board pursuant to paragraphs (4) and (5) of subdivision (a) of Section 16507.6. The extension of voluntary placement services is contingent upon the receipt of federal funding. Any administrative and foster care costs that exceed the amount of federal reimbursement shall be paid solely with county funds.
(d) An otherwise eligible child placed voluntarily prior to January 1, 1982, may remain eligible for child welfare services without regard to the length of time in placement until April 1, 1984. Beginning on October 1, 1982, such a child shall receive administrative review pursuant to the requirements of Section 16503.

SEC. 66.

 Section 16507.4 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

16507.4.
 (a) Notwithstanding any other provisions of this chapter, voluntary family reunification services shall be provided without fee to families who qualify, or would qualify if application had been made therefor, as recipients of public assistance under the Aid to Families with Dependent Children program as described in the State Plan in effect on July 1, 1996. If the family is not qualified for aid, voluntary family reunification services may be utilized, provided that the county seeks reimbursement from the parent or guardian on a statewide sliding scale according to income as determined by the State Department of Social Services and approved by the Department of Finance. The fee may be waived if the social worker determines that the payment of the fee may be a barrier to reunification. Section 17552 of the Family Code shall also apply.
(b) An out-of-home placement of a minor without adjudication by the juvenile court may occur only when all of the following conditions exist:
(1) There is a mutual decision between the child’s parent or guardian and the county welfare department in accordance with regulations promulgated by the State Department of Social Services.
(2) There is a written agreement between the county welfare department and the parent or guardian specifying the terms of the voluntary placement. The State Department of Social Services shall develop a form for voluntary placement agreements which shall be used by all counties. The form shall indicate that foster care under the Aid to Families with Dependent Children program is available to those children.
(3) In the case of an Indian child, in accordance with Section 1913 of the Indian Child Welfare Act (25 U.S.C. Sec. 1901 et seq.), the following criteria are met:
(A) The parent or Indian custodian’s consent to the voluntary out-of-home placement is executed in writing at least 10 days after the child’s birth and recorded before a judge.
(B) The judge certifies that the terms and consequences of the consent were fully explained in detail in English and were fully understood by the parent or that they were interpreted into a language that the parent understood.
(C) A parent of an Indian child may withdraw his or her consent for any reason at any time and the child shall be returned to the parent.
(c) In the case of a voluntary placement pending relinquishment, a county welfare department shall have the option of delegating to a licensed private adoption agency the responsibility for placement by the county welfare department. If such a delegation occurs, the voluntary placement agreement shall be signed by the county welfare department, the child’s parent or guardian, and the licensed private adoption agency.
(d) The State Department of Social Services shall amend its plan pursuant to Part E (commencing with Section 670) of Subchapter IV of Chapter 7 of Title 42 of the United States Code in order to conform to mandates of Public Law 96-272 and Public Law 110-351 for federal financial participation in voluntary placements.

SEC. 67.

 Section 16507.6 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

16507.6.
 If a minor has been voluntarily placed with the county welfare department subsequent to January 1, 1982, for out-of-home placement by his or her parents or guardians pursuant to this chapter and the minor has remained out of their physical custody for a consecutive period not to exceed 180 days, the department shall do one of the following:
(a) Return the minor to the physical custody of his or her parents or guardians.
(b) Refer the minor to a licensed adoption agency for consideration of adoptive planning and receipt of a permanent relinquishment of care and custody rights from the parents pursuant to Section 8700 of the Family Code.
(c) Apply for a petition pursuant to Section 332 and file the petition with the juvenile court to have the minor declared a dependent child of the court under Section 300, in that return to the parental home would be contrary to the best interests of the child.
(d) Refer the minor placed pursuant to paragraph (2) of subdivision (a) of Section 16507.3 to an interagency administrative review board as may be required in federal regulations. One member of the board shall be a licensed mental health practitioner. The review board shall review the appropriateness and continued necessity of six additional months of voluntary placement, the extent of the compliance with the voluntary placement plan, and the adequacy of services to the family and child. If the minor cannot be returned home by the 12th month of voluntary placement services, the department shall proceed pursuant to subdivision (b) or (c).
(e) Refer the minor placed pursuant to paragraph (1) of subdivision (a) of Section 16507.3 to an administrative review board as may be required in federal regulations and as described in subdivision (b) of Section 16503. If the minor cannot be returned home by the 12th month of voluntary placement services, the department shall proceed as described in paragraph subdivisions (b), (c), or (d).

SEC. 68.

 Section 16508 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, as amended by Section 21 of Chapter 287 of the Statutes of 2009, is amended to read:

16508.
 Permanent placement services shall be provided or arranged for by county welfare department staff for children who cannot safely live with their parents and are not likely to return to their own homes. Permanent placement services shall be available without regard to income to the following children:
(a) Children judged dependent under Section 300 where a review has determined that reunification, adoption, tribal customary adoption, or guardianship is inappropriate.
(b) Recipients of public assistance under the nonfederally funded Aid to Families with Dependent Children Foster Care program who are wards of a legal guardian pursuant to Section 11405, where a review has determined that reunification or adoption is inappropriate.
(c) On and after January 1, 2012, nonminor dependents, as defined in subdivision (v) of Section 11400, who are receiving AFDC-FC pursuant to Section 11403.
(d) This section shall remain in effect only until January 1, 2014, and as of that date is repealed, unless a later enacted statute, that is enacted before January 1, 2014, deletes or extends that date.

SEC. 69.

 Section 16508 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, as added by Section 22 of Chapter 287 of the Statutes of 2009, is amended to read:

16508.
 Permanent placement services shall be provided or arranged for by county welfare department staff for children who cannot safely live with their parents and are not likely to return to their own homes. Permanent placement services shall be available without regard to income to the following children:
(a) Children judged dependent under Section 300 where a review has determined that reunification, adoption, or guardianship is inappropriate.
(b) Recipients of public assistance under the nonfederally funded Aid to Families with Dependent Children Foster Care program who are wards of a legal guardian pursuant to Section 11405, where a review has determined that reunification or adoption is inappropriate.
(c) On and after January 1, 2012, nonminor dependents, as defined in subdivision (v) of Section 11400, who are receiving AFDC-FC pursuant to Section 11403.
(d) This section shall become operative on January 1, 2014.

SEC. 70.

 No appropriation pursuant to Section 15200 of the Welfare and Institutions Code shall be made for the purpose of implementing this act.

SEC. 71.

 Section 44.1 of this bill incorporates amendments to Section 11402 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, as amended by Section 7 of Chapter 288 of the Statutes of 2007, proposed by both this bill and SB 1214. It shall only become operative if (1) both bills are enacted and become effective on or before January 1, 2011, (2) each bill amends Section 11402 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, as amended by Section 7 of Chapter 288 of the Statutes of 2007, and (3) this bill is enacted after SB 1214, in which case Section 44 of this bill shall not become operative.

SEC. 72.

 Section 45.1 of this bill incorporates amendments to Section 11402 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, as amended by Section 8 of Chapter 288 of the Statutes of 2007, proposed by both this bill and SB 1214. It shall only become operative if (1) both bills are enacted and become effective on or before January 1, 2011, (2) each bill amends Section 11402 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, as amended by Section 8 of Chapter 288 of the Statutes of 2007, and (3) this bill is enacted after SB 1214, in which case Section 45 of this bill shall not become operative.

SEC. 73.

 (a) Section 62.1 of this bill incorporates amendments to Section 16501.1 of the Welfare and Institutions Code proposed by both this bill and SB 945. It shall only become operative if (1) both bills are enacted and become effective on or before January 1, 2011, (2) each bill amends Section 16501.1 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, and (3) SB 1353 is not enacted or as enacted does not amend that section, and (4) this bill is enacted after SB 945, in which case Sections 62, 62.2, and 62.3 of this bill shall not become operative.
(b) Section 62.2 of this bill incorporates amendments to Section 16501.1 of the Welfare and Institutions Code proposed by both this bill and SB 1353. It shall only become operative if (1) both bills are enacted and become effective on or before January 1, 2011, (2) each bill amends Section 16501.1 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, (3) SB 945 is not enacted or as enacted does not amend that section, and (4) this bill is enacted after SB 1353, in which case Sections 62, 62.1, and 62.3 of this bill shall not become operative.
(c) Section 62.3 of this bill incorporates amendments to Section 16501.1 of the Welfare and Institutions Code proposed by this bill, SB 945, and SB 1353. It shall only become operative if (1) all three bills are enacted and become effective on or before January 1, 2011, (2) all three bills amend Section 16501.1 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, and (3) this bill is enacted after SB 945 and SB 1353, in which case Sections 62, 62.1, and 62.2 of this bill shall not become operative.

SEC. 74.

 No reimbursement is required by this act pursuant to Section 6 of Article XIII B of the California Constitution for certain costs that may be incurred by a local agency or school district because, in that regard, this act creates a new crime or infraction, eliminates a crime or infraction, or changes the penalty for a crime or infraction, within the meaning of Section 17556 of the Government Code, or changes the definition of a crime within the meaning of Section 6 of Article XIII B of the California Constitution.
However, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that this act contains other costs mandated by the state, reimbursement to local agencies and school districts for those costs shall be made pursuant to Part 7 (commencing with Section 17500) of Division 4 of Title 2 of the Government Code.