Code Section Group

Penal Code - PEN

PART 1. OF CRIMES AND PUNISHMENTS [25 - 680]

  ( Part 1 enacted 1872. )

TITLE 17. RIGHTS OF VICTIMS AND WITNESSES OF CRIME [679 - 680.1]
  ( Title 17 added by Stats. 1986, Ch. 1427, Sec. 1. )

679.
  

In recognition of the civil and moral duty of victims and witnesses of crime to fully and voluntarily cooperate with law enforcement and prosecutorial agencies, and in further recognition of the continuing importance of this citizen cooperation to state and local law enforcement efforts and the general effectiveness and well-being of the criminal justice system of this state, the Legislature declares its intent, in the enactment of this title, to ensure that all victims and witnesses of crime are treated with dignity, respect, courtesy, and sensitivity. It is the further intent that the rights enumerated in Section 679.02 relating to victims and witnesses of crime are honored and protected by law enforcement agencies, prosecutors, and judges in a manner no less vigorous than the protections afforded criminal defendants. It is the intent of the Legislature to add to Section 679.02 references to new rights as or as soon after they are created. The failure to enumerate in that section a right which is enumerated elsewhere in the law shall not be deemed to diminish the importance or enforceability of that right.

(Added by Stats. 1986, Ch. 1427, Sec. 1.)

679.01.
  

As used in this title, the following definitions shall control:

(a) “Crime” means an act committed in this state which, if committed by a competent adult, would constitute a misdemeanor or felony.

(b) “Victim” means a person against whom a crime has been committed.

(c) “Witness” means any person who has been or is expected to testify for the prosecution, or who, by reason of having relevant information, is subject to call or likely to be called as a witness for the prosecution, whether or not any action or proceeding has yet been commenced.

(Added by Stats. 1986, Ch. 1427, Sec. 1.)

679.02.
  

(a) The following are hereby established as the statutory rights of victims and witnesses of crimes:

(1) To be notified as soon as feasible that a court proceeding to which he or she has been subpoenaed as a witness will not proceed as scheduled, provided the prosecuting attorney determines that the witness’ attendance is not required.

(2) Upon request of the victim or a witness, to be informed by the prosecuting attorney of the final disposition of the case, as provided by Section 11116.10.

(3) For the victim, the victim’s parents or guardian if the victim is a minor, or the next of kin of the victim if the victim has died, to be notified of all sentencing proceedings, and of the right to appear, to reasonably express his or her views, have those views preserved by audio or video means as provided in Section 1191.16, and to have the court consider his or her statements, as provided by Sections 1191.1 and 1191.15.

(4) For the victim, the victim’s parents or guardian if the victim is a minor, or the next of kin of the victim if the victim has died, to be notified of all juvenile disposition hearings in which the alleged act would have been a felony if committed by an adult, and of the right to attend and to express his or her views, as provided by Section 656.2 of the Welfare and Institutions Code.

(5) Upon request by the victim or the next of kin of the victim if the victim has died, to be notified of any parole eligibility hearing and of the right to appear, either personally as provided by Section 3043 of this code, or by other means as provided by Sections 3043.2 and 3043.25 of this code, to reasonably express his or her views, and to have his or her statements considered, as provided by Section 3043 of this code and by Section 1767 of the Welfare and Institutions Code.

(6) Upon request by the victim or the next of kin of the victim if the crime was a homicide, to be notified of an inmate’s placement in a reentry or work furlough program, or notified of the inmate’s escape as provided by Section 11155.

(7) To be notified that he or she may be entitled to witness fees and mileage, as provided by Section 1329.1.

(8) For the victim, to be provided with information concerning the victim’s right to civil recovery and the opportunity to be compensated from the Restitution Fund pursuant to Chapter 5 (commencing with Section 13959) of Part 4 of Division 3 of Title 2 of the Government Code and Section 1191.2 of this code.

(9) To the expeditious return of his or her property which has allegedly been stolen or embezzled, when it is no longer needed as evidence, as provided by Chapter 12 (commencing with Section 1407) and Chapter 13 (commencing with Section 1417) of Title 10 of Part 2.

(10) To an expeditious disposition of the criminal action.

(11) To be notified, if applicable, in accordance with Sections 679.03 and 3058.8 if the defendant is to be placed on parole.

(12) For the victim, upon request, to be notified of any pretrial disposition of the case, to the extent required by Section 28 of Article I of the California Constitution.

(A) A victim may request to be notified of a pretrial disposition.

(B) The victim may be notified by any reasonable means available.

Nothing in this paragraph is intended to affect the right of the people and the defendant to an expeditious disposition as provided in Section 1050.

(13) For the victim, to be notified by the district attorney’s office of the right to request, upon a form provided by the district attorney’s office, and receive a notice pursuant to paragraph (14), if the defendant is convicted of any of the following offenses:

(A) Assault with intent to commit rape, sodomy, oral copulation, or any violation of Section 264.1, 288, or 289, in violation of Section 220.

(B) A violation of Section 207 or 209 committed with the intent to commit a violation of Section 261, 262, 286, 288, 288a, or 289.

(C) Rape, in violation of Section 261.

(D) Oral copulation, in violation of Section 288a.

(E) Sodomy, in violation of Section 286.

(F) A violation of Section 288.

(G) A violation of Section 289.

(14) When a victim has requested notification pursuant to paragraph (13), the sheriff shall inform the victim that the person who was convicted of the offense has been ordered to be placed on probation, and give the victim notice of the proposed date upon which the person will be released from the custody of the sheriff.

(b) The rights set forth in subdivision (a) shall be set forth in the information and educational materials prepared pursuant to Section 13897.1. The information and educational materials shall be distributed to local law enforcement agencies and local victims’ programs by the Victims’ Legal Resource Center established pursuant to Chapter 11 (commencing with Section 13897) of Title 6 of Part 4.

(c) Local law enforcement agencies shall make available copies of the materials described in subdivision (b) to victims and witnesses.

(d) Nothing in this section is intended to affect the rights and services provided to victims and witnesses by the local assistance centers for victims and witnesses.

(e) The court shall not release statements, made pursuant to paragraph (3) or (4) of subdivision (a), to the public prior to the statement being heard in court.

(Amended by Stats. 2011, Ch. 77, Sec. 1. Effective January 1, 2012.)

679.026.
  

(a) It is the intent of the people of the State of California in enacting this section to implement the rights of victims of crime established in Section 28 of Article I of the California Constitution to be informed of the rights of crime victims enumerated in the Constitution and in the statutes of this state.

(b) Every victim of crime has the right to receive without cost or charge a list of the rights of victims of crime recognized in Section 28 of Article I of the California Constitution. These rights shall be known as “Marsy Rights.”

(c) (1) Every law enforcement agency investigating a criminal act and every agency prosecuting a criminal act shall, as provided herein, at the time of initial contact with a crime victim, during follow-up investigation, or as soon thereafter as deemed appropriate by investigating officers or prosecuting attorneys, provide or make available to each victim of the criminal act without charge or cost a “Marsy Rights” card described in paragraphs (3) and (4).

(2) The victim disclosures required under this section shall be available to the public at a state funded and maintained Web site authorized pursuant to Section 14260 of the Penal Code to be known as “Marsy’s Page.”

(3) The Attorney General shall design and make available in “.pdf” or other imaging format to every agency listed in paragraph (1) a “Marsy Rights” card, which shall contain the rights of crime victims described in subdivision (b) of Section 28 of Article I of the California Constitution, information on the means by which a crime victim can access the web page described in paragraph (2), and a toll-free telephone number to enable a crime victim to contact a local victim’s assistance office.

(4) Every law enforcement agency which investigates criminal activity shall, if provided without cost to the agency by any organization classified as a nonprofit organization under paragraph (3) of subdivision (c) of Section 501 of the Internal Revenue Code, make available and provide to every crime victim a “Victims’ Survival and Resource Guide” pamphlet and/or video that has been approved by the Attorney General. The “Victims’ Survival and Resource Guide” and video shall include an approved “Marsy Rights” card, a list of government agencies, nonprofit victims’ rights groups, support groups, and local resources that assist crime victims, and any other information which the Attorney General determines might be helpful to victims of crime.

(5) Any agency described in paragraph (1) may in its discretion design and distribute to each victim of a criminal act its own Victims’ Survival and Resource Guide and video, the contents of which have been approved by the Attorney General, in addition to or in lieu of the materials described in paragraph (4).

(Added November 4, 2008, by initiative Proposition 9, Sec. 6.1. Note: Prop. 9 is titled the Victims' Bill of Rights Act of 2008: Marsy's Law.)

679.03.
  

(a) With respect to the conviction of a defendant involving a violent offense, as defined in Section 29905, the county district attorney, probation department, and victim-witness coordinator shall confer and establish an annual policy within existing resources to decide which one of their agencies shall inform each witness involved in the conviction who was threatened by the defendant following the defendant’s arrest and each victim or next of kin of the victim of that offense of the right to request and receive a notice pursuant to Section 3058.8 or 3605. If no agreement is reached, the presiding judge shall designate the appropriate county agency or department to provide this notification.

(b) The Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation shall supply a form to the agency designated pursuant to subdivision (a) in order to enable persons specified in subdivision (a) to request and receive notification from the department of the release, escape, scheduled execution, or death of the violent offender. That agency shall give the form to the victim, witness, or next of kin of the victim for completion, explain to that person or persons the right to be so notified, and forward the completed form to the department. The department or the Board of Parole Hearings is responsible for notifying all victims, witnesses, or next of kin of victims who request to be notified of a violent offender’s release or scheduled execution, as provided by Sections 3058.8 and 3605.

(c) All information relating to any person receiving notice pursuant to subdivision (b) shall remain confidential and is not subject to disclosure pursuant to the California Public Records Act (Chapter 3.5 (commencing with Section 6250) of Division 7 of Title 1 of the Government Code).

(d) Nothing in this section precludes a victim, witness, or next of kin of the victim from requesting notification using an automated electronic notification process, if available.

(Amended (as amended by Stats. 2010, Ch. 178) by Stats. 2011, Ch. 364, Sec. 2. Effective September 29, 2011. Amended version operative January 1, 2012, pursuant to Stats. 2010, Ch. 178, Sec. 107.)

679.04.
  

(a) A victim of sexual assault as the result of any offense specified in paragraph (1) of subdivision (b) of Section 264.2 has the right to have victim advocates and a support person of the victim’s choosing present at any interview by law enforcement authorities, district attorneys, or defense attorneys. However, the support person may be excluded from an interview by law enforcement or the district attorney if the law enforcement authority or the district attorney determines that the presence of that individual would be detrimental to the purpose of the interview. As used in this section, “victim advocate” means a sexual assault counselor, as defined in Section 1035.2 of the Evidence Code, or a victim advocate working in a center established under Article 2 (commencing with Section 13835) of Chapter 4 of Title 6 of Part 4.

(b) (1) Prior to the commencement of the initial interview by law enforcement authorities or the district attorney pertaining to any criminal action arising out of a sexual assault, a victim of sexual assault as the result of any offense specified in Section 264.2 shall be notified orally or in writing by the attending law enforcement authority or district attorney that the victim has the right to have victim advocates and a support person of the victim’s choosing present at the interview or contact. This subdivision applies to investigators and agents employed or retained by law enforcement or the district attorney.

(2) At the time the victim is advised of his or her rights pursuant to paragraph (1), the attending law enforcement authority or district attorney shall also advise the victim of the right to have victim advocates and a support person present at any interview by the defense attorney or investigators or agents employed by the defense attorney.

(c) An initial investigation by law enforcement to determine whether a crime has been committed and the identity of the suspects shall not constitute a law enforcement interview for purposes of this section.

(Amended by Stats. 2006, Ch. 689, Sec. 12. Effective January 1, 2007.)

679.05.
  

(a) A victim of domestic violence or abuse, as defined in Sections 6203 or 6211 of the Family Code, or Section 13700 of the Penal Code, has the right to have a domestic violence advocate and a support person of the victim’s choosing present at any interview by law enforcement authorities, prosecutors, or defense attorneys. However, the support person may be excluded from an interview by law enforcement or the prosecutor if the law enforcement authority or the prosecutor determines that the presence of that individual would be detrimental to the purpose of the interview. As used in this section, “domestic violence advocate” means either a person employed by a program specified in Section 13835.2 for the purpose of rendering advice or assistance to victims of domestic violence, or a domestic violence counselor, as defined in Section 1037.1 of the Evidence Code. Prior to being present at any interview conducted by law enforcement authorities, prosecutors, or defense attorneys, a domestic violence advocate shall advise the victim of any applicable limitations on the confidentiality of communications between the victim and the domestic violence advocate.

(b) (1) Prior to the commencement of the initial interview by law enforcement authorities or the prosecutor pertaining to any criminal action arising out of a domestic violence incident, a victim of domestic violence or abuse, as defined in Section 6203 or 6211 of the Family Code, or Section 13700 of this code, shall be notified orally or in writing by the attending law enforcement authority or prosecutor that the victim has the right to have a domestic violence advocate and a support person of the victim’s choosing present at the interview or contact. This subdivision applies to investigators and agents employed or retained by law enforcement or the prosecutor.

(2) At the time the victim is advised of his or her rights pursuant to paragraph (1), the attending law enforcement authority or prosecutor shall also advise the victim of the right to have a domestic violence advocate and a support person present at any interview by the defense attorney or investigators or agents employed by the defense attorney.

(c) An initial investigation by law enforcement to determine whether a crime has been committed and the identity of the suspects shall not constitute a law enforcement interview for purposes of this section.

(Amended by Stats. 2007, Ch. 206, Sec. 6. Effective January 1, 2008.)

679.08.
  

(a) (1) Whenever there has been a crime committed against a victim, the law enforcement officer assigned to the case may provide the victim of the crime with a “Victim’s Rights Card,” as specified in subdivision (b).

(2) This section shall be operative in a city or county only upon the adoption of a resolution by the city council or board of supervisors to that effect.

(3) This section shall not be interpreted as replacing or prohibiting any services currently offered to victims of crime by any agency or person affected by this section.

(b) A “Victim’s Rights Card” means a card or paper that provides a printed notice with a disclaimer, in at least 10-point type, to a victim of a crime regarding potential services that may be available under existing state law to assist the victim. The printed notice shall include the following language or language substantially similar to the following:

“California law provides crime victims with important rights. If you are a victim of crime, you may be entitled to the assistance of a victim advocate who can answer many of the questions you might have about the criminal justice system.”

“Victim advocates can assist you with the following:

(1) Explaining what information you are entitled to receive while criminal proceedings are pending.

(2) Assisting you in applying for restitution to compensate you for crime-related losses.

(3) Communicating with the prosecution.

(4) Assisting you in receiving victim support services.

(5) Helping you prepare a victim impact statement before an offender is sentenced.”

“To speak with a victim advocate, please call any of the following numbers:”

[Set forth the name and phone number, including area code, of all victim advocate agencies in the local jurisdiction]

“PLEASE NOTE THAT THIS INFORMATION IS PROVIDED IN AN ATTEMPT TO ASSIST THE VICTIM, BY NOTIFYING THE VICTIM ABOUT SOME, BUT NOT NECESSARILY ALL, SERVICES AVAILABLE TO THE VICTIM; THE PROVISION OF THIS INFORMATION AND THE INFORMATION CONTAINED THEREIN IS NOT LEGAL ADVICE AND IS NOT INTENDED TO CONSTITUTE A GUARANTEE OF ANY VICTIM’S RIGHTS OR OF A VICTIM’S ELIGIBILITY OR ENTITLEMENT TO ANY SPECIFIC BENEFITS OR SERVICES.”

(c) Any act or omission covered by this section is a discretionary act pursuant to Section 820.2 of the Government Code.

(Added by Stats. 2006, Ch. 94, Sec. 1. Effective January 1, 2007.)

679.10.
  

(a) For purposes of this section, a “certifying entity” is any of the following:

(1) A state or local law enforcement agency.

(2) A prosecutor.

(3) A judge.

(4) Any other authority that has responsibility for the detection or investigation or prosecution of a qualifying crime or criminal activity.

(5) Agencies that have criminal detection or investigative jurisdiction in their respective areas of expertise, including, but not limited to, child protective services, the Department of Fair Employment and Housing, and the Department of Industrial Relations.

(b) For purposes of this section, a “certifying official” is any of the following:

(1) The head of the certifying entity.

(2) A person in a supervisory role who has been specifically designated by the head of the certifying entity to issue Form I-918 Supplement B certifications on behalf of that agency.

(3) A judge.

(4) Any other certifying official defined under Section 214.14 (a)(2) of Title 8 of the Code of Federal Regulations.

(c) “Qualifying criminal activity” means qualifying criminal activity pursuant to Section 101(a)(15)(U)(iii) of the federal Immigration and Nationality Act which includes, but is not limited to, the following crimes:

(1) Rape.

(2) Torture.

(3) Human trafficking.

(4) Incest.

(5) Domestic violence.

(6) Sexual assault.

(7) Abusive sexual conduct.

(8) Prostitution.

(9) Sexual exploitation.

(10) Female genital mutilation.

(11) Being held hostage.

(12) Peonage.

(13) Perjury.

(14) Involuntary servitude.

(15) Slavery.

(16) Kidnaping.

(17) Abduction.

(18) Unlawful criminal restraint.

(19) False imprisonment.

(20) Blackmail.

(21) Extortion.

(22) Manslaughter.

(23) Murder.

(24) Felonious assault.

(25) Witness tampering.

(26) Obstruction of justice.

(27) Fraud in foreign labor contracting.

(28) Stalking.

(d) A “qualifying crime” includes criminal offenses for which the nature and elements of the offenses are substantially similar to the criminal activity described in subdivision (c), and the attempt, conspiracy, or solicitation to commit any of those offenses.

(e) Upon the request of the victim or victim’s family member, a certifying official from a certifying entity shall certify victim helpfulness on the Form I-918 Supplement B certification, when the victim was a victim of a qualifying criminal activity and has been helpful, is being helpful, or is likely to be helpful to the detection or investigation or prosecution of that qualifying criminal activity.

(f) For purposes of determining helpfulness pursuant to subdivision (e), there is a rebuttable presumption that a victim is helpful, has been helpful, or is likely to be helpful to the detection or investigation or prosecution of that qualifying criminal activity, if the victim has not refused or failed to provide information and assistance reasonably requested by law enforcement.

(g) The certifying official shall fully complete and sign the Form I-918 Supplement B certification and, regarding victim helpfulness, include specific details about the nature of the crime investigated or prosecuted and a detailed description of the victim’s helpfulness or likely helpfulness to the detection or investigation or prosecution of the criminal activity.

(h) A certifying entity shall process a Form I-918 Supplement B certification within 90 days of request, unless the noncitizen is in removal proceedings, in which case the certification shall be processed within 14 days of request.

(i) A current investigation, the filing of charges, and a prosecution or conviction are not required for the victim to request and obtain the Form I-918 Supplement B certification from a certifying official.

(j) A certifying official may only withdraw the certification if the victim refuses to provide information and assistance when reasonably requested.

(k) A certifying entity is prohibited from disclosing the immigration status of a victim or person requesting the Form I-918 Supplement B certification, except to comply with federal law or legal process, or if authorized by the victim or person requesting the Form I-918 Supplement B certification.

(l) A certifying entity that receives a request for a Form I-918 Supplement B certification shall report to the Legislature, on or before January 1, 2017, and annually thereafter, the number of victims that requested Form I-918 Supplement B certifications from the entity, the number of those certification forms that were signed, and the number that were denied. A report pursuant to this subdivision shall comply with Section 9795 of the Government Code.

(Amended by Stats. 2016, Ch. 86, Sec. 227. Effective January 1, 2017.)

679.11.
  

(a) For purposes of this section, a “certifying entity” is any of the following:

(1) A state or local law enforcement agency.

(2) A prosecutor.

(3) A judge.

(4) The Department of Industrial Relations.

(5) Any other state or local government agencies that have criminal, civil, or administrative investigative or prosecutorial authority relating to human trafficking.

(b) For purposes of this section, a “certifying official” is any of the following:

(1) The head of the certifying entity.

(2) A person in a supervisory role who has been specifically designated by the head of the certifying entity to issue Form I-914 Supplement B declarations on behalf of that agency.

(3) A judge.

(4) Any other certifying official defined under Section 214.14(a)(2) of Title 8 of the Code of Federal Regulations.

(c) “Human trafficking” means “severe forms of trafficking in persons” pursuant to Section 7102 of Title 22 of the United States Code and includes either of the following:

(1) Sex trafficking in which a commercial sex act is induced by force, fraud, or coercion, or in which the person induced to perform such act has not attained 18 years of age.

(2) The recruitment, harboring, transportation, provision, or obtaining of a person for labor or services, through the use of force, fraud, or coercion for the purpose of subjection to involuntary servitude, peonage, debt bondage, or slavery.

(d) “Human trafficking” also includes criminal offenses for which the nature and elements of the offenses are substantially similar to the criminal activity described in subdivision (c), and the attempt, conspiracy, or solicitation to commit any of those offenses.

(e) Upon the request of the victim or victim’s family member, a certifying official from a certifying entity shall certify victim cooperation on the Form I-914 Supplement B declaration, when the victim was a victim of human trafficking and has been cooperative, is being cooperative, or is likely to be cooperative to the investigation or prosecution of human trafficking.

(f) For purposes of determining cooperation pursuant to subdivision (e), there is a rebuttable presumption that a victim is cooperative, has been cooperative, or is likely to be cooperative to the investigation or prosecution of human trafficking, if the victim has not refused or failed to provide information and assistance reasonably requested by law enforcement.

(g) The certifying official shall fully complete and sign the Form I-914 Supplement B declaration and, regarding victim cooperation, include specific details about the nature of the crime investigated or prosecuted and a detailed description of the victim’s cooperation or likely cooperation to the detection, investigation, or prosecution of the criminal activity.

(h) A certifying entity shall process a Form I-914 Supplement B declaration within 90 days of request, unless the noncitizen is in removal proceedings, in which case the declaration shall be processed within 14 days of request.

(i) A current investigation, the filing of charges, or a prosecution or conviction is not required for the victim to request and obtain the Form I-914 Supplement B declaration from a certifying official.

(j) A certifying official may only withdraw the certification if the victim refuses to provide information and assistance when reasonably requested.

(k) A certifying entity is prohibited from disclosing the immigration status of a victim or person requesting the Form I-914 Supplement B declaration, except to comply with federal law or legal process, or if authorized by the victim or person requesting the Form I-914 Supplement B declaration.

(l) A certifying entity that receives a request for a Form I-914 Supplement B declaration shall report to the Legislature, on or before January 1, 2018, and annually thereafter, the number of victims who requested Form I-914 Supplement B declarations from the entity, the number of those declaration forms that were signed, and the number that were denied. A report pursuant to this subdivision shall comply with Section 9795 of the Government Code.

(Added by Stats. 2016, Ch. 749, Sec. 1. Effective January 1, 2017.)

680.
  

(a) This section shall be known as and may be cited as the “Sexual Assault Victims’ DNA Bill of Rights.”

(b) The Legislature finds and declares all of the following:

(1) Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and forensic identification analysis is a powerful law enforcement tool for identifying and prosecuting sexual assault offenders.

(2) Existing law requires an adult arrested for or charged with a felony and a juvenile adjudicated for a felony to submit DNA samples as a result of that arrest, charge, or adjudication.

(3) Victims of sexual assaults have a strong interest in the investigation and prosecution of their cases.

(4) Law enforcement agencies have an obligation to victims of sexual assaults in the proper handling, retention, and timely DNA testing of rape kit evidence or other crime scene evidence and to be responsive to victims concerning the developments of forensic testing and the investigation of their cases.

(5) The growth of the Department of Justice’s Cal-DNA databank and the national databank through the Combined DNA Index System (CODIS) makes it possible for many sexual assault perpetrators to be identified after their first offense, provided that rape kit evidence is analyzed in a timely manner.

(6) Timely DNA analysis of rape kit evidence is a core public safety issue affecting men, women, and children in the State of California. It is the intent of the Legislature, in order to further public safety, to encourage DNA analysis of rape kit evidence within the time limits imposed by subparagraphs (A) and (B) of paragraph (1) of subdivision (g) of Section 803.

(7) In order to ensure that sexual assault forensic evidence is analyzed within the two-year timeframe required by subparagraphs (A) and (B) of paragraph (1) of subdivision (g) of Section 803 and to ensure the longest possible statute of limitations for sex offenses, including sex offenses designated pursuant to those subparagraphs, the following should occur:

(A) A law enforcement agency in whose jurisdiction a sex offense specified in Section 261, 261.5, 262, 286, 288a, or 289 occurred, should do one of the following for any sexual assault forensic evidence received by the law enforcement agency on or after January 1, 2016:

(i) Submit sexual assault forensic evidence to the crime lab within 20 days after it is booked into evidence.

(ii) Ensure that a rapid turnaround DNA program is in place to submit forensic evidence collected from the victim of a sexual assault directly from the medical facility where the victim is examined to the crime lab within five days after the evidence is obtained from the victim.

(B) The crime lab should do one of the following for any sexual assault forensic evidence received by the crime lab on or after January 1, 2016.

(i) Process sexual assault forensic evidence, create DNA profiles when able, and upload qualifying DNA profiles into CODIS as soon as practically possible, but no later than 120 days after initially receiving the evidence.

(ii) Transmit the sexual assault forensic evidence to another crime lab as soon as practically possible, but no later than 30 days after initially receiving the evidence, for processing of the evidence for the presence of DNA. If a DNA profile is created, the transmitting crime lab should upload the profile into CODIS as soon as practically possible, but no longer than 30 days after being notified about the presence of DNA.

(C) This subdivision does not require a lab to test all items of forensic evidence obtained in a sexual assault forensic evidence examination. A lab is considered to be in compliance with the guidelines of this section when representative samples of the evidence are processed by the lab in an effort to detect the foreign DNA of the perpetrator.

(D) This section does not require a DNA profile to be uploaded into CODIS if the DNA profile does not meet federal guidelines regarding the uploading of DNA profiles into CODIS.

(E) For purposes of this section, a “rapid turnaround DNA program” is a program for the training of sexual assault team personnel in the selection of representative samples of forensic evidence from the victim to be the best evidence, based on the medical evaluation and patient history, the collection and preservation of that evidence, and the transfer of the evidence directly from the medical facility to the crime lab, which is adopted pursuant to a written agreement between the law enforcement agency, the crime lab, and the medical facility where the sexual assault team is based.

(8) For the purpose of this section, “law enforcement” means the law enforcement agency with the primary responsibility for investigating an alleged sexual assault.

(c) (1) Upon the request of a sexual assault victim, the law enforcement agency investigating a violation of Section 261, 261.5, 262, 286, 288a, or 289 may inform the victim of the status of the DNA testing of the rape kit evidence or other crime scene evidence from the victim’s case. The law enforcement agency may, at its discretion, require that the victim’s request be in writing. The law enforcement agency may respond to the victim’s request with either an oral or written communication, or by email, if an email address is available. Nothing in this subdivision requires that the law enforcement agency communicate with the victim or the victim’s designee regarding the status of DNA testing absent a specific request from the victim or the victim’s designee.

(2) Subject to the commitment of sufficient resources to respond to requests for information, sexual assault victims have the following rights:

(A) The right to be informed whether or not a DNA profile of the assailant was obtained from the testing of the rape kit evidence or other crime scene evidence from their case.

(B) The right to be informed whether or not the DNA profile of the assailant developed from the rape kit evidence or other crime scene evidence has been entered into the Department of Justice Data Bank of case evidence.

(C) The right to be informed whether or not there is a match between the DNA profile of the assailant developed from the rape kit evidence or other crime scene evidence and a DNA profile contained in the Department of Justice Convicted Offender DNA Data Base, provided that disclosure would not impede or compromise an ongoing investigation.

(3) This subdivision is intended to encourage law enforcement agencies to notify victims of information which is in their possession. It is not intended to affect the manner of or frequency with which the Department of Justice provides this information to law enforcement agencies.

(d) If the law enforcement agency does not analyze DNA evidence within six months prior to the time limits established by subparagraphs (A) and (B) of paragraph (1) of subdivision (g) of Section 803, a victim of a sexual assault offense specified in Section 261, 261.5, 262, 286, 288a, or 289 shall be informed, either orally or in writing, of that fact by the law enforcement agency.

(e) If the law enforcement agency intends to destroy or dispose of rape kit evidence or other crime scene evidence from an unsolved sexual assault case prior to the expiration of the statute of limitations as set forth in Section 803, a victim of a violation of Section 261, 261.5, 262, 286, 288a, or 289 shall be given written notification by the law enforcement agency of that intention.

(f) Written notification under subdivision (d) or (e) shall be made at least 60 days prior to the destruction or disposal of the rape kit evidence or other crime scene evidence from an unsolved sexual assault case where the election not to analyze the DNA or the destruction or disposal occurs prior to the expiration of the statute of limitations specified in subdivision (g) of Section 803.

(g) A sexual assault victim may designate a sexual assault victim advocate, or other support person of the victim’s choosing, to act as a recipient of the above information required to be provided by this section.

(h)  It is the intent of the Legislature that a law enforcement agency responsible for providing information under subdivision (c) do so in a timely manner and, upon request of the victim or the victim’s designee, advise the victim or the victim’s designee of any significant changes in the information of which the law enforcement agency is aware. In order to be entitled to receive notice under this section, the victim or the victim’s designee shall keep appropriate authorities informed of the name, address, telephone number, and email address of the person to whom the information should be provided, and any changes of the name, address, telephone number, and email address, if an email address is available.

(i) A defendant or person accused or convicted of a crime against the victim shall have no standing to object to any failure to comply with this section. The failure to provide a right or notice to a sexual assault victim under this section may not be used by a defendant to seek to have the conviction or sentence set aside.

(j) The sole civil or criminal remedy available to a sexual assault victim for a law enforcement agency’s failure to fulfill its responsibilities under this section is standing to file a writ of mandamus to require compliance with subdivision (d) or (e).

(Amended by Stats. 2014, Ch. 874, Sec. 1. Effective January 1, 2015.)

680.1.
  

The Department of Justice, on or before July 1, 2018, and in consultation with law enforcement agencies and crime victims groups, shall establish a process by which victims of sexual assault may inquire regarding the location and information regarding their sexual assault evidence kits.

(Added by Stats. 2016, Ch. 884, Sec. 2. Effective January 1, 2017.)

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