Code Section Group

Food and Agricultural Code - FAC

DIVISION 12. POULTRY, RABBITS, EGGS, AND EGG PRODUCTS [24501 - 27690]

  ( Division 12 enacted by Stats. 1967, Ch. 15. )

PART 2. CLASSIFICATION OF POULTRY AND RABBIT MEAT [25401 - 26151]

  ( Part 2 enacted by Stats. 1967, Ch. 15. )

CHAPTER 4. Poultry and Rabbit Meat Classes [25851 - 25857]
  ( Chapter 4 enacted by Stats. 1967, Ch. 15. )

25851.
  

The classes of the kinds of poultry meat are as established in this chapter and any regulations which are adopted by the director pursuant to Section 25857.

(Enacted by Stats. 1967, Ch. 15.)

25852.
  

The classes of chicken meat, as determined by inspection of appearance and other physical characteristics, are as follows:

(a) “Rock Cornish game hen” or “Cornish game hen” means a young immature chicken of either sex (usually five to six weeks of age) which weighs not more than two pounds ready-to-cook weight that was prepared from a Cornish chicken of the progeny of a Cornish chicken crossed with another breed of chicken.

(b) “Broiler” or “fryer” means a young chicken (usually under 16 weeks of age) of either sex, that is tender-meated, with soft, pliable, smooth-textured skin, and flexible breastbone cartilage.

(c) “Roaster” means a young chicken (usually under eight months of age) of either sex, that is tender-meated, with soft, pliable, smooth-textured skin, and breastbone cartilage that is somewhat less flexible than that of a broiler or fryer.

(d) “Caponette,” “caponette fryer,” or “caponette roaster” means a young chicken with the general characteristics of either a fryer or roaster which has been treated with a hormone approved by the Food and Drug Administration of the United States Department of Health, Education and Welfare.

(e) “Capon” means an unsexed male chicken (usually under 10 months of age), that is tender-meated with soft, pliable, smooth-textured skin.

(f) “Hen” or “stewing chicken” or “fowl” means a mature female chicken (usually more than 10 months old) with meat less tender than that of a roaster, and nonflexible breastbone.

(g) “Stag” means a male chicken (usually under 10 months of age) with coarse skin, somewhat toughened and darkened flesh, and considerable hardening of the breastbone cartilage. Stags show a condition of fleshing and a degree of maturity intermediate between that of a roaster and a cock or old rooster.

(h) “Cock” or “old rooster” means a mature male chicken with coarse skin, toughened and darkened meat, and hardened breastbone.

(Amended by Stats. 1967, Ch. 990.)

25853.
  

The classes of turkey meat as determined by appearance are as follows:

(a) “Fryer” or “roaster” means a young, immature turkey (usually under 16 weeks of age) of either sex, that is tender meated with soft, pliable, smooth-textured skin, and flexible breastbone.

(b) “Young turkey” means a turkey (usually under eight months of age) that is tender meated with soft, pliable, smooth-textured skin, and breastbone cartilage that is somewhat less flexible than in a turkey fryer or roaster. For labeling purposes, the designation of sex within the class name is optional.

(c) “Yearling hen turkey” means a fully matured female turkey (usually under 15 months of age) that is reasonably tender meated and with reasonably smooth-textured skin.

(d) “Yearling tom turkey” means a fully matured male turkey (usually under 15 months of age) that is reasonably tender meated and with reasonably smooth-textured skin.

(e) “Mature turkey” or “old turkey (hen or tom)” means an old turkey of either sex (usually in excess of 15 months of age) with coarse skin and toughened flesh.

(Enacted by Stats. 1967, Ch. 15.)

25854.
  

The classes of rabbit meat as determined by appearance and weight are as follows:

(a) “Rabbit fryer” means a young, domestic rabbit (usually under 12 weeks of age) with tender, fine-grained, and bright pearly white color which may be properly cooked by broiling or frying and which weighs not less than 11/2 pounds or over 31/2 pounds ready-to-cook weight.

(b) “Rabbit roaster” means a domestic rabbit (over 12 weeks of age) which may be properly cooked by roasting, and which weighs 31/2 to 5 pounds ready-to-cook weight.

(c) “Stewing rabbit” means a mature domestic rabbit of either sex (over six months of age) which may be properly cooked by stewing at any ready-to-cook weight.

(Enacted by Stats. 1967, Ch. 15.)

25855.
  

The following are the various classes of ducks:

(a) “Duckling” means a young duck of either sex (usually under 10 weeks of age) that is tender meated and has a bill that is not completely hardened and windpipe that is easily dented. This classification may include broilers, fryers, or roasters.

(b) “Duck” means a mature duck or an old duck (usually over 10 weeks of age) of either sex with toughened flesh, hardened bill, and a hardened windpipe.

(Enacted by Stats. 1967, Ch. 15.)

25856.
  

The following are the various classes of geese:

(a) “Young goose” means a goose of either sex which is tender meated, and has a windpipe that is easily dented.

(b) “Mature goose” or “old goose” means a goose of either sex which has toughened flesh and a hardened windpipe.

(Enacted by Stats. 1967, Ch. 15.)

25857.
  

The director may, by regulation, adopt any necessary new class designations and class specifications or modifications of existing class designations and class specifications. He shall, in exercising such authority, take into consideration the standard class designations and class specifications promulgated by the United States Department of Agriculture.

(Enacted by Stats. 1967, Ch. 15.)

FACFood and Agricultural Code - FAC