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SB-2 Peace officers: certification: civil rights.(2021-2022)

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Date Published: 07/07/2021 09:00 PM
SB2:v95#DOCUMENT

Amended  IN  Assembly  July 07, 2021
Amended  IN  Senate  May 20, 2021
Amended  IN  Senate  April 29, 2021
Amended  IN  Senate  March 11, 2021

CALIFORNIA LEGISLATURE— 2021–2022 REGULAR SESSION

Senate Bill
No. 2


Introduced by Senators Bradford and Atkins
(Principal coauthors: Senators Kamlager and Wiener)
(Principal coauthors: Assembly Members Bonta, Cristina Garcia, Kalra, McCarty, and Quirk)
(Coauthor: Senator Durazo)
(Coauthors: Assembly Members Bryan, Carrillo, Chiu, Holden, Lee, Stone, and Ting Ting, Akilah Weber, and Wicks)

December 07, 2020


An act to amend Section 52.1 of the Civil Code, to amend Section 1029 of the Government Code, and to amend Sections 832.7, 13503, 13506, 13510, 13510.1, and 13512 of, to amend the heading of Article 2 (commencing with Section 13510) of Chapter 1 of Title 4 of Part 4 of, and to add Sections 13509.5, 13509.6, 13510.15, 13510.8, 13510.85, and 13510.9 to, the Penal Code, relating to public employment, and making an appropriation therefor. employment.


LEGISLATIVE COUNSEL'S DIGEST


SB 2, as amended, Bradford. Peace officers: certification: civil rights.
(1) Under existing law, the Tom Bane Civil Rights Act, if a person or persons, whether or not acting under color of law, interferes or attempts to interfere, by threats, intimidation, or coercion, with the exercise or enjoyment by any individual or individuals of rights secured by the Constitution or laws of the United States, or of the rights secured by the Constitution or laws of this state, the Attorney General, or any district attorney or city attorney, is authorized to bring a civil action for injunctive and other appropriate equitable relief in the name of the people of the State of California, in order to protect the exercise or enjoyment of the right or rights secured. Existing law also authorizes an action brought by the Attorney General, or any district attorney or city attorney, to seek a civil penalty of $25,000. Existing law also allows an individual whose exercise or enjoyment of rights has been interfered with to prosecute a civil action for damages on their own behalf.
The bill would eliminate certain immunity provisions for peace officers and custodial officers, or public entities employing peace officers or custodial officers sued under the act. The bill would also authorize, in certain circumstances, specified persons to bring an action under the act for the death of a person.
(2) Existing laws defines persons who are peace officers and the entities authorized to appoint them. Existing law requires certain minimum training requirements for peace officers including the completion of a basic training course, as specified. Existing law prescribes certain minimum standards for a person to be appointed as a peace officer, including moral character and physical and mental condition, and certain disqualifying factors for a person to be employed as a peace officer, including a felony conviction.
This bill would prohibit a person who has been convicted of a felony, as specified, from regaining eligibility for peace officer employment based upon any later order of the court setting aside, vacating, withdrawing, expunging or otherwise dismissing or reversing the conviction, unless the court finds the person to be factually innocent of the crime for which they were convicted at the time of entry of the order. The bill would disqualify a person from being employed as a peace officer if that person has been convicted of, or has been adjudicated in an administrative, military, or civil judicial process as having committed, a violation of certain specified crimes against public justice, including the falsification of records, bribery, or perjury. The bill would also disqualify any person who has been certified as a peace officer by the Commission on Peace Officer Standards and Training and has surrendered that certification or had that certification revoked by the commission, or has been denied certification. The bill would disqualify any person previously employed in law enforcement in any state or United States territory or by the federal government, whose name is listed in the national decertification index index, or any other database designated by the federal government, or who engaged in serious misconduct that would have resulted in their certification being revoked in this state. The bill would require a law enforcement agency employing certain peace officers to employ only individuals with a current, valid certification or pending certification.
(3) Existing law establishes the Commission on Peace Officer Standards and Training to set minimum standards for the recruitment and training of peace officers and to develop training courses and curriculum. Existing law authorizes the commission to establish a professional certificate program that awards basic, intermediate, advanced, supervisory, management, and executive certificates on the basis of a combination of training, education, experience, and other prerequisites, for the purpose of fostering the professionalization, education, and experience necessary to adequately accomplish the general police service duties performed by peace officers. Existing law authorizes the commission to cancel a certificate that was awarded in error or obtained through misrepresentation or fraud, but otherwise prohibits the commission from canceling a certificate that has properly been issued.
This bill would require the Department of Justice to provide the commission with necessary disqualifying felony and misdemeanor conviction data for all persons known by the department to be current or former peace officers, as specified. The bill would grant the commission the power to investigate and determine the fitness of any person to serve as a peace officer in the state. The bill would direct the commission to issue or deny certification, which includes a basic certificate or proof of eligibility, to a peace officer in accordance with specified criteria. The bill would require the commission to issue a proof of eligibility or basic certificate, as specified, to certain persons employed as a peace officer on January 1, 2022, who do not otherwise possess a certificate. The bill would require a proof of eligibility or basic certificate to be renewed at least every 2 years and would require the commission to assess a fee for the application and renewal of the certificate or proof of eligibility, as well as an annual certification fee. The bill would require the fees to be deposited into the Peace Officer Certification Fund, created by the bill, and would continuously appropriate those funds to the commission for the administration of the certification program, as specified, thereby making an appropriation. The bill would declare certificates or proof of eligibility awarded by the commission to be property of the commission and would authorize the commission to revoke a proof of eligibility or certificate on specified grounds, including the use of excessive force, sexual assault, making a false arrest, or participating in a law enforcement gang, as defined.
The bill would create the Peace Officer Standards Accountability Division within the commission to investigate and prosecute proceedings to take action against a peace officer’s certification. review investigations conducted by law enforcement agencies and to conduct additional investigations into serious misconduct that may provide grounds for decertification, as specified. The bill would require the division to review and investigate grounds for decertification and make findings as to whether grounds for action against an officer’s certification exist. The bill would require the division to notify the officer subject to decertification of their findings and allow the officer to request review. The bill would also create the Peace Officer Standards Accountability Advisory Board with 9 members to be appointed as specified. The bill would require the board to hold public meetings to review the findings after an investigation made by the division and to make a recommendation to the commission. The bill would require the commission to adopt the recommendation of the board if supported by clear and convincing evidence review the recommendation made by the board based on whether there is evidence that reasonably supports the board’s recommendation and, if action is to be taken against an officer's certification, return the determination to the division to commence formal proceedings consistent with the Administrative Procedure Act. The bill would require the commission to notify the employing agency and the district attorney of the county in which the officer is employed of this determination, as specified.
The bill would make all records related to the revocation of a peace officer’s certification public and would require that records of an investigation be retained for 30 years.
The bill would require an agency employing peace officers to report to the commission the employment, appointment, or separation from employment of a peace officer, any complaint, charge, allegation, or investigation into the conduct of a peace officer that could render the officer subject to revocation, findings by civil oversight entities, and civil judgements that could affect the officer’s certification.
In case of a separation from employment or appointment, the bill would require each agency to execute an affidavit-of-separation form adopted by the commission describing the reason for separation. The bill would require the affidavit to be signed under penalty of perjury. By creating a new crime, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program.
The bill would require the board to report annually on the activities of the division, board, and commission, relating to the certification program, including the number of applications for certification, the events reported, the number of investigations conducted, and the number of certificates surrendered or revoked.
By imposing new requirements on local agencies, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program.
The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.
This bill would provide that with regard to certain mandates no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason.
With regard to any other mandates, this bill would provide that, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that the bill contains costs so mandated by the state, reimbursement for those costs shall be made pursuant to the statutory provisions noted above.
Vote: MAJORITY   Appropriation: YESNO   Fiscal Committee: YES   Local Program: YES  

The people of the State of California do enact as follows:


SECTION 1.

 This act shall be known as the Kenneth Ross Jr. Police Decertification Act of 2021.

SEC. 2.

 The Legislature finds and declares all of the following:
(a) As the Legislature and courts of this state have repeatedly recognized, police officers, sheriffs’ deputies, and other peace officers hold extraordinary powers to detain, to search, to arrest, and to use force, including deadly force. The state has a correspondingly strong interest in ensuring that peace officers do not abuse their authority, including by ensuring that individual peace officers who abuse their authority are held accountable.
(b) California is one of the last few states that does not have a process for revoking peace officer certificates as a result of misconduct. Nationwide, 45 46 states have the authority to decertify peace officers. Four states do not have decertification authority: California, Hawaii, New Jersey, and Rhode Island.
(c) In 2017, 172 Californians were killed by the police, and our state’s police departments have some of the highest rates of killings in the nation. Of the unarmed people California police killed, three out of four were people of color. Black and Latino families and communities of color are disproportionately vulnerable to police violence, creating generations of individual and community trauma.
(d) More than 200 professions and trades, including doctors, lawyers, and contractors are licensed or certified by the State of California, in order to maintain professional standards and to protect the public. Law enforcement officers are entrusted with extraordinary powers including the power to carry a firearm, to stop and search, to arrest, and to use force. They must be held to the highest standards of accountability, and the state should ensure that officers who abuse their authority by committing serious or repeated misconduct, or otherwise demonstrate a lack of fitness to serve as peace officers, are removed from the streets.
(e) To ensure public trust that the system for decertification will hold peace officers accountable for misconduct and that California’s standards for law enforcement reflect community values, it is the intent of the Legislature that the entities charged with investigating and rendering decisions on decertification shall be under independent civilian control and maintain independence from law enforcement.
(f) Civil courts provide a vital avenue for individuals harmed by violations of the law by peace officers to find redress and accountability. But the judicially created doctrine of qualified immunity in federal courts, and broad interpretations of California law immunities and restrictive views on the cause of action under the Tom Bane Civil Rights Act, too often lead to officers escaping accountability in civil courts, even when they have broken the law or violated the rights of members of the public. The civil court process should ensure that peace officers are treated fairly, but that they can be held accountable for violations of the law that harm others, especially the use of excessive force.

SEC. 3.

 Section 52.1 of the Civil Code is amended to read:

52.1.
 (a) This section shall be known, and may be cited, as the Tom Bane Civil Rights Act.
(b) If a person or persons, whether or not acting under color of law, interferes by threat, intimidation, or coercion, or attempts to interfere by threat, intimidation, or coercion, with the exercise or enjoyment by any individual or individuals of rights secured by the Constitution or laws of the United States, or of the rights secured by the Constitution or laws of this state, the Attorney General, or any district attorney or city attorney may bring a civil action for injunctive and other appropriate equitable relief in the name of the people of the State of California, in order to protect the peaceable exercise or enjoyment of the right or rights secured. An action brought by the Attorney General, any district attorney, or any city attorney may also seek a civil penalty of twenty-five thousand dollars ($25,000). If this civil penalty is requested, it shall be assessed individually against each person who is determined to have violated this section and the penalty shall be awarded to each individual whose rights under this section are determined to have been violated.
(c) (1)Any individual whose exercise or enjoyment of rights secured by the Constitution or laws of the United States, or of rights secured by the Constitution or laws of this state, has been interfered with, or attempted to be interfered with, as described in subdivision (b), may institute and prosecute in their own name and on their own behalf a civil action for damages, including, but not limited to, damages under Section 52, injunctive relief, and other appropriate equitable relief to protect the peaceable exercise or enjoyment of the right or rights secured, including appropriate equitable and declaratory relief to eliminate a pattern or practice of conduct as described in subdivision (b).

(2)A cause of action under this section for the death of a person may be asserted by any person described in Section 377.60 of the Code of Civil Procedure. A person may only bring a cause of action under this paragraph if the conduct on which the claim is based constitutes a crime of violence or a crime of moral turpitude.

(d) An action brought pursuant to subdivision (b) or (c) may be filed either in the superior court for the county in which the conduct complained of occurred or in the superior court for the county in which a person whose conduct complained of resides or has their place of business. An action brought by the Attorney General pursuant to subdivision (b) also may be filed in the superior court for any county wherein the Attorney General has an office, and in that case, the jurisdiction of the court shall extend throughout the state.
(e) If a court issues a temporary restraining order or a preliminary or permanent injunction in an action brought pursuant to subdivision (b) or (c), ordering a defendant to refrain from conduct or activities, the order issued shall include the following statement: VIOLATION OF THIS ORDER IS A CRIME PUNISHABLE UNDER SECTION 422.77 OF THE PENAL CODE.
(f) The court shall order the plaintiff or the attorney for the plaintiff to deliver, or the clerk of the court to mail, two copies of any order, extension, modification, or termination thereof granted pursuant to this section, by the close of the business day on which the order, extension, modification, or termination was granted, to each local law enforcement agency having jurisdiction over the residence of the plaintiff and any other locations where the court determines that acts of violence against the plaintiff are likely to occur. Those local law enforcement agencies shall be designated by the plaintiff or the attorney for the plaintiff. Each appropriate law enforcement agency receiving any order, extension, or modification of any order issued pursuant to this section shall serve forthwith one copy thereof upon the defendant. Each appropriate law enforcement agency shall provide to any law enforcement officer responding to the scene of reported violence, information as to the existence of, terms, and current status of, any order issued pursuant to this section.
(g) A court shall not have jurisdiction to issue an order or injunction under this section, if that order or injunction would be prohibited under Section 527.3 of the Code of Civil Procedure.
(h) An action brought pursuant to this section is independent of any other action, remedy, or procedure that may be available to an aggrieved individual under any other provision of law, including, but not limited to, an action, remedy, or procedure brought pursuant to Section 51.7.
(i) In addition to any damages, injunction, or other equitable relief awarded in an action brought pursuant to subdivision (c), the court may award the petitioner or plaintiff reasonable attorney’s fees.
(j) A violation of an order described in subdivision (e) may be punished either by prosecution under Section 422.77 of the Penal Code, or by a proceeding for contempt brought pursuant to Title 5 (commencing with Section 1209) of Part 3 of the Code of Civil Procedure. However, in any proceeding pursuant to the Code of Civil Procedure, if it is determined that the person proceeded against is guilty of the contempt charged, in addition to any other relief, a fine may be imposed not exceeding one thousand dollars ($1,000), or the person may be ordered imprisoned in a county jail not exceeding six months, or the court may order both the imprisonment and fine.
(k) Speech alone is not sufficient to support an action brought pursuant to subdivision (b) or (c), except upon a showing that the speech itself threatens violence against a specific person or group of persons; and the person or group of persons against whom the threat is directed reasonably fears that, because of the speech, violence will be committed against them or their property and that the person threatening violence had the apparent ability to carry out the threat.
(l) No order issued in any proceeding brought pursuant to subdivision (b) or (c) shall restrict the content of any person’s speech. An order restricting the time, place, or manner of any person’s speech shall do so only to the extent reasonably necessary to protect the peaceable exercise or enjoyment of constitutional or statutory rights, consistent with the constitutional rights of the person sought to be enjoined.
(m) The rights, penalties, remedies, forums, and procedures of this section shall not be waived by contract except as provided in Section 51.7.
(n) The state immunity provisions provided in Sections 821.6, 844.6, and 845.6 of the Government Code shall not apply to any cause of action brought against any peace officer or custodial officer, as those terms are defined in Chapter 4.5 (commencing with Section 830) of Title 3 of Part 2 of the Penal Code, or directly against a public entity that employs a peace officer or custodial officer, under this section.
(o) Sections 825, 825.2, 825.4, and 825.6 of the Government Code, providing for indemnification of an employee or former employee of a public entity, shall apply to any cause of action brought under this section against an employee or former employee of a public entity.

SEC. 4.

 Section 1029 of the Government Code is amended to read:

1029.
 (a) Except as provided in subdivision (b), (c), (d), or (e), each of the following persons is disqualified from holding office as a peace officer or being employed as a peace officer of the state, county, city, city and county or other political subdivision, whether with or without compensation, and is disqualified from any office or employment by the state, county, city, city and county or other political subdivision, whether with or without compensation, which confers upon the holder or employee the powers and duties of a peace officer:
(1) Any person who has been convicted of a felony.
(2) Any person who has been convicted of any offense in any other jurisdiction which would have been a felony if committed in this state.
(3) Any person who has been discharged from the military for committing an offense, as adjudicated by a military tribunal, which would have been a felony if committed in this state.
(4) (A) Any person who, after January 1, 2004, has been convicted of a crime based upon a verdict or finding of guilt of a felony by the trier of fact, or upon the entry of a plea of guilty or nolo contendere to a felony. This paragraph applies regardless of whether, pursuant to subdivision (b) of Section 17 of the Penal Code, the court declares the offense to be a misdemeanor or the offense becomes a misdemeanor by operation of law.
(B) For purposes of this paragraph, a person has been “convicted of a crime” immediately upon entry of a plea of guilty or nolo contendere to, or upon being found guilty by a trier of fact of, a felony offense, including an offense that may be charged as a misdemeanor or felony and that was charged as a felony at the time of the conviction.
(C) Effective January 1, 2022, any person who has been convicted of a crime in accordance with this paragraph shall not regain eligibility for peace officer employment based upon the nature of any sentence ordered or imposed. In addition, no such person shall regain eligibility for peace officer employment based upon any later order of the court setting aside, vacating, withdrawing, expunging or otherwise dismissing or reversing the conviction, unless the court finds the person to be factually innocent of the crime for which they were convicted at the time of entry of the order.
(5) Any person who has been charged with a felony and adjudged by a superior court to be mentally incompetent under Chapter 6 (commencing with Section 1367) of Title 10 of Part 2 of the Penal Code.
(6) Any person who has been found not guilty by reason of insanity of any felony.
(7) Any person who has been determined to be a mentally disordered sex offender pursuant to Article 1 (commencing with Section 6300) of Chapter 2 of Part 2 of Division 6 of the Welfare and Institutions Code.
(8) Any person adjudged addicted or in danger of becoming addicted to narcotics, convicted, and committed to a state institution as provided in Section 3051 of the Welfare and Institutions Code.
(9) Any person who has been convicted of, or adjudicated through an administrative, military, or civil judicial process, including a hearing that meets the requirements of the administrative adjudication provisions of the Administrative Procedure Act (Chapter 3.5 (commencing with Section 11340) of Part 1 of Division 3 of Title 2 of the Government Code), 2), as having committed, any act that is a violation of Section 115, 115.3, 116, 116.5, or 117 of, or of any offense described in Chapter 1 (commencing with Section 92), Chapter 5 (commencing with Section 118), Chapter 6 (commencing with Section 132), or Chapter 7 (commencing with Section 142) of Title 7 of Part 1 of the Penal Code, including any act committed in another jurisdiction that would have been a violation of any of those sections if committed in this state.
(10) Any person who has been issued the certification described in Section 13510.1 of the Penal Code, and has had that certification revoked by the Commission on Peace Officer Standards and Training, has voluntarily surrendered that certification pursuant to subdivision (f) of Section 13510.8, or having met the minimum requirement for issuance of certification, has been denied issuance of certification.
(11) Any person previously employed in law enforcement in any state or United States territory or by the federal government, whose name is listed in the National Decertification Index of the International Association of Directors of Law Enforcement Standards and Training or any other database designated by the federal government whose certification as a law enforcement officer in that jurisdiction was revoked for misconduct, or who, while employed as a law enforcement officer, engaged in serious misconduct that would have resulted in their certification being revoked by the commission if employed as a peace officer in this state.
(b) (1) A plea of guilty to a felony pursuant to a deferred entry of judgment program as set forth in Sections 1000 to 1000.4, inclusive, of the Penal Code shall not alone disqualify a person from being a peace officer unless a judgment of guilty is entered pursuant to Section 1000.3 of the Penal Code.
(2) A person who pleads guilty or nolo contendere to, or who is found guilty by a trier of fact of, an alternate felony-misdemeanor drug possession offense and successfully completes a program of probation pursuant to Section 1210.1 of the Penal Code shall not be disqualified from being a peace officer solely on the basis of the plea or finding if the court deems the offense to be a misdemeanor or reduces the offense to a misdemeanor.
(c) Any person who has been convicted of a felony, other than a felony punishable by death, in this state or any other state, or who has been convicted of any offense in any other state which would have been a felony, other than a felony punishable by death, if committed in this state, and who demonstrates the ability to assist persons in programs of rehabilitation may hold office and be employed as a parole officer of the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation or the Division of Juvenile Justice, or as a probation officer in a county probation department, if the person has been granted a full and unconditional pardon for the felony or offense of which they were convicted. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation or the Division of Juvenile Justice, or a county probation department, may refuse to employ that person regardless of their qualifications.
(d) This section does not limit or curtail the power or authority of any board of police commissioners, chief of police, sheriff, mayor, or other appointing authority to appoint, employ, or deputize any person as a peace officer in time of disaster caused by flood, fire, pestilence or similar public calamity, or to exercise any power conferred by law to summon assistance in making arrests or preventing the commission of any criminal offense.
(e) This section does not prohibit any person from holding office or being employed as a superintendent, supervisor, or employee having custodial responsibilities in an institution operated by a probation department, if at the time of the person’s hire a prior conviction of a felony was known to the person’s employer, and the class of office for which the person was hired was not declared by law to be a class prohibited to persons convicted of a felony, but as a result of a change in classification, as provided by law, the new classification would prohibit employment of a person convicted of a felony.
(f) The Department of Justice shall supply the commission with necessary disqualifying felony and misdemeanor conviction data for all persons known by the department to be current or former peace officers. The commission shall be permitted to use the information for decertification purposes. The data, once received by the commission, shall be made available for public inspection pursuant to the California Public Records Act (Chapter 3.5 (commencing with Section 6250) of Division 7 of Title 1), including documentation of the person’s appointment, promotion, and demotion dates, as well as certification or licensing status and the reason or disposition for the person leaving service.

SEC. 5.

 Section 832.7 of the Penal Code is amended to read:

832.7.
 (a) Except as provided in subdivision (b), the personnel records of peace officers and custodial officers and records maintained by any state or local agency pursuant to Section 832.5, or information obtained from these records, are confidential and shall not be disclosed in any criminal or civil proceeding except by discovery pursuant to Sections 1043 and 1046 of the Evidence Code. This section shall not apply to investigations or proceedings concerning the conduct of peace officers or custodial officers, or an agency or department that employs those officers, conducted by a grand jury, a district attorney’s office, the Attorney General’s office, or the Commission on Peace Officer Standards and Training.
(b) (1) Notwithstanding subdivision (a), subdivision (f) of Section 6254 of the Government Code, or any other law, the following peace officer or custodial officer personnel records and records maintained by any state or local agency shall not be confidential and shall be made available for public inspection pursuant to the California Public Records Act (Chapter 3.5 (commencing with Section 6250) of Division 7 of Title 1 of the Government Code):
(A) A record relating to the report, investigation, or findings of any of the following:
(i) An incident involving the discharge of a firearm at a person by a peace officer or custodial officer.
(ii) An incident in which the use of force by a peace officer or custodial officer against a person resulted in death, or in great bodily injury.
(B) (i) Any record relating to an incident in which a sustained finding was made by any law enforcement agency or oversight agency that a peace officer or custodial officer engaged in sexual assault involving a member of the public.
(ii) As used in this subparagraph, “sexual assault” means the commission or attempted initiation of a sexual act with a member of the public by means of force, threat, coercion, extortion, offer of leniency or other official favor, or under the color of authority. For purposes of this definition, subparagraph, the propositioning for or commission of any sexual act while on duty is considered a sexual assault.
(iii) As used in this subparagraph, “member of the public” means any person not employed by the officer’s employing agency and includes any participant in a cadet, explorer, or other youth program affiliated with the agency.
(C)  Any record relating to an incident in which a sustained finding was made by any law enforcement agency or oversight agency of dishonesty by a peace officer or custodial officer directly relating to the reporting, investigation, or prosecution of a crime, or directly relating to the reporting of, or investigation of misconduct by, another peace officer or custodial officer, including, but not limited to, any sustained finding of perjury, false statements, filing false reports, destruction, falsifying, or concealing of evidence.
(2) Records that shall be released pursuant to this subdivision include all investigative reports; photographic, audio, and video evidence; transcripts or recordings of interviews; autopsy reports; all materials compiled and presented for review to the district attorney or to any person or body charged with determining whether to file criminal charges against an officer in connection with an incident, or whether the officer’s action was consistent with law and agency policy for purposes of discipline or administrative action, or what discipline to impose or corrective action to take; documents setting forth findings or recommended findings; and copies of disciplinary records relating to the incident, including any letters of intent to impose discipline, any documents reflecting modifications of discipline due to the Skelly or grievance process, and letters indicating final imposition of discipline or other documentation reflecting implementation of corrective action.
(3) A record from a separate and prior investigation or assessment of a separate incident shall not be released unless it is independently subject to disclosure pursuant to this subdivision.
(4) If an investigation or incident involves multiple officers, information about allegations of misconduct by, or the analysis or disposition of an investigation of, an officer shall not be released pursuant to subparagraph (B) or (C) of paragraph (1), unless it relates to a sustained finding against that officer. However, factual information about that action of an officer during an incident, or the statements of an officer about an incident, shall be released if they are relevant to a sustained finding against another officer that is subject to release pursuant to subparagraph (B) or (C) of paragraph (1).
(5) An agency shall redact a record disclosed pursuant to this section only for any of the following purposes:
(A) To remove personal data or information, such as a home address, telephone number, or identities of family members, other than the names and work-related information of peace and custodial officers.
(B) To preserve the anonymity of complainants and witnesses.
(C) To protect confidential medical, financial, or other information of which disclosure is specifically prohibited by federal law or would cause an unwarranted invasion of personal privacy that clearly outweighs the strong public interest in records about misconduct and serious use of force by peace officers and custodial officers.
(D) Where there is a specific, articulable, and particularized reason to believe that disclosure of the record would pose a significant danger to the physical safety of the peace officer, custodial officer, or another person.
(6) Notwithstanding paragraph (5), an agency may redact a record disclosed pursuant to this section, including personal identifying information, where, on the facts of the particular case, the public interest served by not disclosing the information clearly outweighs the public interest served by disclosure of the information.
(7) An agency may withhold a record of an incident described in subparagraph (A) of paragraph (1) that is the subject of an active criminal or administrative investigation, in accordance with any of the following:
(A) (i) During an active criminal investigation, disclosure may be delayed for up to 60 days from the date the use of force occurred or until the district attorney determines whether to file criminal charges related to the use of force, whichever occurs sooner. If an agency delays disclosure pursuant to this clause, the agency shall provide, in writing, the specific basis for the agency’s determination that the interest in delaying disclosure clearly outweighs the public interest in disclosure. This writing shall include the estimated date for disclosure of the withheld information.
(ii) After 60 days from the use of force, the agency may continue to delay the disclosure of records or information if the disclosure could reasonably be expected to interfere with a criminal enforcement proceeding against an officer who used the force. If an agency delays disclosure pursuant to this clause, the agency shall, at 180-day intervals as necessary, provide, in writing, the specific basis for the agency’s determination that disclosure could reasonably be expected to interfere with a criminal enforcement proceeding. The writing shall include the estimated date for the disclosure of the withheld information. Information withheld by the agency shall be disclosed when the specific basis for withholding is resolved, when the investigation or proceeding is no longer active, or by no later than 18 months after the date of the incident, whichever occurs sooner.
(iii) After 60 days from the use of force, the agency may continue to delay the disclosure of records or information if the disclosure could reasonably be expected to interfere with a criminal enforcement proceeding against someone other than the officer who used the force. If an agency delays disclosure under this clause, the agency shall, at 180-day intervals, provide, in writing, the specific basis why disclosure could reasonably be expected to interfere with a criminal enforcement proceeding, and shall provide an estimated date for the disclosure of the withheld information. Information withheld by the agency shall be disclosed when the specific basis for withholding is resolved, when the investigation or proceeding is no longer active, or by no later than 18 months after the date of the incident, whichever occurs sooner, unless extraordinary circumstances warrant continued delay due to the ongoing criminal investigation or proceeding. In that case, the agency must show by clear and convincing evidence that the interest in preventing prejudice to the active and ongoing criminal investigation or proceeding outweighs the public interest in prompt disclosure of records about use of serious force by peace officers and custodial officers. The agency shall release all information subject to disclosure that does not cause substantial prejudice, including any documents that have otherwise become available.
(iv) In an action to compel disclosure brought pursuant to Section 6258 of the Government Code, an agency may justify delay by filing an application to seal the basis for withholding, in accordance with Rule 2.550 of the California Rules of Court, or any successor rule thereto, if disclosure of the written basis itself would impact a privilege or compromise a pending investigation.
(B) If criminal charges are filed related to the incident in which force was used, the agency may delay the disclosure of records or information until a verdict on those charges is returned at trial or, if a plea of guilty or no contest is entered, the time to withdraw the plea pursuant to Section 1018.
(C) During an administrative investigation into an incident described in subparagraph (A) of paragraph (1), the agency may delay the disclosure of records or information until the investigating agency determines whether the use of force violated a law or agency policy, but no longer than 180 days after the date of the employing agency’s discovery of the use of force, or allegation of use of force, by a person authorized to initiate an investigation, or 30 days after the close of any criminal investigation related to the peace officer or custodial officer’s use of force, whichever is later.
(8) A record of a civilian complaint, or the investigations, findings, or dispositions of that complaint, shall not be released pursuant to this section if the complaint is frivolous, as defined in Section 128.5 of the Code of Civil Procedure, or if the complaint is unfounded.
(c) Notwithstanding subdivisions (a) and (b), a department or agency shall release to the complaining party a copy of the party’s own statements at the time the complaint is filed.
(d) Notwithstanding subdivisions (a) and (b), a department or agency that employs peace or custodial officers may disseminate data regarding the number, type, or disposition of complaints (sustained, not sustained, exonerated, or unfounded) made against its officers if that information is in a form which does not identify the individuals involved.
(e) Notwithstanding subdivisions (a) and (b), a department or agency that employs peace or custodial officers may release factual information concerning a disciplinary investigation if the officer who is the subject of the disciplinary investigation, or the officer’s agent or representative, publicly makes a statement that they know to be false concerning the investigation or the imposition of disciplinary action. Information may not be disclosed by the peace or custodial officer’s employer unless the false statement was published by an established medium of communication, such as television, radio, or a newspaper. Disclosure of factual information by the employing agency pursuant to this subdivision is limited to facts contained in the officer’s personnel file concerning the disciplinary investigation or imposition of disciplinary action that specifically refute the false statements made public by the peace or custodial officer or their agent or representative.
(f) (1) The department or agency shall provide written notification to the complaining party of the disposition of the complaint within 30 days of the disposition.
(2) The notification described in this subdivision shall not be conclusive or binding or admissible as evidence in any separate or subsequent action or proceeding brought before an arbitrator, court, or judge of this state or the United States.
(g) This section does not affect the discovery or disclosure of information contained in a peace or custodial officer’s personnel file pursuant to Section 1043 of the Evidence Code.
(h) This section does not supersede or affect the criminal discovery process outlined in Chapter 10 (commencing with Section 1054) of Title 6 of Part 2, or the admissibility of personnel records pursuant to subdivision (a), which codifies the court decision in Pitchess v. Superior Court (1974) 11 Cal.3d 531.
(i) Nothing in this chapter is intended to limit the public’s right of access as provided for in Long Beach Police Officers Association v. City of Long Beach (2014) 59 Cal.4th 59.

SEC. 6.

 Section 13503 of the Penal Code is amended to read:

13503.
 In carrying out its duties and responsibilities, the commission shall have all of the following powers:
(a) To meet at those times and places as it may deem proper.
(b) To employ an executive secretary and, pursuant to civil service, those clerical and technical assistants as may be necessary.
(c) To contract with other agencies, public or private, or persons as it deems necessary, for the rendition and affording of those services, facilities, studies, and reports to the commission as will best assist it to carry out its duties and responsibilities.
(d) To cooperate with and to secure the cooperation of county, city, city and county, and other local law enforcement agencies in investigating any matter within the scope of its duties and responsibilities, and in performing its other functions.
(e) To develop and implement programs to increase the effectiveness of law enforcement and when those programs involve training and education courses to cooperate with and secure the cooperation of state-level peace officers, agencies, and bodies having jurisdiction over systems of public higher education in continuing the development of college-level training and education programs.
(f) To investigate and determine the fitness of any person to serve as a peace officer within the Peace Officer Standards and Training program or as defined in Section 13510.1 in the State of California.
(g) To cooperate with and secure the cooperation of every department, agency, or instrumentality in the state government.
(h) To audit any law enforcement agency that employs peace officers described in subdivision (a) of Section 13510.1, without cause and at any time.
(i) To do any and all things necessary or convenient to enable it fully and adequately to perform its duties and to exercise the power granted to it.

SEC. 7.

 Section 13506 of the Penal Code is amended to read:

13506.
 The commission may adopt those regulations as are necessary to carry out the purposes of this chapter.

SEC. 8.

 Section 13509.5 is added to the Penal Code, to read:

13509.5.
 (a) There is within the commission a Peace Officer Standards Accountability Division, hereafter referred to in this chapter as the division.
(b) The primary responsibilities of the division shall be to review potential grounds for decertification of peace officers, conduct investigations conducted by law enforcement agencies or any other investigative authority and to conduct additional investigations, as necessary, into serious misconduct that may provide grounds for decertification, present findings and recommendations to the board and commission, and bring proceedings seeking the revocation of certification of peace officers as directed by the board and commission pursuant to this chapter.
(c) The Governor and the commission shall ensure the division is division shall be staffed with a sufficient number of experienced and able employees that are capable of handling the most complex and varied types of decertification investigations, prosecutions, and administrative proceedings against peace officers.
(d) The commission shall establish procedures for accepting complaints from members of the public regarding peace officers or law enforcement agencies that may be investigated by the division or referred to the peace officers’ employing agency or the Department of Justice.

SEC. 9.

 Section 13509.6 is added to the Penal Code, to read:

13509.6.
 (a) No later than January 1, 2023, the Governor shall establish the Peace Officer Standards Accountability Advisory Board, hereafter referred to in this chapter as the board.
(b) The purpose of the board shall be to make recommendations on the decertification of peace officers to the commission.
(c) The protection of the public shall be the highest priority for the board as it upholds the standards for peace officers in California. Whenever the protection of the public is inconsistent with other interests sought to be promoted, the protection of the public shall be paramount.
(d) The board shall consist of nine members, as follows:
(1) One member shall be a peace officer or former peace officer with substantial experience at a command rank, appointed by the Governor.
(2) One member shall be a peace officer or former peace officer with substantial experience at a management rank in internal investigations or disciplinary proceedings of peace officers, appointed by the Governor.
(3) Two members shall be members of the public, who shall not be former peace officers, who have substantial experience working at nonprofit or academic institutions on issues related to police misconduct. accountability. One of these members shall be appointed by the Governor and one by the Speaker of the Assembly.
(4) Two members shall be members of the public, who shall not be former peace officers, who have substantial experience working at community-based organizations on issues related to police misconduct. accountability. One of these members shall be appointed by the Governor and one by the Senate Rules Committee.
(5) Two members shall be members of the public, who shall not be former peace officers, who have been subject to wrongful use of force likely to cause death or serious bodily injury by a peace officer, or who are surviving family members of a person killed by the wrongful use of deadly force by a peace officer, appointed by the Governor.
(6) One member shall be an attorney, who shall not be a former peace officer, with substantial professional experience involving oversight of peace officers, appointed by the Governor.
(e) Except as otherwise provided in subdivision (f), each member shall be appointed for a term of three years and shall hold office until the appointment of the member’s successor or until one year has elapsed since the expiration of the term for which the member was appointed, whichever occurs first. Vacancies occurring shall be filled by appointment for the unexpired term of a person with the same qualification for appointment as the person being replaced. No person shall serve more than two terms consecutively. The Governor shall remove from the board any peace officer member whose certification as a peace officer has been revoked. The Governor may, after hearing, remove any member of the board for neglect of duty or other just cause.
(f) Of the members initially appointed to the board, three shall be appointed for a term of one year, three for a term of two years, and three for a term of three years. Successor appointments shall be made pursuant to subdivision (e).
(g) The Governor shall designate the chair of the board from among the members of the board. The person designated as the chair shall serve as chair of the board at the pleasure of the Governor. The board shall annually select a vice chair from among its members. A majority of the members of the board shall constitute a quorum.

(g)

(h) Each member of the board shall receive a per diem of three hundred fifty dollars ($350) for each day actually spent in the discharge of official duties, including reasonable time spent in preparation for public hearings, and shall be reimbursed for travel and other expenses necessarily incurred in the performance of official duties. Upon request of a member based on financial necessity, the commission shall arrange and make direct payment for travel or other necessities rather than providing reimbursement.

SEC. 10.

 The heading of Article 2 (commencing with Section 13510) of Chapter 1 of Title 4 of Part 4 of the Penal Code is amended to read:
Article  2. Field Services, Standards, and Certification

SEC. 11.

 Section 13510 of the Penal Code is amended to read:

13510.
 (a) (1) For the purpose of raising the level of competence of local law enforcement officers, the commission shall adopt, and may from time to time amend, rules establishing and upholding minimum standards relating to physical, mental, and moral fitness that shall govern the recruitment of any city police officers, peace officer members of a county sheriff’s office, marshals or deputy marshals, peace officer members of a county coroner’s office notwithstanding Section 13526, reserve officers, as defined in subdivision (a) of Section 830.6, police officers of a district authorized by statute to maintain a police department, peace officer members of a police department operated by a joint powers agency established by Article 1 (commencing with Section 6500) of Chapter 5 of Division 7 of Title 1 of the Government Code, regularly employed and paid inspectors and investigators of a district attorney’s office, as defined in Section 830.1, who conduct criminal investigations, peace officer members of a district, safety police officers and park rangers of the County of Los Angeles, as defined in subdivisions (a) and (b) of Section 830.31, or housing authority police departments.
(2) The commission also shall adopt, and may from time to time amend, rules establishing minimum standards for training of city police officers, peace officer members of county sheriff’s offices, marshals or deputy marshals, peace officer members of a county coroner’s office notwithstanding Section 13526, reserve officers, as defined in subdivision (a) of Section 830.6, police officers of a district authorized by statute to maintain a police department, peace officer members of a police department operated by a joint powers agency established by Article 1 (commencing with Section 6500) of Chapter 5 of Division 7 of Title 1 of the Government Code, regularly employed and paid inspectors and investigators of a district attorney’s office, as defined in Section 830.1, who conduct criminal investigations, peace officer members of a district, safety police officers and park rangers of the County of Los Angeles, as defined in subdivisions (a) and (b) of Section 830.31, and housing authority police departments.
(3) These rules shall apply to those cities, counties, cities and counties, and districts receiving state aid pursuant to this chapter and shall be adopted and amended pursuant to Chapter 3.5 (commencing with Section 11340) of Part 1 of Division 3 of Title 2 of the Government Code.
(b) The commission shall conduct research concerning job-related educational standards and job-related selection standards to include vision, hearing, physical ability, and emotional stability. Job-related standards that are supported by this research shall be adopted by the commission prior to January 1, 1985, and shall apply to those peace officer classes identified in subdivision (a). The commission shall consult with local entities during the conducting of related research into job-related selection standards.
(c) For the purpose of raising the level of competence of local public safety dispatchers, the commission shall adopt, and may from time to time amend, rules establishing minimum standards relating to the recruitment and training of local public safety dispatchers having a primary responsibility for providing dispatching services for local law enforcement agencies described in subdivision (a), which standards shall apply to those cities, counties, cities and counties, and districts receiving state aid pursuant to this chapter. These standards also shall apply to consolidated dispatch centers operated by an independent public joint powers agency established pursuant to Article 1 (commencing with Section 6500) of Chapter 5 of Division 7 of Title 1 of the Government Code when providing dispatch services to the law enforcement personnel listed in subdivision (a). Those rules shall be adopted and amended pursuant to Chapter 3.5 (commencing with Section 11340) of Part 1 of Division 3 of Title 2 of the Government Code. As used in this section, “primary responsibility” refers to the performance of law enforcement dispatching duties for a minimum of 50 percent of the time worked within a pay period.
(d) This section does not prohibit a local agency from establishing selection and training standards that exceed the minimum standards established by the commission.

SEC. 12.

 Section 13510.1 of the Penal Code is amended to read:

13510.1.
 (a) The commission shall establish a certification program for peace officers described in Section 830.1, 830.2 with the exception of those described in subdivision (d) of that section, 830.3, 830.32, or 830.33, or any other peace officer employed by an agency that participates in the Peace Officer Standards and Training (POST) program. A certificate or proof of eligibility issued pursuant to this section shall be considered the property of the commission.
(b) Basic, intermediate, advanced, supervisory, management, and executive certificates shall be established for the purpose of fostering professionalization, education, and experience necessary to adequately accomplish the general police service duties performed by peace officer members of city police departments, county sheriffs’ departments, districts, university and state university and college departments, or by the California Highway Patrol.
(c) (1) Certificates shall be awarded on the basis of a combination of training, education, experience, and other prerequisites, as determined by the commission.
(2) In determining whether an applicant for certification has the requisite education, the commission shall recognize as acceptable college education only the following:
(A) Education provided by a community college, college, or university which has been accredited by the department of education of the state in which the community college, college, or university is located or by a recognized national or regional accrediting body.
(B) Until January 1, 1998, educational courses or degrees provided by a nonaccredited but state-approved college that offers programs exclusively in criminal justice.
(d) Persons who are determined by the commission to be eligible peace officers may make application for the certificates, provided they are employed by an agency which participates in the POST program. Any person agency appointing an individual who does not already have a basic certificate as described in subdivision (a) and who is not eligible for a certificate shall make application for proof of eligibility. eligibility within 10 days of appointment.
(e) The commission shall assign each person who applies for or receives certification a unique identifier that shall be used to track certification status from application for certification through that person’s career as a peace officer.
(f) The commission shall have the authority to suspend, revoke, or cancel any certification pursuant to this chapter.
(g) (1) An agency that employs peace officers described in subdivision (a) shall employ as a peace officer only individuals with current, valid certification pursuant to this section, except that an agency may provisionally employ a person for up to 24 months, pending certification by the commission, provided that the person has applied for received certification and has not previously been certified or denied certification.
(2) In accordance with subdivision (b) of Section 832.4, deputy sheriffs described in subdivision (c) of Section 830.1 shall obtain valid certification pursuant to this section upon reassignment from custodial duties to general law enforcement duties.
(h) (1) Notwithstanding subdivision (d), the commission shall issue a basic certificate or proof of eligibility to any peace officer described in subdivision (a) who, on January 1, 2022, is eligible for a basic certificate or proof of eligibility but has not applied for a certification.
(2) Commencing on January 1, 2022, 2023, any peace officer described in subdivision (a) who does not possess a basic certificate and who is not yet or will not be eligible for a basic certificate, shall apply to the commission for proof of eligibility.
(i) As used in this chapter, “certification” means a valid and unexpired basic certificate or proof of eligibility issued by the commission pursuant to this section.

SEC. 13.Section 13510.15 is added to the Penal Code, immediately following Section 13510.1, to read:
13510.15.

(a)Every basic certificate issued before January 1, 2022, shall be deemed to expire on January 1, 2023. Every basic certificate or proof of eligibility issued on or after January 1, 2022, shall be valid for no more than two years, as determined by the commission.

(b)The commission shall assess the following fees related to the issuance and renewal of a basic certificate or proof of eligibility:

(1)A fee not to exceed three hundred dollars ($300) for the initial issuance of a basic certificate or proof of eligibility.

(2)A fee not to exceed fifty dollars ($50) for the renewal of an expiring basic certificate or proof of eligibility.

(3)An annual certification fee not to exceed two hundred fifty dollars ($250), per year, for costs incident to the administration of the certification program, investigations of officer misconduct, and adjudication of certification revocations.

(4)Any other fees determined necessary by the commission for the processing of other transactions related to the certification program, including, but not limited to, the replacement of a lost or destroyed certificate or proof of eligibility, the placement of certification on inactive status, or reactivation of an inactive certification.

(c)The amount of the fees shall be set and may be adjusted by the commission, but shall not exceed the reasonable regulatory cost to the commission of administering the certification program.

(d)Moneys collected pursuant to this section shall be deposited into the Peace Officer Certification Fund, which is hereby created as a special fund in the State Treasury. Notwithstanding Section 13340 of the Government Code, moneys in the Peace Officer Certification Fund are continuously appropriated to the commission for the purpose of administering the certification program.

SEC. 14.SEC. 13.

 Section 13510.8 is added to the Penal Code, to read:

13510.8.
 (a) A certified peace officer shall have their certification revoked, and an applicant shall have their application for certification denied, upon a determination pursuant to subdivision (d) that the peace officer or applicant has done any of the following:
(1) The person is or has become ineligible to hold office as a peace officer pursuant to Section 1029 of the Government Code.
(2) The person has been terminated for cause from employment as a peace officer for, or has, while employed as a peace officer, otherwise engaged in, any serious misconduct as described in subdivision (b).
(b) By January 1, 2023, the commission shall adopt by regulation a definition of “serious misconduct” that shall serve as the criteria to be considered for ineligibility for, or revocation of, certification. This definition shall, without limitation, include all of the following:
(1) Acts of dishonesty relating to the reporting, investigation, or prosecution of a crime, or relating to the reporting of, or investigation of misconduct by, a peace officer or custodial officer, including, but not limited to, false statements, filing false reports, tampering with, falsifying, destroying, or concealing evidence, perjury, and tampering with data recorded by a body-worn camera or other recording device for purposes of concealing misconduct.
(2) Acts of abuse of power, including, but not limited to, intimidating witnesses, knowingly obtaining a false confession, and knowingly making a false arrest.
(3) Acts of physical abuse, including, but not limited to, the unauthorized use of force.
(4) Sexual assault, as described in subdivision (b) of Section 832.7.
(5) Acts demonstrating bias on the basis of race, national origin, religion, gender identity or expression, housing status, sexual orientation, mental or physical disability, or other protected status in violation of law or department policy or inconsistent with a peace officer’s obligation to carry out their duties in a fair and unbiased manner.
(6) Acts that violate the law and are sufficiently egregious or repeated as to be inconsistent with an a peace officer’s obligation to uphold the law or respect the rights of members of the public, as determined by the commission.
(7) Participation in a law enforcement gang or other organization that engages in a pattern of rogue on-duty behavior that violates the law or fundamental principles of professional policing, including, but not limited to, unlawful detention, use of excessive force, falsifying police reports, fabricating evidence, targeting persons for enforcement based solely on protected characteristics of those persons, theft, use of alcohol or drugs on duty, protection of other members from disciplinary actions, and retaliation against other peace officers who threaten or interfere with the activities of the group.
(8) Failure to cooperate with an investigation into potential police misconduct, including an investigation conducted pursuant to this chapter.
(c) (1) Beginning no later than January 1, 2023, the each law enforcement agency shall be responsible for the completion of investigations of allegations of serious misconduct by a peace officer, regardless of their employment status.
(2) The division shall promptly review and investigate any grounds for decertification described in subdivision (a) received from an agency. The division shall have the authority to review any agency or other investigative authority file, as well as to conduct additional investigation, if necessary. The division shall only have authority to review and investigate allegations for purposes of decertification.

(2)In addition to the requirement to investigate incidents specified in paragraph (1), the commission or board, in their discretion, may direct the division to investigate, and the division in its discretion may investigate without the request of the commission or board, any potential grounds for revocation of certification of an officer.

(3) (A) The board, in their discretion, may request that the division review an investigative file or recommend that the commission direct the division to investigate any potential grounds for decertification of a peace officer. Those requests and recommendations from the board to the division or commission must be based upon a decision by a majority vote.
(B) The commission, in its discretion, may direct the division to review an investigative file. The commission, either upon its own motion or in response to a recommendation from the board, may direct the division to investigate any potential grounds for decertification of a peace officer.
(C) The division, in its discretion, may investigate without the request of the commission or board any potential grounds for revocation of certification of a peace officer.

(3)

(4) The division, in carrying out any investigation initiated pursuant to this section or any other duty shall have all of the powers of investigation granted pursuant to Article 2 (commencing with Section 11180) of Chapter 2 of Part 1 of Division 3 of Title 2 of the Government Code.

(4)

(5) Notwithstanding any other law, the investigation shall be completed within three years after the receipt of the completed report of the disciplinary or internal affairs investigation from the employing agency pursuant to Section 13510.9, however, no time limit shall apply if a report of the conduct was not made to the commission. An investigation shall be considered completed upon a notice of intent to deny or revoke certification issued pursuant to subdivision (e). The time limit shall be tolled during the appeal of a termination or other disciplinary action through an administrative or judicial proceeding or during any criminal prosecution of the peace officer. The commission shall consider the peace officer’s prior conduct and service record, and any instances of misconduct, including any incidents occurring beyond the time limitation for investigation in evaluating whether to revoke certification for the incident under investigation.

(5)

(6) An action by an agency or decision resulting from an appeal of an agency’s action does not preclude action by the commission to investigate, suspend, or revoke an a peace officer’s certification pursuant to this section.
(d) Upon arrest or indictment of an a peace officer for any crime described in Section 1029 of the Government Code, or discharge from any law enforcement agency for grounds set forth in subdivision (a), or separation from employment of an a peace officer during a pending investigation into allegations of serious misconduct, the executive director shall order the immediate temporary suspension of any certificate held by that peace officer upon the determination by the executive director that the temporary suspension is in the best interest of the health, safety, or welfare of the public. The order of temporary suspension shall be made in writing and shall specify the basis for the executive director’s determination. Following the issuance of a temporary suspension order, proceedings of the commission in the exercise of its authority to discipline any peace officer shall be promptly scheduled as provided for in this section. The temporary suspension shall continue in effect until issuance of the final decision on revocation pursuant to this section or until the order is withdrawn by the executive director.
(e) Records of an investigation of any person by the commission shall be retained for 30 years following the date that the investigation is deemed concluded by the commission. The commission may destroy records prior to the expiration of the 30-year retention period if the subject is deceased and no action upon the complaint was taken by the commission beyond the commission’s initial intake of such complaint.
(f) Any peace officer may voluntarily surrender their certification permanently. Voluntary permanent surrender of certification pursuant to this subdivision shall have the same effect as revocation. Voluntary permanent surrender is not the same as placement of a valid certification into inactive status during a period in which a person is not actively employed as a peace officer. A permanently surrendered certification cannot be reactivated.
(g) (1) The commission may initiate proceedings to revoke an a peace officer’s certification for conduct which occurred before January 1, 2022, only for either of the following:
(A) Serious misconduct pursuant to paragraphs (1) or (4) of subdivision (b), or pursuant to paragraph (3) of subdivision (b) for the use of deadly force that results in death or serious bodily injury.
(B) If the employing agency makes a final determination regarding its investigation of the misconduct after January 1, 2022.
(2) Nothing in this subdivision prevents the commission from considering the peace officer’s prior conduct and service record in determining whether revocation is appropriate for serious misconduct.

SEC. 15.SEC. 14.

 Section 13510.85 is added to the Penal Code, immediately following Section 13510.8, to read:

13510.85.
 (a) (1) When, upon the completion of an investigation conducted pursuant to subdivision (c) of Section 13510.8, the division finds reasonable grounds for revocation of a peace officer’s certification, it shall take the appropriate steps to promptly notify the peace officer involved, in writing, of its determination and reasons therefore, and shall provide the peace officer with a detailed explanation of the decertification procedure and the peace officer’s rights to contest and appeal.
(2) Upon notification, the peace officer may, within 30 days, file a request for a review of the determination by the board and commission. If the peace officer does not file a request for review within 30 days, the peace officer’s certification shall be revoked without further proceedings. If the peace officer files a timely review, the board shall schedule the case for hearing.
(3) The board shall meet as required to conduct public hearings, but no fewer than four times per year. The location of the board’s meetings shall be varied across the state to facilitate attendance by involved officers and members of the public in the locality where the cases arise.
(4) At each public hearing, the board shall review the findings of investigations presented by the division pursuant to paragraph (1) and shall make a recommendation on what action should be taken on the certification of the peace officer involved. The board shall only recommend revocation if the factual basis for revocation is established by clear and convincing evidence.
(5) The commission shall review all recommendations made by the board and shall adopt the board’s recommendation unless it is without a reasonable basis. board. The commission’s decision shall be based on whether there is evidence that reasonably supports the board’s recommendation. In any case in which the commission reaches a different determination than the board’s recommendation, it shall set forth its analysis and reasons for reaching a different determination in writing.
(6) The commission shall return any determination requiring action to be taken against a peace officer’s an individual’s certification to the division, which shall initiate proceedings for a formal hearing before an administrative law judge in accordance with the Administrative Procedure Act (Chapter 5 (commencing with Section 11500) of Part 1 of Division 3 of Title 2 of the Government Code), which shall be subject to judicial review as set forth in that Act.
(b) Notwithstanding Section 832.7, the hearings of the board and the review by the commission under this section, administrative adjudications held pursuant to paragraph (6) of subdivision (a), and any records introduced during those proceedings, shall be public.
(c) The commission shall publish the names of any peace officer whose certification is suspended or revoked and the basis for the suspension or revocation and shall notify the National Decertification Index of the International Association of Directors of Law Enforcement Standards and Training of the suspension or revocation.

SEC. 16.SEC. 15.

 Section 13510.9 is added to the Penal Code, to read:

13510.9.
 (a) Beginning January 1, 2023, any agency employing peace officers shall report to the commission within seven days, in a form specified by the commission, any of the following events:
(1) The employment, appointment, or termination or separation from employment or appointment, by that agency, of any peace officer. Separation from employment or appointment includes any involuntary termination, resignation, or retirement.
(2) Any complaint, charge, or allegation of conduct against a peace officer employed by that agency that could render a peace officer subject to revocation of certification by the commission pursuant to Section 13510.8.
(3) Any finding or recommendation by a civilian oversight entity, including a civilian review board, civilian police commission, police chief, or civilian inspector general, that an a peace officer employed by that agency engaged in conduct that could render a peace officer subject to revocation of certification by the commission pursuant to Section 13510.8.
(4) The final disposition of any investigation that determines an a peace officer engaged in conduct that could render a peace officer subject to revocation of certification by the commission pursuant to Section 13510.8, regardless of the discipline imposed.
(5) Any civil judgment or court finding against an a peace officer based on conduct, or settlement of a civil claim against an a peace officer or an agency based on allegations of officer conduct that could render a peace officer subject to revocation of certification by the commission pursuant to Section 13510.8.
(b) By July 1, 2023, any agency employing peace officers shall report to the commission any events described in subdivision (a) that occurred between January 1, 2020, and January 1, 2023.

(b)

(c) An agency employing peace officers shall make available for inspection or duplication by the commission any investigation into any matter reported pursuant to paragraph (2) of subdivision (a), including any physical or documentary evidence, witness statements, analysis, and conclusions, for up to two years after reporting of the disposition of the investigation pursuant to paragraph (3) of subdivision (a).

(c)

(d) (1) In a case of separation from employment or appointment, the employing agency shall execute and maintain an affidavit-of-separation form adopted by the commission describing the reason for separation and shall include whether the separation is part of the resolution or settlement of any criminal, civil, or administrative charge or investigation. The affidavit shall be signed under penalty of perjury and submitted to the commission.
(2) An A peace officer who has separated from employment or appointment shall be permitted to respond to the affidavit-of-separation, in writing, to the commission, setting forth their understanding of the facts and reasons for the separation, if different from those provided by the agency.
(3) Before employing or appointing any peace officer who has previously been employed or appointed as a peace officer by another agency, the agency shall contact the commission to inquire as to the facts and reasons an a peace officer became separated from any previous employing agency. The commission shall, upon request and without prejudice, provide to the subsequent employing agency any information regarding the separation in its possession.
(4) Civil liability shall not be imposed on either a law enforcement agency or the commission, or any of the agency’s or commission’s agents, for providing information pursuant to this section in a good faith belief that the information is accurate.

(d)

(e) The commission shall maintain the information reported pursuant to this section, in a form determined by the commission, and in a manner that may be accessed by the subject peace officer, any employing law enforcement agency of that peace officer, any law enforcement agency that is performing a preemployment background investigation of that peace officer, or the commission when necessary for the purposes of decertification.

(e)

(f) (1) The commission shall notify the head of the agency that employs the peace officer of all of the following:
(A) The initiation of any investigation of that peace officer by the division, unless such notification would interfere with the investigation.
(B) A finding by the division, following an investigation or review of the investigation, of grounds to take action against the peace officer’s certification or application.
(C) A final determination by the commission as to whether action should be taken against an a peace officer’s certification or application.
(D) An adjudication, after hearing, resulting in action against an officer’s certification or application.
(2) If the certificate of an a peace officer is temporarily suspended pursuant to subdivision (d) of Section 13510.8, or revoked or if an applicant is denied the basic certificate, revoked, the commission shall also notify the district attorney of the county in which the peace officer is or was employed of this fact.
(3) Each notification required by this subdivision shall include the name of the peace officer and a summary of the basis for the action requiring notification.

SEC. 17.SEC. 16.

 Section 13512 of the Penal Code is amended to read:

13512.
 (a) The commission shall make such inquiries as may be necessary to determine whether every city, county, city and county, and district receiving state aid pursuant to this chapter is adhering to the standards for recruitment, training, certification, and reporting established pursuant to this chapter.
(b) The board shall prepare an annual report on the activities of the commission, board, division, and subject agencies regarding peace officer certification under this chapter. The report shall include, without limitation, all of the following:
(1) The number of applications for certification and the number of certifications granted or denied.
(2) The number of events reported pursuant to paragraphs (1) to (5), inclusive, of subdivision (a) of Section 13510.9.
(3) The criteria and process for review and investigation by the division, the number of reviews, and the number of investigations conducted by the division.
(4) The number of notices sent by the division pursuant to paragraph (1) of subdivision (a) of Section 13510.85, the number of requests for review received, and the number of revocations or denials made pursuant to paragraph (2) of subdivision (a) of Section 13510.85.
(5) The number of review hearings held by the board and commission and the outcomes of those review hearings.
(6) The number of administrative hearings held on revocations and the number of revocations resulting from those hearings.
(7) Any cases of judicial review of commission actions on revocation and the result of those cases.
(8) The number of certifications voluntarily surrendered and the number placed on inactive status.
(9) Any compliance audits or reviews conducted pursuant to this chapter and the results of those audits.
(10) Any other information the board deems relevant to evaluating the functioning of the certification program, the decertification process, and the staffing levels of the division.

SEC. 18.SEC. 17.

 No reimbursement is required by this act pursuant to Section 6 of Article XIII B of the California Constitution for certain costs that may be incurred by a local agency or school district because, in that regard, this act creates a new crime or infraction, eliminates a crime or infraction, or changes the penalty for a crime or infraction, within the meaning of Section 17556 of the Government Code, or changes the definition of a crime within the meaning of Section 6 of Article XIII B of the California Constitution.
However, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that this act contains other costs mandated by the state, reimbursement to local agencies and school districts for those costs shall be made pursuant to Part 7 (commencing with Section 17500) of Division 4 of Title 2 of the Government Code.