Bill Text


PDF |Add To My Favorites |Track Bill | print page

AB-858 Employment: health information technology: clinical practice guidelines: worker rights.(2021-2022)

SHARE THIS:share this bill in Facebookshare this bill in Twitter
Date Published: 04/29/2021 09:00 PM
AB858:v98#DOCUMENT

Amended  IN  Assembly  April 29, 2021

CALIFORNIA LEGISLATURE— 2021–2022 REGULAR SESSION

Assembly Bill
No. 858


Introduced by Assembly Member Jones-Sawyer
(Principal coauthor: Assembly Member Carrillo)

February 17, 2021


An act to add Article 2.7 (commencing with Section 2820) to Chapter 2 of Division 3 of the Labor Code, relating to employment.


LEGISLATIVE COUNSEL'S DIGEST


AB 858, as amended, Jones-Sawyer. Employment: health information technology: clinical practice guidelines: worker rights.
Existing law establishes the Labor Commissioner and sets forth its powers and duties, including investigation of employee complaints. Existing law establishes the State Department of Public health and sets forth its powers and duties relating to the licensure and regulation of health facilities, as defined. Existing law establishes the Department of Consumer Affairs and establishes various boards within its jurisdiction, including those charged with the licensure and regulation of practice in the various healing arts.
This bill would provide that the use of technology shall not limit a worker who is providing direct patient care from exercising independent clinical judgment in the assessment, evaluation, planning and implementation of care, nor from acting as a patient advocate. The bill would define “technology” for these purposes to mean scientific hardware or software including algorithms derived from the use of health care related data, used to achieve a medical or nursing care objective at a health facility.
This bill would authorize each worker who provides direct patient care at a health facility to be free to override health information technology and clinical practice guidelines if, in their professional judgment, and in accordance with their scope of practice, practice, which includes receiving the approval of the patient’s physician, it is in the best interest of the patient to do so. The bill would require each employer to notify all workers who provide direct patient care, and if subject to a collective bargaining agreement, their representatives, before implementing new information technology that materially affects the jobs of the workers or their patients.
This bill would prohibit an employer from retaliating or otherwise discriminating against a worker providing direct patient care who requests to override health information technology and clinical practice guidelines or discusses these issues with other employees or supervisors. The bill would authorize a worker who is subject to retaliation to file a complaint with the Labor Commissioner against an employer who has retaliated or discriminated against the employee.
This bill would require each employer to ensure that appropriate education or training be provided to workers providing direct patient care for purposes of educating or training those workers on how to utilize the new technology and to understand its limitations. The bill would require health facilities to provide opportunities for consult with workers providing direct patient care in the affected clinical areas to participate in the design, building, and validation process for new technology impacting patient care delivery consistent with certain criteria, delivery, as provided. The bill would authorize representatives of a health facilities professional practice committee to recommend certain improvements and participate in the selection, design, building, and validation processes, as specified.
Vote: MAJORITY   Appropriation: NO   Fiscal Committee: YES   Local Program: NO  

The people of the State of California do enact as follows:


SECTION 1.

 (a) It is the intent of the Legislature that health information technology, clinical practice guidelines, or algorithms shall not limit the effective exercise of, or be a substitute for, the professional judgment of workers providing direct patient care. This is crucial to protect millions of patients’ safety in interacting with a deeply flawed medical technological system, that among many issues, has shown their commercial algorithms exhibit significant racial bias.
(b) It is also the intent of the Legislature that new technology will continue to permit the exercise of professional clinical judgment in providing patient care and patient advocacy by workers providing direct patient care. Clinical technology is intended to complement, not diminish, skills, judgment, and decisionmaking. Professional judgment, not algorithms, shall determine the care needed by patient populations or individuals.

SEC. 2.

 Article 2.7 (commencing with Section 2820) is added to Chapter 2 of Division 3 of the Labor Code, to read:
Article  2.7. Health Information Technology: Worker Rights

2820.
 (a) For purposes of this article, “technology” means scientific hardware or software including algorithms derived from the use of health care-related data, used to achieve a medical or nursing care objective at a health facility.
(b) Notwithstanding any law, use of technology shall not limit a worker who is providing direct patient care from exercising independent clinical judgment in assessment, evaluation, planning and implementation of care, nor from acting as a patient advocate. New technology shall not be used to replace the worker’s role in delivery of care to patients.
(c) Each worker who provides direct patient care shall be free to may override health information technology and clinical practice guidelines if, in their professional judgment, and in accordance with their scope of practice, practice, which includes receiving the approval of the patient’s physician, it is in the best interest of the patient to do so.
(d) An employer shall not retaliate or otherwise discriminate against a worker providing direct patient care who requests to override, or who discusses with other employees or supervisors about overriding, health information technology and clinical practice guidelines. A worker who is subject to retaliation or discrimination has the right under this article to file a complaint with the Labor Commissioner against an employer who retaliates or discriminates against the employee.
(e) Each employer shall notify all workers who provide direct patient care and, if subject to a collective bargaining agreement, their representatives prior to implementing new information technology that materially affects the job of the workers or their patients.
(f) (1) Each employer shall ensure that appropriate education or training is provided to its workers that provide direct patient care for purposes of educating or training those workers on how to utilize the new technology and to understand its limitations.
(2) The worker’s patient care assignment shall be taken into consideration when determining the appropriate method for training on new technology.
(g) (1) Health facilities shall provide opportunities for consult with workers providing who provide direct patient care in the affected clinical areas to participate in the design, building, and validation process for new technology impacting patient care delivery, consistent with the following: delivery.

(1)

(2) Representatives of a health facilities professional practice committee shall be entitled to may recommend measures to improve the delivery of safe, therapeutic, equitable, and effective care in conjunction with the use of new technology. Representatives of a health facilities professional practice committee shall also be entitled to may participate in the selection, design, building, and validation processes whenever new technology affecting the delivery of medical or nursing care is being considered.

(2)

(3) When sharing technology, technology in the design, building, and validation process for new technology pursuant to this subdivision, employers shall protect patient’s private medical information in accordance with the federal Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (Public Law 104-191), known as HIPAA, and all other applicable privacy laws.
(h) This section shall not be construed to limit a medical staff’s right to establish, in medical staff bylaws, rules, or regulations, clinical criteria and standards to oversee and manage quality assurance, utilization review, and other medical staff activities pursuant to existing law.