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AB-1505 Land use: zoning regulations. (2017-2018)

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Date Published: 09/29/2017 09:00 PM
AB1505:v93#DOCUMENT

Assembly Bill No. 1505
CHAPTER 376

An act to amend Section 65850 of, and to add Section 65850.01 to, the Government Code, relating to land use.

[ Approved by Governor  September 29, 2017. Filed with Secretary of State  September 29, 2017. ]

LEGISLATIVE COUNSEL'S DIGEST


AB 1505, Bloom. Land use: zoning regulations.
The Planning and Zoning Law authorizes the legislative body of any county or city to adopt ordinances regulating zoning within its jurisdiction, as specified.
This bill would additionally authorize the legislative body of any county or city to adopt ordinances to require, as a condition of development of residential rental units, that the development include a certain percentage of residential rental units affordable to, and occupied by, moderate-income, lower income, very low income, or extremely low income households or by persons and families of low or moderate income, as specified, and would declare the intent of the Legislature in adding this provision.
This bill would also authorize the Department of Housing and Community Development, within 10 years of the adoption or amendment of an ordinance by a county or city after September 15, 2017, that requires as a condition of the development of residential rental units that more than 15% of the total number of units rented in the development be affordable to, and occupied by, households at 80% or less of the area median income, to review that ordinance if the county or city meets specified conditions. The bill would authorize the department to request, and require that the county or city provide, evidence that the ordinance does not unduly constrain the production of housing by submitting an economic feasibility study that meets specified standards. If the department finds that economic feasibility study does not meet these standards, or if the county or city fails to submit the study within 180 days, the bill would require the county or city to limit any requirement to provide rental units in a development affordable to households at 80% or less of the area median income to no more than 15% of the total number of units in the development. The bill would require the department to report any findings made pursuant to these provisions to the Legislature. The bill would also declare that these provisions regarding department review of certain land use ordinances address a matter of statewide concern.
Vote: MAJORITY   Appropriation: NO   Fiscal Committee: YES   Local Program: NO  

The people of the State of California do enact as follows:


SECTION 1.

 Section 65850 of the Government Code is amended to read:

65850.
 The legislative body of any county or city may, pursuant to this chapter, adopt ordinances that do any of the following:
(a) Regulate the use of buildings, structures, and land as between industry, business, residences, open space, including agriculture, recreation, enjoyment of scenic beauty, use of natural resources, and other purposes.
(b) Regulate signs and billboards.
(c) Regulate all of the following:
(1) The location, height, bulk, number of stories, and size of buildings and structures.
(2) The size and use of lots, yards, courts, and other open spaces.
(3) The percentage of a lot which may be occupied by a building or structure.
(4) The intensity of land use.
(d) Establish requirements for offstreet parking and loading.
(e) Establish and maintain building setback lines.
(f) Create civic districts around civic centers, public parks, public buildings, or public grounds, and establish regulations for those civic districts.
(g) Require, as a condition of the development of residential rental units, that the development include a certain percentage of residential rental units affordable to, and occupied by, households with incomes that do not exceed the limits for moderate-income, lower income, very low income, or extremely low income households specified in Sections 50079.5, 50093, 50105, and 50106 of the Health and Safety Code. The ordinance shall provide alternative means of compliance that may include, but are not limited to, in-lieu fees, land dedication, off-site construction, or acquisition and rehabilitation of existing units.

SEC. 2.

 Section 65850.01 is added to the Government Code, to read:

65850.01.
 (a) The Department of Housing and Community Development, hereafter referred to as “the department” in this section, shall have the authority to review an ordinance adopted or amended by a county or city after September 15, 2017, that requires as a condition of the development of residential rental units that more than 15 percent of the total number of units rented in a development be affordable to, and occupied by, households at 80 percent or less of the area median income if either of the following apply:
(1) The county or city has failed to meet at least 75 percent of its share of the regional housing need allocated pursuant to Sections 65584.04, 65584.05, and 65584.06, as applicable for the above-moderate income category specified in Section 50093 of the Health and Safety Code, prorated based on the length of time within the planning period pursuant to paragraph (1) of subdivision (f) of Section 65588, over at least a five-year period. This determination shall be made based on the annual housing element report submitted to the department pursuant to paragraph (2) of subdivision (a) of Section 65400.
(2) The department finds that the jurisdiction has not submitted the annual housing element report as required by paragraph (2) of subdivision (a) of Section 65400 for at least two consecutive years.
(b) Based on a finding pursuant to subdivision (a), the department may request, and the county or city shall provide, evidence that the ordinance does not unduly constrain the production of housing by submitting an economic feasibility study. The county or city shall submit the study within 180 days from receipt of the department’s request. The department’s review of the feasibility study shall be limited to determining whether or not the study meets the following standards:
(1) A qualified entity with demonstrated expertise preparing economic feasibility studies prepared the study.
(2) If the economic feasibility study is prepared after September 15, 2017, the county or city has made the economic feasibility study available for at least 30 days on its Internet Web site. After 30 days, the county or city shall include consideration of the economic feasibility study on the agenda for a regularly scheduled meeting of the legislative body of the county or city prior to consideration and approval. This paragraph applies when an economic feasibility study is completed at the request of the department or prepared in connection with the ordinance.
(3) The study methodology followed best professional practices and was sufficiently rigorous to allow an assessment of whether the rental inclusionary requirement, in combination with other factors that influence feasibility, is economically feasible.
(c) If the economic feasibility study requested pursuant to subdivision (b) has not been submitted to the department within 180 days, the jurisdiction shall limit any requirement to provide rental units in a development affordable to households at 80 percent of the area median income to no more than 15 percent of the total number of units in a development until an economic feasibility study has been submitted to the department and the department makes a finding that the study meets the standards specified in paragraphs (1), (3), and, if applicable, (2), of subdivision (b).
(d) (1) Within 90 days of submission, the department shall make a finding as to whether or not the economic feasibility study meets the standards specified in paragraphs (1), (3), and, if applicable, (2), of subdivision (b).
(2) If the department finds that the jurisdiction’s economic feasibility study does not meet the standards in paragraphs (1), (3), and, if applicable, (2), of subdivision (b), the jurisdiction shall have the right to appeal the decision to the Director of Housing and Community Development or his or her designee. The director or his or her designee shall issue a final decision within 90 days of the department’s receipt of the appeal unless extended by mutual agreement of the jurisdiction and the department.
(3) If in its final decision the department finds that jurisdiction’s economic feasibility study does not meet the standards in paragraphs (1), (3), and, if applicable, (2), of subdivision (b), the jurisdiction shall limit any requirement to provide rental units in a development affordable to households at 80 percent of the area median income to no more than 15 percent of the total number of units in a development until such time as the jurisdiction submits an economic feasibility study that supports the ordinance under review and the department issues a finding that the study meets the standards in paragraphs (1), (3), and, if applicable, (2), of subdivision (b).
(e) The department shall not request to review an economic feasibility study for an ordinance more than 10 years from the date of adoption or amendment of the ordinance, whichever is later.
(f) The department shall annually report any findings made pursuant to this section to the Legislature. The report required by this subdivision shall be submitted in compliance with Section 9795.
(g) The Legislature finds and declares that ensuring access to affordable housing is a matter of statewide concern and not a municipal affair, as that term is used in Section 5 of Article XI of the California Constitution. Therefore, this section shall apply to an ordinance proposed or adopted by any city, including a charter city.

SEC. 3.

 The Legislature finds and declares all of the following:
(a) Inclusionary housing ordinances have provided quality affordable housing to over 80,000 Californians, including the production of an estimated 30,000 units of affordable housing in the last decade alone.
(b) Since the 1970s, over 170 jurisdictions have enacted inclusionary housing ordinances to meet their affordable housing needs.
(c) While many of these local programs have been in place for decades, a 2009 appellate court decision has created uncertainty and confusion for local governments regarding the use of this tool to ensure the inclusion of affordable rental units in residential developments.
(d) It is the intent of the Legislature to reaffirm the authority of local jurisdictions to include within these inclusionary housing ordinances requirements related to the provision of rental units.
(e) The Legislature declares its intent in adding subdivision (g) to Section 65850 of the Government Code, pursuant to Section 1 of this act, to supersede the holding and dicta in the court decision of Palmer/Sixth Street Properties, L.P. v. City of Los Angeles (2009) 175 Cal.App.4th 1396 to the extent that the decision conflicts with a local jurisdiction’s authority to impose inclusionary housing ordinances pursuant to subdivision (g) of Section 65850 of the Government Code, as added pursuant to Section 1 of this act.
(f) In no case is it the intent of the Legislature in adding subdivision (g) to Section 65850 of the Government Code, pursuant to Section 1 of this act, to enlarge, diminish, or modify in any way the existing authority of local jurisdictions to establish, as a condition of development, inclusionary housing requirements, beyond reaffirming their applicability to rental units.
(g) This act does not modify or in any way change or affect the authority of local jurisdictions to require, as a condition of the development of residential units, that the development include a certain percentage of residential for-sale units affordable to, and occupied by, households with incomes that do not exceed the limits for moderate-income, lower income, very low income, or extremely low income households.
(h) It is the intent of the Legislature to reaffirm that existing law requires that the action of any legislative body of any city, county, or city and county to adopt a new inclusionary housing ordinance be taken openly and that their deliberations be conducted openly consistent with the requirements of the Ralph M. Brown Act (Chapter 9 (commencing with Section 54950) of Part 1 of Division 2 of Title 5 of the Government Code).
(i) Except as provided in subdivision (e), in no case is it the intent of the Legislature in adding subdivision (g) to Section 65850 of the Government Code, pursuant to Section 1 of this act, to enlarge, diminish, or modify in any way the existing rights of an owner of residential real property under Sections 1954.50 to 1954.535, inclusive, of the Civil Code and Sections 7060 to 7060.7, inclusive, of the Government Code.