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AB-2322 Small water suppliers and rural communities: drought and water shortage planning: repeal.(2019-2020)

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Date Published: 02/14/2020 09:00 PM
AB2322:v99#DOCUMENT


CALIFORNIA LEGISLATURE— 2019–2020 REGULAR SESSION

Assembly Bill
No. 2322


Introduced by Assembly Member Friedman

February 14, 2020


An act to repeal Sections 10609.40 and 10609.42 of the Water Code, relating to water.


LEGISLATIVE COUNSEL'S DIGEST


AB 2322, as introduced, Friedman. Small water suppliers and rural communities: drought and water shortage planning: repeal.
Existing law makes legislative findings and declarations regarding drought planning for small water suppliers and rural communities, and requires the Department of Water Resources, in consultation with the State Water Resources Control Board and other relevant state and local agencies and stakeholders, to use available data to identify, no later than January 1, 2020, small water suppliers and rural communities that may be at risk of drought and water shortage vulnerability and notify counties and groundwater sustainability agencies of those suppliers or communities. Existing law requires the department, in consultation with the state board, to propose to the Governor and the Legislature, by January 1, 2020, recommendations and guidance relating to the development and implementation of countywide drought and water shortage contingency plans to address the planning needs of small water suppliers and rural communities, as provided.
This bill would repeal these provisions.
Vote: MAJORITY   Appropriation: NO   Fiscal Committee: YES   Local Program: NO  

The people of the State of California do enact as follows:


SECTION 1.

 Section 10609.40 of the Water Code is repealed.
10609.40.

The Legislature finds and declares both of the following:

(a)Small water suppliers and rural communities are often not covered by established water shortage planning requirements. Currently, most counties do not address water shortages or do so minimally in their general plan or the local hazard mitigation plan.

(b)The state should provide guidance to improve drought planning for small water suppliers and rural communities.

SEC. 2.

 Section 10609.42 of the Water Code is repealed.
10609.42.

(a)No later than January 1, 2020, the department, in consultation with the board and other relevant state and local agencies and stakeholders, shall use available data to identify small water suppliers and rural communities that may be at risk of drought and water shortage vulnerability. The department shall notify counties and groundwater sustainability agencies of those suppliers or communities that may be at risk within its jurisdiction, and may make the information publicly accessible on its Internet Web site.

(b)The department shall, in consultation with the board, by January 1, 2020, propose to the Governor and the Legislature recommendations and guidance relating to the development and implementation of countywide drought and water shortage contingency plans to address the planning needs of small water suppliers and rural communities. The department shall recommend how these plans can be included in county local hazard mitigation plans or otherwise integrated with complementary existing planning processes. The guidance from the department shall outline goals of the countywide drought and water shortage contingency plans and recommend components including, but not limited to, all of the following:

(1)Assessment of drought vulnerability.

(2)Actions to reduce drought vulnerability.

(3)Response, financing, and local communication and outreach planning efforts that may be implemented in times of drought.

(4)Data needs and reporting.

(5)Roles and responsibilities of interested parties and coordination with other relevant water management planning efforts.

(c)In formulating the proposal, the department shall utilize a public process involving state agencies, cities, counties, small communities, small water suppliers, and other stakeholders.