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AB-2121 Traffic safety.(2019-2020)

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Date Published: 02/06/2020 09:00 PM
AB2121:v99#DOCUMENT


CALIFORNIA LEGISLATURE— 2019–2020 REGULAR SESSION

Assembly Bill
No. 2121


Introduced by Assembly Members Friedman and Ting
(Principal coauthor: Assembly Member Boerner Horvath)

February 06, 2020


An act to add Section 14033.5 to the Government Code, and to amend Section 40802 of, and to add Section 2904.5 to, the Vehicle Code, relating to traffic safety.


LEGISLATIVE COUNSEL'S DIGEST


AB 2121, as introduced, Friedman. Traffic safety.
Existing law creates the Department of Transportation (Caltrans) within the Transportation Agency. Existing law provides various duties of Caltrans, including, among others, coordinating and assisting, upon request of the various public and private transportation entities in strengthening their development and operation of balanced integrated mass transportation, highway, aviation, maritime, railroad, and other transportation facilities and services in support of statewide and regional goals.
This bill would require, beginning June 1, 2022, and every 6 months thereafter, Caltrans to convene a committee of external design experts to advise on revisions to the Highway Design Manual.
Existing law establishes the California Traffic Safety Program, which consists of a comprehensive plan in conformity with the laws of this state to reduce traffic accidents and deaths, injuries, and property damage resulting from accidents. Existing law requires the program to include provisions to improve driver performance, including, driver education, driver testing to determine proficiency to operate motor vehicles, and driver examinations and licensing, and provisions to improve bicyclist and pedestrian education and performance.
This bill would require the California Traffic Safety Program to include a traffic safety monitoring program that identifies and addresses locations with pedestrian- and bicyclist-related crashes, upon appropriation of state funds for this purpose.
Existing law establishes various speed limits and prohibits a person from driving with a greater speed than those limits. Existing law prohibits a peace officer or other person from using a speed trap in arresting, or participating in the arrest of, any person for any alleged violation of the Vehicle Code, and prohibits the use of a speed trap in securing evidence as to the speed of any vehicle for the purpose of an arrest or prosecution under the Vehicle Code. Existing law defines the term “speed trap,” for these purposes, among other things, to include a particular section of a highway with a prima facie speed limit that is provided by the Vehicle Code or by local ordinance, if that prima facie speed limit is not justified by an engineering and traffic survey conducted within a specified number of years of the alleged violation, and enforcement of the speed limit involves the use of radar or any other electronic device.
This bill would extend the period of time a prima facie speed limit may be justified by an engineering and traffic survey, as specified, if a registered engineer evaluates the section of the highway and finds that there has been an increase in traffic-related crashes.
Vote: MAJORITY   Appropriation: NO   Fiscal Committee: YES   Local Program: NO  

The people of the State of California do enact as follows:


SECTION 1.

 Section 14033.5 is added to the Government Code, to read:

14033.5.
 Beginning June 1, 2022, and every six months thereafter, the department shall convene a committee of external design experts to advise on revisions to the Highway Design Manual.

SEC. 2.

 Section 2904.5 is added to the Vehicle Code, to read:

2904.5.
 The California Traffic Safety Program shall include a traffic safety monitoring program that identifies and addresses locations with pedestrian- and bicyclist-related crashes, upon appropriation of state funds for this purpose.

SEC. 3.

 Section 40802 of the Vehicle Code is amended to read:

40802.
 (a) A “speed trap” is either of the following:
(1) A particular section of a highway measured as to distance and with boundaries marked, designated, or otherwise determined in order that the speed of a vehicle may be calculated by securing the time it takes the vehicle to travel the known distance.
(2) (A) A particular section of a highway with a prima facie speed limit that is provided by this code or by local ordinance under paragraph (1) of subdivision (b) of Section 22352, or established under Section 22354, 22357, 22358, or 22358.3, if that prima facie speed limit is not justified by an engineering and traffic survey conducted within five years prior to the date of the alleged violation, and enforcement of the speed limit involves the use of radar or any other electronic device that measures the speed of moving objects. This paragraph does not apply to a local street, road, or school zone.
(B) If a registered engineer evaluates the section of the highway and finds there has been an increase in traffic-related crashes, the prima facie speed limit may be justified by an engineering and traffic survey conducted every 10 years.
(b) (1) For purposes of this section, a local street or road is one that is functionally classified as “local” on the “California Road System Maps,” that are approved by the Federal Highway Administration and maintained by the Department of Transportation. When a street or road does not appear on the “California Road System Maps,” it may be defined as a “local street or road” if it primarily provides access to abutting residential property and meets the following three conditions:
(A) Roadway width of not more than 40 feet.
(B) Not more than one-half of a mile of uninterrupted length. Interruptions shall include official traffic control signals as defined in Section 445.
(C) Not more than one traffic lane in each direction.
(2) For purposes of this section, “school zone” means that area approaching or passing a school building or the grounds thereof that is contiguous to a highway and on which is posted a standard “SCHOOL” warning sign, while children are going to or leaving the school either during school hours or during the noon recess period. “School zone” also includes the area approaching or passing any school grounds that are not separated from the highway by a fence, gate, or other physical barrier while the grounds are in use by children if that highway is posted with a standard “SCHOOL” warning sign.
(c) (1) When all of the following criteria are met, paragraph (2) of this subdivision shall be applicable and subdivision (a) shall not be applicable:
(A) When radar is used, the arresting officer has successfully completed a radar operator course of not less than 24 hours on the use of police traffic radar, and the course was approved and certified by the Commission on Peace Officer Standards and Training.
(B) When laser or any other electronic device is used to measure the speed of moving objects, the arresting officer has successfully completed the training required in subparagraph (A) and an additional training course of not less than two hours approved and certified by the Commission on Peace Officer Standards and Training.
(C) (i) The prosecution proved that the arresting officer complied with subparagraphs (A) and (B) and that an engineering and traffic survey has been conducted in accordance with subparagraph (B) of paragraph (2). The prosecution proved that, prior to the officer issuing the notice to appear, the arresting officer established that the radar, laser, or other electronic device conformed to the requirements of subparagraph (D).
(ii) The prosecution proved the speed of the accused was unsafe for the conditions present at the time of alleged violation unless the citation was for a violation of Section 22349, 22356, or 22406.
(D) The radar, laser, or other electronic device used to measure the speed of the accused meets or exceeds the minimal operational standards of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, and has been calibrated within the three years prior to the date of the alleged violation by an independent certified laser or radar repair and testing or calibration facility.
(2) A “speed trap” is either of the following:
(A) A particular section of a highway measured as to distance and with boundaries marked, designated, or otherwise determined in order that the speed of a vehicle may be calculated by securing the time it takes the vehicle to travel the known distance.
(B) (i) A particular section of a highway or state highway with a prima facie speed limit that is provided by this code or by local ordinance under paragraph (1) of subdivision (b) of Section 22352, or established under Section 22354, 22357, 22358, or 22358.3, if that prima facie speed limit is not justified by an engineering and traffic survey conducted within one of the following time periods, prior to the date of the alleged violation, and enforcement of the speed limit involves the use of radar or any other electronic device that measures the speed of moving objects:
(I) Except as specified in subclause (II), (II) or (III), seven years.
(II) If an engineering and traffic survey was conducted more than seven years prior to the date of the alleged violation, and a registered engineer evaluates the section of the highway and determines that no significant changes in roadway or traffic conditions have occurred, including, but not limited to, changes in adjoining property or land use, roadway width, or traffic volume, 10 years.
(III) If a registered engineer evaluates the section of the highway or state highway and finds there has been an increase in traffic-related crashes, the prima facie speed limit may be justified by an engineering and traffic survey conducted every 15 years.
(ii) This subparagraph does not apply to a local street, road, or school zone.