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AB-2057 San Francisco Bay area: public transportation.(2019-2020)

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Date Published: 04/30/2020 09:00 PM
AB2057:v98#DOCUMENT

Amended  IN  Assembly  May 04, 2020

CALIFORNIA LEGISLATURE— 2019–2020 REGULAR SESSION

Assembly Bill
No. 2057


Introduced by Assembly Member Chiu
(Principal coauthor: Assembly Member Mullin)
(Principal coauthor: Senator Wiener)
(Coauthors: Assembly Members Bonta, Levine, Ting, and Wicks)

February 03, 2020


An act to amend Section 66502 of, to add Sections 66501, 66513.1, 66513.3, 66516.1, 66516.3, 66517.3, and 66533 to, and to add and repeal Section 13985 of, the Government Code, and to add Section 99177 to the Public Utilities Code, relating to transportation.


LEGISLATIVE COUNSEL'S DIGEST


AB 2057, as amended, Chiu. San Francisco Bay area: public transportation.
(1) Existing law creates the Metropolitan Transportation Commission as a local area planning agency for the 9-county San Francisco Bay area with comprehensive regional transportation planning and other related responsibilities. Existing law creates various transit districts located in the San Francisco Bay area, with specified powers and duties relative to providing public transit services.
Existing law establishes the Transportation Agency consisting of various state agencies under the supervision of an executive officer known as the Secretary of Transportation, who is required to develop and report to the Governor on legislative, budgetary, and administrative programs to accomplish comprehensive, long-range, and coordinated planning and policy formulation in the matters of public interest related to the agency.
This bill would declare the intent of the Legislature to enact subsequent legislation that would create a transportation network manager for the 9-county San Francisco Bay area to, among other things, integrate all aspects of public transit within the 9-county San Francisco Bay area and provide leadership and accountability in planning, coordinating, and financing the transportation network. The bill would establish a 19-member Bay Area Seamless Transit Task Force to recommend to the Legislature the structure, governance, and funding of the transportation network manager and the organizational structure, governance, and funding for San Francisco Bay area transportation agencies, and other reforms to the San Francisco Bay area’s local, regional, and state public agencies, that should be enacted in future legislation to maximize the effectiveness of the public transit system in the San Francisco Bay area. The bill would require the Secretary of Transportation to convene the task force by April 1, 2021. The bill would require the Metropolitan Transportation Commission to provide staffing to the task force to aid it in the performance of its duties, and would require the Legislative Analyst’s Office to advise the task force in the performance of its duties. The bill would require the task force to submit a report to the Legislature on or before January 1, 2023, of its findings and recommendations and a summary of its activities. The bill would repeal these provisions on January 1, 2027.
(2) Existing law requires the Metropolitan Transportation Commission, in coordination with a specified regional transit coordinating council, to adopt rules and regulations to promote the coordination of fares and schedules for all public transit systems within its jurisdiction.
This bill would require the commission, in consultation with transit agencies, on or before January 1, 2022, (A) to create standardized discount categories and eligibility requirements for fare discount programs for seniors, students, youth, and other rider categories, and (B) to create a multimodal, multiagency pilot program to implement an accumulator pass that may be used with one regional rail agency and at least one transit agency. The bill would require the regional rail agency and the transit agency or agencies selected to participate in the pilot program to offer the accumulator pass to the public on or before July 1, 2022. The bill would require the commission to prepare a plan, on or before July 1, 2023, to deploy the Clipper card payment system on passenger trains operated on the Capitol Corridor and on passenger trains operated by the Altamont Corridor Express. The bill would require the commission, in the next upgrade to the Clipper card payment system, to enable customers to pay for paratransit, parking at transit stations, and employer and educational institution transit discount programs.
The bill would require the commission on or before January 1, 2022, to submit a copy of a specified transit fare study undertaken by the commission to certain committees of the Legislature and the Bay Area Seamless Transit Task Force. The bill would require the commission to submit a report on or before January 1, 2023, to those entities on the progress of implementing the recommendations of that study.
(3) Existing law authorizes the Metropolitan Transportation Commission to improve service coordination and effectiveness in specified transit corridors by recommending improvements in those corridors, including the reduction of duplicative service and institution of coordinated service across public transit system boundaries.
This bill would require the commission, in consultation with transit agencies, on or before July 1, 2023, to develop a comprehensive, standardized regional transit mapping and wayfinding system and to develop an implementation and maintenance strategy and funding plan for deployment of the system.
The bill would require a transit operator in the San Francisco Bay area to use open data standards to make available all routes, schedules, and fares in a specified data format and to track actual transmission of real-time information by transit vehicles and report that information to the commission to ensure that schedule predictions are available. The bill would require the commission to coordinate these activities and to develop an implementation and funding plan for deployment of these capabilities.
(4) The California Global Warming Solutions Act of 2006 establishes the State Air Resources Board as the state agency responsible for monitoring and regulating sources emitting greenhouse gases. The act requires the state board to approve a statewide greenhouse gas emissions limit equivalent to the statewide greenhouse gas emissions level in 1990 to be achieved by 2020 and to ensure that statewide greenhouse gas emissions are reduced to at least 40% below the 1990 level by 2030.
Existing law requires designated regional transportation planning agencies to prepare and adopt a regional transportation plan. Certain of these agencies are also designated under federal law as metropolitan planning organizations. Existing law requires a regional transportation plan to include specified elements, and, if the transportation planning agency is also a metropolitan planning organization, to also include a sustainable communities strategy or alternative planning strategy, which is designed to achieve certain targets for 2020 and 2035 established by the state board for the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions from automobiles and light trucks in the region.
This bill would require the Metropolitan Transportation Commission to develop and adopt targets for reducing vehicle miles traveled per capita and for increasing the travel mode share of public transit and active modes of transportation in the San Francisco Bay area that are consistent with, or exceed, state climate goals and other goals and standards for improving air quality in the region. The bill would require the commission to develop a comprehensive set of performance indicators for those targets, and would require the commission to annually report to the Transportation Agency and the state board on the progress the region is making towards meeting those targets.
The bill would require the commission to establish a capital project development review process on or before January 1, 2023, and, as part of the process to, among other things, specify the project deliverables that will be evaluated to determine if a project is eligible to be included in the regional transportation plan or to receive an allocation of state or regional funds.
(5) Existing law authorizes a regional transportation agency or the Department of Transportation to apply to the California Transportation Commission to develop and operate high-occupancy toll lanes or other toll facilities.
The bill would require, on or before January 1, 2022, the Metropolitan Transportation Commission, in partnership with the Department of Transportation and the operators of managed lanes in the San Francisco Bay area, to take specified steps to ensure the regional managed lanes network supports seamless operation of high-capacity transit.
(6) By imposing new duties on local agencies, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program.
(7) The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.
This bill would provide that, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that the bill contains costs mandated by the state, reimbursement for those costs shall be made pursuant to the statutory provisions noted above.

Existing law creates the Metropolitan Transportation Commission as a local area planning agency for the 9-county San Francisco Bay area with comprehensive regional transportation planning and other related responsibilities. Existing law creates various transit districts located in the San Francisco Bay area, with specified powers and duties relative to providing public transit services.

This bill would state the intent of the Legislature to later enact legislation relating to public transportation in the 9-county San Francisco Bay area.

Vote: MAJORITY   Appropriation: NO   Fiscal Committee: NOYES   Local Program: NOYES  

The people of the State of California do enact as follows:


SECTION 1.

 This act shall be known, and may be cited, as the Bay Area Seamless Transit Act.

SEC. 2.

 (a) The Legislature finds and declares all of the following:
(1) Transit connectivity and integration in the San Francisco Bay area has been a longstanding challenge that has discouraged transit usage.
(2) Legislative efforts to mandate and incentivize coordination between the disparate transit agencies date back to 1996 and earlier.
(3) As identified in the 2015 San Francisco Bay Area Planning and Urban Research Association report, Seamless Transit, transit in the San Francisco Bay area is plagued by many coordination issues, including:
(A) An inconsistent, poorly connected transit network with major gaps resulting from fragmented planning and decisionmaking without an overarching regional vision for integration.
(B) A lack of sufficient or quality customer information about how to make multioperator trips, deterring potential riders; each transit agency has a unique nomenclature to describe its services, vehicles, and wayfinding.
(C) Poorly designed transit hubs have not been designed to facilitate transfers, where connecting from one operator to another can present complex navigational challenges, difficult walks, or long waits.
(D) Fare structures and transit passes that differ from agency to agency, discouraging riders from making multiagency trips and financially penalizing riders using more than one transit agency.
(E) A limited fare payment system that limits opportunities for integration and innovation.
(4) Low-income people, many of whom have experienced displacement and have long commutes requiring multiple transit services, are among the most adversely affected by the San Francisco Bay area’s poorly integrated public transportation system, experiencing a significant financial burden from needing to pay multiple separate transit fares or being forced into costly vehicle ownership.
(5) As of 2017, only 4 percent of all trips in the San Francisco Bay area were made using transit. Per-capita transit ridership in the San Francisco Bay area decreased 12 percent between 1991 and 2016.
(6) Since 1970, 12 percent or fewer San Francisco Bay area commuters have used transit for commute trips. Since 1979, car travel has comprised at least 75 percent of commute trips and two-thirds of car commuters in the San Francisco Bay area travel alone in their vehicles.
(7) Transit ridership in the San Francisco Bay area declined 5 percent between 2016 and 2018. Between 2001 and 2016, average bus speeds declined 9 percent. Between 2006 and 2016 the length of the average commute on transit increased by more than 5 minutes to over 50 minutes.
(8) Increasing transit ridership is critical to meeting the state’s greenhouse gas reduction goals and alleviating the effects of climate change. Transportation is responsible for 40 percent of state greenhouse gas emissions.
(b) It is the intent of the Legislature to support the creation of a high-ridership, reliable, accessible, and seamlessly integrated public transportation system in the nine-county San Francisco Bay area.
(c) It is the intent of the Legislature to require future regional funds for public transportation in the San Francisco Bay area to be conditioned on advancing institutional reforms that improve accountability and establish a seamlessly integrated regional transit system.

SEC. 3.

 It is the intent of the Legislature to enact subsequent legislation that would do all of the following:
(a) Create a Transportation Network Manager for the nine-county San Francisco Bay area based on the recommendations of the Bay Area Seamless Transit Task Force submitted to the Legislature pursuant to Section 13985 of the Government Code.
(b) Require the Transportation Network Manager to do all of the following:
(1) Integrate all aspects of public transit within the San Francisco Bay area and provide leadership and accountability in planning, coordinating, and financing the seamless transportation network.
(2) Develop a long-range plan, that would be known as the Seamless Transit Strategic Plan or the Seamless Strategic Plan, focused on attaining the strategic policy direction described in Section 66501 of the Government Code and specific travel mode share and vehicle miles traveled targets adopted pursuant to Section 66533 of the Government Code.
(3) Coordinate the development of the Seamless Strategic Plan with development of the sustainable communities strategy adopted pursuant to Section 65080 of the Government Code.
(4) Include all of the following in the Seamless Strategic Plan:
(A) A frequent rapid transit network plan. For purposes of this paragraph, a “frequent rapid transit network plan” means a long-range regional plan for the strategic build-out and operation of a multimodal high-ridership transit network, identifying an interconnected network of key rapid transit corridors throughout the San Francisco Bay area that makes rapid, reliable, seamlessly integrated transit service widely accessible throughout the region, particularly to low-income and disadvantaged communities.
(B) A phased investment plan.
(C) A regional plan for transit priority on state and local roads in the frequent rapid transit network throughout the San Francisco Bay area to ensure that transit and other high-capacity vehicles can travel efficiently. The regional plan would include a plan for managed lanes, in partnership with the Department of Transportation and managed lane operators, to ensure an efficient regional express lane network for high-capacity transit.
(5) Establish and oversee the following regional standards that are consistent with, or exceed, any state standards on the same subject:
(A) Transit quality of service standards, including speed, frequency, reliability, and timing of connections along a frequent rapid transit network.
(B) Transit customer experience standards.
(C) Customer information, wayfinding, and branding standards.
(D) Integrated transit fare standards.
(E) Multimodal corridor, transit hub, and transit station design standards.
(F) Project delivery, cost estimation, and risk management standards.
(G) Mobility data and integration standards.
(H) Accessible mobility standards.

SEC. 4.

 Section 13985 is added to the Government Code, immediately following Section 13984, to read:

13985.
 (a) For purposes of this section, the following definitions apply:
(1) “Bay area” means the region comprised of the City and County of San Francisco and the Counties of Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, Napa, San Mateo, Santa Clara, Solano, and Sonoma.
(2) “Centers of Excellence” means concentrations of staff, financial, professional, and other resources that provide leadership, best practices, research, support, training, and efficient delivery for the entire bay area.
(3) “Clipper Executive Board” means the board formed by a memorandum of understanding between MTC and bay area transit agencies to establish goals, a budget, and workplan for the Clipper card payment system and to provide policy, oversight, direction, and authorization of business matters for the Clipper card payment system.
(4) “MTC” means the Metropolitan Transportation Commission.
(5) “Network manager” means the Transportation Network Manager described in Section 3 of the act adding this section, which the Legislature intends to create in subsequent legislation in the future.
(6) “Task force” means the Bay Area Seamless Transit Task Force.
(7) “Transportation agencies” means all public agencies involved in the planning, regulation, or provision of transportation in the bay area, including public transit agencies, county transportation authorities, congestion management authorities, the Metropolitan Transportation Commission, the Department of Transportation, and, where applicable, municipalities located in the bay area that oversee use of public rights-of-way used for transportation.
(b) (1) There is hereby established a Bay Area Seamless Transit Task Force to do both of the following:
(A) Recommend the organizational structure, governance, and funding for bay area transportation agencies, and other reforms to the bay area’s local, regional, and state public agencies, that should be enacted in future legislation to maximize the effectiveness of the public transit system in the bay area.
(B) Recommend the structure, governance, and funding of the network manager.
(2) MTC shall, and the Clipper Executive Board may, provide staffing to the task force to aid it in the performance of its duties. The task force may also hire additional staff to aid it in the performance of its duties.
(3) The Legislative Analyst’s Office shall advise the task force in the performance of its duties.
(c) (1) The task force shall consist of 19 members who shall be appointed as follows and confirmed by the secretary pursuant to paragraph (2):
(A) One member representing the Transportation Agency, appointed by the secretary.
(B) One member appointed by the Governor.
(C) One member appointed by the President pro Tempore of the Senate.
(D) One member appointed by the Speaker of the Assembly.
(E) Three members who are bay area local elected officials, appointed by MTC, including at least one member from either the City of San Jose, the City of Oakland, or the City and County of San Francisco.
(F) Three members representing public transit operators in the bay area, appointed by the Clipper Executive Board, including at least one representative of bus operators and one representative of rail operators.
(G) Two members representing county transportation agencies in the bay area, appointed by the directors of the county transportation agencies in the bay area. For purposes of this subparagraph, “county transportation agency” means the agency responsible for preparing and implementing the congestion management program in the county, except for the County of San Mateo, in which case “county transportation agency” means the San Mateo County Transportation Authority.
(H) Two members who are technical experts, appointed jointly by MTC and the Clipper Executive Board, with relevant national or international expertise, or both, in fields including, but not limited to, public transit operations, finance, scheduling, procurement, project delivery, capital project management, planning, or governance. MTC and the Clipper Executive Board may appoint a technical expert who is not a citizen of the United States or a resident of the bay area. MTC and the Clipper Executive Board shall not appoint a technical expert who is employed by MTC or a bay area transit operator.
(I) Four members who are bay area residents appointed by MTC as follows:
(i) Two members representing low-income transit riders, residents of communities of concern designated by MTC, or persons with disabilities, or any combination of these groups.
(ii) One member representing the bay area business community.
(iii) One member representing transit riders from a sustainable transportation advocacy organization.
(J) One member representing bay area organized labor, appointed by the Governor.
(2) The secretary shall confirm each member appointed pursuant to paragraph (1).
(3) The secretary shall convene the task force by April 1, 2021.
(4) The secretary shall appoint a chair and vice chair from the membership of the task force.
(5) The task force shall establish an executive committee of four to eight members of the task force, which may meet more often than the task force.
(d) The task force shall study the collective and individual performance of existing agencies and funding sources that impact the planning, delivery, and operations of transportation in the bay area and shall recommend institutional and funding reforms in the report required pursuant to subdivision (f) that would enable seamless integration of all forms of transportation in the bay area.
(e) The task force shall do all of the following and shall summarize the results of these activities in its report to the Legislature required pursuant to subdivision (f):
(1) Identify the goals of the bay area’s multimodal transportation system.
(2) Consult with a wide variety of bay area residents and workers to understand public goals and expectations for a multimodal, regionally integrated, user-centered, and equitable transportation system.
(3) Investigate worldwide institutional best practices of metropolitan regions with high-performing, competitive, regionally integrated transportation systems, including associated governance systems.
(4) Recommend an agency to be designated as the network manager in future subsequent legislation. The task force may recommend an existing, modified, or new public agency to be designated as the network manager. If the task force recommends the creation of a new public agency to be designated as the network manager, the task force shall also recommend at least one transportation agency in the bay area to be incorporated into the new public agency.
(5) Assess the effectiveness and adequacy of the governance structures of existing transportation agencies in the bay area, collectively and individually, and recommend improved governance structures for any existing entities, the network manager recommended pursuant to paragraph (4), and the region’s transportation system as a whole.
(6) Assess the effectiveness of MTC in achieving its current mandate and recommend governance changes to support the realization of a multimodal, regionally integrated, user-centered, and equitable transportation system.
(7) Recommend a governance system or process that enables integrated fares, such as a zone-based system or integrated passes for express bus, rail, and ferries.
(8) Recommend a governance system or new process for transit operator route and schedule coordination.
(9) Recommend strategies to develop a qualified and adequate workforce of transit workers to fulfill the needs of an integrated, high-ridership transit system.
(10) Recommend a governance system or process improvements to the project delivery process to allow projects to be delivered on time and in a cost-effective manner.
(11) Identify functions that are provided separately across agencies that could be consolidated into fewer agencies or a single agency.
(12) Explore the potential for establishing Centers of Excellence. Centers of Excellence should serve the collective needs of transportation agencies, jurisdictions, or other public entities in the bay area, and should provide higher quality and more efficient service than if transit agencies were to pursue these focus areas independently.
(13) Analyze institutional mergers, consolidations, or dissolutions, or any combination of these things, of agencies that could be implemented to promote better customer outcomes and improved access. The task force shall consider creating a single regional rail operator, and whether any transit operator consolidations would provide a benefit to riders.
(14) Ensure that connectivity and transit rider perspectives are built into the recommendations for planning and design phases of capital projects.
(15) Evaluate the optimal structure and authority for the network manager described in paragraph (4) and the appropriate accountability and enforcement levers for further transit integrations to support the creation of a seamless regional transportation system.
(16) Identify what authority the network manager described in paragraph (4) should have in order to raise revenue for public transit.
(17) Recommend additional strategies to minimize unnecessary bureaucracy or institutional layers that contribute to poor coordination, high costs, and inefficiency.
(18) Evaluate what role the network manager should play in guiding the evolution of emerging forms of mobility, including transportation network companies, autonomous vehicles, and other private sector mobility providers.
(19) Evaluate actions and changes in authority and governance needed for managed lanes and other transit priority lanes in order to establish consistent operations, design standards, pricing policies, violation rules, penalties, enforcement tools, and occupancy requirements.
(20) Recommend actions to ensure that future regional funding is conditioned on advancing institutional reforms that improve accountability and establish a seamlessly integrated regional transit system.
(21) Develop a timeline for implementation of reforms that recognizes the urgency of addressing the state’s climate crisis.
(f) (1) The task force shall submit a report of its findings and recommendations and a summary of its activities to the Legislature consistent with the requirements of this section on or before January 1, 2023.
(2) A report to be submitted pursuant to paragraph (1) shall be submitted in compliance with Section 9795.
(3) Pursuant to Section 10231.5, this section is repealed on January 1, 2027.

SEC. 5.

 Section 66501 is added to the Government Code, to read:

66501.
 The Legislature finds and declares that it is the policy of the state that all transportation agencies in the region, including the commission, congestion management agencies, and transit agencies, work towards the following goals:
(a) Integrate all transit in the region to operate as one seamless, easy-to-use, multimodal transit system from the perspective of the user.
(b) Create an integrated system of transit that is simple, fair, and affordable for users.
(c) Equitably expand and improve access to high-quality, reliable public transportation.
(d) Prioritize institutional reforms that support the creation of a more seamless public transportation network.

SEC. 6.

 Section 66502 of the Government Code is amended to read:

66502.
 (a) There is hereby created, as a local area planning agency and not as a part of the executive branch of the state government, the Metropolitan Transportation Commission to provide comprehensive regional transportation planning for the region comprised of the City and County of San Francisco and the Counties of Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, Napa, San Mateo, Santa Clara, Solano, and Sonoma.

As used in this title, “region” means the region described in this section.

(b) For purposes of this title, the following definitions apply:
(1) “Commission” means the Metropolitan Transportation Commission.
(2) “Region” means the region described in subdivision (a).
(3) “Transit agency” means a public agency that provides transit service and charges fares for transit service in the region.

SEC. 7.

 Section 66513.1 is added to the Government Code, to read:

66513.1.
 (a) On or before January 1, 2023, the commission shall establish a capital project development review process for transit projects to improve practices in project delivery, align all stakeholders, and control project risks. In establishing the capital project development review process, the commission shall do both of the following:
(1) Prepare and publish guidance documents for the development of cost estimates, business cases, and deliverability assessments and all other materials to be evaluated in standardized review stages so that submissions of cost estimates, business cases, and deliverability assessments and other materials are consistent and comparable for a range of potential capital investment options.
(2) Specify the project deliverables that will be evaluated to determine if a project is eligible to be included in the regional transportation plan or to receive an allocation of state or regional funds.
(b) For purposes of this section, “business case” means a comprehensive collection of evidence and analysis that sets out the rationale for why an investment should be implemented to solve a problem or address an opportunity.

SEC. 8.

 Section 66513.3 is added to the Government Code, to read:

66513.3.
 On or before January 1, 2022, the commission shall, in partnership with the Department of Transportation and the operators of managed lanes in the region, take the following steps to ensure the regional managed lanes network in the region supports seamless operation of high-capacity transit:
(a) Develop regional policy goals and performance measures and targets that will guide decisionmaking for the build-out and operation of the regional managed lanes network.
(b) Initiate a process with the Department of Transportation and the Department of the California Highway Patrol to establish a range of approaches for delivering uncongested bus priority lanes through congested or constrained freeway segments while minimizing the need to expand freeway rights-of-way.
(c) Submit a report recommending changes to state and federal law that would support a more efficient and sustainable regional managed lanes network and regional high-capacity transit to the Senate Committee on Transportation, the Assembly Committee on Transportation, and the Bay Area Seamless Transit Task Force established by Section 13985.

SEC. 9.

 Section 66516.1 is added to the Government Code, to read:

66516.1.
 (a) The Legislature finds and declares both of the following:
(1) Transit riders in the region face a confusing array of fares, significant variability in price for the same distance and transit mode, 16 different youth discount rates, and 14 different senior discount rates.
(2) While many transit agencies’ discount programs aim to advance equity and expand access to disadvantaged populations, the lack of an integrated fare structure punishes low-income riders who commute across transit agency boundaries.
(b) It is the intent of the Legislature that the commission provide a predictable, equitable, and seamless experience for residents of, and visitors to, the region.
(c) (1) On or before January 1, 2022, the commission shall submit a copy of the study entitled the Transit Fare Coordination and Integration Study to the Senate Committee on Transportation, the Assembly Committee on Transportation, and the Bay Area Seamless Transit Task Force established by Section 13985.
(2) The commission shall submit a report on or before January 1, 2023, to the Senate Committee on Transportation and the Assembly Committee on Transportation on the progress of implementing the recommendations included in the study entitled the Transit Fare Coordination and Integration Study.
(d) The commission, in consultation with transit agencies, shall do both of the following on or before January 1, 2022:
(1) Create standardized discount categories and eligibility requirements for fare discount programs for seniors, students, youth, and other rider categories. Each transit agency shall use the discount categories and eligibility requirements when offering fare discount programs.
(2) Create a multimodal, multiagency pilot program to implement an accumulator pass that may be used with one regional rail agency and at least one transit agency that has an average daily weekday ridership of more than 20,000 riders. The commission shall select the regional rail agency and transit agency or agencies to participate in the program. The regional rail agency and the transit agency or agencies selected to participate in the pilot program shall offer the accumulator pass to the public on or before July 1, 2022.
(e) For purposes of this section, the following definitions apply:
(1) “Accumulator pass” means a fare product that charges users for their transit usage on a per-trip basis, but limits total user costs to a daily, weekly, or monthly maximum amount, with the goal of incentivizing frequent transit use.
(2) “Regional rail agency” means either the San Francisco Bay Area Rapid Transit District or the Peninsula Corridor Joint Powers Board (Caltrain).

SEC. 10.

 Section 66516.3 is added to the Government Code, to read:

66516.3.
 (a) The Legislature finds and declares that existing and potential transit riders in the region deserve a simple payment method for transit fares and related expenses, such as parking payments.
(b) To enable regional rail customers to easily transfer to transit services in the region, the commission shall prepare a plan, on or before July 1, 2023, to deploy the Clipper card payment system on passenger trains operated on the Capitol Corridor and on passenger trains operated by the Altamont Corridor Express. The plan shall include, but not be limited to, an operational element, a capital element, a funding element, a list of roles and responsibilities, and an implementation schedule.
(c) The commission shall, in the next upgrade to the Clipper card payment system, enable customers to pay for paratransit, parking at transit stations, and employer and educational institution transit discount programs. The commission shall ensure that the Clipper card payment system can integrate payments for new transportation-related services.

SEC. 11.

 Section 66517.3 is added to the Government Code, to read:

66517.3.
 (a) The Legislature finds and declares both of the following:
(1) The lack of a universal regional transit map and common wayfinding format at transit stops and stations in the region adds to the fragmented experience transit riders encounter, especially when planning a trip with multiple transit operators.
(2) Research has shown that the way transit lines and stations are shown on maps strongly influences how travelers use the system.
(b) The commission, in consultation with transit agencies, shall, on or before July 1, 2023, do both of the following:
(1) Develop a comprehensive, standardized regional transit mapping and wayfinding system, including common branding for regional transit service and a shared digital mapping platform. Standards and resources shall be developed to display this information on print, digital, and interactive media. The system shall identify the standards that are required and the standards that allow for customization.
(2) Develop an implementation and maintenance strategy and funding plan to deploy the comprehensive, standardized regional transit mapping and wayfinding system. The commission may adopt a phased deployment of the system.
(c) Each transit agency shall use the comprehensive, standardized regional transit mapping and wayfinding system by July 1, 2024, unless the commission requires a transit agency to use the system at an earlier date pursuant to a phased deployment adopted pursuant to paragraph (2) of subdivision (b).

SEC. 12.

 Section 66533 is added to the Government Code, to read:

66533.
 (a) The commission shall develop and adopt targets for reducing vehicle miles traveled per capita and for increasing the travel mode share of public transit and active modes of transportation for the region that are consistent with, or exceed, state climate goals and other goals and standards for improving air quality in the region.
(b) The commission shall develop a comprehensive set of performance indicators for the targets adopted pursuant to subdivision (a), and the performance indicators shall be approved by the Transportation Agency and the State Air Resources Board.
(c) The commission shall annually report to the Transportation Agency and the State Air Resources Board on the progress the region is making towards meeting the targets adopted pursuant to subdivision (a). The Transportation Agency and the State Air Resources Board shall verify the adequacy of the report and make recommendations to the commission on how to achieve the targets adopted pursuant to subdivision (a).
(d) The commission may submit the annual report required by subdivision (c) to the Transportation Agency or the State Air Resources Board as part of any other annual report that it is required to submit to either of those agencies.

SEC. 13.

 Section 99177 is added to the Public Utilities Code, to read:

99177.
 (a) The Legislature finds and declares all of the following:
(1) Various studies have shown that the wait time at a transit stop is the most inconvenient part of the transit journey experience.
(2) Despite best efforts by the transit operators to adhere to their published schedules, the conditions on the roadway, including congestion and other unplanned delays, create unpredictability for on-time arrivals.
(3) The development of technology enabling real-time transit information, including arrival and departure predictions, vehicle locations, occupancy, and service alerts, has created an opportunity for transit agencies to alleviate the wait-time frustrations.
(4) Dissemination of standardized real-time data by transit operators and use of that data by third-party applications used by transit riders are the key ingredients of that process.
(5) Transit riders should have access to consistent and uniform real-time information across all transit services in the San Francisco Bay area.
(b) A transit operator in the San Francisco Bay area shall, on or before January 1, 2022, do all of the following:
(1) Use open data standards to make available all routes, schedules, and fares in the General Transit Feed Specification (GTFS) data format.
(2) Make real-time transit vehicle data available in GTFS-Realtime.
(3) Track actual transmission of real-time information by transit vehicles and report that information to the Metropolitan Transportation Commission to ensure that schedule predictions are available.
(c) The Metropolitan Transportation Commission shall coordinate the activities of transit operators pursuant to subdivision (b), serve as the point of contact for data development and dissemination to third parties, and develop an implementation and funding plan for deployment of real-time information.
(d) For purposes of this section, “San Francisco Bay area” means the region comprised of the City and County of San Francisco and the Counties of Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, Napa, San Mateo, Santa Clara, Solano, and Sonoma.

SEC. 14.

 If the Commission on State Mandates determines that this act contains costs mandated by the state, reimbursement to local agencies and school districts for those costs shall be made pursuant to Part 7 (commencing with Section 17500) of Division 4 of Title 2 of the Government Code.
SECTION 1.

It is the intent of the Legislature to later enact legislation that would do all of the following:

(a)Require future regional funds for public transportation in the nine-county San Francisco Bay area to be conditioned on advancing institutional reforms that improve accountability and establish a seamlessly integrated regional transit system, so that these funds are responsibly spent and advance state mobility and environmental goals.

(b)Integrate all transit in the region to operate as one seamless, easy-to-use, multimodal transit system from the perspective of the user.

(c)Create an integrated system of transit that is simple, fair, and affordable for users.

(d)Equitably expand and improve access to high-quality, reliable public transportation.

(e)Prioritize institutional reforms that support the creation of a more seamless public transportation network.