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AB-2001 Alzheimer’s Disease and Dementia Caregiver pilot program.(2019-2020)

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Date Published: 01/28/2020 09:00 PM
AB2001:v99#DOCUMENT


CALIFORNIA LEGISLATURE— 2019–2020 REGULAR SESSION

Assembly Bill
No. 2001


Introduced by Assembly Member Nazarian

January 28, 2020


An act to add and repeal Article 4.5 (commencing with Section 9125) of Chapter 2 of Division 8.5 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, relating to dementia.


LEGISLATIVE COUNSEL'S DIGEST


AB 2001, as introduced, Nazarian. Alzheimer’s Disease and Dementia Caregiver pilot program.
Existing law, the Mello-Granlund Older Californians Act, reflects the policy mandates and directives of the Older Americans Act of 1965, as amended, and sets forth the state’s commitment to its older population and other populations served by the programs administered by the California Department of Aging.
This bill would require the department, upon appropriation by the Legislature, to establish and administer the Alzheimer’s Disease and Dementia Caregiver Pilot Program, a 3-year pilot program, to support expanded access to evidence-based or evidence-derived dementia caregiver education programs, and to perform specified duties, including prioritizing innovative proposals seeking to reach specified communities, and awarding grants. The bill would repeal these provisions on January 1, 2026.
Vote: MAJORITY   Appropriation: NO   Fiscal Committee: YES   Local Program: NO  

The people of the State of California do enact as follows:


SECTION 1.

 (a) The Legislature hereby finds and declares that unpaid family caregivers are unsung heroes of our nation’s long-term care system. They often provide selfless care while facing increased financial burden, emotional stress, and negative impacts on their health. Investing in education, support, and resources for family caregivers is an integral part of Alzheimer’s care and services. The following are examples of Alzheimer’s caregiver education programs currently being used in the state:
(1) Savvy Caregiver® is a successful, evidence-based educational program, designed to train family caregivers in the basic knowledge, skills, and attitudes needed to handle the stress of caring for family members with Alzheimer’s disease. Research has demonstrated the program’s ability to reduce caregiver depression and burden, improve caregivers’ willingness to use support groups and other community services, and enhance family caregivers’ effectiveness as managers of their relatives’ illness and the associated behavioral symptoms.
(2) Savvy Caregiver Express®, a condensed version of the original evidence-based program, was specifically revised to make it more accessible, particularly to working caregivers. Similar to a study of the original six-session program, an evaluation of the Savvy Caregiver Express® pilot found statistically significant positive outcomes for caregivers who participated in the program with respect to the caregivers’ reactions to the behavioral symptoms of their care recipient, and their feelings of depression and anxiety. Savvy Caregiver Express® is delivered in three two-hour sessions.
(b) It is the intent of the Legislature to enact legislation that would require the California Department of Aging to establish and administer the Alzheimer’s Disease and Dementia Caregiver Pilot Program to support expanded access to evidence-based or evidence-derived dementia caregiver education programs, and to educate trainers in order to build the state’s capacity to deliver those programs.

SEC. 2.

 Article 4.5 (commencing with Section 9125) is added to Chapter 2 of Division 8.5 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, to read:
Article  4.5. Alzheimer’s Disease and Dementia Caregiver Pilot Program

9125.
 (a) Upon appropriation by the Legislature for this purpose, the California Department of Aging shall establish and administer the Alzheimer’s Disease and Dementia Caregiver Pilot Program, a comprehensive three-year pilot program, to support expanded access to evidence-based or evidence-derived dementia caregiver education programs, and to educate trainers in order to build the state’s capacity to deliver those programs.
(b) The department shall do all of the following:
(1) Prioritize innovative proposals seeking to reach underserved and hard-to-reach communities.
(2) Consider proposals seeking to linguistically and culturally translate existing programs or to develop new programs for underserved communities.
(3) Award grants, ranging from fifty thousand dollars ($50,000) to five hundred thousand dollars ($500,000), to 10 sites located in urban and rural regions throughout the state.

9126.
 This article shall remain in effect only until January 1, 2026, and as of that date is repealed.