Today's Law As Amended


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SB-331 Settlement and nondisparagement agreements.(2021-2022)



As Amends the Law Today


SECTION 1.

 Section 1001 of the Code of Civil Procedure is amended to read:

1001.
 (a) Notwithstanding any other law, a provision within a settlement agreement that prevents or restricts  the disclosure of factual information related to a claim filed in a civil action or a complaint filed in an administrative action, regarding any of the following, is prohibited:
(1) An act of sexual assault that is not governed by subdivision (a) of Section 1002.
(2) An act of sexual harassment, as defined in Section 51.9 of the Civil Code.
(3) An act of workplace harassment or discrimination based on sex, or  discrimination,  failure to prevent an act of workplace harassment or discrimination based on sex  discrimination,  or an act of retaliation against a person for reporting or opposing  harassment or discrimination based on sex,  discrimination,  as described in subdivisions (a),  (h), (i), (j), and (k) of Section 12940 of the Government Code.
(4) An act of harassment or discrimination based on sex,  discrimination,  or an act of retaliation against a person for reporting harassment or discrimination based on sex,  by the owner of a housing accommodation, as described in Section 12955 of the Government Code.
(b) Notwithstanding any other law, in a civil matter described in paragraphs (1) to (4), inclusive, of subdivision (a), a court shall not enter, by stipulation or otherwise, an order that restricts the disclosure of information in a manner that conflicts with subdivision (a).
(c) Notwithstanding subdivision subdivisions  (a) and (b), a provision that shields the identity of the claimant and all facts that could lead to the discovery of his or her  the claimant’s  identity, including pleadings filed in court, may be included within a settlement agreement at the request of the claimant. This subdivision does not apply if a government agency or public official is a party to the settlement agreement.
(d) Except as authorized by subdivision (c), a provision within a settlement agreement that prevents or restricts  the disclosure of factual information related to the claim described in subdivision (a) that is entered into on or after January 1, 2019, is void as a matter of law and against public policy.
(e) This section does not prohibit the entry or enforcement of a provision in any agreement that precludes the disclosure of the amount paid in settlement of a claim.
(f) In determining the factual foundation of a cause of action for civil damages under subdivision (a), a court may consider the pleadings and other papers in the record, or any other findings of the court.
(g) The amendments made to subparagraphs (3) and (4) of subdivision (a) by Senate Bill 331 of the 2021–22 Regular Session apply only to agreements entered into on or after January 1, 2022. All other amendments made to this section by Senate Bill 331 of the 2021-22 Regular Session shall not be construed as substantive changes, but instead as merely clarifying existing law.

SEC. 2.

 Section 12964.5 of the Government Code is amended to read:

12964.5.
 (a) (1)   It is an unlawful employment practice for an employer, in exchange for a raise or bonus, or as a condition of employment or continued employment, to do either of the following:
(1) (A)  (A) (i)  For an employer to require an employee to sign a release of a claim or right under this part.
(B) (ii)  As used in this section, subparagraph,  “release of a  claim or right” includes requiring an individual to execute a statement that he or she  the individual  does not possess any claim or injury against the employer or other covered entity, and includes the release of a right to file and pursue a civil action or complaint with, or otherwise notify, a state agency, other public prosecutor, law enforcement agency, or any court or other governmental entity.
(2) (B)  (A) (i)  For an employer to require an employee to sign a nondisparagement agreement or other document that purports  to deny the  the extent it has the purpose or effect of denying the  employee the right to disclose information about unlawful acts in the workplace, including, but not limited to, sexual harassment. workplace. 
(ii) A nondisparagement or other contractual provision that restricts an employee’s ability to disclose information related to conditions in the workplace shall include, in substantial form, the following language: “Nothing in this agreement prevents you from discussing or disclosing information about unlawful acts in the workplace, such as harassment or discrimination or any other conduct that you have reason to believe is unlawful.”
(2) Any agreement or document in violation of this subdivision is contrary to public policy and shall be unenforceable.
(b) (1) (A) It is an unlawful employment practice for an employer or former employer to include in any agreement related to an employee’s separation from employment any provision that prohibits the disclosure of information about unlawful acts in the workplace.
(B) A nondisparagement or other contractual provision that restricts an employee’s ability to disclose information related to conditions in the workplace shall include, in substantial form, the following language: “Nothing in this agreement prevents you from discussing or disclosing information about unlawful acts in the workplace, such as harassment or discrimination or any other conduct that you have reason to believe is unlawful.”
(2) Any provision in violation of paragraph (1) is against public policy and shall be unenforceable.
(3) This subdivision does not prohibit the inclusion of a general release or waiver of all claims in an agreement related to an employee’s separation from employment, provided that the release or waiver is otherwise lawful and valid.
(4) An employer offering an employee or former employee an agreement related to that employee’s separation from employment as provided in this subdivision shall notify the employee that the employee has a right to consult an attorney regarding the agreement and shall provide the employee with a reasonable time period of not less than five business days in which to do so. An employee may sign such an agreement prior to the end of the reasonable time period as long as the employee’s decision to accept such shortening of time is knowing and voluntary and is not induced by the employer through fraud, misrepresentation, or a threat to withdraw or alter the offer prior to the expiration of the reasonable time period, or by providing different terms to employees who sign such an agreement prior to the expiration of such time period.
(B) (c)  For purposes of this paragraph, As used in this section,  “information about unlawful acts in the workplace” includes, but is not limited to, information pertaining to sexual  harassment or any other unlawful or potentially unlawful conduct. discrimination or any other conduct that the employee has reasonable cause to believe is unlawful. 
(b) Any agreement or document in violation of this section is contrary to public policy and shall be unenforceable.
(c) (d)  (1) This section does not apply to a negotiated settlement agreement to resolve an underlying claim under this part that has been filed by an employee in court, before an administrative agency, in an  alternative dispute resolution forum, or through an employer’s internal complaint process.
(2) As used in this section, “negotiated” means that the agreement is voluntary, deliberate, and informed, the agreement  provides consideration of value to the employee, and that the employee is given notice and an opportunity to retain an attorney or is represented by an attorney.
(e) This section does not prohibit the entry or enforcement of a provision in any agreement that precludes the disclosure of the amount paid in a severance agreement.
(f) This section does not prohibit an employer from protecting the employer’s trade secrets, proprietary information, or confidential information that does not involve unlawful acts in the workplace.