Today's Law As Amended

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AB-64 Cannabis: licensure and regulation.(2017-2018)



SECTION 1.
 The Legislature finds and declares all of the following:
(a) In 1996, California became the first state in the nation to allow the use of medicinal cannabis after voters approved Proposition 215, the California Compassionate Use Act. In 2003, California enacted Senate Bill 420, the Medical Marijuana Program Act, which allowed the medicinal cannabis industry to organize as collectives and cooperatives, and provided limited protections from prosecution. In 2015, California enacted the Medical Cannabis Regulation and Safety Act (MCRSA), by passing Assembly Bill 266 (Bonta, Cooley, Jones-Sawyer, Lackey, and Wood), Assembly Bill 243 (Wood), and Senate Bill 643 (McGuire). The Medical Cannabis Regulation and Safety Act was the first proactive regulatory framework for medicinal cannabis in the state’s history. The MCRSA was revised in 2016 with the passage of Senate Bill 837 and Assembly Bill 2516, which made changes to implement the act and create a new cottage cultivation license.
(b) In 2016, two decades after the approval of Proposition 215, California voters approved Proposition 64, the Control, Regulate and Tax Adult Use of Marijuana Act (AUMA). The regulatory system contained within AUMA was modeled after the MCRSA, as approved by the Legislature in 2015, but contained policy differences and did not reflect legislative amendments made to the MCRSA prior to AUMA’s approval. Both acts require state licenses to be issued by the Department of Consumer Affairs, the Department of Food and Agriculture, and the State Department of Public Health, and both require compliance with local ordinances regulating commercial cannabis activity.
(c) AUMA directs the state to begin issuing licenses to businesses in the adult use cannabis industry by January 1, 2018, despite having only been approved by the voters on November 8, 2016. This is an aggressive timeline for implementation given that it leaves state licensing authorities with less than 14 months to engage in the stakeholder process, determine how to regulate the adult-use cannabis industry and to what extent these regulations should differ from those they develop for the medicinal cannabis industry, and begin issuing multiple types of licenses under AUMA and the MCRSA, two systems with significant policy differences.
(d) The Blue Ribbon Commission report published on July 22, 2015, highlighted the benefits and drawbacks of a unitary, reconciled system for regulating medicinal and adult-use cannabis, suggesting that under such a system regulated businesses can reach the entire market of both adult-use and medicinal consumers under one set of licenses, which would help reduce the costs of compliance with regulations and enable the businesses to remain competitive with the illicit market.
(e) Robust standards for the cultivation, manufacturing, testing, distribution, and transportation of cannabis are required under both the MCRSA and AUMA and should be uniform in order to protect communities, the environment, public safety, and patients, while easing the transition for business.
(f) Senate Bill 94 reconciled the Medical Cannabis Regulation and Safety Act and the Control, Regulate and Tax Adult Use of Marijuana Act and provided uniform standards for both medicinal and adult-use cannabis activity.
(g) AUMA provides for amendment by the Legislature when consistent with and furthering the intent and text of the initiative. Creating a viable regulatory structure for both medical and adult use, which this act does, is core to and furthers that intent.
(h) It is the intent of the Legislature that this act continue the reconciliation of the Medical Cannabis Regulation and Safety Act and the Control, Regulate and Tax Adult Use of Marijuana Act in order to protect public safety, communities, patients, consumers, and the environment.

SEC. 2.

 Section 14235.5 is added to the Business and Professions Code, to read:

14235.5.
 (a) Notwithstanding Section 14235, for purposes of marks for which a certificate of registration is issued on or after January 1, 2018, the following classifications may be used for marks related to cannabis, including medicinal cannabis, goods and services that are lawfully in commerce under state law in the State of California:
(1) 500 for goods that are cannabis or cannabis products, including medicinal cannabis or medicinal cannabis products.
(2) 501 for services related to cannabis or cannabis products, including medicinal cannabis or medicinal cannabis products.
(b) For purposes of this
section, “cannabis,” “cannabis products,” medicinal cannabis,” and “medicinal cannabis products” have the meanings provided in Section 26001.

SEC. 3.

 Section 26001 of the Business and Professions Code, as amended by Section 5 of Senate Bill 94 of the 2017–18 Regular Session, is amended to read:

26001.
 For purposes of this division, the following definitions shall apply:
(a) “A-license” means a state license issued under this division for cannabis or cannabis products that are intended for adults who are 21 years of age and older over  and who do not possess a  physician’s recommendation. recommendations. 
(b) “A-licensee” means any person holding a license under this division for cannabis or cannabis products that are intended for adults who are 21 years of age and older over  and who do not possess a  physician’s recommendation. recommendations. 
(c) “Applicant” means an owner applying for a state license pursuant to this division.
(d) “Batch” means a specific quantity of homogeneous cannabis or cannabis product that is one of the following types:
(1) Harvest batch. “Harvest batch” means a specifically identified quantity of dried flower or trim, leaves, and other cannabis plant matter that is uniform in strain, harvested at the same time, and, if applicable, cultivated using the same pesticides and other agricultural chemicals, and harvested at the same time.
(2) Manufactured cannabis batch. “Manufactured cannabis batch” means either of the following:
(A) An amount of cannabis concentrate or extract that is produced in one production cycle using the same extraction methods and standard operating procedures.
(B) An amount of a type of manufactured cannabis produced in one production cycle using the same formulation and standard operating procedures.
(e) “Bureau” means the Bureau of Cannabis Control within the Department of Consumer Affairs, formerly named the Bureau of Marijuana Control, the Bureau of Medical Cannabis Regulation, and the Bureau of Medical Marijuana Regulation.
(f) “Cannabis” means all parts of the plant Cannabis sativa Linnaeus, Cannabis indica, or Cannabis ruderalis, whether growing or not; the seeds thereof; the resin, whether crude or purified, extracted from any part of the plant; and every compound, manufacture, salt, derivative, mixture, or preparation of the plant, its seeds, or resin. “Cannabis” also means the separated resin, whether crude or purified, obtained from cannabis. “Cannabis” does not include the mature stalks of the plant, fiber produced from the stalks, oil or cake made from the seeds of the plant, any other compound, manufacture, salt, derivative, mixture, or preparation of the mature stalks (except the resin extracted therefrom), fiber, oil, or cake, or the sterilized seed of the plant which is incapable of germination. For the purpose of this division, “cannabis” does not mean “industrial hemp” as defined by Section 11018.5 of the Health and Safety Code.
(g) “Cannabis accessories” has the same meaning as in Section 11018.2 of the Health and Safety Code.
(h) “Cannabis concentrate” means cannabis that has undergone a process to concentrate one or more active cannabinoids, thereby increasing the product’s potency. Resin from granular trichomes from a cannabis plant is a concentrate for purposes of this division. A cannabis concentrate is not considered food, as defined by Section 109935 of the Health and Safety Code, or a drug, as defined by Section 109925 of the Health and Safety Code.
(i) “Cannabis products” has the same meaning as in Section 11018.1 of the Health and Safety Code.
(j) “Child resistant” means designed or constructed to be significantly difficult for children under five years of age to open, and not difficult for normal adults to use properly.
(k) “Commercial cannabis activity” includes the cultivation, possession, manufacture, distribution, processing, storing, laboratory testing, packaging, labeling, transportation, delivery or sale of cannabis and cannabis products as provided for in this division.
(l) “Cultivation” means any activity involving the planting, growing, harvesting, drying, curing, grading, or trimming of cannabis.
(m) “Cultivation site” means a location where cannabis is planted, grown, harvested, dried, cured, graded, or trimmed, or a location where any combination of those activities occurs.
(n) “Customer” means a natural person 21 years of age or older over  or a natural person 18 years of age or older who possesses a physician’s recommendation, or a primary caregiver. recommendation. 
(o) “Day care center” has the same meaning as in Section 1596.76 of the Health and Safety Code.
(p) “Delivery” means the commercial transfer of cannabis or cannabis products to a customer. “Delivery” also includes the use by a retailer of any technology platform. platform owned, leased, or controlled by the retailer. 
(q) “Director” means the Director of Consumer Affairs.
(r) “Distribution” means the procurement, sale, and transport of cannabis and cannabis products between licensees.
(s) “Dried flower” means all dead cannabis that has been harvested, dried, cured, or otherwise processed, excluding leaves and stems.
(t) “Edible cannabis product” means cannabis product that is intended to be used, in whole or in part, for human consumption, including, but not limited to, chewing gum, but excluding products set forth in Division 15 (commencing with Section 32501) of the Food and Agricultural Code. An edible cannabis product is not considered food, as defined by Section 109935 of the Health and Safety Code, or a drug, as defined by Section 109925 of the Health and Safety Code.
(u) “Fund” means the Cannabis Control Fund established pursuant to Section 26210.
(v) “Kind” means applicable type or designation regarding a particular cannabis variant or cannabis product type, including, but not limited to, strain name or other grower trademark, or growing area designation.
(w) “Labeling” means any label or other written, printed, or graphic matter upon a cannabis product, upon its container or wrapper, or that accompanies any cannabis product.
(x) “Labor peace agreement” means an agreement between a licensee and any bona fide labor organization that, at a minimum, protects the state’s proprietary interests by prohibiting labor organizations and members from engaging in picketing, work stoppages, boycotts, and any other economic interference with the applicant’s business. This agreement means that the applicant has agreed not to disrupt efforts by the bona fide labor organization to communicate with, and attempt to organize and represent, the applicant’s employees. The agreement shall provide a bona fide labor organization access at reasonable times to areas in which the applicant’s employees work, for the purpose of meeting with employees to discuss their right to representation, employment rights under state law, and terms and conditions of employment. This type of agreement shall not mandate a particular method of election or certification of the bona fide labor organization.
(y) “License” means a state license issued under this division, and includes both an A-license and an M-license, as well as a testing laboratory license.
(z) “Licensee” means any person holding a license under this division, regardless of whether the license held is an A-license or an M-license, and includes the holder of a testing laboratory license.
(aa) “Licensing authority” means the state agency responsible for the issuance, renewal, or reinstatement of the license, or the state agency authorized to take disciplinary action against the licensee.
(ab) “Live plants” means living cannabis flowers and plants, including seeds, immature plants, and vegetative stage plants.
(ac) “Local jurisdiction” means a city, county, or city and county.
(ad) “Lot” means a batch or a specifically identified portion of a batch.
(ae) “M-license” means a state license issued under this division for commercial cannabis activity involving medicinal cannabis.
(af) “M-licensee” means any person holding a license under this division for commercial cannabis activity involving medicinal cannabis.
(ag) “Manufacture” means to compound, blend, extract, infuse, or otherwise make or prepare a cannabis product.
(ah) “Manufacturer” means a licensee that conducts the production, preparation, propagation, or compounding of cannabis or cannabis products either directly or indirectly or by extraction methods, or independently by means of chemical synthesis, or by a combination of extraction and chemical synthesis at a fixed location that packages or repackages cannabis or cannabis products or labels or relabels its container.
(ai) “Medicinal cannabis” or “medicinal cannabis product” means cannabis or a cannabis product, respectively, intended to be sold for use pursuant to the Compassionate Use Act of 1996 (Proposition 215), found at Section 11362.5 of the Health and Safety Code, by a medicinal cannabis patient in California who possesses a physician’s recommendation.
(aj) “Nursery” means a licensee that produces only clones, immature plants, seeds, and other agricultural products used specifically for the propagation and cultivation of cannabis.
(ak) “Operation” means any act for which licensure is required under the provisions of this division, or any commercial transfer of cannabis or cannabis products.
(al) “Owner” means any of the following:
(1) A person with an aggregate ownership interest of 20 percent or more in the person applying for a license or a licensee, unless the interest is solely a security, lien, or encumbrance.
(2) The chief executive officer of a nonprofit or other entity.
(3) A member of the board of directors of a nonprofit.
(4) An individual who will be participating in the direction, control, or management of the person applying for a license.
(am) “Package” means any container or receptacle used for holding cannabis or cannabis products.
(an) “Person” includes any individual, firm, partnership, joint venture, association, corporation, limited liability company, estate, trust, business trust, receiver, syndicate, or any other group or combination acting as a unit, and the plural as well as the singular.
(ao) “Physician’s recommendation” means a recommendation by a physician and surgeon that a patient use cannabis provided in accordance with the Compassionate Use Act of 1996 (Proposition 215), found at Section 11362.5 of the Health and Safety Code.
(ap) “Premises” means the designated structure or structures and land specified in the application that is owned, leased, or otherwise held under the control of the applicant or licensee where the commercial cannabis activity will be or is conducted. The premises shall be a contiguous area and shall only be occupied by one licensee.
(aq) “Primary caregiver” has the same meaning as in Section 11362.7 of the Health and Safety Code.
(ar) (aq)  “Purchaser” means the customer who is engaged in a transaction with a licensee for purposes of obtaining cannabis or cannabis products.
(as) (ar)  “Sell,” “sale,” and “to sell” include any transaction whereby, for any consideration, title to cannabis or cannabis products is transferred from one person to another, and includes the delivery of cannabis or cannabis products pursuant to an order placed for the purchase of the same and soliciting or receiving an order for the same, but does not include the return of cannabis or cannabis products by a licensee to the licensee from whom the cannabis or cannabis product was purchased.
(at) (as)  “Testing laboratory” means a laboratory, facility, or entity in the state that offers or performs tests of cannabis or cannabis products and that is both of the following:
(1) Accredited by an accrediting body that is independent from all other persons involved in commercial cannabis activity in the state.
(2) Licensed by the bureau.
(au) (at)  “Unique identifier” means an alphanumeric code or designation used for reference to a specific plant on a licensed premises and any cannabis or cannabis product derived or manufactured from that plant.
(av) (au)  “Youth center” has the same meaning as in Section 11353.1 of the Health and Safety Code.

SEC. 4.

 Section 26053 of the Business and Professions Code, as amended by Section 37 of Senate Bill 94 of the 2017–18 Regular Session, is amended to read:

26053.
 (a) All commercial cannabis activity shall be conducted between licensees, except as otherwise provided in this division.
(b) A person that holds a state testing laboratory license under this division is prohibited from licensure for any other activity, except testing, as authorized under this division. A person that holds a state testing laboratory license shall not employ an individual who is also employed by any other licensee that does not hold a state testing laboratory license. A person that holds a state testing laboratory license shall not own, or have an ownership interest in, a premises licensed pursuant to this division for any activity except testing. 
(c) Except as provided in subdivision (b), a person may apply for and be issued more than one license under this division.
(d) Each applicant or licensee shall apply for, and if approved, shall obtain, a separate license for each location where it engages in commercial cannabis activity.

SEC. 5.

 Section 26070 of the Business and Professions Code, as amended by Section 59 of Senate Bill 94 of the 2017–18 Regular Session, is amended to read:

26070.

Retailers and Distributors.

26070.
 Retailers and Distributors.
(a) State licenses to be issued by the bureau related to the sale and distribution of cannabis and cannabis products are as follows:
(1) “Retailer,” for the retail sale and delivery of cannabis or cannabis products to customers. A retailer shall have a licensed premises which is a physical location from which commercial cannabis activities are conducted. A retailer’s premises may be closed to the public. A retailer may conduct sales exclusively by delivery.
(2) “Distributor,” for the distribution of cannabis and cannabis products. A distributor licensee shall be bonded and insured at a minimum level established by the licensing authority.
(3) (A) “Microbusiness,” for the cultivation of cannabis on an area less than 10,000 square feet and to act as a licensed distributor, Level 1 manufacturer, and retailer under this division, provided such licensee can demonstrate compliance with all requirements imposed by this division on licensed cultivators, distributors, Level 1 manufacturers, and retailers to the extent the licensee engages in such those  activities. Microbusiness licenses that authorize cultivation of cannabis shall include the license conditions described in subdivision (b) of Section 26060.1.
(B) In coordination with each other, the licensing authorities shall establish a process by which an applicant for a microbusiness license can demonstrate compliance with all the requirements under this division for the activities that will be conducted under the license.
(C) The bureau may enter into interagency agreements with licensing authorities to implement and enforce the provisions of this division related to microbusinesses. The costs of activities carried out by the licensing authorities as requested by the bureau pursuant to the interagency agreement shall be calculated into the application and licensing fees collected pursuant to this division, and shall provide for reimbursement to state agencies for associated costs as provided for in the interagency agreement.
(b) The bureau shall establish minimum security and transportation safety requirements for the commercial distribution and delivery of cannabis and cannabis products. Except as provided in subdivision (d) of Section 26110, the  The  transportation of cannabis and cannabis products shall only be conducted by persons holding a distributor license under this division or employees of those persons. Transportation safety standards established by the bureau shall include, but not be limited to, minimum standards governing the types of vehicles in which cannabis and cannabis products may be distributed and delivered and minimum qualifications for persons eligible to operate such vehicles.
(c) The driver of a vehicle transporting or transferring  cannabis or cannabis products shall be directly employed by a licensee authorized to transport or transfer  cannabis or cannabis products.
(d) Notwithstanding any other law, all vehicles transporting cannabis and cannabis products for hire shall be required to have a valid motor carrier permit pursuant to Chapter 2 (commencing with Section 34620) of Division 14.85 of the Vehicle Code. The Department of the California Highway Patrol shall have authority over the safe operation of these vehicles, including, but not limited to, requiring licensees engaged in the transportation of cannabis or cannabis products to participate in the Basic Inspection of Terminals (BIT) program pursuant to Section 34501.12 of the Vehicle Code.
(e) Prior to transporting cannabis or cannabis products, a licensed distributor shall do both of the following:
(1) Complete an electronic shipping manifest as prescribed by the licensing authority. The shipping manifest shall include the unique identifier, pursuant to Section 26069, issued by the Department of Food and Agriculture for the original cannabis product.
(2) Securely transmit the manifest to the bureau and the licensee that will receive the cannabis product. The bureau shall inform the Department of Food and Agriculture of information pertaining to commercial cannabis activity for the purpose of the track and trace program identified in Section 26067.
(f) During transportation, the licensed distributor shall maintain a physical copy of the shipping manifest and make it available upon request to agents of the Department of Consumer Affairs and law enforcement officers.
(g) The licensee receiving the shipment shall maintain each electronic shipping manifest and shall make it available upon request to the Department of Consumer Affairs and any law enforcement officers.
(h) Upon receipt of the transported shipment, the licensee receiving the shipment shall submit to the licensing authority a record verifying receipt of the shipment and the details of the shipment.
(i) Transporting, or arranging for or facilitating the transport of, cannabis or cannabis products in violation of this chapter is grounds for disciplinary action against the license.
(j) Licensed retailers and microbusinesses, and licensed nonprofits under Section 26070.5, shall implement security measures reasonably designed to prevent unauthorized entrance into areas containing cannabis or cannabis products and theft of cannabis or cannabis products from the premises. These security measures shall include, but not be limited to, all of the following:
(1) Prohibiting individuals from remaining on the licensee’s premises if they are not engaging in activity expressly related to the operations of the retailer.
(2) Establishing limited access areas accessible only to authorized personnel.
(3) Other than limited amounts of cannabis used for display purposes, samples, or immediate sale, storing all finished cannabis and cannabis products in a secured and locked room, safe, or vault, and in a manner reasonably designed to prevent diversion, theft, and loss.
(k) A retailer shall notify the licensing authority and the appropriate law enforcement authorities within 24 hours after discovering any of the following:
(1) Significant discrepancies identified during inventory. The level of significance shall be determined by the bureau.
(2) Diversion, theft, loss, or any criminal activity pertaining to the operation of the retailer.
(3) Diversion, theft, loss, or any criminal activity by any agent or employee of the retailer pertaining to the operation of the retailer.
(4) The loss or unauthorized alteration of records related to cannabis or cannabis products, registered qualifying patients, primary caregivers, or retailer employees or agents.
(5) Any other breach of security.
(l) Beginning January 1, 2018, a licensee may sell cannabis or cannabis products that have not been tested for a limited and finite time as determined by the bureau. The cannabis or cannabis products must have a label affixed to each package containing the cannabis or cannabis products that clearly states “This product has not been tested as required by the Medicinal and Adult-Use Cannabis Regulation and Safety Act” and must comply with any other requirement as determined by the bureau.
(m) A retailer, microbusiness, or licensed nonprofit under Section 26070.5 shall display a sign educating its customers on California’s laws on transporting cannabis or cannabis products in a vehicle, in accordance with Section 23222 of the Vehicle Code.

SEC. 6.

 Section 26100 of the Business and Professions Code, as renumbered from Section 26100 of the Business and Professions Code by Section 66 of Senate Bill 94 of the 2017–18 Regular Session, is amended to read:

26100.
 (a) Except as otherwise provided by law, cannabis or cannabis products shall not be sold pursuant to a license provided for under this division unless a representative sample of the cannabis or cannabis products has been tested by a licensed testing laboratory.
(b) The bureau shall develop criteria to determine which batches shall be tested. All testing of the samples shall be performed on the final form in which the cannabis or cannabis product will be consumed or used.
(c) Testing of batches to meet the requirements of this division shall only be conducted by a licensed testing laboratory.
(d) For each batch tested, the testing laboratory shall issue a certificate of analysis for selected lots at a frequency determined by the bureau with supporting data, to report both of the following:
(1) Whether the chemical profile of the sample conforms to the labeled content of compounds, including, but not limited to, all of the following, unless limited through regulation by the bureau:
(A) Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC).
(B) Tetrahydrocannabinolic Acid (THCA).
(C) Cannabidiol (CBD).
(D) Cannabidiolic Acid (CBDA).
(E) The terpenes required by the bureau in regulation.
(F) Cannabigerol (CBG).
(G) Cannabinol (CBN).
(H) Any other compounds or contaminants required by the bureau.
(2) That the presence of contaminants does not exceed the levels established by the bureau. In establishing the levels, the bureau shall consider the American Herbal Pharmacopoeia monograph, guidelines set by the Department of Pesticide Regulation pursuant to subdivision (d) of Section 26060, and any other relevant sources. For purposes of this paragraph, “contaminants” includes, but is not limited to, all of the following:
(A) Residual solvent or processing chemicals.
(B) Foreign material, including, but not limited to, hair, insects, or similar or related adulterant.
(C) Microbiological impurities as identified by the bureau in regulation.
(e) Standards for residual levels of volatile organic compounds shall be established by the bureau.
(f) The testing laboratory shall conduct all testing required by this section in a manner consistent with general requirements for the competence of testing and calibrations activities, including sampling and using verified methods.
(g) All testing laboratories performing tests pursuant to this section shall obtain and maintain ISO/IEC 17025 accreditation as required by the bureau in regulation.
(h) If a test result falls outside the specifications authorized by law or regulation, the testing laboratory shall follow a standard operating procedure to confirm or refute the original result.
(i) A testing laboratory shall destroy the remains of the sample of medical  cannabis or medical  cannabis product upon completion of the analysis, as determined by the bureau through regulations.
(j) Any presale inspection, testing transfer, or transportation of cannabis products pursuant to this section shall conform to a specified chain of custody protocol and any other requirements imposed under this division.
(k) This division does not prohibit a licensee from performing testing on the licensee’s premises for the purposes of quality assurance of the product in conjunction with reasonable business operations. This division also does not prohibit a licensee from performing testing on the licensee’s premises of cannabis or cannabis products obtained from another licensee. Onsite testing by the licensee shall not be certified by the bureau and does not exempt the licensee from the requirements of quality assurance testing at a testing laboratory pursuant to this section.

SEC. 7.

 Section 26110 of the Business and Professions Code, as added by Section 73 of Senate Bill 94 of the 2017–18 Regular Session, is amended to read:

26110.
 (a) Cannabis batches are subject to quality assurance and testing prior to sale at a retailer, microbusiness, or nonprofit licensed under Section 26070.5, except for immature cannabis plants and seeds, as provided for in this division.
(b) A licensee that holds a valid distributor license may act as the distributor for the licensee’s cannabis and cannabis products.
(c) The distributor shall store, as determined by the bureau, the cannabis batches on the premises of the distributor before testing and continuously until either of the following occurs:
(1) The cannabis batch passes the testing requirements pursuant to this division and is transported to a licensed retailer or to another licensed distributor. retailer. 
(2) The cannabis batch fails the testing requirements pursuant to this division and is destroyed or transported to a manufacturer for remediation as allowed by the bureau or the State Department of Public Health.
(d) The distributor shall arrange for a testing laboratory to obtain a representative sample of each cannabis batch at the distributor’s licensed premises. After obtaining the sample, the testing laboratory representative shall maintain custody of the sample and transport it to the testing laboratory.
(e) Upon issuance of a certificate of analysis by the testing laboratory that the cannabis batch has passed the testing requirements pursuant to this division, the distributor shall conduct a quality assurance review before distribution to ensure the labeling and packaging of the cannabis and cannabis products conform to the requirements of this division.
(f) (1) There shall be a quality assurance compliance monitor who is an employee or contractor of the bureau and who shall not hold a license in any category or own or have an ownership interest in a licensee or the premises of a licensee.
(2) The quality assurance compliance monitor shall conduct random quality assurance reviews at a distributor’s licensed premises before distribution to ensure the labeling and packaging of the cannabis and cannabis products conform to the requirements of this division.
(3) The quality assurance compliance monitor shall have access to all records and test results required of a licensee by law in order to conduct quality assurance analysis and to confirm test results. All records of inspection and verification by the quality assurance compliance monitor shall be provided to the bureau. Failure to comply shall be noted by the quality assurance compliance monitor for further investigation. Violations shall be reported to the bureau. The quality assurance compliance monitor shall also verify the tax payments collected and paid under Sections 34011 and 34012  Section 34012.5  of the Revenue and Taxation Code are accurate. The monitor shall also have access to the inputs and assumptions in the track and trace system and shall be able to verify their the  accuracy of those  and that they are commensurate with the tax payments.
(g) After testing, all cannabis and cannabis products fit for sale may be transported only from the distributor’s premises to the premises of another licensed distributor for further distribution, or to  a licensed retailer, microbusiness, or nonprofit for retail sale. nonprofit. 
(h) A licensee is not required to sell cannabis or cannabis products to a distributor and may directly contract for sale with a licensee authorized to sell cannabis and cannabis products to purchasers.
(i) A distributor performing services pursuant to this section may collect a fee from the licensee for the services provided. The fee may include, but is not limited to, the costs incurred for laboratory testing. A distributor may also collect applicable state or local taxes and fees.
(j) This section does not prohibit a licensee from performing testing on the licensee’s premises for the purposes of quality assurance of the product in conjunction with reasonable business operations. The testing conducted on the licensee’s premises by the licensee does not meet the testing requirements pursuant to this division.

SEC. 8.

 Section 26130 of the Business and Professions Code, as amended by Section 77 of Senate Bill 94 of the 2017–18 Regular Session, is amended to read:

26130.
 (a) The State Department of Public Health shall promulgate regulations governing the licensing of cannabis manufacturers and standards for the manufacturing, packaging, and labeling of all manufactured cannabis products. Licenses to be issued are as follows:
(1) “Manufacturing Level 1,” for sites that manufacture cannabis products using nonvolatile solvents, or no solvents. A Manufacturing Level 1 M-Type 6 licensee shall only manufacture cannabis products for sale by a retailer with an M-Type 10 license. 
(2) “Manufacturing Level 2,” for sites that manufacture cannabis products using volatile solvents. A Manufacturing Level 2 M-Type 7 licensee shall only manufacture cannabis products for sale by a retailer with an M-Type 10 license. 
(b) For purposes of this section, “volatile solvents” shall have the same meaning as in paragraph (3) of subdivision (b) of Section 11362.3 of the Health and Safety Code, unless otherwise provided by law or regulation.
(c) Edible cannabis products shall be:
(1) Not designed to be appealing to children or easily confused with commercially sold candy or foods that do not contain cannabis.
(2) Produced and sold with a standardized concentration of cannabinoids not to exceed 10 milligrams tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) per serving.
(3) Delineated or scored into standardized serving sizes if the cannabis product contains more than one serving and is an edible cannabis product in solid form.
(4) Homogenized to ensure uniform disbursement of cannabinoids throughout the product.
(5) Manufactured and sold under sanitation standards established by the State Department of Public Health, in consultation with the bureau, that are similar to the standards for preparation, storage, handling, and sale of food products.
(6) Provided to customers with sufficient information to enable the informed consumption of the product, including the potential effects of the cannabis product and directions as to how to consume the cannabis product, as necessary.
(7) Marked with a universal symbol, as determined by the State Department of Public Health through regulation.
(d) Cannabis, including concentrated cannabis, included in a cannabis product manufactured in compliance with law is not considered an adulterant under state law.

SEC. 9.

 Section 11362.775 of the Health and Safety Code, as amended by Section 140 of Senate Bill 94 of the 2017–18 Regular Session, is amended to read:

11362.775.
 (a) Subject to subdivision (d), qualified patients, persons with valid identification cards, and the designated primary caregivers of qualified patients and persons with identification cards, who associate within the State of California in order collectively or cooperatively to cultivate cannabis for medicinal purposes, shall not solely on the basis of that fact be subject to state criminal sanctions under Section 11357, 11358, 11359, 11360, 11366, 11366.5, or 11570. A collective or cooperative that operates pursuant to this section may operate for profit or not for profit. A collective or cooperative that operates for profit shall retain the protections of this section only if it possesses a valid seller’s permit from the State Board of Equalization and a valid local license, permit, or other authorization. 
(b) A collective or cooperative that operates pursuant to this section and manufactures medicinal cannabis products shall not, solely on the basis of that fact, be subject to state criminal sanctions under Section 11379.6 if the collective or cooperative abides by all of the following requirements:
(1) The collective or cooperative does either or both of the following:
(A) Utilizes only manufacturing processes that are either solventless or that employ only nonflammable, nontoxic solvents that are generally recognized as safe pursuant to the federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (21 U.S.C. Sec. 301 et seq.).
(B) Utilizes only manufacturing processes that use solvents exclusively within a closed-loop system that meets all of the following requirements:
(i) The system uses only solvents that are generally recognized as safe pursuant to the federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (21 U.S.C. Sec. 301 et seq.).
(ii) The system is designed to recapture and contain solvents during the manufacturing process, and otherwise prevent the off-gassing of solvents into the ambient atmosphere to mitigate the risks of ignition and explosion during the manufacturing process.
(iii) A licensed engineer certifies that the system was commercially manufactured, safe for its intended use, and built to codes of recognized and generally accepted good engineering practices, including, but not limited to, the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), the American National Standards Institute (ANSI), Underwriters Laboratories (UL), the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM), or OSHA Nationally Recognized Testing Laboratories (NRTLs).
(iv) The system has a certification document that contains the signature and stamp of a professional engineer and the serial number of the extraction unit being certified.
(2) The collective or cooperative receives and maintains approval from the local fire official for the closed-loop system, other equipment, the extraction operation, and the facility.
(3) The collective or cooperative meets required fire, safety, and building code requirements in one or more of the following:
(A) The California Fire Code.
(B) The National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) standards.
(C) International Building Code (IBC).
(D) The International Fire Code (IFC).
(E) Other applicable standards, including complying with all applicable fire, safety, and building codes in processing, handling, and storage of solvents or gasses.
(4) The collective or cooperative is in possession of a valid seller’s permit issued by the State Board of Equalization.
(5) The collective or cooperative is in possession of a valid local license, permit, or other authorization specific to the manufacturing of medicinal cannabis products, and in compliance with any additional conditions imposed by the city or county issuing the local license, permit, or other authorization.
(c) For purposes of this section, “manufacturing” means compounding, converting, producing, deriving, processing, or preparing, either directly or indirectly by chemical extraction or independently by means of chemical synthesis, medicinal cannabis products.
(d) This section shall remain in effect only until one year after the Bureau of Cannabis Control posts a notice on its Internet Web site that the licensing authorities have commenced issuing licenses pursuant to the Medicinal and Adult-Use Cannabis Regulation and Safety Act (Division 10 (commencing with Section 26000) of the Business and Professions Code).
(e) This section is repealed one year after the date upon which the notice is posted pursuant to subdivision (d).
SEC. 10.
 The Legislature finds and declares that this act furthers the purposes and intent of the Control, Regulate and Tax Adult Use of Marijuana Act by accomplishing all of the following:
(a) Reducing barriers to entry into the legal, regulated market by ensuring that the market is not dominated by a monopoly power.
(b) Taking adult-use cannabis production and sales out of the hands of the illegal market and bringing them under a regulatory structure that prevents access by minors and protects public safety, public health, and the environment.
(c) Strictly controlling the cultivation, processing, manufacture, distribution, testing, and sale of adult-use cannabis through a system of state licensing, regulation, and enforcement.
(d) Allowing local governments to enforce state laws and regulations for adult-use cannabis businesses if that authority is delegated to them by the state, and enact additional local requirements for adult-use cannabis businesses, but not require that they do so for an adult-use cannabis business to be issued a state license and be legal under state law.