Today's Law As Amended

PDF |Add To My Favorites | print page

SB-524 Private alternative boarding schools and outdoor programs.(2015-2016)



SECTION 1.
 The Legislature finds and declares all of the following:
(a) For decades, hundreds of nontraditional treatment programs that are intended to be less restrictive treatment options for children with significant behavioral issues have been established nationwide, with thousands of allegations of abuse, including death.
(b) There are currently facilities operating within California that are not licensed by the State Department of Social Services.
(c) These facilities are often owned and operated by nonprofit organizations described in Section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code.
(d) These facilities advertise services for youth with behavioral issues to families who may feel they have no other options.
(e) Former students have formed national and local organizations to expose the trauma and abuse they experienced at these facilities.
(f) Students at these facilities are previous victims of trauma, have experienced parental rejection based on actual or perceived sexual orientation or gender identity, and have mental health and substance use issues.
(g) It is the role of the Legislature to ensure proper licensing and regulation of residential facilities for the protection and care of all citizens.
(h) It is the intent of the Legislature that the state license private alternative boarding schools and private alternative outdoor programs as community care facilities to ensure the safety of children admitted to those schools or programs.

SEC. 2.

 Section 1502 of the Health and Safety Code is amended to read:

1502.
 As used in this chapter:
(a) “Community care facility” means any facility, place, or building that is maintained and operated to provide nonmedical residential care, day treatment, adult day care, or foster family agency services for children, adults, or children and adults, including, but not limited to, the physically handicapped, mentally impaired, incompetent persons, and abused or neglected children, and includes the following:
(1) “Residential facility” means any family home, group care facility, or similar facility determined by the department, director,  for 24-hour nonmedical care of persons in need of personal services, supervision, or assistance essential for sustaining the activities of daily living or for the protection of the individual.
(2) “Adult day program” means any community-based facility or program that provides care to persons 18 years of age or older in need of personal services, supervision, or assistance essential for sustaining the activities of daily living or for the protection of these individuals on less than a 24-hour basis.
(3) “Therapeutic day services facility” means any facility that provides nonmedical care, counseling, educational or vocational support, or social rehabilitation services on less than a 24-hour basis to persons under 18 years of age who would otherwise be placed in foster care or who are returning to families from foster care. Program standards for these facilities shall be developed by the department, pursuant to Section 1530, in consultation with therapeutic day services and foster care providers.
(4) “Foster family agency” means any public agency or private organization,  organization engaged in the recruiting, certifying, and training of, and providing professional support to, foster parents, or in finding homes or other places for placement of children for temporary or permanent care who require that level of care. Private foster family agencies shall be  organized and operated on a nonprofit basis, engaged in any of the following: basis. 
(A) Recruiting, certifying, approving, and training of, and providing professional support to, foster parents and resource families.
(B) Coordinating with county placing agencies to find homes for foster children in need of care.
(C) Providing services and supports to licensed or certified foster parents, county-approved resource families, and children to the extent authorized by state and federal law.
(5) “Foster family home” means any residential facility providing 24-hour care for six or fewer foster children that is owned, leased, or rented and is the residence of the foster parent or parents, including their family, in whose care the foster children have been placed. The placement may be by a public or private child placement agency or by a court order, or by voluntary placement by a parent, parents, or guardian. It also means a foster family home described in Section 1505.2.
(6) “Small family home” means any residential facility, in the licensee’s family residence, that provides 24-hour care for six or fewer foster children who have mental disorders or developmental or physical disabilities and who require special care and supervision as a result of their disabilities. A small family home may accept children with special health care needs, pursuant to subdivision (a) of Section 17710 of the Welfare and Institutions Code. In addition to placing children with special health care needs, the department may approve placement of children without special health care needs, up to the licensed capacity.
(7) “Social rehabilitation facility” means any residential facility that provides social rehabilitation services for no longer than 18 months in a group setting to adults recovering from mental illness who temporarily need assistance, guidance, or counseling. Program components shall be subject to program standards pursuant to Article 1 (commencing with Section 5670) of Chapter 2.5 of Part 2 of Division 5 of the Welfare and Institutions Code.
(8) “Community treatment facility” means any residential facility that provides mental health treatment services to children in a group setting and that has the capacity to provide secure containment. Program components shall be subject to program standards developed and enforced by the State Department of Health Care Services pursuant to Section 4094 of the Welfare and Institutions Code.
Nothing in this section shall be construed to prohibit or discourage placement of persons who have mental or physical disabilities into any category of community care facility that meets the needs of the individual placed, if the placement is consistent with the licensing regulations of the department.
(9) “Full-service adoption agency” means any licensed entity engaged in the business of providing adoption services, that does all of the following:
(A) Assumes care, custody, and control of a child through relinquishment of the child to the agency or involuntary termination of parental rights to the child.
(B) Assesses the birth parents, prospective adoptive parents, or child.
(C) Places children for adoption.
(D) Supervises adoptive placements.
Private full-service adoption agencies shall be organized and operated on a nonprofit basis. As a condition of licensure to provide intercountry adoption services, a full-service adoption agency shall be accredited and in good standing according to Part 96 of Title 22 of the Code of Federal Regulations, or supervised by an accredited primary provider, or acting as an exempted provider, in compliance with Subpart F (commencing with Section 96.29) of Part 96 of Title 22 of the Code of Federal Regulations.
(10) “Noncustodial adoption agency” means any licensed entity engaged in the business of providing adoption services, that does all of the following:
(A) Assesses the prospective adoptive parents.
(B) Cooperatively matches children freed for adoption, who are under the care, custody, and control of a licensed adoption agency, for adoption, with assessed and approved adoptive applicants.
(C) Cooperatively supervises adoption adoptive  placements with a full-service adoptive agency, but does not disrupt a placement or remove a child from a placement.
Private noncustodial adoption agencies shall be organized and operated on a nonprofit basis. As a condition of licensure to provide intercountry adoption services, a noncustodial adoption agency shall be accredited and in good standing according to Part 96 of Title 22 of the Code of Federal Regulations, or supervised by an accredited primary provider, or acting as an exempted provider, in compliance with Subpart F (commencing with Section 96.29) of Part 96 of Title 22 of the Code of Federal Regulations.
(11) “Transitional shelter care facility” means any group care facility that provides for 24-hour nonmedical care of persons in need of personal services, supervision, or assistance essential for sustaining the activities of daily living or for the protection of the individual. Program components shall be subject to program standards developed by the State Department of Social Services pursuant to Section 1502.3.
(12) “Transitional housing placement provider” means an organization licensed by the department pursuant to Section 1559.110 and Section 16522.1 of the Welfare and Institutions Code to provide transitional housing to foster children at least 16 years of age and not more than 18 years of age, and nonminor dependents, as defined in subdivision (v) of Section 11400 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, to promote their transition to adulthood. A transitional housing placement provider shall be privately operated and organized on a nonprofit basis.
(13) “Group home” means a residential facility that provides 24-hour care and supervision to children, delivered at least in part by staff employed by the licensee in a structured environment. The care and supervision provided by a group home shall be nonmedical, except as otherwise permitted by law.
(14) “Runaway and homeless youth shelter” means a group home licensed by the department to operate a program pursuant to Section 1502.35 to provide voluntary, short-term, shelter and personal services to runaway youth or homeless youth, as defined in paragraph (2) of subdivision (a) of Section 1502.35.
(15) “Enhanced behavioral supports home” means a facility certified by the State Department of Developmental Services pursuant to Article 3.6 (commencing with Section 4684.80) of Chapter 6 of Division 4.5 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, and licensed by the State Department of Social Services as an adult residential facility or a group home that provides 24-hour nonmedical care to individuals with developmental disabilities who require enhanced behavioral supports, staffing, and supervision in a homelike setting. An enhanced behavioral supports home shall have a maximum capacity of four consumers, shall conform to Section 441.530(a)(1) of Title 42 of the Code of Federal Regulations, and shall be eligible for federal Medicaid home- and community-based services funding.
(16) “Community crisis home” means a facility certified by the State Department of Developmental Services pursuant to Article 8 (commencing with Section 4698) of Chapter 6 of Division 4.5 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, and licensed by the State Department of Social Services pursuant to Article 9.7 (commencing with Section 1567.80), as an adult residential facility, providing 24-hour nonmedical care to individuals with developmental disabilities receiving regional center service, in need of crisis intervention services, and who would otherwise be at risk of admission to the acute crisis center at Fairview Developmental Center, Sonoma Developmental Center, an acute general hospital, acute psychiatric hospital, an institution for mental disease, as described in Part 5 (commencing with Section 5900) of Division 5 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, or an out-of-state placement. A community crisis home shall have a maximum capacity of eight consumers, as defined in subdivision (a) of Section 1567.80, shall conform to Section 441.530(a)(1) of Title 42 of the Code of Federal Regulations, and shall be eligible for federal Medicaid home- and community-based services funding.
(17) “Crisis nursery” means a facility licensed by the department to operate a program pursuant to Section 1516 to provide short-term care and supervision for children under six years of age who are voluntarily placed for temporary care by a parent or legal guardian due to a family crisis or stressful situation.
(18) “Short-term residential therapeutic program” treatment center”  means a residential facility operated by a public agency or private organization and  licensed by the department pursuant to Section 1562.01 that provides an integrated program of specialized and intensive care and supervision, services and supports, treatment, and short-term,  and operated by any public agency or private organization that provides short-term, specialized, and intensive treatment, and  24-hour care and supervision to children. The care and supervision provided by a short-term residential therapeutic program treatment center  shall be nonmedical, except as otherwise permitted by law. Private short-term residential therapeutic programs shall be organized and operated on a nonprofit basis. 
(19) “Private alternative boarding school” means a group home licensed by the department to operate a program pursuant to Section 1502.2 to provide youth with 24-hour residential care and supervision, which, in addition to providing educational services to youth, provides, or holds itself out as providing, behavioral-based services to youth with social, emotional, or behavioral issues. The care and supervision provided by a private alternative boarding school shall be nonmedical, except as otherwise permitted by law.
(20) “Private alternative outdoor program” means a group home licensed by the department to operate a program pursuant to Section 1502.21 to provide youth with 24-hour residential care and supervision, which provides, or holds itself out as providing, behavioral-based services in an outdoor living setting to youth with social, emotional, or behavioral issues. The care and supervision provided by a private alternative outdoor program shall be nonmedical, except as otherwise permitted by law.
(b) “Department” or “state department” means the State Department of Social Services.
(c) “Director” means the Director of Social Services.

SEC. 2.1.

 Section 1502 of the Health and Safety Code is amended to read:

1502.
 (a)  As used in this chapter:
(a) (1)  “Community care facility” means any facility, place, or building that is maintained and operated to provide nonmedical residential care, day treatment, adult day care, or foster family agency services for children, adults, or children and adults, including, but not limited to, the physically handicapped, mentally impaired, incompetent persons, and abused or neglected children, and includes the following:
(1) (A)  “Residential facility” means any family home, group care facility, or similar facility determined by the department, director,  for 24-hour nonmedical care of persons in need of personal services, supervision, or assistance essential for sustaining the activities of daily living or for the protection of the individual.
(2) (B)  “Adult day program” means any community-based facility or program that provides care to persons 18 years of age or older in need of personal services, supervision, or assistance essential for sustaining the activities of daily living or for the protection of these individuals on less than a 24-hour basis.
(3) (C)  “Therapeutic day services facility” means any facility that provides nonmedical care, counseling, educational or vocational support, or social rehabilitation services on less than a 24-hour basis to persons under 18 years of age who would otherwise be placed in foster care or who are returning to families from foster care. Program standards for these facilities shall be developed by the department, pursuant to Section 1530, in consultation with therapeutic day services and foster care providers.
(4) (D)  “Foster family agency” means any public agency or private organization,  organization engaged in the recruiting, certifying, and training of, and providing professional support to, foster parents, or in finding homes or other places for placement of children for temporary or permanent care who require that level of care. Private foster family agencies shall be  organized and operated on a nonprofit basis, engaged in any of the following: basis. 
(A) Recruiting, certifying, approving, and training of, and providing professional support to, foster parents and resource families.
(B) Coordinating with county placing agencies to find homes for foster children in need of care.
(C) Providing services and supports to licensed or certified foster parents, county-approved resource families, and children to the extent authorized by state and federal law.
(5) (E)  “Foster family home” means any residential facility providing 24-hour care for six or fewer foster children that is owned, leased, or rented and is the residence of the foster parent or parents, including their family, in whose care the foster children have been placed. The placement may be by a public or private child placement agency or by a court order, or by voluntary placement by a parent, parents, or guardian. It also means a foster family home described in Section 1505.2.
(6) (F)  “Small family home” means any residential facility, in the licensee’s family residence, that provides 24-hour care for six or fewer foster children who have mental disorders or developmental or physical disabilities and who require special care and supervision as a result of their disabilities. A small family home may accept children with special health care needs, pursuant to subdivision (a) of Section 17710 of the Welfare and Institutions Code. In addition to placing children with special health care needs, the department may approve placement of children without special health care needs, up to the licensed capacity.
(7) (G)  “Social rehabilitation facility” means any residential facility that provides social rehabilitation services for no longer than 18 months in a group setting to adults recovering from mental illness who temporarily need assistance, guidance, or counseling. Program components shall be subject to program standards pursuant to Article 1 (commencing with Section 5670) of Chapter 2.5 of Part 2 of Division 5 of the Welfare and Institutions Code.
(8) (H)  “Community treatment facility” means any residential facility that provides mental health treatment services to children in a group setting and that has the capacity to provide secure containment. Program components shall be subject to program standards developed and enforced by the State Department of Health Care Services pursuant to Section 4094 of the Welfare and Institutions Code.
Nothing in this section shall be construed to prohibit or discourage placement of persons who have mental or physical disabilities into any category of community care facility that meets the needs of the individual placed, if the placement is consistent with the licensing regulations of the department.
(9) (I)  (i)  “Full-service adoption agency” means any licensed entity engaged in the business of providing adoption services, that does all of the following:
(A) (I)  Assumes care, custody, and control of a child through relinquishment of the child to the agency or involuntary termination of parental rights to the child.
(B) (II)  Assesses the birth parents, prospective adoptive parents, or child.
(C) (III)  Places children for adoption.
(D) (IV)  Supervises adoptive placements.
(ii)  Private full-service adoption agencies shall be organized and operated on a nonprofit basis. As a condition of licensure to provide intercountry adoption services, a full-service adoption agency shall be accredited and in good standing according to Part 96 of Title 22 of the Code of Federal Regulations, or supervised by an accredited primary provider, or acting as an exempted provider, in compliance with Subpart F (commencing with Section 96.29) of Part 96 of Title 22 of the Code of Federal Regulations.
(10) (J)  (i)  “Noncustodial adoption agency” means any licensed entity engaged in the business of providing adoption services, that does all of the following:
(A) (I)  Assesses the prospective adoptive parents.
(B) (II)  Cooperatively matches children freed for adoption, who are under the care, custody, and control of a licensed adoption agency, for adoption, with assessed and approved adoptive applicants.
(C) (III)  Cooperatively supervises adoption adoptive  placements with a full-service adoptive agency, but does not disrupt a placement or remove a child from a placement.
(ii)  Private noncustodial adoption agencies shall be organized and operated on a nonprofit basis. As a condition of licensure to provide intercountry adoption services, a noncustodial adoption agency shall be accredited and in good standing according to Part 96 of Title 22 of the Code of Federal Regulations, or supervised by an accredited primary provider, or acting as an exempted provider, in compliance with Subpart F (commencing with Section 96.29) of Part 96 of Title 22 of the Code of Federal Regulations.
(11) (K)  “Transitional shelter care facility” means any group care facility that provides for 24-hour nonmedical care of persons in need of personal services, supervision, or assistance essential for sustaining the activities of daily living or for the protection of the individual. Program components shall be subject to program standards developed by the State Department of Social Services pursuant to Section 1502.3.
(12) (L)  “Transitional housing placement provider” means an organization licensed by the department pursuant to Section 1559.110 and Section 16522.1 of the Welfare and Institutions Code to provide transitional housing to foster children at least 16 years of age and not more than 18 years of age, and nonminor dependents, as defined in subdivision (v) of Section 11400 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, to promote their transition to adulthood. A transitional housing placement provider shall be privately operated and organized on a nonprofit basis.
(13) (M)  “Group home” means a residential facility that provides 24-hour care and supervision to children, delivered at least in part by staff employed by the licensee in a structured environment. The care and supervision provided by a group home shall be nonmedical, except as otherwise permitted by law.
(14) (N)  “Runaway and homeless youth shelter” means a group home licensed by the department to operate a program pursuant to Section 1502.35 to provide voluntary, short-term, short-term  shelter and personal services to runaway youth or homeless youth, as defined in paragraph (2) of subdivision (a) of Section 1502.35.
(15) (O)  “Enhanced behavioral supports home” means a facility certified by the State Department of Developmental Services pursuant to Article 3.6 (commencing with Section 4684.80) of Chapter 6 of Division 4.5 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, and licensed by the State Department of Social Services as an adult residential facility or a group home that provides 24-hour nonmedical care to individuals with developmental disabilities who require enhanced behavioral supports, staffing, and supervision in a homelike setting. An enhanced behavioral supports home shall have a maximum capacity of four consumers, shall conform to Section 441.530(a)(1) of Title 42 of the Code of Federal Regulations, and shall be eligible for federal Medicaid home- and community-based services funding.
(16) (P)  “Community crisis home” means a facility certified by the State Department of Developmental Services pursuant to Article 8 (commencing with Section 4698) of Chapter 6 of Division 4.5 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, and licensed by the State Department of Social Services pursuant to Article 9.7 (commencing with Section 1567.80), as an adult residential facility, providing 24-hour nonmedical care to individuals with developmental disabilities receiving regional center service, in need of crisis intervention services, and who would otherwise be at risk of admission to the acute crisis center at Fairview Developmental Center, Sonoma Developmental Center, an acute general hospital, acute psychiatric hospital, an institution for mental disease, as described in Part 5 (commencing with Section 5900) of Division 5 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, or an out-of-state placement. A community crisis home shall have a maximum capacity of eight consumers, as defined in subdivision (a) of Section 1567.80, shall conform to Section 441.530(a)(1) of Title 42 of the Code of Federal Regulations, and shall be eligible for federal Medicaid home- and community-based services funding.
(17) (Q)  “Crisis nursery” means a facility licensed by the department to operate a program pursuant to Section 1516 to provide short-term care and supervision for children under six years of age who are voluntarily placed for temporary care by a parent or legal guardian due to a family crisis or stressful situation.
(18) (R)  “Short-term residential therapeutic program” treatment center”  means a residential facility operated by a public agency or private organization and  licensed by the department pursuant to Section 1562.01 that provides an integrated program of specialized and intensive care and supervision, services and supports, treatment, and short-term,  and operated by any public agency or private organization that provides short-term, specialized, and intensive treatment, and  24-hour care and supervision to children. The care and supervision provided by a short-term residential therapeutic program treatment center  shall be nonmedical, except as otherwise permitted by law. Private A  short-term residential therapeutic programs shall be organized and operated on a nonprofit basis. treatment center may be operated as a children’s crisis residential center. 
(S) “Children’s crisis residential center” means a short-term residential treatment center operated specifically to divert children experiencing a mental health crisis from psychiatric hospitalization.
(19) (T)  “Private alternative boarding school” means a group home licensed by the department to operate a program pursuant to Section 1502.2 to provide youth with 24-hour residential care and supervision, which, in addition to providing educational services to youth, provides, or holds itself out as providing, behavioral-based services to youth with social, emotional, or behavioral issues. The care and supervision provided by a private alternative boarding school shall be nonmedical, except as otherwise permitted by law.
(20) (U)  “Private alternative outdoor program” means a group home licensed by the department to operate a program pursuant to Section 1502.21 to provide youth with 24-hour residential care and supervision, which provides, or holds itself out as providing, behavioral-based services in an outdoor living setting to youth with social, emotional, or behavioral issues. The care and supervision provided by a private alternative outdoor program shall be nonmedical, except as otherwise permitted by law.
(b) (2)  “Department” or “state department” means the State Department of Social Services.
(c) (3)  “Director” means the Director of Social Services.
(b) Nothing in this section shall be construed to prohibit or discourage placement of persons who have mental or physical disabilities into any category of community care facility that meets the needs of the individual placed, if the placement is consistent with the licensing regulations of the department.

SEC. 2.2.

 Section 1502 of the Health and Safety Code is amended to read:

1502.
 As used in this chapter:
(a) “Community care facility” means any facility, place, or building that is maintained and operated to provide nonmedical residential care, day treatment, adult day care, or foster family agency services for children, adults, or children and adults, including, but not limited to, the physically handicapped, mentally impaired, incompetent persons, and abused or neglected children, and includes the following:
(1) “Residential facility” means any family home, group care facility, or similar facility determined by the department, for 24-hour nonmedical care of persons in need of personal services, supervision, or assistance essential for sustaining the activities of daily living or for the protection of the individual.
(2) “Adult day program” means any community-based facility or program that provides care to persons 18 years of age or older in need of personal services, supervision, or assistance essential for sustaining the activities of daily living or for the protection of these individuals on less than a 24-hour basis.
(3) “Therapeutic day services facility” means any facility that provides nonmedical care, counseling, educational or vocational support, or social rehabilitation services on less than a 24-hour basis to persons under 18 years of age who would otherwise be placed in foster care or who are returning to families from foster care. Program standards for these facilities shall be developed by the department, pursuant to Section 1530, in consultation with therapeutic day services and foster care providers.
(4) “Foster family agency” means any public agency or private organization, organized and operated on a nonprofit basis, engaged in any of the following:
(A) Recruiting, certifying, approving, and training of, and providing professional support to, foster parents and resource families.
(B) Coordinating with county placing agencies to find homes for foster children in need of care.
(C) Providing services and supports to licensed or certified foster parents, county-approved resource families, and children to the extent authorized by state and federal law.
(5) “Foster family home” means any residential facility providing 24-hour care for six or fewer foster children that is owned, leased, or rented and is the residence of the foster parent or parents, including their family, in whose care the foster children have been placed. The placement may be by a public or private child placement agency or by a court order, or by voluntary placement by a parent, parents, or guardian. It also means a foster family home described in Section 1505.2.
(6) “Small family home” means any residential facility, in the licensee’s family residence, that provides 24-hour care for six or fewer foster children who have mental disorders or developmental or physical disabilities and who require special care and supervision as a result of their disabilities. A small family home may accept children with special health care needs, pursuant to subdivision (a) of Section 17710 of the Welfare and Institutions Code. In addition to placing children with special health care needs, the department may approve placement of children without special health care needs, up to the licensed capacity.
(7) “Social rehabilitation facility” means any residential facility that provides social rehabilitation services for no longer than 18 months in a group setting to adults recovering from mental illness who temporarily need assistance, guidance, or counseling. Program components shall be subject to program standards pursuant to Article 1 (commencing with Section 5670) of Chapter 2.5 of Part 2 of Division 5 of the Welfare and Institutions Code.
(8) “Community treatment facility” means any residential facility that provides mental health treatment services to children in a group setting and that has the capacity to provide secure containment. Program components shall be subject to program standards developed and enforced by the State Department of Health Care Services pursuant to Section 4094 of the Welfare and Institutions Code.
Nothing in this section shall be construed to prohibit or discourage placement of persons who have mental or physical disabilities into any category of community care facility that meets the needs of the individual placed, if the placement is consistent with the licensing regulations of the department.
(9) “Full-service adoption agency” means any licensed entity engaged in the business of providing adoption services, that does all of the following:
(A) Assumes care, custody, and control of a child through relinquishment of the child to the agency or involuntary termination of parental rights to the child.
(B) Assesses the birth parents, prospective adoptive parents, or child.
(C) Places children for adoption.
(D) Supervises adoptive placements.
Private full-service adoption agencies shall be organized and operated on a nonprofit basis. As a condition of licensure to provide intercountry adoption services, a full-service adoption agency shall be accredited and in good standing according to Part 96 of Title 22 of the Code of Federal Regulations, or supervised by an accredited primary provider, or acting as an exempted provider, in compliance with Subpart F (commencing with Section 96.29) of Part 96 of Title 22 of the Code of Federal Regulations.
(10) “Noncustodial adoption agency” means any licensed entity engaged in the business of providing adoption services, that does all of the following:
(A) Assesses the prospective adoptive parents.
(B) Cooperatively matches children freed for adoption, who are under the care, custody, and control of a licensed adoption agency, for adoption, with assessed and approved adoptive applicants.
(C) Cooperatively supervises adoption placements with a full-service adoptive agency, but does not disrupt a placement or remove a child from a placement.
Private noncustodial adoption agencies shall be organized and operated on a nonprofit basis. As a condition of licensure to provide intercountry adoption services, a noncustodial adoption agency shall be accredited and in good standing according to Part 96 of Title 22 of the Code of Federal Regulations, or supervised by an accredited primary provider, or acting as an exempted provider, in compliance with Subpart F (commencing with Section 96.29) of Part 96 of Title 22 of the Code of Federal Regulations.
(11) “Transitional shelter care facility” means any group care facility that provides for 24-hour nonmedical care of persons in need of personal services, supervision, or assistance essential for sustaining the activities of daily living or for the protection of the individual. Program components shall be subject to program standards developed by the State Department of Social Services pursuant to Section 1502.3.
(12) “Transitional housing placement provider” means an organization licensed by the department pursuant to Section 1559.110 and Section 16522.1 of the Welfare and Institutions Code to provide transitional housing to foster children at least 16 years of age and not more than 18 years of age, and nonminor dependents, as defined in subdivision (v) of Section 11400 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, to promote their transition to adulthood. A transitional housing placement provider shall be privately operated and organized on a nonprofit basis.
(13) “Group home” means a residential facility that provides 24-hour care and supervision to children, delivered at least in part by staff employed by the licensee in a structured environment. The care and supervision provided by a group home shall be nonmedical, except as otherwise permitted by law.
(14) “Runaway and homeless youth shelter” means a group home licensed by the department to operate a program pursuant to Section 1502.35 to provide voluntary, short-term, shelter and personal services to runaway youth or homeless youth, as defined in paragraph (2) of subdivision (a) of Section 1502.35.
(15) “Enhanced behavioral supports home” means a facility certified by the State Department of Developmental Services pursuant to Article 3.6 (commencing with Section 4684.80) of Chapter 6 of Division 4.5 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, and licensed by the State Department of Social Services as an adult residential facility or a group home that provides 24-hour nonmedical care to individuals with developmental disabilities who require enhanced behavioral supports, staffing, and supervision in a homelike setting. An enhanced behavioral supports home shall have a maximum capacity of four consumers, shall conform to Section 441.530(a)(1) of Title 42 of the Code of Federal Regulations, and shall be eligible for federal Medicaid home- and community-based services funding.
(16) “Community crisis home” means a facility certified by the State Department of Developmental Services pursuant to Article 8 (commencing with Section 4698) of Chapter 6 of Division 4.5 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, and licensed by the State Department of Social Services pursuant to Article 9.7 (commencing with Section 1567.80), as an adult residential facility, providing 24-hour nonmedical care to individuals with developmental disabilities receiving regional center service, in need of crisis intervention services, and who would otherwise be at risk of admission to the acute crisis center at Fairview Developmental Center, Sonoma Developmental Center, an acute general hospital, acute psychiatric hospital, an institution for mental disease, as described in Part 5 (commencing with Section 5900) of Division 5 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, or an out-of-state placement. A community crisis home shall have a maximum capacity of eight consumers, as defined in subdivision (a) of Section 1567.80, shall conform to Section 441.530(a)(1) of Title 42 of the Code of Federal Regulations, and shall be eligible for federal Medicaid home- and community-based services funding.
(17) “Crisis nursery” means a facility licensed by the department to operate a program pursuant to Section 1516 to provide short-term care and supervision for children under six years of age who are voluntarily placed for temporary care by a parent or legal guardian due to a family crisis or stressful situation.
(18) “Short-term residential therapeutic program” means a residential facility operated by a public agency or private organization and licensed by the department pursuant to Section 1562.01 that provides an integrated program of specialized and intensive care and supervision, services and supports, treatment, and short-term, 24-hour care and supervision to children. The care and supervision provided by a short-term residential therapeutic program shall be nonmedical, except as otherwise permitted by law. Private short-term residential therapeutic programs shall be organized and operated on a nonprofit basis.
(19) “Private alternative boarding school” means a group home licensed by the department to operate a program pursuant to Section 1502.2 to provide youth with 24-hour residential care and supervision, which, in addition to providing educational services to youth, provides, or holds itself out as providing, behavioral-based services to youth with social, emotional, or behavioral issues. The care and supervision provided by a private alternative boarding school shall be nonmedical, except as otherwise permitted by law.
(20) “Private alternative outdoor program” means a group home licensed by the department to operate a program pursuant to Section 1502.21 to provide youth with 24-hour residential care and supervision, which provides, or holds itself out as providing, behavioral-based services in an outdoor living setting to youth with social, emotional, or behavioral issues. The care and supervision provided by a private alternative outdoor program shall be nonmedical, except as otherwise permitted by law.
(b) “Department” or “state department” means the State Department of Social Services.
(c) “Director” means the Director of Social Services.

SEC. 2.3.

 Section 1502 of the Health and Safety Code is amended to read:

1502.
 (a)  As used in this chapter:
(a) (1)  “Community care facility” means any facility, place, or building that is maintained and operated to provide nonmedical residential care, day treatment, adult day care, or foster family agency services for children, adults, or children and adults, including, but not limited to, the physically handicapped, mentally impaired, incompetent persons, and abused or neglected children, and includes the following:
(1) (A)  “Residential facility” means any family home, group care facility, or similar facility determined by the department, for 24-hour nonmedical care of persons in need of personal services, supervision, or assistance essential for sustaining the activities of daily living or for the protection of the individual.
(2) (B)  “Adult day program” means any community-based facility or program that provides care to persons 18 years of age or older in need of personal services, supervision, or assistance essential for sustaining the activities of daily living or for the protection of these individuals on less than a 24-hour basis.
(3) (C)  “Therapeutic day services facility” means any facility that provides nonmedical care, counseling, educational or vocational support, or social rehabilitation services on less than a 24-hour basis to persons under 18 years of age who would otherwise be placed in foster care or who are returning to families from foster care. Program standards for these facilities shall be developed by the department, pursuant to Section 1530, in consultation with therapeutic day services and foster care providers.
(4) (D)  “Foster family agency” means any public agency or private organization, organized and operated on a nonprofit basis, engaged in any of the following:
(A) (i)  Recruiting, certifying, approving, and training of, and providing professional support to, foster parents and resource families.
(B) (ii)  Coordinating with county placing agencies to find homes for foster children in need of care.
(C) (iii)  Providing services and supports to licensed or certified foster parents, county-approved resource families, and children to the extent authorized by state and federal law.
(5) (E)  “Foster family home” means any residential facility providing 24-hour care for six or fewer foster children that is owned, leased, or rented and is the residence of the foster parent or parents, including their family, in whose care the foster children have been placed. The placement may be by a public or private child placement agency or by a court order, or by voluntary placement by a parent, parents, or guardian. It also means a foster family home described in Section 1505.2.
(6) (F)  “Small family home” means any residential facility, in the licensee’s family residence, that provides 24-hour care for six or fewer foster children who have mental disorders or developmental or physical disabilities and who require special care and supervision as a result of their disabilities. A small family home may accept children with special health care needs, pursuant to subdivision (a) of Section 17710 of the Welfare and Institutions Code. In addition to placing children with special health care needs, the department may approve placement of children without special health care needs, up to the licensed capacity.
(7) (G)  “Social rehabilitation facility” means any residential facility that provides social rehabilitation services for no longer than 18 months in a group setting to adults recovering from mental illness who temporarily need assistance, guidance, or counseling. Program components shall be subject to program standards pursuant to Article 1 (commencing with Section 5670) of Chapter 2.5 of Part 2 of Division 5 of the Welfare and Institutions Code.
(8) (H)  “Community treatment facility” means any residential facility that provides mental health treatment services to children in a group setting and that has the capacity to provide secure containment. Program components shall be subject to program standards developed and enforced by the State Department of Health Care Services pursuant to Section 4094 of the Welfare and Institutions Code.
Nothing in this section shall be construed to prohibit or discourage placement of persons who have mental or physical disabilities into any category of community care facility that meets the needs of the individual placed, if the placement is consistent with the licensing regulations of the department.
(9) (I)  (i)  “Full-service adoption agency” means any licensed entity engaged in the business of providing adoption services, that does all of the following:
(A) (I)  Assumes care, custody, and control of a child through relinquishment of the child to the agency or involuntary termination of parental rights to the child.
(B) (II)  Assesses the birth parents, prospective adoptive parents, or child.
(C) (III)  Places children for adoption.
(D) (IV)  Supervises adoptive placements.
(ii)  Private full-service adoption agencies shall be organized and operated on a nonprofit basis. As a condition of licensure to provide intercountry adoption services, a full-service adoption agency shall be accredited and in good standing according to Part 96 of Title 22 of the Code of Federal Regulations, or supervised by an accredited primary provider, or acting as an exempted provider, in compliance with Subpart F (commencing with Section 96.29) of Part 96 of Title 22 of the Code of Federal Regulations.
(10) (J)  (i)  “Noncustodial adoption agency” means any licensed entity engaged in the business of providing adoption services, that does all of the following:
(A) (I)  Assesses the prospective adoptive parents.
(B) (II)  Cooperatively matches children freed for adoption, who are under the care, custody, and control of a licensed adoption agency, for adoption, with assessed and approved adoptive applicants.
(C) (III)  Cooperatively supervises adoption placements with a full-service adoptive agency, but does not disrupt a placement or remove a child from a placement.
(ii)  Private noncustodial adoption agencies shall be organized and operated on a nonprofit basis. As a condition of licensure to provide intercountry adoption services, a noncustodial adoption agency shall be accredited and in good standing according to Part 96 of Title 22 of the Code of Federal Regulations, or supervised by an accredited primary provider, or acting as an exempted provider, in compliance with Subpart F (commencing with Section 96.29) of Part 96 of Title 22 of the Code of Federal Regulations.
(11) (K)  “Transitional shelter care facility” means any group care facility that provides for 24-hour nonmedical care of persons in need of personal services, supervision, or assistance essential for sustaining the activities of daily living or for the protection of the individual. Program components shall be subject to program standards developed by the State Department of Social Services pursuant to Section 1502.3.
(12) (L)  “Transitional housing placement provider” means an organization licensed by the department pursuant to Section 1559.110 and Section 16522.1 of the Welfare and Institutions Code to provide transitional housing to foster children at least 16 years of age and not more than 18 years of age, and nonminor dependents, as defined in subdivision (v) of Section 11400 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, to promote their transition to adulthood. A transitional housing placement provider shall be privately operated and organized on a nonprofit basis.
(13) (M)  “Group home” means a residential facility that provides 24-hour care and supervision to children, delivered at least in part by staff employed by the licensee in a structured environment. The care and supervision provided by a group home shall be nonmedical, except as otherwise permitted by law.
(14) (N)  “Runaway and homeless youth shelter” means a group home licensed by the department to operate a program pursuant to Section 1502.35 to provide voluntary, short-term, short-term  shelter and personal services to runaway youth or homeless youth, as defined in paragraph (2) of subdivision (a) of Section 1502.35.
(15) (O)  “Enhanced behavioral supports home” means a facility certified by the State Department of Developmental Services pursuant to Article 3.6 (commencing with Section 4684.80) of Chapter 6 of Division 4.5 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, and licensed by the State Department of Social Services as an adult residential facility or a group home that provides 24-hour nonmedical care to individuals with developmental disabilities who require enhanced behavioral supports, staffing, and supervision in a homelike setting. An enhanced behavioral supports home shall have a maximum capacity of four consumers, shall conform to Section 441.530(a)(1) of Title 42 of the Code of Federal Regulations, and shall be eligible for federal Medicaid home- and community-based services funding.
(16) (P)  “Community crisis home” means a facility certified by the State Department of Developmental Services pursuant to Article 8 (commencing with Section 4698) of Chapter 6 of Division 4.5 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, and licensed by the State Department of Social Services pursuant to Article 9.7 (commencing with Section 1567.80), as an adult residential facility, providing 24-hour nonmedical care to individuals with developmental disabilities receiving regional center service, in need of crisis intervention services, and who would otherwise be at risk of admission to the acute crisis center at Fairview Developmental Center, Sonoma Developmental Center, an acute general hospital, acute psychiatric hospital, an institution for mental disease, as described in Part 5 (commencing with Section 5900) of Division 5 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, or an out-of-state placement. A community crisis home shall have a maximum capacity of eight consumers, as defined in subdivision (a) of Section 1567.80, shall conform to Section 441.530(a)(1) of Title 42 of the Code of Federal Regulations, and shall be eligible for federal Medicaid home- and community-based services funding.
(17) (Q)  “Crisis nursery” means a facility licensed by the department to operate a program pursuant to Section 1516 to provide short-term care and supervision for children under six years of age who are voluntarily placed for temporary care by a parent or legal guardian due to a family crisis or stressful situation.
(18) (R)  “Short-term residential therapeutic program” means a residential facility operated by a public agency or private organization and licensed by the department pursuant to Section 1562.01 that provides an integrated program of specialized and intensive care and supervision, services and supports, treatment, and short-term, 24-hour care and supervision to children. The care and supervision provided by a short-term residential therapeutic program shall be nonmedical, except as otherwise permitted by law. Private short-term residential therapeutic programs shall be organized and operated on a nonprofit basis. A short-term residential therapeutic program may be operated as a children’s crisis residential center. 
(S) “Children’s crisis residential center” means a short-term residential therapeutic program operated specifically to divert children experiencing a mental health crisis from psychiatric hospitalization.
(19) (T)  “Private alternative boarding school” means a group home licensed by the department to operate a program pursuant to Section 1502.2 to provide youth with 24-hour residential care and supervision, which, in addition to providing educational services to youth, provides, or holds itself out as providing, behavioral-based services to youth with social, emotional, or behavioral issues. The care and supervision provided by a private alternative boarding school shall be nonmedical, except as otherwise permitted by law.
(20) (U)  “Private alternative outdoor program” means a group home licensed by the department to operate a program pursuant to Section 1502.21 to provide youth with 24-hour residential care and supervision, which provides, or holds itself out as providing, behavioral-based services in an outdoor living setting to youth with social, emotional, or behavioral issues. The care and supervision provided by a private alternative outdoor program shall be nonmedical, except as otherwise permitted by law.
(b) (2)  “Department” or “state department” means the State Department of Social Services.
(c) (3)  “Director” means the Director of Social Services.
(b) Nothing in this section shall be construed to prohibit or discourage placement of persons who have mental or physical disabilities into any category of community care facility that meets the needs of the individual placed, if the placement is consistent with the licensing regulations of the department.

SEC. 3.

 Section 1502.2 is added to the Health and Safety Code, to read:

1502.2.
 (a) Commencing January 1, 2018, the department shall license private alternative boarding schools, as defined in paragraph (19) of subdivision (a) of Section 1502, as a group home pursuant to this chapter. A licensed private alternative boarding school shall comply with all provisions of this chapter that are applicable to group homes, unless otherwise indicated, and with this section.
(b) A licensed private alternative boarding school shall comply with all of the following:
(1) It shall be owned and operated on a nonprofit basis by a private nonprofit corporation or a nonprofit organization.
(2) It shall prepare and maintain a current, written plan of operation, as defined by the department.
(3) It shall offer 24-hour, nonmedical care and supervision to youth who voluntarily consent to being admitted to the program and who are voluntarily admitted by his or her parent or legal guardian.
(4) (A) It shall not admit a child younger than 12 years of age.
(B) It shall not admit a youth who has been assessed by a licensed mental health professional as seriously emotionally disturbed, unless the youth does not require care in a licensed health facility and the State Department of Health Care Services has certified the facility as a program that meets the standards to provide mental health treatment services for a child having a serious emotional disturbance, as set forth in Section 4096.5 of the Welfare and Institutions Code.
(5) It shall provide each prospective youth and his or her parent or legal guardian with an accurate written description of the programs and services to be provided. If it advertises or promotes special care, programming, or environments for persons with behavioral, emotional, or social challenges, the written description shall include how its programs and services are intended to achieve the advertised or promoted claims.
(6) It shall ensure that all individuals providing behavioral-based services to youth at the facility are licensed or certified by the appropriate agency, department, or accrediting body, as specified by the department in regulation.
(7) It shall not use secure containment or manual or mechanical restraints.
(8) If it offers access to, or holds itself out as offering access to, mental health services, it shall ensure that those services are provided by a licensed mental health provider.
(9) If it advertises or includes in its marketing materials reference to providing alcohol or substance abuse treatment, it shall ensure that the treatment is provided by a licensed or certified alcoholism or drug abuse recovery or treatment facility.
(c) A private alternative boarding school shall submit a staff training plan to the department as part of its plan of operation. In addition to the training required of group home staff, the staff training plan shall include, but not be limited to, training in all of the following subject areas:
(1) Youth rights, as described in subdivision (d).
(2) Physical and psychosocial needs of youth.
(3) Appropriate responses to emergencies, including an emergency intervention plan.
(4) Cultural competency and sensitivity in issues relating to the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender communities.
(5) Laws pertaining to residential care facilities for youth.
(d) (1) A youth admitted to a licensed private alternative boarding school shall be accorded the following rights and any other rights adopted by the department in regulations, a list of which shall be publicly posted and accessible to youth. The personal rights enumerated in Section 84072 of Title 22 of the California Code of Regulations shall not apply.
(A) To be accorded dignity in his or her personal relationships with staff, youth, and other persons.
(B) To live in a safe, healthy, and comfortable environment where he or she is treated with respect.
(C) To be free from physical, sexual, emotional, or other abuse, or corporal punishment.
(D) To be granted a reasonable level of personal privacy in accommodations, personal care and assistance, and visits.
(E) To confidential care of his or her records and personal information, and to approve release of those records prior to release, except as otherwise authorized or required by law.
(F) To care, supervision, and services that meet his or her individual needs and that are delivered by staff who are sufficient in numbers, qualifications, and competency to meet his or her needs and ensure his or her safety.
(G) To be served food and beverages of the quality and in the quantity necessary to meet his or her nutritional and physical needs.
(H) (i) To present grievances and recommend changes in policies, procedures, and services to the facility’s staff, management, and governing authority, or any other person without restraint, coercion, discrimination, reprisal, or other retaliatory actions.
(ii) To have the licensee take prompt actions to respond to grievances presented pursuant to clause (i).
(I) To be able to contact parents or legal guardians, including visits and scheduled and unscheduled private telephone conversations, written correspondence, and electronic communications, unless prohibited by court order.
(J) To be fully informed, as evidenced by the youth’s written acknowledgment, prior to, or at the time of, admission at the facility, of all the rules governing the youth’s conduct and responsibilities.
(K) To receive in the admission agreement information that details the planned programs and services for the youth.
(L) To have his or her parents or legal guardians remove him or her from the facility.
(M) To consent to have visitors or telephone calls during reasonable hours, privately and without prior notice, if the visitors or telephone calls do not disrupt planned activities and are not prohibited by court order or by the youth’s parent or legal guardian.
(N) To be free of corporal punishment, physical restraints of any kind, and deprivation of basic necessities, including education, as a punishment, deterrent, or incentive.
(O) To have caregivers who have received instruction on cultural competency and sensitivity relating to, and best practices for, providing adequate care to lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender youth in out-of-home care.
(P) To be free from acts that seek to change his or her sexual orientation, including efforts to change his or her gender expressions, or to eliminate or reduce sexual or romantic attractions or feelings toward individuals of the same sex.
(Q) To have fair and equal access to all available services, placement, care, treatment, and benefits and to not be subjected to discrimination or harassment on the basis of actual or perceived race, ethnic group identification, ancestry, national origin, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, mental or physical disability, or HIV status.
(R) To be free from abusive, humiliating, degrading, or traumatizing actions.
(2) Paragraph (1) shall not be interpreted to require a licensed private alternative boarding school to take any action that would impair the health or safety of youth in the facility.
(e) (1) A licensed private alternative boarding school is not an eligible placement option pursuant to Section 319, 361.2, 450, or 727 of the Welfare and Institutions Code.
(2) A licensed private alternative boarding school shall not be eligible for a rate pursuant to Section 11462 of the Welfare and Institutions Code.
(f) This section does not apply to any facility operated, licensed, or certified by the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation and its Division of Juvenile Justice, the California Conservation Corps, the Military Department, or any other governmental entity or to a boarding school that solely focuses on academics.
(g) (1) On or before January 1, 2018, the department shall adopt regulations to implement this section, in consultation with interested parties, including representatives of private alternative boarding schools, former residents of private alternative boarding schools, and advocates for youth. Until regulations are adopted and become effective pursuant to the Administrative Procedure Act, Chapter 3.5 (commencing with Section 11340) of Part 1 of Division 3 of Title 2 of the Government Code, a private alternative boarding school shall be governed by the regulations applicable to group homes, Chapter 5 (commencing with Section 84000) of Division 6 of Title 22 of the California Code of Regulations.
(2) The department may adopt emergency regulations to implement this section. The adoption, amendment, repeal, or readoption of a regulation authorized by this section is deemed to address an emergency, for purposes of Sections 11346.1 and 11349.6 of the Government Code, and the department is hereby exempted for this purpose from the requirements of subdivision (b) of Section 11346.1 of the Government Code.
(h) A private alternative boarding school operating prior to January 1, 2018, shall comply with licensing requirements on or before July 1, 2018.
(i) For the purpose of this section, “youth” means a person who is 12 to 17 years of age, inclusive, or a person who is 18 years of age if he or she is completing high school or its equivalent.

SEC. 4.

 Section 1502.21 is added to the Health and Safety Code, to read:

1502.21.
 (a) Commencing January 1, 2019, the department shall license private alternative outdoor programs, as defined in paragraph (20) of subdivision (a) of Section 1502, as a group home pursuant to this chapter. A private alternative outdoor program shall comply with the provisions of this chapter that are applicable to group homes, unless otherwise indicated, and with this section.
(b) A licensed private alternative outdoor program shall comply with all of the following:
(1) It shall be owned and operated on a nonprofit basis by a private nonprofit corporation or a nonprofit organization.
(2) It shall prepare and maintain a current, written plan of operation, as defined by the department.
(3) It shall offer 24-hour, nonmedical care and supervision to youth who voluntarily consent to being admitted to the program and who are voluntarily admitted by his or her parent or legal guardian.
(4) It shall have a ratio of one staff person to every four youths.
(5) (A) It shall not admit a child who is younger than 12 years of age.
(B) It shall not admit a youth who has been assessed by a licensed mental health professional as seriously emotionally disturbed, unless the youth does not require care in a licensed health facility and the State Department of Health Care Services has certified the program as a program that meets the standards to provide mental health treatment services for a child having a serious emotional disturbance, as set forth in Section 4096.5 of the Welfare and Institutions Code.
(6) It shall provide each prospective youth and his or her parent or legal guardian with an accurate written description of the programs and services to be provided. If it advertises or promotes special care, programming, or environments for persons with behavioral, emotional, or social challenges, the written description shall include how its programs and services are intended to achieve the advertised or promoted claims.
(7) It shall ensure that all individuals providing behavioral-based services to youth in the program are licensed or certified by the appropriate agency, department, or accrediting body, as specified by the department in regulation.
(8) It shall not use secure containment or manual or mechanical restraints.
(9) If it offers access to, or holds itself out as offering access to, mental health services, it shall ensure that those services are provided by a licensed mental health provider.
(10) If it advertises or includes in its marketing materials reference to providing alcohol or substance abuse treatment, it shall ensure that the treatment is provided by a licensed or certified alcoholism or drug abuse recovery or treatment facility.
(c) (1) In addition to the training required of group home staff by department regulations, a staff member of a licensed private alternative outdoor program who supervises youth shall receive an additional number of hours of initial and annual training, to be determined by the department in regulations developed in consultation with stakeholders.
(2) A private alternative outdoor program shall submit a staff training plan to the department as part of its plan of operation. The staff training plan shall provide for the number of additional initial and annual training hours required by paragraph (1) and shall include, but not be limited to, training in all of the following subject areas:
(A) Youth rights, as described in subdivision (d).
(B) Physical and psychosocial needs of youth.
(C) Appropriate responses to emergencies, including an emergency intervention plan.
(D) Cultural competency and sensitivity in issues relating to the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender communities.
(E) Laws pertaining to residential care facilities for youth.
(F) Low-impact camping.
(G) Navigation skills.
(H) Water, food, and shelter procurement.
(I) Recognition of poisonous plants.
(J) Wilderness first aid.
(K) Health issues related to acclimation and exposure.
(L) Report writing and log maintenance.
(d) (1) A youth admitted to a licensed private alternative outdoor program shall be accorded the following rights and any other rights adopted by the department by regulation, a list of which shall be publicly posted and accessible to youth. The personal rights enumerated in Section 84072 of Title 22 of the California Code of Regulations shall not apply.
(A) To be accorded dignity in his or her personal relationships with staff, youth, and other persons.
(B) To live in a safe, healthy, and comfortable environment where he or she is treated with respect.
(C) To be free from physical, sexual, emotional, or other abuse, or corporal punishment.
(D) To be granted a reasonable level of personal privacy in accommodations, personal care and assistance, and visits.
(E) To confidential care of his or her records and personal information, and to approve release of those records prior to release, except as otherwise authorized or required by law.
(F) To care, supervision, and services that meet his or her individual needs and that are delivered by staff who are sufficient in numbers, qualifications, and competency to meet his or her needs and ensure his or her safety.
(G) To be served food and beverages of the quality and in the quantity necessary to meet his or her nutritional and physical needs.
(H) (i) To present grievances and recommend changes in policies, procedures, and services to the program’s staff, management, and governing authority, or any other person without restraint, coercion, discrimination, reprisal, or other retaliatory actions.
(ii) To have the licensee take prompt actions to respond to grievances presented pursuant to clause (i).
(I) To be able to contact parents or legal guardians, including visits and scheduled and unscheduled private telephone conversations, written correspondence, and electronic communications, unless prohibited by court order.
(J) To be fully informed, as evidenced by the youth’s written acknowledgment, prior to, or at the time of, admission in the program, of all the rules governing the youth’s conduct and responsibilities.
(K) To receive in the admission agreement information that details the planned programs and services for the youth.
(L) To have his or her parents or legal guardians remove him or her from the program.
(M) To consent to have visitors or telephone calls during reasonable hours, privately and without prior notice, provided the visitors or telephone calls do not disrupt planned activities and are not prohibited by court order or by the youth’s parent or legal guardian.
(N) To be free of corporal punishment, physical restraints of any kind, and deprivation of basic necessities, including education, as a punishment, deterrent, or incentive.
(O) To have caregivers who have received instruction on cultural competency and sensitivity relating to, and best practices for, providing adequate care to lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender youth in out-of-home care.
(P) To be free from acts that seek to change his or her sexual orientation, including efforts to change his or her gender expressions, or to eliminate or reduce sexual or romantic attractions or feelings toward individuals of the same sex.
(Q) To have fair and equal access to all available services, placement, care, treatment, and benefits and to not be subjected to discrimination or harassment on the basis of actual or perceived race, ethnic group identification, ancestry, national origin, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, mental or physical disability, or HIV status.
(R) To be free from abusive, humiliating, degrading, or traumatizing actions.
(2) Paragraph (1) shall not be interpreted to require a licensed private alternative outdoor program to take any action that would impair the health or safety of youth in the program.
(e) (1) A licensed private alternative outdoor program is not an eligible placement option pursuant to Section 319, 361.2, 450, or 727 of the Welfare and Institutions Code.
(2) A licensed private alternative outdoor program shall not be eligible for a rate pursuant to Section 11462 of the Welfare and Institutions Code.
(f) This section does not apply to programs operated, licensed, or certified by the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation and its Division of Juvenile Justice, the California Conservation Corps, or the Military Department, programs operated by any governmental entity, any organized camp as defined in Section 18897, outdoor activities for youth designed to be primarily recreational, including, but not limited to, activities organized by Outward Bound, Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts, Camp Fire, or other similar organizations, or any camp exclusively serving children with a medical diagnosis for a physical condition or illness, including, but not limited to, cancer, muscular dystrophy, or burn injuries.
(g) (1) On or before January 1, 2019, the department shall adopt regulations to implement this section in consultation with interested parties, including representatives of private alternative outdoor programs, former participants in private alternative outdoor programs, and advocates for youth. Regulations adopted pursuant to this section shall be contained in the regulations applicable to group homes in Chapter 5 (commencing with Section 84000) of Division 6 of Title 22 of the California Code of Regulations.
(2) The department may adopt emergency regulations to implement this section. The adoption, amendment, repeal, or readoption of a regulation authorized by this section is deemed to address an emergency, for purposes of Sections 11346.1 and 11349.6 of the Government Code, and the department is hereby exempted for this purpose from the requirements of subdivision (b) of Section 11346.1 of the Government Code.
(h) A private alternative outdoor program operating prior January 1, 2019, shall comply with licensing requirements on or before July 1, 2019.
(i) For the purpose of this section, “youth” means a person who is 12 to 17 years of age, inclusive, or a person who is 18 years of age if he or she is completing high school or its equivalent.

SEC. 5.

 Section 1505 of the Health and Safety Code is amended to read:

1505.
 This chapter does not apply to any of the following:
(a) Any health facility, as defined by Section 1250.
(b) Any clinic, as defined by Section 1202.
(c) Any juvenile placement facility approved by the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, Division of Juvenile Justice, or any juvenile hall operated by a county.
(d) Any place in which a juvenile is judicially placed pursuant to subdivision (a) of Section 727 of the Welfare and Institutions Code.
(e) Any child day care facility, as defined in Section 1596.750.
(f) (1) Any facility conducted by and for the adherents of any well-recognized church or religious denomination for the purpose of providing facilities for the care or treatment of the sick who depend solely upon prayer or spiritual means for healing in the practice of the religion of the church or denomination.
(2) A private alternative boarding school or private alternative outdoor program, as defined in subdivision (a) of Section 1502, that uses prayer or spiritual means as a component of its programming or services in addition to behavioral-based services is subject to licensure under this chapter.
(g) Any school dormitory or similar facility determined by the department, except a private alternative boarding school or private alternative outdoor program as defined in subdivision (a) of Section 1502.
(h) Any house, institution, hotel, homeless shelter, or other similar place that supplies board and room only, or room only, or board only, provided that no resident thereof requires any element of care as determined by the director.
(i) Recovery houses or other similar facilities providing group living arrangements for adults recovering from alcoholism or drug addiction where the facility provides no care or supervision.
(j) Any alcoholism or drug abuse recovery or treatment facility as defined in Section 11834.02.
(k) Any arrangement for the receiving and care of persons by a relative or any arrangement for the receiving and care of persons from only one family by a close friend of the parent, guardian, or conservator, if the arrangement is not for financial profit and occurs only occasionally and irregularly, as defined by regulations of the department. For purposes of this chapter, arrangements for the receiving and care of persons by a relative shall include relatives of the child for the purpose of keeping sibling groups together.
(l) (1) Any home of a relative caregiver of children who are placed by a juvenile court, supervised by the county welfare or probation department, and the placement of whom is approved according to subdivision (d) of Section 309 of the Welfare and Institutions Code.
(2) Any home of a nonrelative extended family member, as described in Section 362.7 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, providing care to children who are placed by a juvenile court, supervised by the county welfare or probation department, and the placement of whom is approved according to subdivision (d) of Section 309 of the Welfare and Institutions Code.
(3) On and after January 1, 2012, any supervised independent living placement for nonminor dependents, as defined in subdivision (w) of Section 11400 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, who are placed by the juvenile court, supervised by the county welfare department, probation department, Indian tribe, consortium of tribes, or tribal organization that entered into an agreement pursuant to Section 10553.1 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, and whose placement is approved pursuant to subdivision (k) of Section 11400 of the Welfare and Institutions Code.
(4) A Transitional Housing Program-Plus, as defined in subdivision (s) of Section 11400 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, that serves only eligible former foster youth over 18 years of age who have exited from the foster care system on or after their 18th birthday, and that has obtained certification from the applicable county in accordance with subdivision (c) of Section 16522 of the Welfare and Institutions Code.
(m) Any supported living arrangement for individuals with developmental disabilities, as defined in Section 4689 of the Welfare and Institutions Code.
(n) (1) Any family home agency, family home, or family teaching home as defined in Section 4689.1 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, that is vendored by the State Department of Developmental Services and that does any of the following:
(A) As a family home approved by a family home agency, provides 24-hour care for one or two adults with developmental disabilities in the residence of the family home provider or providers and the family home provider or providers’ family, and the provider is not licensed by the State Department of Social Services or the State Department of Public Health or certified by a licensee of the State Department of Social Services or the State Department of Public Health.
(B) As a family teaching home approved by a family home agency, provides 24-hour care for a maximum of three adults with developmental disabilities in independent residences, whether contiguous or attached, and the provider is not licensed by the State Department of Social Services or the State Department of Public Health or certified by a licensee of the State Department of Social Services or the State Department of Public Health.
(C) As a family home agency, engages in recruiting, approving, and providing support to family homes.
(2) No part of this subdivision shall be construed as establishing by implication either a family home agency or family home licensing category.
(o) Any facility in which only Indian children who are eligible under the federal Indian Child Welfare Act (Chapter 21 (commencing with Section 1901) of Title 25 of the United States Code) are placed and that is one of the following:
(1) An extended family member of the Indian child, as defined in Section 1903 of Title 25 of the United States Code.
(2) A foster home that is licensed, approved, or specified by the Indian child’s tribe pursuant to Section 1915 of Title 25 of the United States Code.
(p) (1) (A) Any housing occupied by elderly or disabled persons, or both, that is initially approved and operated under a regulatory agreement pursuant to Section 202 of Public Law 86-372 (12 U.S.C. Sec. 1701q), or Section 811 of Public Law 101-625 (42 U.S.C. Sec. 8013), or whose mortgage is insured pursuant to Section 236 of Public Law 90-448 (12 U.S.C. Sec. 1715z), or that receives mortgage assistance pursuant to Section 221d (3) of Public Law 87-70 (12 U.S.C. Sec. 1715l), where supportive services are made available to residents at their option, as long as the project owner or operator does not contract for or provide the supportive services.
(B) Any housing that qualifies for a low-income housing credit pursuant to Section 252 of Public Law 99-514 (26 U.S.C. Sec. 42) or that is subject to the requirements for rental dwellings for low-income families pursuant to Section 8 of Public Law 93-383 (42 U.S.C. Sec. 1437f), and that is occupied by elderly or disabled persons, or both, where supportive services are made available to residents at their option, as long as the project owner or operator does not contract for or provide the supportive services.
(2) The project owner or operator to which paragraph (1) applies may coordinate, or help residents gain access to, the supportive services, either directly, or through a service coordinator.
(q) A resource family, as defined in Section 16519.5 of the Welfare and Institutions Code.
(r) Any similar facility determined by the director.

SEC. 6.

 Section 1507.6 of the Health and Safety Code is amended to read:

1507.6.
 (a) Mental health services, as deemed necessary by the placing agency, may be provided to children in a group home. Except for the physical safety and direct care and supervision of children so placed, the State Department of Social Services and its agents shall not evaluate or have responsibility or liability for the evaluation of mental health services provided in those homes. Supervision of mental health treatment services provided to a child in a group home shall be a case management responsibility of the placing agency.
(b) (1) Psychotropic medications shall be used only in accordance with the written directions of the physician prescribing the medication and as authorized by the juvenile court pursuant to Section 369.5 or 739.5 of the Welfare and Institutions Code.
(2) The facility shall maintain in a child’s records all of the following information:
(A) A copy of any court order authorizing the psychotropic medication for the child.
(B) A separate log for each psychotropic medication prescribed for the child, showing all of the following:
(i) The name of the medication.
(ii) The date of the prescription.
(iii) The quantity of medication and number of refills initially prescribed.
(iv) When applicable, any additional refills prescribed.
(v) The required dosage and directions for use as specified in writing by the physician prescribing the medication, including any changes directed by the physician.
(vi) The date and time of each dose taken by the child.
(3) This subdivision does not apply to a runaway and homeless youth shelter, as defined in Section 1502.
(4) The requirements regarding juvenile court authorization, as described in paragraph (1), and maintaining a copy of any court order, as described in subparagraph (A) of paragraph (2), shall only apply to private alternative boarding schools and private alternative outdoor programs, as defined in Section 1502, as otherwise required by applicable law.

SEC. 7.

 Section 1522.06 of the Health and Safety Code is amended to read:

1522.06.
 (a) Individuals who are volunteer candidates for mentoring children in foster care settings, as defined by the department, in private alternative boarding schools, or in private alternative outdoor programs, shall be subject to a criminal background investigation prior to having unsupervised contact with the children. The criminal background check shall be initiated and conducted pursuant to either Sections 1522 and 1522.1 or Section 1596.603, as applicable. Sections 1522 and 1522.1 may be utilized by a county social services agency in cooperation with, or as a component of, a licensed foster family agency.
(b) (1) The Department of Justice shall not charge a processing fee with respect to any individual to whom subdivision (a) applies for a state-level criminal offender record information search pursuant to Section 1522.
(2) The State Department of Social Services shall not charge a fee for the cost of a criminal background investigation under Section 1522 with respect to any individual to whom subdivision (a) applies.

SEC. 8.

 Section 1522.44 of the Health and Safety Code is amended to read:

1522.44.
 (a) It is the policy of the state that caregivers of children in foster care possess knowledge and skills relating to the reasonable and prudent parent standard, as defined in subdivision (c) of Section 362.05 of the Welfare and Institutions Code.
(b) Except for licensed foster family homes,  homes and  certified family homes, and resource families approved by a foster family agency,  each licensed community care facility that provides care and supervision to children and operates with staff shall designate at least one onsite staff member to apply the reasonable and prudent parent standard to decisions involving the participation of a child who is placed in the facility in age or developmentally appropriate activities in accordance with the requirements of Section 362.05 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, Section 671(a)(10) of Title 42 of the United States Code, and the regulations adopted by the department pursuant to this chapter.
(c) A licensed and certified foster parent, resource family,  parent  or facility staff member, as described in subdivision (b), shall receive training related to the reasonable and prudent parent standard that is consistent with Section 671(a)(24) of Title 42 of the United States Code. This training shall include knowledge and skills relating to the reasonable and prudent parent standard for the participation of the child in age or developmentally appropriate activities, including knowledge and skills relating to the developmental stages of the cognitive, emotional, physical, and behavioral capacities of a child, and knowledge and skills relating to applying the standard to decisions such as whether to allow the child to engage in extracurricular, enrichment, cultural, and social activities, including sports, field trips, and overnight activities lasting one or more days, and to decisions involving the signing of permission slips and arranging of transportation for the child to and from extracurricular, enrichment, and social activities.
(d) This section does not apply to a runaway and homeless youth shelter, a private alternative boarding school, or a private alternative outdoor program, as those terms are defined, respectively, in subdivision (a) of Section 1502.

SEC. 8.5.

 Section 1522.44 of the Health and Safety Code is amended to read:

1522.44.
 (a) It is the policy of the state that caregivers of children in foster care possess knowledge and skills relating to the reasonable and prudent parent standard, as defined in subdivision (c) of Section 362.05 of the Welfare and Institutions Code.
(b) Except for licensed foster family homes, certified family homes, and resource families approved by a foster family agency, each licensed community care facility that provides care and supervision to children and operates with staff shall designate at least one onsite staff member to apply the reasonable and prudent parent standard to decisions involving the participation of a child who is placed in the facility in age or developmentally appropriate activities in accordance with the requirements of Section 362.05 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, Section 671(a)(10) of Title 42 of the United States Code, and the regulations adopted by the department pursuant to this chapter.
(c) A licensed and certified foster parent, resource family, or facility staff member, as described in subdivision (b), shall receive training related to the reasonable and prudent parent standard that is consistent with Section 671(a)(24) of Title 42 of the United States Code. This training shall include knowledge and skills relating to the reasonable and prudent parent standard for the participation of the child in age or developmentally appropriate activities, including knowledge and skills relating to the developmental stages of the cognitive, emotional, physical, and behavioral capacities of a child, and knowledge and skills relating to applying the standard to decisions such as whether to allow the child to engage in extracurricular, enrichment, cultural, and social activities, including sports, field trips, and overnight activities lasting one or more days, and to decisions involving the signing of permission slips and arranging of transportation for the child to and from extracurricular, enrichment, and social activities.
(d) This section does not apply to a runaway and homeless youth shelter, a private alternative boarding school, or a private alternative outdoor program, as those terms are defined, respectively, in subdivision (a) of Section 1502.

SEC. 9.

 Section 1523.1 of the Health and Safety Code is amended to read:

1523.1.
 (a) (1) An application fee adjusted by facility and capacity shall be charged by the department for the issuance of a license. After initial licensure, a fee shall be charged by the department annually on each anniversary of the effective date of the license. The fees are for the purpose of financing the activities specified in this chapter. Fees shall be assessed as follows, subject to paragraph (2):
Fee Schedule
Facility Type
Capacity
Initial
Application
Annual
Foster Family and
Adoption Agencies
 
$3,025
$1,513
Adult Day Programs
  1–15
  $182
  $91
 16–30
  $303
 $152
 31–60
  $605
 $303
 61–75
  $758
 $378
 76–90
  $908
 $454
 91–120
 $1,210
 $605
121+
 $1,513
 $757
Other Community
Care Facilities
  1–3
  $454
 $454
  4–6
  $908
 $454
  7–15
 $1,363
 $681
 16–30
 $1,815
 $908
 31–49
 $2,270
$1,135
 
 50–74
 $2,725
$1,363
 
 75–100
 $3,180
$1,590
 
101–150  
 $3,634
$1,817
 
151–200  
 $4,237
$2,119
 
201–250  
 $4,840
$2,420
 
251–300  
 $5,445
$2,723
 
301–350  
 $6,050
$3,025
 
351–400  
 $6,655
   $3,328
 
401–500  
    $7,865
   $3,933
 
501–600  
    $9,075
   $4,538
 
601–700  
   $10,285
   $5,143
 
701+  
   $12,100
   $6,050
(2) (A) The Legislature finds that all revenues generated by fees for licenses computed under this section and used for the purposes for which they were imposed are not subject to Article XIII B of the California Constitution.
(B) The department, at least every five years, shall analyze initial application fees and annual fees issued by it to ensure the appropriate fee amounts are charged. The department shall recommend to the Legislature that fees established by the Legislature be adjusted as necessary to ensure that the amounts are appropriate.
(b) (1) In addition to fees set forth in subdivision (a), the department shall charge the following fees:
(A) A fee that represents 50 percent of an established application fee when an existing licensee moves the facility to a new physical address.
(B) A fee that represents 50 percent of the established application fee when a corporate licensee changes who has the authority to select a majority of the board of directors.
(C) A fee of twenty-five dollars ($25) when an existing licensee seeks to either increase or decrease the licensed capacity of the facility.
(D) An orientation fee of fifty dollars ($50) for attendance by any individual at a department-sponsored orientation session.
(E) A probation monitoring fee equal to the current annual fee, in addition to the current annual fee for that category and capacity for each year a license has been placed on probation as a result of a stipulation or decision and order pursuant to the administrative adjudication procedures of the Administrative Procedure Act (Chapter 4.5 (commencing with Section 11400) and Chapter 5 (commencing with Section 11500) of Part 1 of Division 3 of Title 2 of the Government Code).
(F) A late fee that represents an additional 50 percent of the established current annual fee when any licensee fails to pay the current annual licensing fee on or before the due date as indicated by postmark on the payment.
(G) A fee to cover any costs incurred by the department for processing payments including, but not limited to, bounced check charges, charges for credit and debit transactions, and postage due charges.
(H) A plan of correction fee of two hundred dollars ($200) when any licensee does not implement a plan of correction on or prior to the date specified in the plan.
(I) Additional fees established by the department by regulation for private alternative boarding schools and private alternative outdoor programs, as necessary to regulate those licensees.
(2) Foster family homes and resource family homes approved by a foster family agency  shall be exempt from the fees imposed pursuant to this subdivision.
(3) Foster family agencies shall be annually assessed eighty-eight dollars ($88) for each certified family home and resource family certified or approved  home certified  by the agency.
(4) No local jurisdiction shall impose any business license, fee, or tax for the privilege of operating a facility licensed under this chapter which serves six or fewer persons.
(c) (1) The revenues collected from licensing fees pursuant to this section shall be utilized by the department for the purpose of ensuring the health and safety of all individuals provided care and supervision by licensees and to support activities of the licensing program, including, but not limited to, monitoring facilities for compliance with licensing laws and regulations pursuant to this chapter, and other administrative activities in support of the licensing program, when appropriated for these purposes. The revenues collected shall be used in addition to any other funds appropriated in the Budget Act in support of the licensing program. The department shall adjust the fees collected pursuant to this section as necessary to ensure that they do not exceed the costs described in this paragraph.
(2) The department shall not utilize any portion of these revenues sooner than 30 days after notification in writing of the purpose and use of this revenue, as approved by the Director of Finance, to the Chairperson of the Joint Legislative Budget Committee, and the chairpersons of the committee in each house that considers appropriations for each fiscal year. The department shall submit a budget change proposal to justify any positions or any other related support costs on an ongoing basis.
(d) A facility may use a bona fide business check to pay the license fee required under this section.
(e) The failure of an applicant or licensee to pay all applicable and accrued fees and civil penalties shall constitute grounds for denial or forfeiture of a license.

SEC. 9.5.

 Section 1523.1 of the Health and Safety Code is amended to read:

1523.1.
 (a) (1) An application fee adjusted by facility and capacity shall be charged by the department for the issuance of a license. After initial licensure, a fee shall be charged by the department annually on each anniversary of the effective date of the license. The fees are for the purpose of financing the activities specified in this chapter. Fees shall be assessed as follows, subject to paragraph (2):
Fee Schedule
Facility Type
Capacity
Initial
Application
Annual
Foster Family and
Adoption Agencies
 
$3,025
$1,513
Adult Day Programs
  1–15
  $182
  $91
 16–30
  $303
 $152
 31–60
  $605
 $303
 61–75
  $758
 $378
 76–90
  $908
 $454
 91–120
 $1,210
 $605
121+
 $1,513
 $757
Other Community
Care Facilities
  1–3
  $454
 $454
  4–6
  $908
 $454
  7–15
 $1,363
 $681
 16–30
 $1,815
 $908
 31–49
 $2,270
$1,135
 
 50–74
 $2,725
$1,363
 
 75–100
 $3,180
$1,590
 
101–150  
 $3,634
$1,817
 
151–200  
 $4,237
$2,119
 
201–250  
 $4,840
$2,420
 
251–300  
 $5,445
$2,723
 
301–350  
 $6,050
$3,025
 
351–400  
 $6,655
   $3,328
 
401–500  
    $7,865
   $3,933
 
501–600  
    $9,075
   $4,538
 
601–700  
   $10,285
   $5,143
 
701+  
   $12,100
   $6,050
(2) (A) The Legislature finds that all revenues generated by fees for licenses computed under this section and used for the purposes for which they were imposed are not subject to Article XIII B of the California Constitution.
(B) The department, at least every five years, shall analyze initial application fees and annual fees issued by it to ensure the appropriate fee amounts are charged. The department shall recommend to the Legislature that fees established by the Legislature be adjusted as necessary to ensure that the amounts are appropriate.
(b) (1) In addition to fees set forth in subdivision (a), the department shall charge the following fees:
(A) A fee that represents 50 percent of an established application fee when an existing licensee moves the facility to a new physical address.
(B) A fee that represents 50 percent of the established application fee when a corporate licensee changes who has the authority to select a majority of the board of directors.
(C) A fee of twenty-five dollars ($25) when an existing licensee seeks to either increase or decrease the licensed capacity of the facility.
(D) An orientation fee of fifty dollars ($50) for attendance by any individual at a department-sponsored orientation session.
(E) A probation monitoring fee equal to the current annual fee, in addition to the current annual fee for that category and capacity for each year a license has been placed on probation as a result of a stipulation or decision and order pursuant to the administrative adjudication procedures of the Administrative Procedure Act (Chapter 4.5 (commencing with Section 11400) and Chapter 5 (commencing with Section 11500) of Part 1 of Division 3 of Title 2 of the Government Code).
(F) A late fee that represents an additional 50 percent of the established current annual fee when any licensee fails to pay the current annual licensing fee on or before the due date as indicated by postmark on the payment.
(G) A fee to cover any costs incurred by the department for processing payments including, but not limited to, bounced check charges, charges for credit and debit transactions, and postage due charges.
(H) A plan of correction fee of two hundred dollars ($200) when any licensee does not implement a plan of correction on or prior to the date specified in the plan.
(I) Additional fees established by the department by regulation for private alternative boarding schools and private alternative outdoor programs, as necessary to regulate those licensees.
(2) Foster family homes and resource family homes approved by a foster family agency shall be exempt from the fees imposed pursuant to this subdivision.
(3) Foster family agencies shall be annually assessed eighty-eight dollars ($88) for each certified family home and resource family certified or approved by the agency.
(4) No local jurisdiction shall impose any business license, fee, or tax for the privilege of operating a facility licensed under this chapter which serves six or fewer persons.
(c) (1) The revenues collected from licensing fees pursuant to this section shall be utilized by the department for the purpose of ensuring the health and safety of all individuals provided care and supervision by licensees and to support activities of the licensing program, including, but not limited to, monitoring facilities for compliance with licensing laws and regulations pursuant to this chapter, and other administrative activities in support of the licensing program, when appropriated for these purposes. The revenues collected shall be used in addition to any other funds appropriated in the Budget Act in support of the licensing program. The department shall adjust the fees collected pursuant to this section as necessary to ensure that they do not exceed the costs described in this paragraph.
(2) The department shall not utilize any portion of these revenues sooner than 30 days after notification in writing of the purpose and use of this revenue, as approved by the Director of Finance, to the Chairperson of the Joint Legislative Budget Committee, and the chairpersons of the committee in each house that considers appropriations for each fiscal year. The department shall submit a budget change proposal to justify any positions or any other related support costs on an ongoing basis.
(d) A facility may use a bona fide business check to pay the license fee required under this section.
(e) The failure of an applicant or licensee to pay all applicable and accrued fees and civil penalties shall constitute grounds for denial or forfeiture of a license.

SEC. 10.

 Section 1538.8 of the Health and Safety Code is amended to read:

1538.8.
 (a) (1) In order to review and evaluate the use of psychotropic medications in group homes and short-term residential therapeutic programs,  homes,  the department shall compile, to the extent feasible and not otherwise prohibited by law and based on information received from the State Department of Health Care Services, at least annually, information concerning each group home and short-term residential therapeutic program,  home,  including, but not limited to, the child welfare psychotropic medication measures developed by the department and the following Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set (HEDIS) measures related to psychotropic medications:
(A) Follow-Up Care for Children Prescribed Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Medication (HEDIS ADD), which measures the number of children 6 to 12 years of age, inclusive, who have a visit with a provider with prescribing authority within 30 days of the new prescription.
(B) Use of Multiple Concurrent Antipsychotics in Children and Adolescents (HEDIS APC), which does both of the following:
(i) Measures the number of children receiving an antipsychotic medication for at least 60 out of 90 days and the number of children who additionally receive a second antipsychotic medication that overlaps with the first.
(ii) Reports a total rate and age stratifications including 6 to 11 years of age, inclusive, and 12 to 17 years of age, inclusive.
(C) Use of First-Line Psychosocial Care for Children and Adolescents on Antipsychotics (HEDIS APP), which measures whether a child has received psychosocial services 90 days before through 30 days after receiving a new prescription for an antipsychotic medication.
(D) Metabolic Monitoring for Children and Adolescents on Antipsychotics (HEDIS APM), which does both of the following:
(i) Measures testing for glucose or HbA1c and lipid or cholesterol of a child who has received at least two different antipsychotic prescriptions on different days.
(ii) Reports a total rate and age stratifications including 6 to 11 years of age, inclusive, and 12 to 17 years of age, inclusive.
(2) The department shall post the list of data to be collected pursuant to this subdivision on the department’s Internet Web site.
(b) The data in subdivision (a) concerning psychotropic medication, mental health services, and placement shall be drawn from existing data maintained by the State Department of Health Care Services and the State Department of Social Services and shared pursuant to a data sharing agreement meeting the requirements of all applicable state and federal laws and regulations.
(c) This section does not apply to a runaway and homeless youth shelter, a private alternative boarding school, or a private alternative outdoor program, as those terms are defined, respectively, in Section 1502.

SEC. 10.5.

 Section 1538.8 of the Health and Safety Code is amended to read:

1538.8.
 (a) (1) In order to review and evaluate the use of psychotropic medications in group homes and short-term residential therapeutic programs, the department shall compile, to the extent feasible and not otherwise prohibited by law and based on information received from the State Department of Health Care Services, at least annually, information concerning each group home and short-term residential therapeutic program, including, but not limited to, the child welfare psychotropic medication measures developed by the department and the following Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set (HEDIS) measures related to psychotropic medications:
(A) Follow-Up Care for Children Prescribed Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Medication (HEDIS ADD), which measures the number of children 6 to 12 years of age, inclusive, who have a visit with a provider with prescribing authority within 30 days of the new prescription.
(B) Use of Multiple Concurrent Antipsychotics in Children and Adolescents (HEDIS APC), which does both of the following:
(i) Measures the number of children receiving an antipsychotic medication for at least 60 out of 90 days and the number of children who additionally receive a second antipsychotic medication that overlaps with the first.
(ii) Reports a total rate and age stratifications including 6 to 11 years of age, inclusive, and 12 to 17 years of age, inclusive.
(C) Use of First-Line Psychosocial Care for Children and Adolescents on Antipsychotics (HEDIS APP), which measures whether a child has received psychosocial services 90 days before through 30 days after receiving a new prescription for an antipsychotic medication.
(D) Metabolic Monitoring for Children and Adolescents on Antipsychotics (HEDIS APM), which does both of the following:
(i) Measures testing for glucose or HbA1c and lipid or cholesterol of a child who has received at least two different antipsychotic prescriptions on different days.
(ii) Reports a total rate and age stratifications including 6 to 11 years of age, inclusive, and 12 to 17 years of age, inclusive.
(2) The department shall post the list of data to be collected pursuant to this subdivision on the department’s Internet Web site.
(b) The data in subdivision (a) concerning psychotropic medication, mental health services, and placement shall be drawn from existing data maintained by the State Department of Health Care Services and the State Department of Social Services and shared pursuant to a data sharing agreement meeting the requirements of all applicable state and federal laws and regulations.
(c) This section does not apply to a runaway and homeless youth shelter, a private alternative boarding school, or a private alternative outdoor program, as those terms are defined, respectively, in Section 1502.

SEC. 11.

 Section 1538.9 of the Health and Safety Code is amended to read:

1538.9.
 (a) (1) (A) The department shall consult with the State Department of Health Care Services and stakeholders to establish a methodology for identifying those group homes providing care under the AFDC-FC program pursuant to Sections 11460 and 11462 of the Welfare and Institutions Code that have levels of psychotropic drug utilization warranting additional review. The methodology shall be adopted on or before July 1, 2016.
(B) Every three years after adopting the methodology developed under subparagraph (A), or earlier if needed, the department shall consult with the State Department of Health Care Services and stakeholders and revise the methodology, if necessary.
(2) If the department, applying the methodology described in paragraph (1), determines that a facility appears to have levels of psychotropic drug utilization warranting additional review, it shall inspect the facility at least once a year.
(3) The inspection of the facility shall include, but not be limited to, a review of the following:
(A) Plan of operation, policies, procedures, and practices.
(B) Child-to-staff ratios.
(C) Staff qualifications and training.
(D) Implementation of children’s needs and services plan.
(E) Availability of psychosocial and other alternative treatments to the use of psychotropic medications.
(F) Other factors that the department determines contribute to levels of psychotropic drug utilization that warrant additional review.
(G) Confidential interviews of children residing in the facility at the time of the inspection.
(4) The inspection of the facility may include, but is not limited to, the following:
(A) Confidential interviews of children who resided in the facility within the last six months.
(B) Confidential discussions with physicians identified as prescribing the medications.
(b) Following an inspection conducted pursuant to this section, the department, as it deems appropriate, may do either or both of the following:
(1) Share relevant information and observations with county placing agencies, social workers, probation officers, the court, dependency counsel, or the Medical Board of California, as applicable.
(2) Share relevant information and observations with the facility and require the facility to submit a plan, within 30 days of receiving the information and observations from the department, to address any identified risks within the control of the facility related to psychotropic medication. The department shall approve the plan and verify implementation of the plan to determine whether those risks have been remedied.
(c) (1) Notwithstanding the rulemaking provisions of the Administrative Procedure Act (Chapter 3.5 (commencing with Section 11340) of Part 1 of Division 3 of Title 2 of the Government Code), until emergency regulations are filed with the Secretary of State, the department may implement this section through all-county letters or similar instructions.
(2) On or before January 1, 2017, the department shall adopt regulations to implement this section. The initial adoption, amendment, or repeal of a regulation authorized by this subdivision is deemed to address an emergency, for purposes of Sections 11346.1 and 11349.6 of the Government Code, and the department is hereby exempted for that purpose from the requirements of subdivision (b) of Section 11346.1 of the Government Code. After the initial adoption, amendment, or repeal of an emergency regulation pursuant to this section, the department may twice request approval from the Office of Administrative Law to readopt the regulation as an emergency regulation pursuant to Section 11346.1 of the Government Code. The department shall adopt final regulations on or before January 1, 2018.
(d) Nothing in this section does any of the following:
(1) Replaces or alters other requirements for responding to complaints and making inspections or visits to group homes, including, but not limited to, those set forth in Sections 1534 and 1538.
(2) Prevents or precludes the department from taking any other action permitted under any other law, including any regulation adopted pursuant to this chapter.
(e) The methodology developed pursuant to this section shall apply to short-term residential therapeutic programs, as defined in Section 1502, in a manner determined by the department.
(f) (e)  This section does not apply to a runaway and homeless youth shelter, a private alternative boarding school, or a private alternative outdoor program, as those terms are defined, respectively, in Section 1502.

SEC. 11.5.

 Section 1538.9 of the Health and Safety Code is amended to read:

1538.9.
 (a) (1) (A) The department shall consult with the State Department of Health Care Services and stakeholders to establish a methodology for identifying those group homes providing care under the AFDC-FC program pursuant to Sections 11460 and 11462 of the Welfare and Institutions Code that have levels of psychotropic drug utilization warranting additional review. The methodology shall be adopted on or before July 1, 2016.
(B) Every three years after adopting the methodology developed under subparagraph (A), or earlier if needed, the department shall consult with the State Department of Health Care Services and stakeholders and revise the methodology, if necessary.
(2) If the department, applying the methodology described in paragraph (1), determines that a facility appears to have levels of psychotropic drug utilization warranting additional review, it shall inspect the facility at least once a year.
(3) The inspection of the facility shall include, but not be limited to, a review of the following:
(A) Plan of operation, policies, procedures, and practices.
(B) Child-to-staff ratios.
(C) Staff qualifications and training.
(D) Implementation of children’s needs and services plan.
(E) Availability of psychosocial and other alternative treatments to the use of psychotropic medications.
(F) Other factors that the department determines contribute to levels of psychotropic drug utilization that warrant additional review.
(G) Confidential interviews of children residing in the facility at the time of the inspection.
(4) The inspection of the facility may include, but is not limited to, the following:
(A) Confidential interviews of children who resided in the facility within the last six months.
(B) Confidential discussions with physicians identified as prescribing the medications.
(b) Following an inspection conducted pursuant to this section, the department, as it deems appropriate, may do either or both of the following:
(1) Share relevant information and observations with county placing agencies, social workers, probation officers, the court, dependency counsel, or the Medical Board of California, as applicable.
(2) Share relevant information and observations with the facility and require the facility to submit a plan, within 30 days of receiving the information and observations from the department, to address any identified risks within the control of the facility related to psychotropic medication. The department shall approve the plan and verify implementation of the plan to determine whether those risks have been remedied.
(c) (1) Notwithstanding the rulemaking provisions of the Administrative Procedure Act (Chapter 3.5 (commencing with Section 11340) of Part 1 of Division 3 of Title 2 of the Government Code), until emergency regulations are filed with the Secretary of State, the department may implement this section through all-county letters or similar instructions.
(2) On or before January 1, 2017, the department shall adopt regulations to implement this section. The initial adoption, amendment, or repeal of a regulation authorized by this subdivision is deemed to address an emergency, for purposes of Sections 11346.1 and 11349.6 of the Government Code, and the department is hereby exempted for that purpose from the requirements of subdivision (b) of Section 11346.1 of the Government Code. After the initial adoption, amendment, or repeal of an emergency regulation pursuant to this section, the department may twice request approval from the Office of Administrative Law to readopt the regulation as an emergency regulation pursuant to Section 11346.1 of the Government Code. The department shall adopt final regulations on or before January 1, 2018.
(d) Nothing in this section does any of the following:
(1) Replaces or alters other requirements for responding to complaints and making inspections or visits to group homes, including, but not limited to, those set forth in Sections 1534 and 1538.
(2) Prevents or precludes the department from taking any other action permitted under any other law, including any regulation adopted pursuant to this chapter.
(e) The methodology developed pursuant to this section shall apply to short-term residential therapeutic programs, as defined in Section 1502, in a manner determined by the department.
(f) This section does not apply to a runaway and homeless youth shelter, a private alternative boarding school, or a private alternative outdoor program, as those terms are defined, respectively, in Section 1502.
SEC. 12.
 (a) (1) Section 2.1 of this bill incorporates amendments to Section 1502 of the Health and Safety Code proposed by both this bill and Assembly Bill 741. It shall only become operative if (A) both bills are enacted and become effective on or before January 1, 2017, (B) each bill amends Section 1502 of the Health and Safety Code, (C) Assembly Bill 1997 is not enacted or as enacted does not amend that section, and (D) this bill is enacted after Assembly Bill 741, in which case Sections 2, 2.2, and 2.3 of this bill shall not become operative.
(2) Section 2.2 of this bill incorporates amendments to Section 1502 of the Health and Safety Code proposed by both this bill and Assembly Bill 1997. It shall only become operative if (A) both bills are enacted and become effective on or before January 1, 2017, (B) each bill amends Section 1502 of the Health and Safety Code, (C) Assembly Bill 741 is not enacted or as enacted does not amend that section, and (D) this bill is enacted after Assembly Bill 1997, in which case Sections 2, 2.1, and 2.3 of this bill shall not become operative.
(3) Section 2.3 of this bill incorporates amendments to Section 1502 of the Health and Safety Code proposed by this bill, Assembly Bill 741, and Assembly Bill 1997. It shall only become operative if (A) all three bills are enacted and become effective on or before January 1, 2017, (B) all three bills amend Section 1502 of the Health and Safety Code, and (C) this bill is enacted after Assembly Bill 741 and Assembly Bill 1997, in which case Sections 2, 2.1, and 2.2 of this bill shall not become operative.
(b) Section 8.5 of this bill incorporates amendments to Section 1522.44 of the Health and Safety Code proposed by both this bill and Assembly Bill 1997. It shall only become operative if (1) both bills are enacted and become effective on or before January 1, 2017, (2) each bill amends Section 1522.44 of the Health and Safety Code, and (3) this bill is enacted after Assembly Bill 1997, in which case Section 8 of this bill shall not become operative.
(c) Section 9.5 of this bill incorporates amendments to Section 1523.1 of the Health and Safety Code proposed by both this bill and Assembly Bill 1997. It shall only become operative if (1) both bills are enacted and become effective on or before January 1, 2017, (2) each bill amends Section 1523.1 of the Health and Safety Code, and (3) this bill is enacted after Assembly Bill 1997, in which case Section 9 of this bill shall not become operative.
(d) Section 10.5 of this bill incorporates amendments to Section 1538.8 of the Health and Safety Code proposed by both this bill and Assembly Bill 1997. It shall only become operative if (1) both bills are enacted and become effective on or before January 1, 2017, (2) each bill amends Section 1538.8 of the Health and Safety Code, and (3) this bill is enacted after Assembly Bill 1997, in which case Section 10 of this bill shall not become operative.
(e) Section 11.5 of this bill incorporates amendments to Section 1538.9 of the Health and Safety Code proposed by both this bill and Assembly Bill 1997. It shall only become operative if (1) both bills are enacted and become effective on or before January 1, 2017, (2) each bill amends Section 1538.9 of the Health and Safety Code, and (3) this bill is enacted after Assembly Bill 1997, in which case Section 11 of this bill shall not become operative.
SEC. 13.
 No reimbursement is required by this act pursuant to Section 6 of Article XIII B of the California Constitution because the only costs that may be incurred by a local agency or school district will be incurred because this act creates a new crime or infraction, eliminates a crime or infraction, or changes the penalty for a crime or infraction, within the meaning of Section 17556 of the Government Code, or changes the definition of a crime within the meaning of Section 6 of Article XIII B of the California Constitution.