Code Section Group

Public Utilities Code - PUC

DIVISION 10. TRANSIT DISTRICTS [24501 - 107025]

  ( Division 10 repealed and added by Stats. 1955, Ch. 1036. )

PART 11. PROVISIONS APPLICABLE TO ALL PUBLIC TRANSIT [99000 - 99582]

  ( Part 11 added by Stats. 1968, Ch. 1325. )

CHAPTER 3. Miscellaneous [99150 - 99175]
  ( Chapter 3 added by Stats. 1976, Ch. 501. )

99150.
  

In locating its bus stops, park and ride service facilities, and special service terminal points and stations, a transit district shall consult with, and consider the recommendations of, the city if such transit facilities are to be located therein, or the county if such transit facilities are to be located in the unincorporated area thereof, on the proposed locations.

The city or county, as the case may be, in making its recommendations to the transit district on the proposed location of any such transit facilities, shall consider whether the proposed location is consistent with the circulation element of its general plan.

(Added by Stats. 1976, Ch. 501.)

99151.
  

Any transit district whose area is served by the Southern Pacific Transportation Company line from the City of San Jose to the City and County of San Francisco may make a bulk purchase of passenger tickets for that line from the company, or from the Greyhound Bus Lines for transportation services within the area, or from both, for resale at less than the cost to the transit district to residents of the transit district.

The governing body of the transit district shall determine the resale price of tickets purchased by it.

(Amended by Stats. 1979, Ch. 768.)

99152.
  

Any public transit guideway planned, acquired, or constructed, on or after January 1, 1979, is subject to regulations of the Public Utilities Commission relating to safety appliances and procedures.

The commission shall inspect all work done on those guideways and may make further additions or changes necessary for the purpose of safety to employees and the general public.

The commission shall develop an oversight program employing safety planning criteria, guidelines, safety standards, and safety procedures to be met by operators in the design, construction, and operation of those guideways. Existing industry standards shall be used where applicable.

The commission shall enforce the provisions of this section.

(Amended by Stats. 1986, Ch. 483, Sec. 1.)

99153.
  

Any transit district or operator may adopt uniform standards to rate bidders, on the basis of questionnaires and required statements, with respect to contracts for railroad rolling stock upon which each bidder is qualified to bid. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, the district or operator may limit bidding and award of contracts for railroad rolling stock to the bidders the district or operator has determined are qualified to bid. However, the district or operator shall qualify at least two persons or entities for bidding on the contracts.

(Added by Stats. 1982, Ch. 177, Sec. 1.)

99154.
  

Any transit district or operator may require from prospective bidders for any contract answers to questions contained in a standard questionnaire and financial statement, including a complete statement of the prospective bidder’s financial ability and experience in performing public contracts. When completed, the questionnaire and financial statement shall be verified under oath by the bidder in the manner in which pleadings are verified in civil actions.

The questionnaires and financial statements are not public records and shall not be open to public inspection.

(Added by Stats. 1982, Ch. 177, Sec. 2.)

99155.
  

(a) Each transit operator, whether publicly or privately funded all or in part, nonprofit or for profit, which offers reduced fares to senior citizens shall honor the federal Medicare identification card as sufficient identification to receive reduced fares. A transit operator which offers reduced fares to those senior citizens who are less than 65 years old shall also honor the senior citizen identification card issued pursuant to subdivision (b) of Section 13000 of the Vehicle Code.

(b) Each transit operator, whether publicly or privately funded, in whole or in part, nonprofit or for profit, which offers reduced fares pursuant to subdivision (a) shall also offer reduced fares to disabled persons, as defined by Section 99206.5, disabled persons, as defined by Section 295.5 of the Vehicle Code, and disabled veterans, as defined by Section 295.7 of the Vehicle Code, at the same rate established for senior citizens. A transit operator shall honor the disabled person or disabled veteran placard identification card issued pursuant to Section 22511.55 of the Vehicle Code.

(c) Every transit operator that offers reduced fares to disabled persons shall honor any current identification card that is valid for the type of transportation service or discount requested and that has been issued to an individual with a disability by another transit operator.

(d) This section also applies to any dial-a-ride, paratransit, or nonfixed route operator which serves the disabled, but does not apply to a private nonprofit entity which serves the disabled or elderly.

(e) Nothing in this section prohibits a transit operator from issuing its own identification card, except that no such card shall be required to be presented in addition to either a federal Medicare card or a card issued pursuant to Section 22511.55 of the Vehicle Code.

(f) A transit operator, as defined in subdivision (b), which receives funds pursuant to the Mills-Alquist-Deddeh Act (Chapter 4 (commencing with Section 99200)), shall not require that a person requesting transportation be a resident of that transit operator’s service area.

(Amended by Stats. 2012, Ch. 769, Sec. 4. (AB 2679) Effective January 1, 2013.)

99155.1.
  

(a) There shall be close coordination between local transit providers and county welfare departments in order to ensure that transportation moneys available for purposes of assisting recipients of aid under Chapter 2 (commencing with Section 11200) of Part 3 of Division 9 of the Welfare and Institutions Code are expended efficiently for the benefit of that population.

(1) In areas where public transit service is available, local transit providers shall give priority, in the use of funds allocated under the CalWORKs program and made available by the county, to the enhancement of public transportation services for welfare-to-work purposes.

(2) In areas where public transit services are unavailable, local transit providers shall give priority, in the use of funds allocated under the CalWORKs program and made available by the county, to the enhancement of transportation alternatives, such as, but not limited to, subsidies or vouchers, van pools, and contract paratransit operations, in order to promote welfare-to-work purposes.

(b) In areas where public transit service is available, local transit providers shall consider giving priority in the use of transit funds to the enhancement of public transportation services for welfare-to-work purposes.

(Amended by Stats. 1998, Ch. 877, Sec. 4. Effective January 1, 1999.)

99155.5.
  

(a) The Legislature intends that dial-a-ride and paratransit services be accessible to disabled persons, as defined in Section 99206.5. It is intended that transportation service be provided for employment, education, medical, and personal reasons. Transportation for individuals with disabilities is a necessity, and allows these persons to fully participate in our society.

The Legislature finds and declares that the term “paratransit,” as used in the federal Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (Public Law 101-336), refers to transportation services with specific criteria of quality and quantity, and which are required to be made available to limited classes of persons based on eligibility categories; this is often referred to as “ADA paratransit” or “complementary paratransit.” The Legislature finds and declares that the terms “paratransit” and “dial-a-ride,” as used in the laws of this state, apply to a broader range of transportation services and that not all individuals with disabilities under the laws of this state are eligible for “ADA paratransit” under the federal law.

(b) Each transit operator, for profit or nonprofit, which provides, or contracts for the provision of, dial-a-ride or paratransit service for individuals with disabilities and which receives public funding pursuant to the Mills-Alquist-Deddeh Act (Chapter 4 (commencing with Section 99200)) for that service shall provide the service without regard to either of the following:

(1) Whether the person is a member of a household which owns a motor vehicle.

(2) Whether the place of residence of the person who requests transportation service is within the service area of the provider. To the extent that they are eligible for the specified service requested, all persons requesting transportation service in the service area of the provider shall be provided service on the same terms and at the same price that service is provided to other persons residing within the service area of the provider.

(c) Subdivision (b) does not preclude a provider from offering a subscription service, and does not require a reduction in the amount the provider charges other public or private agencies.

(d) Except as required by the federal Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (Public Law 101-336) and federal regulations adopted pursuant thereto or by higher standards prescribed by the laws of this state, nothing in this section requires any transit operator which provides service to individuals with disabilities in a manner consistent with subdivision (b) to make those services available outside the operator’s established operating service area, or requires the operator to make the presentation of identification a condition to using the service.

(e) A transit operator shall honor any current identification card which is valid for the type of transportation service or discount requested and which has been issued to an individual with disabilities by another transit operator.

(f) Any person who believes an operator has violated Section 99155 or 99155.5 may file a report of the alleged violation with the transportation planning agency or county transportation commission. Any individual with disabilities may request the Attorney General to resolve any dispute as to compliance with Section 99155 or this section.

(Amended by Stats. 2012, Ch. 769, Sec. 5. (AB 2679) Effective January 1, 2013.)

99156.
  

Notwithstanding any other provision of law, a transit district may provide compensation to a member of the governing board of the district only for attendance at a meeting of the board or for each day the member is engaged in other district business within or without the district. A member who engages in district business other than attendance at board meetings shall first obtain authorization of the board for reimbursement of travel expenses or other compensation before engaging in that business and shall submit a report thereof to the board for all expenditures.

(Added by Stats. 1988, Ch. 1160, Sec. 1.)

99157.
  

Notwithstanding any other provision of law, a transit district may not provide any life, accident, or health insurance plan to any member or former member of the governing board of the district who first served as a member of the governing board after January 1, 1989, that exceeds the benefits provided to full-time active or retired district employees. The terms, conditions, or contributions applicable to any plan provided for employees shall also apply to any plan provided for those members of the governing board.

(Added by Stats. 1988, Ch. 1160, Sec. 2.)

99158.
  

Notwithstanding any other provision of law, a transit district may not establish or contribute to a pension or retirement benefits plan or purchase an annunity for any member of its governing board who first served as a member of the governing board after January 1, 1989. This section does not apply to a deferred compensation plan described in Section 53213 of the Government Code.

(Added by Stats. 1988, Ch. 1160, Sec. 3.)

99159.
  

(a) Any retirement system established or maintained pursuant to this division for employees of a transit district who are members of a unit appropriate for collective bargaining shall be maintained pursuant to a collective bargaining agreement and this section.

(b) Notwithstanding any other provision of this division, the retirement system and the funds of the system shall be managed and administered by a retirement board composed of equal representation of labor and management. Any deadlock among the members of the board with respect to that management and administration shall be resolved in the manner specified in Section 302 of the federal Labor Management Relations Act, 1947 (29 U.S.C. Sec. 186(c)(5)).

(c) The duties and responsibilities of the retirement board shall be executed in accordance with Section 17 of Article XVI of the California Constitution.

(d) This section does not apply to any public transit district that has, pursuant to a collective bargaining agreement, provided membership for the district’s represented employees in the Public Employees’ Retirement System, a retirement system established pursuant to the County Employees Retirement Law of 1937, or a pension trust subject to the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 (29 U.S.C. Sec. 1001 et seq.) or any transit district where the membership of the governing board of the transit district is directly elected by the voters.

(Added by Stats. 2003, Ch. 845, Sec. 2. Effective January 1, 2004.)

99160.
  

Any public entity which plans the development of, or which operates, a rail transit system, shall, with respect to any current or future rail transit system, (a) develop motor vehicle parking facilities to serve the system’s passengers at stations planned to be park and ride facilities, and (b) expand private enterprise participation in the development of air space and publicly owned assets to provide those parking facilities.

(Added by Stats. 1989, Ch. 579, Sec. 1.)

99161.
  

(a) Space at a publicly owned transportation facility may be leased by competitive bid, taking into consideration affordability and quality of care, to a child care operator who has obtained licensure as required by Section 1596.80 of the Health and Safety Code. Priority for child care services provided by the center shall be given to the children of public agency employees who work at the transportation facility and children of users of the transportation facility.

(b) No state funds shall be provided to any child care operator pursuant to this section unless all of the following conditions are met:

(1) The child care facility is open to children without regard to any child’s religious beliefs or any other factor related to religion.

(2) No religious instruction is included in the child care program.

(3) The space in which the child care program is operated is not utilized in any manner to foster religion during the time it is used for child care.

(c) The Legislature finds and declares that the use of publicly owned transportation facilities for the purpose of furnishing child care services for the benefit of persons using public transit is in the public interest and serves a public purpose.

(Added by Stats. 1993, Ch. 792, Sec. 3. Effective January 1, 1994.)

99162.
  

Notwithstanding any other provision of law, one or more local agencies listed in subdivision (i) of Section 99602 may undertake a study or a joint study concerning the feasibility of extending the commuter rail or intercity rail service described in subdivision (c) of Section 99622 beyond the City of Davis to the City of Dixon.

(Added by Stats. 2002, Ch. 314, Sec. 1. Effective January 1, 2003.)

99163.
  

On and after January 1, 2005, whenever a transit operator improves or replaces a ticket vending machine at a public transit station to include video instructions, the transit operator shall also equip the ticket vending machine with audio instructions that will enable visually impaired persons to follow the visual prompts. State funds made available to the operator through the State Transportation Assistance Program under Section 99312 shall be available for the purposes of this section.

(Added by Stats. 2003, Ch. 141, Sec. 1. Effective January 1, 2004.)

99164.
  

(a) When installing new security systems, a transit agency operated by an operator as defined in Section 99210 shall only purchase and install equipment capable of storing recorded images for at least one year, unless all of the following conditions apply:

(1) The transit agency has made a diligent effort to identify a security system that is capable of storing recorded data for one year.

(2) The transit agency determines that the technology to store recorded data in an economically and technologically feasible manner for one year is not available.

(3) The transit agency purchases and installs the best available technology with respect to storage capacity that is both economically and technologically feasible at that time.

(b) Notwithstanding any other provision of law, videotapes or recordings made by security systems operated as part of a public transit system shall be retained for one year, unless one of the following conditions applies:

(1) The videotapes or recordings are evidence in any claim filed or any pending litigation, in which case the videotapes or recordings shall be preserved until the claim or the pending litigation is resolved.

(2) The videotapes or recordings recorded an event that was or is the subject of an incident report, in which case the videotapes or recordings shall be preserved until the incident is resolved.

(3) The transit agency utilizes a security system that was purchased or installed prior to January 1, 2004, or that meets the requirements of subdivision (a), in which case the videotapes or recordings shall be preserved for as long as the installed technology allows.

(c) Installation of a security system by a transit agency pursuant to this section shall not create a duty to contemporaneously monitor the live video or other data collected by the system.

(Amended by Stats. 2015, Ch. 451, Sec. 8. (SB 491) Effective January 1, 2016.)

99165.
  

(a) For purposes of this section, “environmental and public health impacts” means those impacts that affect the health and environment of persons living, working, and attending school in the vicinity of a bus fueling station, including, but not limited to, impacts associated with nuisance odors.

(b) On or before July 1, 2003, the Omnitrans Joint Powers Authority shall contract with an independent third party to prepare and submit to the Legislature and the Governor a report on the environmental and public health impacts of transit bus fueling stations located within the jurisdiction of the authority and owned or operated by the authority. In conducting the assessment, the authority shall hold at least one noticed public hearing in the vicinity of each bus fueling station for the purposes of soliciting input from persons who may be affected by those impacts. The authority shall consult with the South Coast Air Quality Management District and other appropriate federal, state, local agencies, and community groups representing residents of the affected areas, in conducting the assessment.

(c) The Omnitrans Joint Powers Authority shall solely use state funds allocated to it or its member agencies pursuant to the State Transportation Assistance Program under Section 99313.3 in order to comply with this section.

(Added by Stats. 2002, Ch. 602, Sec. 1. Effective January 1, 2003.)

99170.
  

(a) A person shall not do any of the following with respect to the property, facilities, or vehicles of a transit district:

(1) Operate, interfere with, enter into, or climb on or in, the property, facilities, or vehicles owned or operated by the transit district without the permission or approval of the transit district.

(2) Interfere with the operator or operation of a transit vehicle, or impede the safe boarding or alighting of passengers.

(3) Extend any portion of the body through a window opening of a transit vehicle in a manner that may cause harm or injury.

(4) Throw an object from a transit vehicle.

(5) Commit an act or engage in a behavior that may, with reasonable foreseeability, cause harm or injury to any person or property.

(6) Violate a notice, prohibition, instruction, or direction on a sign that is intended to provide for the safety and security of transit passengers, or the safe and secure operation of the transit system.

(7) Knowingly give false information to a district employee, or contracted security officer, engaged in the enforcement of a district ordinance or a state law, or otherwise obstruct the issuance of a citation for the violation of a district ordinance or a state law.

(8) Violate any of the conditions established by a transit district ordinance under which a passenger may board a transit vehicle with a bicycle and where that bicycle may be stowed on the transit vehicle.

(b) For purposes of this section, “transit district” means an entity that qualifies as a claimant, as defined in Section 99203, eligible to receive allocations under Chapter 4 (commencing with Section 99200).

(c) A violation of this section is an infraction under Section 19.8 of the Penal Code punishable by a fine not exceeding seventy-five dollars ($75), and a violation by a person after a second conviction is punishable by a fine not exceeding two hundred fifty dollars ($250) or by community service that does not conflict with the violator’s hours of school attendance or employment for a total time not to exceed 48 hours over a period not to exceed 60 days.

(d) A transit district shall provide reasonable notification to the public of the activities prohibited by this section and the penalties for violations of those prohibitions.

(e) This section does not prohibit a person from engaging in activities that are protected under the laws of the United States or of this state, including, but not limited to, picketing, demonstrating, or distributing handbills.

(f) Revenue from fines imposed pursuant to subdivision (c) shall not be distributed or allocated to the transit agency issuing citations under this section. Fine revenue instead shall be allocated to the other entities eligible to receive those funds under existing law.

(Amended by Stats. 2014, Ch. 253, Sec. 2. (SB 1236) Effective January 1, 2015.)

99171.
  

(a) (1) A transit district may issue a prohibition order to any person to whom either of the following applies:

(A) On at least three separate occasions within a period of 90 consecutive days, the person is cited for an infraction committed in or on a vehicle, bus stop, or train or light rail station of the transit district for any act that is a violation of paragraph (2) or (5) of subdivision (a) of Section 99170 of this code or paragraph (1), (2), (3), or (4) of subdivision (d) of Section 640 or Section 640.5 of the Penal Code.

(B) The person is arrested or convicted for a misdemeanor or felony committed in or on a vehicle, bus stop, or light rail station of the transit district for acts involving violence, threats of violence, lewd or lascivious behavior, or possession for sale or sale of a controlled substance.

(C) The person is convicted of a violation of Section 11532 of the Health and Safety Code or Section 653.22 of the Penal Code.

(2) A person subject to a prohibition order may not enter the property, facilities, or vehicles of the transit district for a period of time deemed appropriate by the transit district, provided that the duration of a prohibition order shall not exceed the following, as applicable:

(A) Thirty days if issued pursuant to subparagraph (A) of paragraph (1), provided that a second prohibition order within one year may not exceed 90 days, and a third or subsequent prohibition order within one year may not exceed 180 days.

(B) Thirty days if issued pursuant to an arrest pursuant to subparagraph (B) of paragraph (1). Upon conviction of a misdemeanor offense, the duration of the prohibition order for the conviction, when added to the duration of the prohibition order for the initial arrest, if any, may not exceed 180 days. Upon conviction of a felony offense, the duration of the prohibition order for the conviction, when added to the duration of the prohibition order for the initial arrest, if any, may not exceed one year.

(3) No prohibition order issued under this subdivision shall be effective unless the transit district first affords the person an opportunity to contest the transit district’s proposed action in accordance with procedures adopted by the transit district for this purpose. A transit district’s procedures shall provide, at a minimum, for the notice and other protections set forth in subdivisions (b) and (c), and the transit district shall provide reasonable notification to the public of the availability of those procedures.

(b) (1) A notice of a prohibition order issued under subdivision (a) shall set forth a description of the conduct underlying the violation or violations giving rise to the prohibition order, including reference to the applicable statutory provision, ordinance, or transit district rule violated, the date of the violation, the approximate time of the violation, the location where the violation occurred, the period of the proposed prohibition, and the scope of the prohibition. The notice shall include a clear and conspicuous statement indicating the procedure for contesting the prohibition order. The notice of prohibition order shall be personally served upon the violator. The notice of prohibition order, or a copy, shall be considered a record kept in the ordinary course of business of the transit district and shall be prima facie evidence of the facts contained in the notice establishing a rebuttable presumption affecting the burden of producing evidence. For purposes of this paragraph, “clear and conspicuous” means in larger type than the surrounding text, or in contrasting type, font, or color to the surrounding text of the same size, or set off from the surrounding text of the same size by symbols or other marks that call attention to the language.

(2) For purposes of this section, “personal service” means any of the following:

(A) In-person delivery.

(B) Delivery by any form of mail providing for delivery confirmation, postage prepaid, to at least one address provided by the person being served, including, but not limited to, the address set forth in any citation or in court records.

(C) Any alternate method approved in writing by the transit district and the person being served.

(3) If a person served with a notice of prohibition order is not able, or refuses, to provide a mailing address, the notice of prohibition order shall set forth the procedure for obtaining any letters, notices, or orders related to the prohibition order from the administrative offices of the transit district. For purposes of this section, delivery shall be deemed to have been made on the following date, as applicable:

(A) On the date of delivery, if delivered in person.

(B) On the date of confirmed delivery, for any delivery by mail.

(C) For any alternate method of service, as provided in the writing specifying the alternate method.

(4) Proof of service of the notice shall be filed with the transit district.

(5) If a person contests a notice of prohibition order, the transit district shall proceed in accordance with subdivision (c). If the notice of prohibition order is not contested within 10 calendar days after delivery by personal service, the prohibition order shall be deemed final and shall go into effect, without further action by the transit district, for the period of time set forth in the order.

(6) All prohibition orders shall be subject to an automatic stay and shall not take effect until the latest of the following:

(A) Eleven calendar days after delivery of the prohibition order by personal service.

(B) If an initial review is timely requested under paragraph (1) of subdivision (c), 11 calendar days after delivery by personal service of the results of the review.

(C) If an administrative hearing is timely requested under paragraph (3) of subdivision (c), the date the hearing officer’s decision is delivered by personal service.

(c) (1) For a period of 10 calendar days from the delivery of the prohibition order by personal service, the person may request an initial review of the prohibition order by the transit district. The request may be made by telephone, in writing, or in person. There shall be no charge for this review. In conducting its review and reaching a determination, the transit district shall determine whether the prohibition order meets the requirements of subdivision (a) and, unless the person has been convicted of the offense or offenses, whether the offense or offenses for which the person was cited or arrested are proven by a preponderance of the evidence. If, following the initial review, based on these findings, the transit district determines that the prohibition order is not adequately supported or that extenuating circumstances make dismissal of the prohibition order appropriate in the interest of justice, the transit district shall cancel the notice. If, following the initial review, based on these findings, the transit district determines that the prohibition order should be upheld in whole or in part, the transit district shall issue a written statement to that effect, including any modification to the period or scope of the prohibition order. The transit district shall serve the results of the initial review to the person contesting the notice by personal service.

(2) The transit district may modify or cancel a prohibition order in the interest of justice. The transit district shall cancel a prohibition order if it determines that the person did not understand the nature and extent of his or her actions or did not have the ability to control his or her actions. If the person is dependent upon the transit system for trips of necessity, including, but not limited to, travel to or from medical or legal appointments, school or training classes, places of employment, or obtaining food, clothing, and necessary household items, the transit district shall modify a prohibition order to allow for those trips. A person requesting a cancellation or modification in the interest of justice shall have the burden of establishing the qualifying circumstances by a preponderance of the evidence.

(3) If the person is dissatisfied with the results of the initial review, the person may request an administrative hearing of the prohibition order no later than 10 calendar days after the results of the initial review are delivered by personal service. The request may be made by telephone, in writing, or in person. An administrative hearing shall be held within 30 calendar days after the receipt of a request for an administrative hearing. The person requesting the hearing may request one continuance, not to exceed seven calendar days.

(4) The administrative hearing process shall include all of the following:

(A) The person requesting the hearing shall have the choice of a hearing by mail or in person. An in-person hearing shall be conducted within the jurisdiction of the transit district.

(B) The administrative hearing shall be conducted in accordance with written procedures established by the transit district and approved by the governing body or chief executive officer of the transit district. The hearing shall provide an independent, objective, fair, and impartial review of the prohibition order.

(C) The administrative review shall be conducted before a hearing officer designated to conduct the review by the transit district’s governing body or chief executive officer. In addition to any other requirements, a hearing officer shall demonstrate the qualifications, training, and objectivity prescribed by the transit agency’s governing body or chief executive officer as are necessary to fulfill and that are consistent with the duties and responsibilities set forth in this subdivision. The hearing officer’s continued service, performance evaluation, compensation, and benefits, as applicable, shall not be directly or indirectly linked to the number of prohibition orders upheld by the hearing officer.

(D) The person who issued the notice of prohibition order shall not be required to participate in an administrative hearing, unless participation is requested by the person requesting the hearing. The request for participation must be made at least five calendar days prior to the date of the hearing and may be made by telephone, in writing, or in person. The notice of prohibition order, in proper form, shall be prima facie evidence of the violation or violations pursuant to subdivision (a) establishing a rebuttable presumption affecting the burden of producing evidence.

(E) In issuing a decision, the hearing officer shall determine whether the prohibition order meets the requirements of subdivision (a) and, unless the person has been convicted of the offense or offenses, whether the offense or offenses for which the person was cited or arrested are proven by a preponderance of the evidence. Based upon these findings, the hearing officer may uphold the prohibition order in whole, determine that the prohibition order is not adequately supported, or cancel or modify the prohibition order in the interest of justice. The hearing officer shall cancel a prohibition order if he or she determines that the person did not understand the nature and extent of his or her actions or did not have the ability to control his or her actions. If the person is dependent upon the transit system for trips of necessity, including, but not limited to, travel to or from medical or legal appointments, school or training classes, places of employment, or obtaining food, clothing, and necessary household items, the transit district shall modify a prohibition order to allow for those trips. A person requesting a cancellation or modification in the interest of justice shall have the burden of establishing the qualifying circumstances by a preponderance of the evidence.

(F) The hearing officer’s decision following the administrative hearing shall be delivered by personal service.

(G) A person aggrieved by the final decision of the hearing officer may seek judicial review of the decision within 90 days of the date of delivery of the decision by personal service, as provided by Section 1094.6 of the Code of Civil Procedure.

(d) A person issued a prohibition order under subdivision (a) may, within 10 calendar days of the date the order goes into effect under paragraph (6) of subdivision (b), request a refund for any prepaid fare media rendered unusable in whole or in part by the prohibition order, including, but not limited to, monthly passes. If the fare media remain usable for one or more days outside the period of the prohibition order, the refund shall be prorated based on the number of days the fare media will be unusable. The issuance of a refund may be made contingent on surrender of the fare media.

(e) For purposes of this section, “transit district” means the Sacramento Regional Transit District, the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority, the Fresno Area Express, or the San Francisco Bay Area Rapid Transit District.

(Amended by Stats. 2017, Ch. 192, Sec. 1. (AB 468) Effective January 1, 2018.)

99172.
  

(a) Prior to exercising the authority given in subdivision (a) of Section 99171 to issue prohibition orders, a transit district shall do all of the following:

(1) Establish an advisory committee for the purpose of evaluating the procedures for and issuance of prohibition orders and recommending a course of training for personnel charged with issuance and enforcement of prohibition orders.

(2) Ensure that personnel to be charged with issuance and enforcement of prohibition orders have received training as recommended by the advisory committee.

(3) Provide reasonable notification to transit district riders that persons who engage in disorderly conduct may be subject to a prohibition order barring the person from the transit district’s property, facilities, or vehicles for a period of up to one year. “Reasonable notification” may include, but is not limited to, information on the transit district’s Internet Web site, in written materials, at transit stations, and on citations issued by the transit district of the types of conduct that may result in issuance of a prohibition order.

(b) The advisory committee shall be composed of at least five members appointed by the legislative body of the transit district. At least one of the members of the advisory committee shall have experience working with individuals with psychiatric, developmental, or other disabilities, at least one member shall be a youth advocate, and at least one member shall have law enforcement experience.

(c) The advisory committee shall be tasked, at a minimum, with all of the following:

(1) Providing recommendations, in consultation with the county mental health director within the service area of the transit district, regarding the type and extent of training that should be undertaken by individuals with responsibility for issuance and enforcement of prohibition orders, with particular emphasis on training designed to assist those individuals in identifying and interacting with persons who are homeless or who have psychiatric, developmental, or other disabilities.

(2) Identifying, in consultation with the county mental health director within the service area of the transit district, services and programs to which persons who are homeless or who have psychiatric, developmental, or other disabilities may be referred by transit district enforcement personnel prior to or in conjunction with issuance of a prohibition order.

(3) Monitoring the issuance of prohibition orders to assist the transit district in ensuring compliance with Section 51 of the Civil Code.

(4) Providing the governing board of the transit district and the Legislature with an annual report summarizing the number of prohibition orders that were issued by the transit district during the preceding year, including, but not limited to, the types and numbers of citations by category, and the number of exclusion orders appealed, the appeals granted, the reasons granted, and other relevant information directly related to those orders.

(d) The transit district may use an existing advisory committee to fulfill the requirements of this section, provided that the composition and purpose of the existing advisory committee meet or are modified to meet the requirements of this section.

(e) For purposes of this section, “transit district” means the Sacramento Regional Transit District, the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority, the Fresno Area Express, or the San Francisco Bay Area Rapid Transit District.

(Amended by Stats. 2017, Ch. 192, Sec. 2. (AB 468) Effective January 1, 2018.)

99173.
  

(a) Before the procurement of a new bus to be used in revenue operations, a public transit operator shall take into consideration recommendations of, and best practices standards developed by, the exclusive representative of the recognized organization representing bus operators of the transit operator for the following purposes:

(1) To reduce the risk of assault on bus operators.

(2) To prevent accidents caused by blind spots created by bus equipment or bus design.

(3) To enhance the safety of passengers, bus operators, or other vehicles or pedestrians that the bus may come into contact with while in service.

(b) Nothing in this section shall be construed to require a public transit operator to implement specific recommendations.

(Added by Stats. 2017, Ch. 126, Sec. 1. (AB 673) Effective January 1, 2018.)

99175.
  

(a) A public entity that operates, or contracts for the operation of, a commuter rail system shall ensure that each train has an automated external defibrillator (AED) as part of its safety equipment subject to the requirements in Section 1797.196 of the Health and Safety Code. As used in this subdivision, “commuter rail system” does not include intercity passenger rail services, including state-funded intercity passenger rail services managed under an interagency transfer agreement by the LOSSAN Rail Corridor Agency, the San Joaquin Joint Powers Authority, or the Capitol Corridor Joint Powers Authority, and does not include light rail or rapid transit services managed by local agencies.

(b) An affected public entity may provide training for their employees on the use of the AEDs as part of their regularly scheduled safety or other training sessions.

(c) (1) An affected public entity shall install AEDs pursuant to this section by July 1, 2020.

(2) The Peninsula Corridor Joint Powers Board shall be exempt from paragraph (1) and shall instead ensure that trainsets procured as part of the Caltrain Electrification Project are equipped with AEDs.

(d) (1) Upon completion of the installation of AEDs, the public entity shall transmit confirmation of its compliance in writing to the Public Utilities Commission.

(2) If an affected public entity is in compliance with the requirements of this section when it becomes effective, it shall notify the Public Utilities Commission pursuant to paragraph (1).

(e) An affected public entity that acquires an AED for emergency care pursuant to this section shall not be liable for any civil damages resulting from any acts or omissions in the rendering of the emergency care by use of an AED if the public entity has complied with paragraph (1) of subdivision (b) of Section 1797.196 of the Health and Safety Code.

(Added by Stats. 2018, Ch. 602, Sec. 2. (SB 502) Effective January 1, 2019.)

PUCPublic Utilities Code - PUC