Code Section Group

Labor Code - LAB

DIVISION 1. DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS [50 - 176]

  ( Division 1 enacted by Stats. 1937, Ch. 90. )

CHAPTER 6. Occupational Safety and Health Standards Board [140 - 147.6]
  ( Heading of Chapter 6 amended by Stats. 1973, Ch. 993. )

140.
  

(a) There is in the Department of Industrial Relations, the Occupational Safety and Health Standards Board which consists of seven members who shall be appointed by the Governor. Two members shall be from the field of management, two members shall be from the field of labor, one member shall be from the field of occupational health, one member shall be from the field of occupational safety and one member shall be from the general public. Members representing occupational safety and health fields and the public member shall be selected from other than the fields of management or labor.

(b) Terms of office for members of the Industrial Safety Board shall expire 60 days after the effective date of the amendment of this section enacted at the 1973–74 Regular Session. Newly appointed members of the Occupational Safety and Health Standards Board shall assume their duties upon that date.

(c) The Governor shall designate the chairman of the board from the membership of the board. The person so designated shall hold the office of chairman at the pleasure of the Governor. The chairman shall designate a member of the board to act as chairman in his absence.

(d) As used in this chapter, “board” means the Occupational Safety and Health Standards Board.

(e) All references in this or any other code to the Industrial Safety Board shall be deemed to mean the Occupational Safety and Health Standards Board.

(Amended by Stats. 1973, Ch. 993.)

141.
  

(a) The terms of office of the members of the board shall be four years and they shall hold office until the appointment and qualification of a successor. The terms of the members of the board first appointed shall expire as follows: three members, one representative from management, one representative from labor, and one representative from occupational health, on June 1, 1974; three members, one representative from management, one representative from labor, and one representative from occupational safety, on June 1, 1975; one member June 1, 1976. The terms shall thereafter expire in the same relative order. Vacancies occurring shall be filled by appointment to the unexpired term.

(b) Each member of the board shall receive one hundred dollars ($100) for each day of his or her actual attendance at meetings of the board, and other official business of the board, and his or her actual and necessary traveling expenses incurred in the performance of his or her duty as a member.

(Amended by Stats. 2004, Ch. 183, Sec. 254. Effective January 1, 2005.)

142.
  

The Division of Occupational Safety and Health shall enforce all occupational safety and health standards adopted pursuant to this chapter, and those heretofore adopted by the Industrial Accident Commission or the Industrial Safety Board. General safety orders heretofore adopted by the Industrial Accident Commission or the Industrial Safety Board shall continue to remain in effect, but they may be amended or repealed pursuant to this chapter.

(Amended by Stats. 2002, Ch. 1124, Sec. 40. Effective September 30, 2002.)

142.1.
  

The board shall meet at least monthly. The meetings shall be rotated throughout the state at locations designated by the chairman. All meetings held by the board shall be open and public. Written notice of all meetings and a proposed agenda shall be given to all persons who make request for the notice in writing to the board.

(Amended by Stats. 1985, Ch. 657, Sec. 1.)

142.2.
  

At each of its meetings, the board shall make time available to interested persons to propose new or revised orders or standards appropriate for adoption pursuant to this chapter or other items concerning occupational safety and health. The board shall consider such proposed orders or standards and report its decision no later than six months following receipt of such proposals.

(Added by Stats. 1973, Ch. 993.)

142.3.
  

(a) (1) The board, by an affirmative vote of at least four members, may adopt, amend or repeal occupational safety and health standards and orders. The board shall be the only agency in the state authorized to adopt occupational safety and health standards.

(2) The board shall adopt standards at least as effective as the federal standards for all issues for which federal standards have been promulgated under Section 6 of the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 (P.L. 91-596) within six months of the promulgation date of the federal standards and which, when applicable to products which are distributed or used in interstate commerce, are required by compelling local conditions and do not unduly burden interstate commerce.

(3) No standard or amendment to any standard adopted by the board that is substantially the same as a federal standard shall be subject to Article 5 (commencing with Section 11346) and Article 6 (commencing with Section 11349) of Chapter 3.5 of Part 1 of Division 3 of Title 2 of the Government Code. For purposes of this subdivision, “substantially the same” means identical to the federal standard with the exception of editorial and format differences needed to conform to other state laws and standards.

(4) If a federal standard is promulgated and no state standard that is at least as effective as the federal standard is adopted by the board within six months of the date of promulgation of the federal standard, the following provisions shall apply unless adoption of the state standard is imminent:

(A) If there is no existing state standard covering the same issues, the federal standard shall be deemed to be a standard adopted by the board and enforceable by the division pursuant to Section 6317. This standard shall not be subject to Article 5 (commencing with Section 11346) and Article 6 (commencing with Section 11349) of Chapter 3.5 of Part 1 of Division 3 of Title 2 of the Government Code.

(B) If a state standard is in effect at the time a federal standard is promulgated covering the same issue or issues, the board may adopt the federal standard, or a portion thereof, as a standard enforceable by the division pursuant to Section 6317; provided, however, if a federal standard or portion thereof is adopted which replaces an existing state standard or portion thereof, the federal standard shall be as effective as the state standard or portion thereof. No adoption of or amendment to any federal standard, or portion thereof shall be subject to Article 5 (commencing with Section 11346) and Article 6 (commencing with Section 11349) of Chapter 3.5 of Part 1 of Division 3 of Title 2 of the Government Code.

(C) Any state standard adopted pursuant to subparagraph (A) or (B) shall become effective at the time the standard is filed with the Secretary of State, unless otherwise provided, but shall not take effect before the effective date of the equivalent federal standard and shall remain in effect for six months unless readopted by the board for an additional six months or superseded by a standard adopted by the board pursuant to paragraph (2) of subdivision (a).

(D) Any standard adopted pursuant to subparagraph (A), (B), or (C), shall be published in Title 8 of the California Code of Regulations in a manner similar to any other standards adopted pursuant to paragraphs (1) and (2) of subdivision (a) of this section.

(b) The State Building Standards Commission shall codify and publish in a semiannual supplement to the California Building Standards Code, or in a more frequent supplement if required by federal law, all occupational safety and health standards that would otherwise meet the definition of a building standard described in Section 18909 of the Health and Safety Code adopted by the board in the State Building Standards Code without reimbursement from the board. These occupational safety and health standards may also be published by the Occupational Safety and Health Standards Board in other provisions in Title 8 of the California Code of Regulations prior to publication in the California Building Standards Code if that other publication includes an appropriate identification of occupational safety and health standards contained in the other publication.

(c) Any occupational safety or health standard or order promulgated under this section shall prescribe the use of labels or other appropriate forms of warning as are necessary to ensure that employees are apprised of all hazards to which they are exposed, relevant symptoms and appropriate emergency treatment, and proper conditions and precautions for safe use or exposure. Where appropriate, these standards or orders shall also prescribe suitable protective equipment and control or technological procedures to be used in connection with these hazards and shall provide for monitoring or measuring employee exposure at such locations and intervals and in a manner as may be necessary for the protection of employees. In addition, where appropriate, the occupational safety or health standard or order shall prescribe the type and frequency of medical examinations or other tests which shall be made available, by the employer or at his or her cost, to employees exposed to such hazards in order to most effectively determine whether the health of such employee is adversely affected by this exposure.

(d) The results of these examinations or tests shall be furnished only to the Division of Occupational Safety and Health, the State Department of Health Services, any other authorized state agency, the employer, the employee, and, at the request of the employee, to his or her physician.

(Amended by Stats. 2002, Ch. 1124, Sec. 41. Effective September 30, 2002.)

142.4.
  

(a) Occupational safety and health standards and orders shall be adopted, amended, or repealed as provided in Chapter 3.5 (commencing with Section 11340) of Part 1 of Division 3 of Title 2 of the Government Code, except as modified by this chapter.

(b) If an emergency regulation is based upon an emergency temporary standard published in the Federal Register by the Secretary of Labor pursuant to Section 6(c)(1) of the Federal Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 (P.L. 91-596; 29 U.S.C. Sec. 655(c)(1)), the 120-day period specified in Section 11346.1 of the Government Code shall be deemed not to expire until 120 days after a permanent standard is promulgated by the Secretary of Labor pursuant to Section 6(c)(3) of the Federal Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 (29 U.S.C. Sec. 655(c)(3)).

(Amended by Stats. 2006, Ch. 538, Sec. 478. Effective January 1, 2007.)

142.7.
  

(a) On or before October 1, 1987, the board shall adopt an occupational safety and health standard concerning hazardous substance removal work, so as to protect most effectively the health and safety of employees. The standard shall include, but not be limited to, requirements for all of the following:

(1) Specific work practices.

(2) Certification of all employees engaged in hazardous substance removal-related work, except that no certification shall be required for an employee whose only activity is the transportation of hazardous substances which are subject to the requirement for a certificate under Section 12804.1 of the Vehicle Code.

(3) Certification of supervisors with sufficient experience and authority to be responsible for hazardous substance removal work.

(4) Designation of a qualified person who shall be responsible for scheduling any air sampling, laboratory calibration of sampling equipment, evaluation of soil or other contaminated materials sampling results, and for conducting any equipment testing and evaluating the results of the tests.

(5) Requiring that a safety and health conference be held for all hazardous substance removal jobs before the start of actual work. The conference shall include representatives of the owner or contracting agency, the contractor, the employer, employees, and employee representatives, and shall include a discussion of the employer’s safety and health program and the means, methods, devices, processes, practices, conditions, or operations which the employer intends to use in providing a safe and healthy place of employment.

(b) For purposes of this section, “hazardous substance removal work” means cleanup work at any of the following:

(1) A site where removal or remedial action is taken pursuant to either of the following:

(A) Chapter 6.8 (commencing with Section 25300) of Division 20 of the Health and Safety Code, regardless of whether the site is listed pursuant to Section 25356 of the Health and Safety Code.

(B) The federal Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (42 U.S.C. Sec. 9601 et seq.).

(2) A site where corrective action is taken pursuant to Section 25187 or 25200.10 of the Health and Safety Code or the federal Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (42 U.S.C. Sec. 6901 et seq.).

(3) A site where cleanup of a discharge of a hazardous substance is required pursuant to Division 7 (commencing with Section 13000) of the Water Code.

(4) A site where removal or remedial action is taken because a hazardous substance has been discharged or released in an amount that is reportable pursuant to Section 13271 of the Water Code or the federal Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (42 U.S.C. Sec. 9601 et seq.). “Hazardous substance removal work” does not include work related to a hazardous substance spill on a highway.

(c) Until the occupational safety and health standard required by subdivision (a) is adopted by the board and becomes effective, the occupational safety and health standard concerning hazardous substance removal work shall be the standard adopted by the federal government and codified in Section 1910.120 of Title 29 of the Code of Federal Regulations. In addition, before actual work is started on a hazardous substance removal job, a safety and health conference shall be held that shall include the participants and involve a discussion of the subjects described in paragraph (5) of subdivision (a).

(Amended by Stats. 1990, Ch. 1188, Sec. 1. Effective September 24, 1990.)

143.
  

(a) Any employer may apply to the board for a permanent variance from an occupational safety and health standard, order, special order, or portion thereof, upon a showing of an alternate program, method, practice, means, device, or process which will provide equal or superior safety for employees.

(b) The board shall issue such variance if it determines on the record, after opportunity for an investigation where appropriate and a hearing, that the proponent of the variance has demonstrated by a preponderance of the evidence that the conditions, practices, means, methods, operations, or processes used or proposed to be used by an employer will provide employment and places of employment to his employees which are as safe and healthful as those which would prevail if he complied with the standard. The variance so issued shall prescribe the conditions the employer must maintain, and the practices, means, methods, operations, and processes which he must adopt and utilize to the extent they differ from the standard in question.

(c) The board is authorized to grant a variance from any standard or portion thereof whenever it determines such variance is necessary to permit an employer to participate in an experiment approved by the director designed to demonstrate or validate new and improved techniques to safeguard the health or safety of workers.

(d) A permanent variance may be modified or revoked upon application by an employer, employees, or the division, or by the board on its own motion, in the manner prescribed for its issuance under this section at any time.

(Amended by Stats. 1974, Ch. 1284.)

143.1.
  

The board shall conduct hearings on such requests for a permanent variance after employees or employee representatives are properly notified and given an opportunity to appear. All board decisions on permanent variance requests shall be final except for any rehearing or judicial review provided for by law.

(Added by Stats. 1973, Ch. 993.)

143.2.
  

The board, acting as a whole, may adopt, amend, or repeal rules of practice and procedure pertaining to hearings on applications for permanent variances, variance appeals, and other matters within its jurisdiction. All rules of practice and procedure amendments thereto, or repeal thereof, shall be made in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 3.5 (commencing with Section 11340) of Part 1 of Division 3 of Title 2 of the Government Code.

(Amended by Stats. 2004, Ch. 183, Sec. 255. Effective January 1, 2005.)

144.
  

(a) The authority of any agency, department, division, bureau or any other political subdivision other than the Division of Occupational Safety and Health to assist in the administration or enforcement of any occupational safety or health standard, order, or rule adopted pursuant to this chapter shall be contained in a written agreement with the Department of Industrial Relations or an agency authorized by the department to enter into such agreement.

(b) No such agreement shall deprive the Division of Occupational Safety and Health or other state agency to which authority has been delegated of any power or authority of the state agency.

(c) Such an agreement may provide for the right of access of an authorized representative of the designated agency to enter any place of employment which is under the jurisdiction of the Division of Occupational Safety and Health.

(d) If any representative of an agency operating under such an agreement becomes aware of an imminent hazard, he shall notify the employer and affected employees of the hazard and immediately notify the Division of Occupational Safety and Health.

(e) Nothing in this section shall affect or limit the authority of any state or local agency as to any matter other than the enforcement of occupational safety and health standards adopted by the board; however, nothing herein shall limit or reduce the authority of local agencies to adopt and enforce higher standards relating to occupational safety and health for their own employees.

(Amended by Stats. 1979, Ch. 72.)

144.5.
  

(a) The Division of Occupational Safety and Health in connection with the enforcement of occupational safety and health standards adopted pursuant to this chapter shall do all of the following:

(1) Conduct inspections or investigations related to specific workplaces for the evaluation of occupational health problems or environmental conditions which may be harmful to the health of employees.

(2) Upon request of any employer or employee, or on its own initiative, conduct special investigations or studies of occupational health problems which are unrelated to a specific enforcement action to the extent the circumstances indicate and priorities permit.

(3) Provide a continuing program of training for safety engineers of the Division of Occupational Safety and Health in the recognition of health hazards, in dealing with such hazards that do not require specialized competence or equipment and in acquainting them with the skills available from the State Department of Health Services and local health agencies.

(b) (1) When requested by a local health department, the Division of Occupational Safety and Health shall enter into a written agreement with such local health department to conduct inspections and evaluations of occupational health problems, including environmental and sanitary conditions, in places of employment.

(2) Any such agreement shall be subject to the provisions of Section 144. It shall be entered into only after a finding that the local health department can meet the necessary standards of performance for inspections and evaluations to be conducted pursuant to the agreement.

(3) Such agreement shall not be binding upon either party unless and until it has been fully approved by the United States Department of Labor.

(4) Such agreements shall be completed by the Division of Occupational Safety and Health and submitted for approval to the United States Department of Labor not later than six months from the date of request by the local health department.

(5) Inspection services performed under the agreement shall be conducted pursuant to the occupational safety and health standards adopted pursuant to this chapter.

(Amended by Stats. 1979, Ch. 72.)

144.6.
  

In promulgating standards dealing with toxic materials or harmful physical agents, the board shall adopt that standard which most adequately assures, to the extent feasible, that no employee will suffer material impairment of health or functional capacity even if such employee has regular exposure to a hazard regulated by such standard for the period of his working life. Development of standards under this section shall be based upon research, demonstrations, experiments, and such other information as may be appropriate. In addition to the attainment of the highest degree of health and safety protection for the employee, other considerations shall be the latest available scientific data in the field, the reasonableness of the standards, and experience gained under this and other health and safety laws. Whenever practicable, the standard promulgated shall be expressed in terms of objective criteria and of the performance desired.

(Amended by Stats. 1976, Ch. 963.)

144.7.
  

(a) The board shall, no later than January 15, 1999, adopt an emergency regulation revising the bloodborne pathogen standard currently set forth in Section 5193 of Title 8 of the California Code of Regulations in accordance with subdivision (b). Following adoption of the emergency regulation, the board shall complete the regulation adoption process and shall formally adopt a regulation embodying a bloodborne pathogen standard meeting the requirements of subdivision (b), which regulation shall become operative no later than August 1, 1999. Notwithstanding Section 11346.1 of the Government Code, the emergency regulation adopted pursuant to this subdivision shall remain in effect until the nonemergency regulation becomes operative or until August 1, 1999, whichever first occurs.

(b) The board shall adopt a standard, as described in subdivision (a), to be developed by the Division of Occupational Safety and Health. The standard shall include, but not be limited to, the following:

(1) A revised definition of “engineering controls” that includes sharps injury prevention technology including, but not limited to, needleless systems and needles with engineered sharps injury protection, which shall be defined in the standard.

(2) A requirement that sharps injury prevention technology specified in paragraph (1) be included as engineering or work practice controls, except in cases where the employer or other appropriate party can demonstrate circumstances in which the technology does not promote employee or patient safety or interferes with a medical procedure. Those circumstances shall be specified in the standard, and shall include, but not be limited to, circumstances where the technology is medically contraindicated or not more effective than alternative measures used by the employer to prevent exposure incidents.

(3) A requirement that written exposure control plans include an effective procedure for identifying and selecting existing sharps injury prevention technology of the type specified in paragraph (1).

(4) A requirement that written exposure control plans be updated when necessary to reflect progress in implementing the sharps injury prevention technology specified in paragraph (1).

(5) A requirement that information concerning exposure incidents be recorded in a sharps injury log, including, but not limited to, the type and brand of device involved in the incident.

(c) The Division of Occupational Safety and Health may consider and propose for adoption by the board additional revisions to the bloodborne pathogen standards to prevent sharps injuries or exposure incidents including, but not limited to, training requirements and measures to increase vaccinations.

(d) The Division of Occupational Safety and Health and the State Department of Health Services shall jointly compile and maintain a list of existing needleless systems and needles with engineered sharps injury protection, which shall be available to assist employers in complying with the requirements of the bloodborne pathogen standard adopted pursuant to this section. The list may be developed from existing sources of information, including, but not limited to, the federal Food and Drug Administration, the federal Centers for Disease Control, the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health, and the United States Department of Veterans Affairs.

(Amended by Stats. 2001, Ch. 370, Sec. 2. Effective January 1, 2002.)

144.8.
  

(a) As used in this section the following definitions shall apply:

(1) “Antineoplastic drug” means a chemotherapeutic agent that controls or kills cancer cells.

(2) “NIOSH” means the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health.

(b) The board shall adopt an occupational safety and health standard for the handling of antineoplastic drugs in health care facilities regardless of the setting. In developing the standard, the board shall consider input from hospitals, practicing physicians from impacted specialties, including oncology, organizations representing health care personnel, including registered nurses and pharmacists, and other stakeholders, and shall determine a reasonable time for facilities to implement new requirements imposed by the adopted standard. The standard, to the extent feasible, shall be consistent with and not exceed recommendations in the NIOSH 2004 alert entitled “Preventing Occupational Exposures to Antineoplastic and Other Hazardous Drugs in Health Care Settings,” as updated in 2010. The standard may incorporate applicable updates and changes to NIOSH guidelines.

(Added by Stats. 2013, Ch. 678, Sec. 2. (AB 1202) Effective January 1, 2014.)

145.
  

The board may employ necessary assistants, officers, experts, and such other employees as it deems necessary. All such personnel of the board shall be under the supervision of the chairman of the board or an executive officer to whom he delegates such responsibility. All such personnel shall be appointed pursuant to the State Civil Service Act (Part 1 (commencing with Section 18000) of Division 5 of Title 2 of the Government Code), except for the one exempt deputy or employee allowed by subdivision (e) of Section 4 of Article XXIV of the California Constitution.

(Repealed and added by Stats. 1973, Ch. 993.)

145.1.
  

The board and its duly authorized representatives in the performance of its duties shall have the powers of a head of a department as set forth in Article 2 (commencing with Section 11180) of Chapter 2 of Part 1 of Division 3 of Title 2 of the Government Code.

(Added by Stats. 1973, Ch. 993.)

146.
  

In the conduct of hearings related to permanent variances, the board and its representatives are not bound by common law or statutory rules of evidence or by technical or formal rules of procedure but shall conduct the hearings in accordance with Article 8 (commencing with Section 11435.05) of Chapter 4.5 of Part 1 of Division 3 of Title 2 of, and Section 11513 of, the Government Code. A full and complete record shall be kept of all proceedings.

(Amended by Stats. 1995, Ch. 938, Sec. 72.8. Effective January 1, 1996. Operative July 1, 1997, by Sec. 98 of Ch. 938.)

147.
  

The board shall refer to the Division of Occupational Safety and Health for evaluation any proposed occupational safety or health standard or variance from adopted standards received by the board from sources other than the division. The division shall submit a report on the proposed standard or variance within 60 days of receipt thereof.

(Amended by Stats. 1979, Ch. 72.)

147.1.
  

In connection with the development and promulgation of occupational health standards the Division of Occupational Safety and Health shall perform all of the following functions:

(a) Analyze proposed and new federal occupational health standards, evaluate their impact on California, determine any necessity for their modification, and present proposed standards to the board in sufficient time for the board to conduct hearings and adopt standards within the time required.

(b) Maintain liaison with the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health and the federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration in the development of recommended federal standards and when appropriate provide representation on federal advisory committees dealing with the development of occupational health standards.

(c) On occupational health issues not covered by federal standards maintain surveillance, determine the necessity for standards, develop and present proposed standards to the board.

(d) Evaluate any proposed occupational health standard or application for a variance of an occupational health standard received by the board, and submit a report to the board on the proposed standard or variance within 60 days of receipt thereof.

(e) Appear and testify at board hearings and other public proceedings involving occupational health matters.

(Amended by Stats. 1979, Ch. 72.)

147.2.
  

(a) As used in this section, “Hazard Evaluation System and Information Service” or “HESIS” means the repository established pursuant to subdivision (b).

(b) In accordance with Chapter 2 (commencing with Section 6350) of Part 1 of Division 5 of this code and Section 105175 of the Health and Safety Code, the Department of Industrial Relations, by interagency agreement with the State Department of Public Health, shall establish a repository of current data on toxic materials and harmful physical agents in use or potentially in use in places of employment in the state, known as the Hazard Evaluation System and Information Service, or HESIS.

(c) HESIS shall fulfill all of the following functions:

(1) Provide reliable information of practical use to employers, employees, representatives of employees, and other governmental agencies on the possible hazards to employees of exposure to toxic materials or harmful physical agents.

(2) Collect and evaluate toxicological and epidemiological data and any other information that may be pertinent to establishing harmful effects on health of exposure to toxic materials or harmful physical agents. Nothing in this subdivision shall be construed as authorizing HESIS to require employers, other than chemical manufacturers, formulators, suppliers, distributors, importers, and their agents, to report any information not otherwise required by law.

(3) When there is new scientific or medical information and the Chief of HESIS, in consultation with the Director of Industrial Relations and the Chief of the Division of Environmental and Occupational Disease Control in the State Department of Public Health, determines that a substance may be in use in a place of employment, may pose a hazard under a reasonable anticipated condition of use, and potentially poses a serious new or unrecognized health hazard to an employee, including, but not limited to, cancer, reproductive or developmental harm, organ system impairment, or death, chemical manufacturers, formulators, suppliers, distributors, importers, and their agents, as specified in subparagraph (A), shall provide to HESIS the names and addresses of their customers who have purchased certain chemicals, as specified by HESIS, or commercial products containing those chemicals and information related to those shipments, including the quantities and dates of shipments, and the proportion of a specified chemical within a mixture containing the specified chemical, upon written request by HESIS, for every product the final destination of which may be a place of employment in California. This paragraph shall not apply to a retail seller of the substance, whether sold individually or as part of a commercial product to the public. The following shall apply to this paragraph:

(A) On or after January 1, 2016, the information requested shall include current and past customers for not more than a one-year period prior to the date the request is issued. The information shall be provided within a reasonable timeframe, not to exceed 30 calendar days from the date the request is issued. The information shall be provided in a format specified by the State Department of Public Health but consistent with the responding entity’s current data system.

(B) Unless, pursuant to other law or regulation the following persons, any other person, or any governmental entity is required to publicly disclose the following information, the names and addresses of customers, the quantities and dates of shipments, and the proportion of a specified chemical within a mixture provided by chemical manufacturers, formulators, suppliers, distributors, importers, and their agents pursuant to this paragraph shall be considered confidential and, except as specified in this subparagraph, exempt from public disclosure under the California Public Records Act (Chapter 3.5 (commencing with Section 6250) of Division 7 of Title 1 of the Government Code). HESIS may disclose that information to officers or employees of the State Department of Public Health, to officers or employees of the state who are responsible for carrying out the purposes of Division 5 (commencing with Section 6300), or to the state agencies of the state officers specified in paragraphs (5) and (6). Any officer, employee, or agency to which the information is disclosed shall be subject to this subparagraph.

(C) The State Department of Public Health shall be entitled to reimbursement of attorney’s fees and costs incurred in seeking an injunction to enforce this paragraph.

(4) Recommend to the Chief of the Division of Occupational Safety and Health Administration that an occupational safety and health standard be developed whenever it has been determined that a substance in use or potentially in use in places of employment is potentially toxic at the concentrations or under the conditions used.

(5) Notify the Director of Pesticide Regulation of any information developed by HESIS that is relevant to carrying out his or her responsibilities under Chapters 2 (commencing with Section 12751) and 3 (commencing with Section 14001) of Division 7 of the Food and Agricultural Code.

(6) Notify the Secretary for Environmental Protection of any information developed by HESIS that is relevant to carrying out his or her responsibilities.

(d) The Director of Industrial Relations shall appoint an advisory committee to HESIS. The advisory committee shall consist of four representatives from labor, four representatives from management, four active practitioners in the occupational health field, and three persons knowledgeable in biomedical statistics or information storage and retrieval systems. The advisory committee shall meet on a regular basis at the request of the director. The committee shall be consulted by, and shall advise the director at each phase of the structuring and functioning of the repository and alert system with regard to, the procedures, methodology, validity, and practical utility of collecting, evaluating, and disseminating information concerning hazardous substances, consistent with the primary goals and objectives of the repository.

(e) Nothing in this section shall be construed to limit the ability of the State Department of Public Health to propose occupational safety and health standards to the Occupational Safety and Health Standards Board.

(f) Policies and procedures shall be developed to assure, to the extent possible, that HESIS uses and does not duplicate the resources of the federal government and other states.

(g) On or before December 31 of each year, the Department of Industrial Relations shall submit a report to the Legislature detailing the implementation and operation of HESIS including, but not limited to, the amount and source of funds allocated and spent on repository activities, the toxic materials and harmful physical agents investigated during the past year and recommendations made concerning them, actions taken to inform interested persons of the possible hazards of exposure to toxic materials and harmful physical agents, and any recommendations for legislative changes relating to the functions of HESIS.

(Amended by Stats. 2014, Ch. 830, Sec. 2. (SB 193) Effective January 1, 2015.)

147.3.
  

(a) When the Division of Occupational Safety and Health receives a report from the State Department of Public Health pursuant to subdivision (c) of Section 105185 of the Health and Safety Code, the report shall constitute a complaint from a government agency representative charging a serious violation and shall subject the employer or place of employment to the requirements of subdivision (a) of Section 6309 for the Division of Occupational Safety and Health to initiate an investigation within three working days. Upon the completion of the investigation, any citations and fines imposed by the division shall be made publicly available on an annual basis pursuant to subdivision (d) of Section 6309.

(b) The blood lead level established in subdivision (c) of Section 105185 of the Health and Safety Code is not intended to supersede any lower blood lead level that may be actionable under the Division of Occupational Safety and Health’s lead standards in its general industry safety order (Section 5198 of Title 8 of the California Code of Regulations) or construction safety order (Section 1532.1 of Title 8 of the California Code of Regulations). For purposes of this section, an actionable employee blood lead level means a level that triggers an employer obligation to reduce lead exposure in the workplace or an investigation by the division.

(Added by Stats. 2019, Ch. 710, Sec. 2. (AB 35) Effective January 1, 2020.)

147.4.
  

(a) By January 1, 2016, the department shall convene an advisory committee to evaluate whether changes are needed to align the general industry safety orders in Sections 3403 to 3411, inclusive, of Article 10.1 (commencing with Section 3401) of Group 2 of Subchapter 7 of Chapter 4 of Article 8 of Division 1 of Title 8 of the California Code of Regulations with the applicable and most recently promulgated standards of the National Fire Protection Association. The committee shall be composed of parties in both management and labor, represent a cross section of the fire protection industry and community, and be competent and knowledgeable regarding personal protective clothing and equipment for firefighters and firefighting practices generally.

(b) By July 1, 2016, the advisory committee shall present its findings and recommendations for consideration by the board. No later than July 1, 2017, the board shall render a decision regarding the adoption of changes to the general industry safety orders in Sections 3403 to 3411, inclusive, of Article 10.1 (commencing with Section 3401) of Group 2 of Subchapter 7 of Chapter 4 of Article 8 of Division 1 of Title 8 of the California Code of Regulations, or other applicable standards and regulations, in order to maintain alignment with the applicable National Fire Protection Association standards.

(c) Beginning July 1, 2018, and every five years thereafter, the board, in consultation with the department, shall complete a comprehensive review of all revisions to National Fire Protection Association standards pertaining to personal protective equipment covered by the general industry safety orders in Sections 3403 to 3411, inclusive, of Article 10.1 (commencing with Section 3401) of Group 2 of Subchapter 7 of Chapter 4 of Article 8 of Division 1 of Title 8 of the California Code of Regulations. If the review finds that the revisions to applicable National Fire Protection Association standards provide a greater degree of personal protection than the safety orders, the board shall consider modifying existing safety orders and shall render a decision regarding the adoption of necessary changes to safety orders, or other applicable standards and regulations, no later than July 1 of the subsequent year, in order to maintain alignment of the safety orders with the applicable National Fire Protection Association standards.

(Added by Stats. 2014, Ch. 811, Sec. 1. (AB 2146) Effective January 1, 2015.)

147.5.
  

(a) By January 1, 2017, the Division of Occupational Safety and Health shall convene an advisory committee to evaluate whether there is a need to develop industry-specific regulations related to the activities of facilities issued a license pursuant to Chapter 3.5 (commencing with Section 19300) of Division 8 of the Business and Professions Code.

(b) By July 1, 2017, the advisory committee shall present to the board its findings and recommendations for consideration by the board. By July 1, 2017, the board shall render a decision regarding the adoption of industry-specific regulations pursuant to this section.

(Added by Stats. 2015, Ch. 689, Sec. 7. (AB 266) Effective January 1, 2016.)

147.6.
  

(a) By March 1, 2018, the Division of Occupational Safety and Health shall convene an advisory committee to evaluate whether there is a need to develop industry-specific regulations related to the activities of licensees under Division 10 (commencing with Section 26000) of the Business and Professions Code, including but not limited to, whether specific requirements are needed to address exposure to second-hand marijuana smoke by employees at facilities where on-site consumption of marijuana is permitted under subdivision (d) of Section 26200 of the Business and Professions Code, and whether specific requirements are needed to address the potential risks of combustion, inhalation, armed robberies or repetitive strain injuries.

(b) By October 1, 2018, the advisory committee shall present to the board its findings and recommendations for consideration by the board. By October 1, 2018, the board shall render a decision regarding the adoption of industry-specific regulations pursuant to this section.

(Added November 8, 2016, by initiative Proposition 64, Sec. 6.2.)

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