Code Section Group

Government Code - GOV

TITLE 7. PLANNING AND LAND USE [65000 - 66499.58]

  ( Heading of Title 7 amended by Stats. 1974, Ch. 1536. )

DIVISION 1. PLANNING AND ZONING [65000 - 66103]

  ( Heading of Division 1 added by Stats. 1974, Ch. 1536. )

CHAPTER 2.5. Transportation Planning and Programming [65080 - 65086.5]
  ( Heading of Chapter 2.5 amended by Stats. 1977, Ch. 1106. )

65080.
  

(a) Each transportation planning agency designated under Section 29532 or 29532.1 shall prepare and adopt a regional transportation plan directed at achieving a coordinated and balanced regional transportation system, including, but not limited to, mass transportation, highway, railroad, maritime, bicycle, pedestrian, goods movement, and aviation facilities and services. The plan shall be action-oriented and pragmatic, considering both the short-term and long-term future, and shall present clear, concise policy guidance to local and state officials. The regional transportation plan shall consider factors specified in Section 134 of Title 23 of the United States Code. Each transportation planning agency shall consider and incorporate, as appropriate, the transportation plans of cities, counties, districts, private organizations, and state and federal agencies.

(b) The regional transportation plan shall be an internally consistent document and shall include all of the following:

(1) A policy element that describes the transportation issues in the region, identifies and quantifies regional needs, and describes the desired short-range and long-range transportation goals, and pragmatic objective and policy statements. The objective and policy statements shall be consistent with the funding estimates of the financial element. The policy element of transportation planning agencies with populations that exceed 200,000 persons may quantify a set of indicators including, but not limited to, all of the following:

(A) Measures of mobility and traffic congestion, including, but not limited to, daily vehicle hours of delay per capita and vehicle miles traveled per capita.

(B) Measures of road and bridge maintenance and rehabilitation needs, including, but not limited to, roadway pavement and bridge conditions.

(C) Measures of means of travel, including, but not limited to, percentage share of all trips (work and nonwork) made by all of the following:

(i) Single occupant vehicle.

(ii) Multiple occupant vehicle or carpool.

(iii) Public transit including commuter rail and intercity rail.

(iv) Walking.

(v) Bicycling.

(D) Measures of safety and security, including, but not limited to, total injuries and fatalities assigned to each of the modes set forth in subparagraph (C).

(E) Measures of equity and accessibility, including, but not limited to, percentage of the population served by frequent and reliable public transit, with a breakdown by income bracket, and percentage of all jobs accessible by frequent and reliable public transit service, with a breakdown by income bracket.

(F) The requirements of this section may be met utilizing existing sources of information. No additional traffic counts, household surveys, or other sources of data shall be required.

(2) A sustainable communities strategy prepared by each metropolitan planning organization as follows:

(A) No later than September 30, 2010, the State Air Resources Board shall provide each affected region with greenhouse gas emission reduction targets for the automobile and light truck sector for 2020 and 2035, respectively.

(i) No later than January 31, 2009, the state board shall appoint a Regional Targets Advisory Committee to recommend factors to be considered and methodologies to be used for setting greenhouse gas emission reduction targets for the affected regions. The committee shall be composed of representatives of the metropolitan planning organizations, affected air districts, the League of California Cities, the California State Association of Counties, local transportation agencies, and members of the public, including homebuilders, environmental organizations, planning organizations, environmental justice organizations, affordable housing organizations, and others. The advisory committee shall transmit a report with its recommendations to the state board no later than September 30, 2009. In recommending factors to be considered and methodologies to be used, the advisory committee may consider any relevant issues, including, but not limited to, data needs, modeling techniques, growth forecasts, the impacts of regional jobs-housing balance on interregional travel and greenhouse gas emissions, economic and demographic trends, the magnitude of greenhouse gas reduction benefits from a variety of land use and transportation strategies, and appropriate methods to describe regional targets and to monitor performance in attaining those targets. The state board shall consider the report prior to setting the targets.

(ii) Prior to setting the targets for a region, the state board shall exchange technical information with the metropolitan planning organization and the affected air district. The metropolitan planning organization may recommend a target for the region. The metropolitan planning organization shall hold at least one public workshop within the region after receipt of the report from the advisory committee. The state board shall release draft targets for each region no later than June 30, 2010.

(iii) In establishing these targets, the state board shall take into account greenhouse gas emission reductions that will be achieved by improved vehicle emission standards, changes in fuel composition, and other measures it has approved that will reduce greenhouse gas emissions in the affected regions, and prospective measures the state board plans to adopt to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from other greenhouse gas emission sources as that term is defined in subdivision (i) of Section 38505 of the Health and Safety Code and consistent with the regulations promulgated pursuant to the California Global Warming Solutions Act of 2006 (Division 25.5 (commencing with Section 38500) of the Health and Safety Code).

(iv) The state board shall update the regional greenhouse gas emission reduction targets every eight years consistent with each metropolitan planning organization’s timeframe for updating its regional transportation plan under federal law until 2050. The state board may revise the targets every four years based on changes in the factors considered under clause (iii). The state board shall exchange technical information with the Department of Transportation, metropolitan planning organizations, local governments, and affected air districts and engage in a consultative process with public and private stakeholders prior to updating these targets.

(v) The greenhouse gas emission reduction targets may be expressed in gross tons, tons per capita, tons per household, or in any other metric deemed appropriate by the state board.

(B) Each metropolitan planning organization shall prepare a sustainable communities strategy, subject to the requirements of Part 450 of Title 23 of, and Part 93 of Title 40 of, the Code of Federal Regulations, including the requirement to utilize the most recent planning assumptions considering local general plans and other factors. The sustainable communities strategy shall (i) identify the general location of uses, residential densities, and building intensities within the region, (ii) identify areas within the region sufficient to house all the population of the region, including all economic segments of the population, over the course of the planning period of the regional transportation plan taking into account net migration into the region, population growth, household formation and employment growth, (iii) identify areas within the region sufficient to house an eight-year projection of the regional housing need for the region pursuant to Section 65584, (iv) identify a transportation network to service the transportation needs of the region, (v) gather and consider the best practically available scientific information regarding resource areas and farmland in the region as defined in subdivisions (a) and (b) of Section 65080.01, (vi) consider the state housing goals specified in Sections 65580 and 65581, (vii) set forth a forecasted development pattern for the region, which, when integrated with the transportation network, and other transportation measures and policies, will reduce the greenhouse gas emissions from automobiles and light trucks to achieve, if there is a feasible way to do so, the greenhouse gas emission reduction targets approved by the state board, and (viii) allow the regional transportation plan to comply with Section 176 of the federal Clean Air Act (42 U.S.C. Sec. 7506).

(C) (i) Within the jurisdiction of the Metropolitan Transportation Commission, as defined by Section 66502, the Association of Bay Area Governments shall be responsible for clauses (i), (ii), (iii), (v), and (vi) of subparagraph (B), the Metropolitan Transportation Commission shall be responsible for clauses (iv) and (viii) of subparagraph (B); and the Association of Bay Area Governments and the Metropolitan Transportation Commission shall jointly be responsible for clause (vii) of subparagraph (B).

(ii) Within the jurisdiction of the Tahoe Regional Planning Agency, as defined in Sections 66800 and 66801, the Tahoe Metropolitan Planning Organization shall use the Regional Plan for the Lake Tahoe Region as the sustainable community strategy, provided that it complies with clauses (vii) and (viii) of subparagraph (B).

(D) In the region served by the multicounty transportation planning agency described in Section 130004 of the Public Utilities Code, a subregional council of governments and the county transportation commission may work together to propose the sustainable communities strategy and an alternative planning strategy, if one is prepared pursuant to subparagraph (I), for that subregional area. The metropolitan planning organization may adopt a framework for a subregional sustainable communities strategy or a subregional alternative planning strategy to address the intraregional land use, transportation, economic, air quality, and climate policy relationships. The metropolitan planning organization shall include the subregional sustainable communities strategy for that subregion in the regional sustainable communities strategy to the extent consistent with this section and federal law and approve the subregional alternative planning strategy, if one is prepared pursuant to subparagraph (I), for that subregional area to the extent consistent with this section. The metropolitan planning organization shall develop overall guidelines, create public participation plans pursuant to subparagraph (F), ensure coordination, resolve conflicts, make sure that the overall plan complies with applicable legal requirements, and adopt the plan for the region.

(E) The metropolitan planning organization shall conduct at least two informational meetings in each county within the region for members of the board of supervisors and city councils on the sustainable communities strategy and alternative planning strategy, if any. The metropolitan planning organization may conduct only one informational meeting if it is attended by representatives of the county board of supervisors and city council members representing a majority of the cities representing a majority of the population in the incorporated areas of that county. Notice of the meeting or meetings shall be sent to the clerk of the board of supervisors and to each city clerk. The purpose of the meeting or meetings shall be to discuss the sustainable communities strategy and the alternative planning strategy, if any, including the key land use and planning assumptions to the members of the board of supervisors and the city council members in that county and to solicit and consider their input and recommendations.

(F) Each metropolitan planning organization shall adopt a public participation plan, for development of the sustainable communities strategy and an alternative planning strategy, if any, that includes all of the following:

(i) Outreach efforts to encourage the active participation of a broad range of stakeholder groups in the planning process, consistent with the agency’s adopted Federal Public Participation Plan, including, but not limited to, affordable housing advocates, transportation advocates, neighborhood and community groups, environmental advocates, home builder representatives, broad-based business organizations, landowners, commercial property interests, and homeowner associations.

(ii) Consultation with congestion management agencies, transportation agencies, and transportation commissions.

(iii) Workshops throughout the region to provide the public with the information and tools necessary to provide a clear understanding of the issues and policy choices. At least one workshop shall be held in each county in the region. For counties with a population greater than 500,000, at least three workshops shall be held. Each workshop, to the extent practicable, shall include urban simulation computer modeling to create visual representations of the sustainable communities strategy and the alternative planning strategy.

(iv) Preparation and circulation of a draft sustainable communities strategy and an alternative planning strategy, if one is prepared, not less than 55 days before adoption of a final regional transportation plan.

(v) At least three public hearings on the draft sustainable communities strategy in the regional transportation plan and alternative planning strategy, if one is prepared. If the metropolitan transportation organization consists of a single county, at least two public hearings shall be held. To the maximum extent feasible, the hearings shall be in different parts of the region to maximize the opportunity for participation by members of the public throughout the region.

(vi) A process for enabling members of the public to provide a single request to receive notices, information, and updates.

(G) In preparing a sustainable communities strategy, the metropolitan planning organization shall consider spheres of influence that have been adopted by the local agency formation commissions within its region.

(H) Prior to adopting a sustainable communities strategy, the metropolitan planning organization shall quantify the reduction in greenhouse gas emissions projected to be achieved by the sustainable communities strategy and set forth the difference, if any, between the amount of that reduction and the target for the region established by the state board.

(I) If the sustainable communities strategy, prepared in compliance with subparagraph (B) or (D), is unable to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to achieve the greenhouse gas emission reduction targets established by the state board, the metropolitan planning organization shall prepare an alternative planning strategy to the sustainable communities strategy showing how those greenhouse gas emission targets would be achieved through alternative development patterns, infrastructure, or additional transportation measures or policies. The alternative planning strategy shall be a separate document from the regional transportation plan, but it may be adopted concurrently with the regional transportation plan. In preparing the alternative planning strategy, the metropolitan planning organization:

(i) Shall identify the principal impediments to achieving the targets within the sustainable communities strategy.

(ii) May include an alternative development pattern for the region pursuant to subparagraphs (B) to (G), inclusive.

(iii) Shall describe how the greenhouse gas emission reduction targets would be achieved by the alternative planning strategy, and why the development pattern, measures, and policies in the alternative planning strategy are the most practicable choices for achievement of the greenhouse gas emission reduction targets.

(iv) An alternative development pattern set forth in the alternative planning strategy shall comply with Part 450 of Title 23 of, and Part 93 of Title 40 of, the Code of Federal Regulations, except to the extent that compliance will prevent achievement of the greenhouse gas emission reduction targets approved by the state board.

(v) For purposes of the California Environmental Quality Act (Division 13 (commencing with Section 21000) of the Public Resources Code), an alternative planning strategy shall not constitute a land use plan, policy, or regulation, and the inconsistency of a project with an alternative planning strategy shall not be a consideration in determining whether a project may have an environmental effect.

(J) (i) Prior to starting the public participation process adopted pursuant to subparagraph (F), the metropolitan planning organization shall submit a description to the state board of the technical methodology it intends to use to estimate the greenhouse gas emissions from its sustainable communities strategy and, if appropriate, its alternative planning strategy. The state board shall respond to the metropolitan planning organization in a timely manner with written comments about the technical methodology, including specifically describing any aspects of that methodology it concludes will not yield accurate estimates of greenhouse gas emissions, and suggested remedies. The metropolitan planning organization is encouraged to work with the state board until the state board concludes that the technical methodology operates accurately.

(ii) After adoption, a metropolitan planning organization shall submit a sustainable communities strategy or an alternative planning strategy, if one has been adopted, to the state board for review, including the quantification of the greenhouse gas emission reductions the strategy would achieve and a description of the technical methodology used to obtain that result. Review by the state board shall be limited to acceptance or rejection of the metropolitan planning organization’s determination that the strategy submitted would, if implemented, achieve the greenhouse gas emission reduction targets established by the state board. The state board shall complete its review within 60 days.

(iii) If the state board determines that the strategy submitted would not, if implemented, achieve the greenhouse gas emission reduction targets, the metropolitan planning organization shall revise its strategy or adopt an alternative planning strategy, if not previously adopted, and submit the strategy for review pursuant to clause (ii). At a minimum, the metropolitan planning organization must obtain state board acceptance that an alternative planning strategy would, if implemented, achieve the greenhouse gas emission reduction targets established for that region by the state board.

(K) Neither a sustainable communities strategy nor an alternative planning strategy regulates the use of land, nor, except as provided by subparagraph (J), shall either one be subject to any state approval. Nothing in a sustainable communities strategy shall be interpreted as superseding the exercise of the land use authority of cities and counties within the region. Nothing in this section shall be interpreted to limit the state board’s authority under any other provision of law. Nothing in this section shall be interpreted to authorize the abrogation of any vested right whether created by statute or by common law. Nothing in this section shall require a city’s or county’s land use policies and regulations, including its general plan, to be consistent with the regional transportation plan or an alternative planning strategy. Nothing in this section requires a metropolitan planning organization to approve a sustainable communities strategy that would be inconsistent with Part 450 of Title 23 of, or Part 93 of Title 40 of, the Code of Federal Regulations and any administrative guidance under those regulations. Nothing in this section relieves a public or private entity or any person from compliance with any other local, state, or federal law.

(L) Nothing in this section requires projects programmed for funding on or before December 31, 2011, to be subject to the provisions of this paragraph if they (i) are contained in the 2007 or 2009 Federal Statewide Transportation Improvement Program, (ii) are funded pursuant to Chapter 12.49 (commencing with Section 8879.20) of Division 1 of Title 2, or (iii) were specifically listed in a ballot measure prior to December 31, 2008, approving a sales tax increase for transportation projects. Nothing in this section shall require a transportation sales tax authority to change the funding allocations approved by the voters for categories of transportation projects in a sales tax measure adopted prior to December 31, 2010. For purposes of this subparagraph, a transportation sales tax authority is a district, as defined in Section 7252 of the Revenue and Taxation Code, that is authorized to impose a sales tax for transportation purposes.

(M) A metropolitan planning organization, or a regional transportation planning agency not within a metropolitan planning organization, that is required to adopt a regional transportation plan not less than every five years, may elect to adopt the plan not less than every four years. This election shall be made by the board of directors of the metropolitan planning organization or regional transportation planning agency no later than June 1, 2009, or thereafter 54 months prior to the statutory deadline for the adoption of housing elements for the local jurisdictions within the region, after a public hearing at which comments are accepted from members of the public and representatives of cities and counties within the region covered by the metropolitan planning organization or regional transportation planning agency. Notice of the public hearing shall be given to the general public and by mail to cities and counties within the region no later than 30 days prior to the date of the public hearing. Notice of election shall be promptly given to the Department of Housing and Community Development. The metropolitan planning organization or the regional transportation planning agency shall complete its next regional transportation plan within three years of the notice of election.

(N) Two or more of the metropolitan planning organizations for Fresno County, Kern County, Kings County, Madera County, Merced County, San Joaquin County, Stanislaus County, and Tulare County may work together to develop and adopt multiregional goals and policies that may address interregional land use, transportation, economic, air quality, and climate relationships. The participating metropolitan planning organizations may also develop a multiregional sustainable communities strategy, to the extent consistent with federal law, or an alternative planning strategy for adoption by the metropolitan planning organizations. Each participating metropolitan planning organization shall consider any adopted multiregional goals and policies in the development of a sustainable communities strategy and, if applicable, an alternative planning strategy for its region.

(3) An action element that describes the programs and actions necessary to implement the plan and assigns implementation responsibilities. The action element may describe all transportation projects proposed for development during the 20-year or greater life of the plan. The action element shall consider congestion management programming activities carried out within the region.

(4) (A) A financial element that summarizes the cost of plan implementation constrained by a realistic projection of available revenues. The financial element shall also contain recommendations for allocation of funds. A county transportation commission created pursuant to Section 130000 of the Public Utilities Code shall be responsible for recommending projects to be funded with regional improvement funds, if the project is consistent with the regional transportation plan. The first five years of the financial element shall be based on the five-year estimate of funds developed pursuant to Section 14524. The financial element may recommend the development of specified new sources of revenue, consistent with the policy element and action element.

(B) The financial element of transportation planning agencies with populations that exceed 200,000 persons may include a project cost breakdown for all projects proposed for development during the 20-year life of the plan that includes total expenditures and related percentages of total expenditures for all of the following:

(i) State highway expansion.

(ii) State highway rehabilitation, maintenance, and operations.

(iii) Local road and street expansion.

(iv) Local road and street rehabilitation, maintenance, and operation.

(v) Mass transit, commuter rail, and intercity rail expansion.

(vi) Mass transit, commuter rail, and intercity rail rehabilitation, maintenance, and operations.

(vii) Pedestrian and bicycle facilities.

(viii) Environmental enhancements and mitigation.

(ix) Research and planning.

(x) Other categories.

(C) The metropolitan planning organization or county transportation agency, whichever entity is appropriate, shall consider financial incentives for cities and counties that have resource areas or farmland, as defined in Section 65080.01, for the purposes of, for example, transportation investments for the preservation and safety of the city street or county road system and farm-to-market and interconnectivity transportation needs. The metropolitan planning organization or county transportation agency, whichever entity is appropriate, shall also consider financial assistance for counties to address countywide service responsibilities in counties that contribute toward the greenhouse gas emission reduction targets by implementing policies for growth to occur within their cities.

(c) Each transportation planning agency may also include other factors of local significance as an element of the regional transportation plan, including, but not limited to, issues of mobility for specific sectors of the community, including, but not limited to, senior citizens.

(d) Except as otherwise provided in this subdivision, each transportation planning agency shall adopt and submit, every four years, an updated regional transportation plan to the California Transportation Commission and the Department of Transportation. A transportation planning agency located in a federally designated air quality attainment area or that does not contain an urbanized area may at its option adopt and submit a regional transportation plan every five years. When applicable, the plan shall be consistent with federal planning and programming requirements and shall conform to the regional transportation plan guidelines adopted by the California Transportation Commission. Prior to adoption of the regional transportation plan, a public hearing shall be held after the giving of notice of the hearing by publication in the affected county or counties pursuant to Section 6061.

(Amended by Stats. 2010, Ch. 328, Sec. 95. Effective January 1, 2011.)

65080.01.
  

The following definitions apply to terms used in Section 65080:

(a) “Resource areas” include (1) all publicly owned parks and open space; (2) open space or habitat areas protected by natural community conservation plans, habitat conservation plans, and other adopted natural resource protection plans; (3) habitat for species identified as candidate, fully protected, sensitive, or species of special status by local, state, or federal agencies or protected by the federal Endangered Species Act of 1973, the California Endangered Species Act, or the Native Plan Protection Act; (4) lands subject to conservation or agricultural easements for conservation or agricultural purposes by local governments, special districts, or nonprofit 501(c)(3) organizations, areas of the state designated by the State Mining and Geology Board as areas of statewide or regional significance pursuant to Section 2790 of the Public Resources Code, and lands under Williamson Act contracts; (5) areas designated for open-space or agricultural uses in adopted open-space elements or agricultural elements of the local general plan or by local ordinance; (6) areas containing biological resources as described in Appendix G of the CEQA Guidelines that may be significantly affected by the sustainable communities strategy or the alternative planning strategy; and (7) an area subject to flooding where a development project would not, at the time of development in the judgment of the agency, meet the requirements of the National Flood Insurance Program or where the area is subject to more protective provisions of state law or local ordinance.

(b) “Farmland” means farmland that is outside all existing city spheres of influence or city limits as of January 1, 2008, and is one of the following:

(1) Classified as prime or unique farmland or farmland of statewide importance.

(2) Farmland classified by a local agency in its general plan that meets or exceeds the standards for prime or unique farmland or farmland of statewide importance.

(c) “Feasible” means capable of being accomplished in a successful manner within a reasonable period of time, taking into account economic, environmental, legal, social, and technological factors.

(d) “Consistent” shall have the same meaning as that term is used in Section 134 of Title 23 of the United States Code.

(e) “Internally consistent” means that the contents of the elements of the regional transportation plan must be consistent with each other.

(Added by Stats. 2008, Ch. 728, Sec. 5. Effective January 1, 2009.)

65080.1.
  

Once preparation of a regional transportation plan has been commenced by or on behalf of a designated transportation planning agency, the Secretary of Transportation shall not designate a new transportation planning agency pursuant to Section 29532 for all or any part of the geographic area served by the originally designated agency unless he or she first determines that redesignation will not result in the loss to California of any substantial amounts of federal funds.

(Amended (as amended by Stats. 1982, Ch. 681, Sec. 20) by Stats. 2013, Ch. 352, Sec. 310. Effective September 26, 2013. Operative July 1, 2013, by Sec. 543 of Ch. 352.)

65080.2.
  

A transportation planning agency which has within its area of jurisdiction a transit development board established pursuant to Division 11 (commencing with Section 120000) of the Public Utilities Code shall include, in the regional transportation improvement program prepared pursuant to Section 65080, those elements of the transportation improvement program prepared by the transit development board pursuant to Section 120353 of the Public Utilities Code relating to funds made available to the transit development board for transportation purposes.

(Added by renumbering Section 65080.1 by Stats. 1978, Ch. 669.)

65080.3.
  

(a) Each transportation planning agency with a population that exceeds 200,000 persons may prepare at least one “alternative planning scenario” for presentation to local officials, agency board members, and the public during the development of the triennial regional transportation plan and the hearing required under subdivision (c) of Section 65080.

(b) The alternative planning scenario shall accommodate the same amount of population growth as projected in the plan but shall be based on an alternative that attempts to reduce the growth in traffic congestion, make more efficient use of existing transportation infrastructure, and reduce the need for costly future public infrastructure.

(c) The alternative planning scenario shall be developed in collaboration with a broad range of public and private stakeholders, including local elected officials, city and county employees, relevant interest groups, and the general public. In developing the scenario, the agency shall consider all of the following:

(1) Increasing housing and commercial development around transit facilities and in close proximity to jobs and commercial activity centers.

(2) Encouraging public transit usage, ridesharing, walking, bicycling, and transportation demand management practices.

(3) Promoting a more efficient mix of current and future job sites, commercial activity centers, and housing opportunities.

(4) Promoting use of urban vacant land and “brownfield” redevelopment.

(5) An economic incentive program that may include measures such as transit vouchers and variable pricing for transportation.

(d) The planning scenario shall be included in a report evaluating all of the following:

(1) The amounts and locations of traffic congestion.

(2) Vehicle miles traveled and the resulting reduction in vehicle emissions.

(3) Estimated percentage share of trips made by each means of travel specified in subparagraph (C) of paragraph (1) of subdivision (b) of Section 65080.

(4) The costs of transportation improvements required to accommodate the population growth in accordance with the alternative scenario.

(5) The economic, social, environmental, regulatory, and institutional barriers to the scenario being achieved.

(e) If the adopted regional transportation plan already achieves one or more of the objectives set forth in subdivision (c), those objectives need not be discussed or evaluated in the alternative planning scenario.

(f) The alternative planning scenario and accompanying report shall not be adopted as part of the regional transportation plan, but it shall be distributed to cities and counties within the region and to other interested parties, and may be a basis for revisions to the transportation projects that will be included in the regional transportation plan.

(g) Nothing in this section grants transportation planning agencies any direct or indirect authority over local land use decisions.

(h) This section does not apply to a transportation plan adopted on or before September 1, 2001, proposed by a transportation planning agency with a population of less than 1,000,000 persons.

(Added by Stats. 2000, Ch. 832, Sec. 3. Effective January 1, 2001.)

65080.5.
  

(a) For each area for which a transportation planning agency is designated under subdivision (c) of Section 29532, or adopts a resolution pursuant to subdivision (c) of Section 65080, the Department of Transportation, in cooperation with the transportation planning agency, and subject to subdivision (e), shall prepare the regional transportation plan, and the updating thereto, for that area and submit it to the governing body or designated policy committee of the transportation planning agency for adoption. Prior to adoption, a public hearing shall be held, after the giving of notice of the hearing by publication in the affected county or counties pursuant to Section 6061. Prior to the adoption of the regional transportation improvement program by the transportation planning agency if it prepared the program, the transportation planning agency shall consider the relationship between the program and the adopted plan. The adopted plan and program, and the updating thereto, shall be submitted to the California Transportation Commission and the department pursuant to subdivision (b) of Section 65080.

(b) In the case of a transportation planning agency designated under subdivision (c) of Section 29532, the transportation planning agency may prepare the regional transportation plan for the area under its jurisdiction pursuant to this chapter, if the transportation planning agency, prior to July 1, 1978, adopts by resolution a declaration of intention to do so.

(c) In those areas that have a county transportation commission created pursuant to Section 130050 of the Public Utilities Code, the multicounty designated transportation planning agency, as defined in Section 130004 of that code, shall prepare the regional transportation plan and the regional transportation improvement program in consultation with the county transportation commissions.

(d) Any transportation planning agency which did not elect to prepare the initial regional transportation plan for the area under its jurisdiction, may prepare the updated plan if it adopts a resolution of intention to do so at least one year prior to the date when the updated plan is to be submitted to the California Transportation Commission.

(e) If the department prepares or updates a regional transportation improvement program or regional transportation plan, or both, pursuant to this section, the state-local share of funding the preparation or updating of the plan and program shall be calculated on the same basis as though the preparation or updating were to be performed by the transportation planning agency and funded under Sections 99311, 99313, and 99314 of the Public Utilities Code.

(Amended by Stats. 1982, Ch. 681, Sec. 21.)

65080.6.
  

Each transportation planning agency designated under Section 29532 or 29532.1 whose jurisdiction includes a portion of the California Coastal Trail, or property designated for the trail, that is located within the coastal zone, as defined in Section 30103 of the Public Resources Code, shall coordinate with the State Coastal Conservancy, the California Coastal Commission, and the Department of Transportation regarding development of the California Coastal Trail, and each transportation planning agency shall include provisions for the California Coastal Trail in its regional plan, under Section 65080.

(Added by renumbering Section 65080.1 (as added by Stats. 2007, Ch. 375, Sec. 3) by Stats. 2015, Ch. 303, Sec. 230. Effective January 1, 2016.)

65081.
  

(a) It is the intent of the Legislature to encourage metropolitan planning organizations and local air quality management districts or air pollution control districts to work with local employers to adopt policies that encourage commuting by means other than driving alone. To encourage this, the Legislature hereby establishes a program in that regard in the greater San Francisco Bay Area.

(b) Notwithstanding Section 40717.9 of the Health and Safety Code, the Bay Area Air Quality Management District and the Metropolitan Transportation Commission with respect to the common area within their respective jurisdictions may jointly adopt a commute benefit ordinance that requires covered employers operating within the common area of the district and commission to offer all covered employees one of the following choices:

(1) A pretax option: a program, consistent with Section 132(f) of the Internal Revenue Code, allowing covered employees to elect to exclude from taxable wages employee commuting costs incurred for transit passes or vanpool charges, up to the maximum amount allowed by federal tax law.

(2) Employer-paid benefit: a program whereby the covered employer offers employees a subsidy to offset the monthly cost of commuting via public transit or by vanpool, or, in addition, and at the employer’s discretion, by bicycle. The subsidy shall be equal to either the monthly cost of commuting via public transit or by vanpool, or seventy-five dollars ($75), whichever is lower. The seventy-five dollar ($75) amount shall be adjusted annually consistent with the California Consumer Price Index. If the covered employer chooses to offer a subsidy to offset the monthly cost of commuting by bicycle, the subsidy shall be either the monthly cost of commuting by bicycle or twenty dollars ($20), whichever is lower.

(3) Employer-provided transit: transportation furnished by the covered employer at no cost, or low cost as determined by the district or commission, to the covered employee in a vanpool or bus, or similar multipassenger vehicle operated by or for the employer.

(c) Nothing in this section shall prevent a covered employer from offering a more generous commuter benefit that is otherwise consistent with the requirements of the applicable commute benefit ordinance. Nothing in this section shall require employees to change their behavior.

(d) An employer offering, or proposing to offer, an alternative commuter benefit on the employer’s own initiative, or an employer otherwise required to offer an alternative commuter benefit as a condition of a lease, original building permit, or other similar requirement, if the alternative is not one of the options identified in subdivision (b), may seek approval of the alternative from the district or commission. The district or commission may approve an alternative if it determines that the alternative provides at least the same benefit in terms of reducing single-occupant vehicle trips as any of the options in subdivision (b). An employer that offers an approved alternative to covered employees in a manner otherwise consistent with this section is not required to offer one of the options in subdivision (b).

(e) The commute benefit ordinance shall provide covered employers with at least six months to comply after the ordinance is adopted.

(f) An employer that participates in or is represented by a transportation management association that provides the employer’s covered employees with any of the benefits in subdivision (b), or an alternative benefit determined by the district or commission pursuant to subdivision (d) to provide at least the same benefit in terms of reducing single-occupant vehicle trips as any of the options in subdivision (b), shall be deemed in compliance with the regional ordinance, and the transportation management association may act on behalf of those employers in that regard. The district or commission shall communicate directly with the transportation management association, rather than the participating employers, to determine compliance with the ordinance.

(g) A commute benefit ordinance adopted pursuant to this section shall specify all of the following: (1) how the implementing agencies will inform covered employers about the ordinance, (2) how compliance with the ordinance will be demonstrated, (3) the procedures for proposing and the criteria that will be used to evaluate an alternative commuter benefit pursuant to subdivision (d), and (4) any consequences for noncompliance.

(h) Nothing in this section shall limit or restrict the statutory or regulatory authority of the commission or district.

(i) The commission shall not use federal planning funds in the implementation of the commute benefit ordinance.

(j) As used in this section, the following terms have the following meanings:

(1) “Covered employer” means any employer for which an average of 50 or more employees per week perform work for compensation within the area where the ordinance adopted pursuant to this section operates. In determining the number of employees performing work for an employer during a given week, only employees performing work on a full-time basis shall be counted.

(2) “Covered employee” means an employee who performed at least an average of 20 hours of work per week within the previous calendar month within the area where the ordinance adopted pursuant to this section operates.

(3) “District” means the Bay Area Air Quality Management District.

(4) “Commission” means the Metropolitan Transportation Commission.

(Amended by Stats. 2016, Ch. 483, Sec. 1. Effective January 1, 2017.)

65081.1.
  

(a) After consultation with other regional and local transportation agencies, each transportation planning agency whose planning area includes a primary air carrier airport shall, in conjunction with its preparation of an updated regional transportation plan, include an airport ground access improvement program.

(b) The program shall address the development and extension of mass transit systems, including passenger rail service, major arterial and highway widening and extension projects, and any other ground access improvement projects the planning agency deems appropriate.

(c) Highest consideration shall be given to mass transit for airport access improvement projects in the program.

(d) If federal funds are not available to a transportation planning agency for the costs of preparing or updating an airport ground access improvement program, the agency may charge the operators of primary air carrier airports within its planning area for the direct costs of preparing and updating the program. An airport operator against whom charges are imposed pursuant to this subdivision shall pay the amount of those charges to the transportation planning agency.

(Amended by Stats. 1997, Ch. 622, Sec. 26. Effective January 1, 1998.)

65081.3.
  

(a) As a part of its adoption of the regional transportation plan, the designated county transportation commission, regional transportation planning agency, or the Metropolitan Transportation Commission may designate special corridors, which may include, but are not limited to, adopted state highway routes, which, in consultation with the Department of Transportation, cities, counties, and transit operators directly impacted by the corridor, are determined to be of statewide or regional priority for long-term right-of-way preservation.

(b) Prior to designating a corridor for priority acquisition, the regional transportation planning agency shall do all of the following:

(1) Establish geographic boundaries for the proposed corridor.

(2) Complete a traffic survey, including a preliminary recommendation for transportation modal split, which generally describes the traffic and air quality impacts of the proposed corridor.

(3) Consider the widest feasible range of possible transportation facilities that could be located in the corridor and the major environmental impacts they may cause to assist in making the corridor more environmentally sensitive and, in the long term, a more viable site for needed transportation improvements.

(c) A designated corridor of statewide or regional priority shall be specifically considered in the certified environmental impact report completed for the adopted regional transportation plan required by the California Environmental Quality Act, which shall include a review of the environmental impacts of the possible transportation facilities which may be located in the corridor. The environmental impact report shall include a survey within the corridor boundaries to determine if there exist any of the following:

(1) Rare or endangered plant or animal species.

(2) Historical or cultural sites of major significance.

(3) Wetlands, vernal pools, or other naturally occurring features.

(d) The regional transportation planning agency shall designate a corridor for priority acquisition only if, after a public hearing, it finds that the range of potential transportation facilities to be located in the corridor can be constructed in a manner which will avoid or mitigate significant environmental impacts or values identified in subdivision (c), consistent with the California Environmental Quality Act and the state and federal Endangered Species Acts.

(e) Notwithstanding any other provision of this section, a corridor of statewide or regional priority may be designated as part of the regional transportation plan only if it has previously been specifically defined in the plan required pursuant to Section 134 and is consistent with the plan required pursuant to Section 135 of Title 23 of the United States Code.

(Added by Stats. 1992, Ch. 754, Sec. 1. Effective January 1, 1993.)

65082.
  

(a) (1) A five-year regional transportation improvement program shall be prepared, adopted, and submitted to the California Transportation Commission on or before December 15 of each odd-numbered year thereafter, updated every two years, pursuant to Sections 65080 and 65080.5 and the guidelines adopted pursuant to Section 14530.1, to include regional transportation improvement projects and programs proposed to be funded, in whole or in part, in the state transportation improvement program.

(2) Major projects shall include current costs updated as of November 1 of the year of submittal and escalated to the appropriate year, and be listed by relative priority, taking into account need, delivery milestone dates, and the availability of funding.

(b) Except for those counties that do not prepare a congestion management program pursuant to Section 65088.3, congestion management programs adopted pursuant to Section 65089 shall be incorporated into the regional transportation improvement program submitted to the commission by December 15 of each odd-numbered year.

(c) Local projects not included in a congestion management program shall not be included in the regional transportation improvement program. Projects and programs adopted pursuant to subdivision (a) shall be consistent with the capital improvement program adopted pursuant to paragraph (5) of subdivision (b) of Section 65089, and the guidelines adopted pursuant to Section 14530.1.

(d) Other projects may be included in the regional transportation improvement program if listed separately.

(e) Unless a county not containing urbanized areas of over 50,000 population notifies the Department of Transportation by July 1 that it intends to prepare a regional transportation improvement program for that county, the department shall, in consultation with the affected local agencies, prepare the program for all counties for which it prepares a regional transportation plan.

(f) The requirements for incorporating a congestion management program into a regional transportation improvement program specified in this section do not apply in those counties that do not prepare a congestion management program in accordance with Section 65088.3.

(g) The regional transportation improvement program may include a reserve of county shares for providing funds in order to match federal funds.

(Amended by Stats. 2003, Ch. 525, Sec. 7. Effective January 1, 2004.)

65084.
  

In order to insure coordinated planning, development, and operation of transportation systems of all types and modes, the board of supervisors of each county may appoint a county director of transportation, and specify the extent of the responsibilities of such officer.

(Added by Stats. 1972, Ch. 1253.)

65085.
  

The board of supervisors may designate any county officer who is properly qualified to serve as the county director of transportation.

(Added by Stats. 1972, Ch. 1253.)

65086.
  

The Department of Transportation, in consultation with transportation planning agencies, county transportation commissions, counties, and cities, shall carry out long-term state highway system planning to identify future highway improvements.

(Amended by Stats. 1997, Ch. 622, Sec. 29. Effective January 1, 1998.)

65086.4.
  

Projects on the state highway system shall comply with applicable state and federal standards to ensure systemwide consistency with operational, safety, and maintenance needs. The department may approve exceptions to this requirement that it determines to be appropriate.

(Repealed and added by Stats. 1997, Ch. 622, Sec. 31. Effective January 1, 1998.)

65086.5.
  

(a) To the extent that the work does not jeopardize the delivery of the projects in the adopted state transportation improvement program, the Department of Transportation may prepare a project studies report for capacity-increasing state highway projects that are not included in the state transportation improvement program. Preparation of the project studies report shall be limited by the resources available to the department for that work, supplemented, as appropriate, by regional or local resources. The project studies report shall include the project-related factors of limits, description, scope, costs, and the amount of time needed for initiating construction.

(b) Whenever project studies reports are performed by an entity other than the Department of Transportation, the department shall review and approve the report.

(c) The Department of Transportation may be requested to prepare a project studies report for a capacity-increasing state highway project which is being proposed for inclusion in a future state transportation improvement program. The department shall have 30 days to determine whether it can complete the requested report in a timely fashion. If the department determines that it cannot complete the report in a timely fashion, the requesting entity may prepare the report. Upon submission of a project studies report to the department by the entity, the department shall complete its review and provide its comments to that entity within 60 days from the date of submission. The department shall complete its review and final determination of a report which has been revised to address the department’s comments within 30 days following submission of the revised report.

(d) The Department of Transportation, in consultation with representatives of cities, counties, and regional transportation planning agencies, shall prepare draft guidelines for the preparation of project studies reports by all entities. The guidelines shall address the development of reliable cost estimates. The department shall submit the draft guidelines to the California Transportation Commission not later than July 1, 1991. The commission shall adopt the final guidelines not later than October 1, 1991. Guidelines adopted by the commission shall apply only to project studies reports commenced after October 1, 1991.

(Amended by Stats. 1998, Ch. 596, Sec. 3. Effective September 21, 1998.)

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