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SB-749 California Public Records Act: trade secrets: reverse public records actions.(2019-2020)

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Date Published: 03/27/2019 09:00 PM
SB749:v98#DOCUMENT

Amended  IN  Senate  March 27, 2019

CALIFORNIA LEGISLATURE— 2019–2020 REGULAR SESSION

Senate Bill No. 749


Introduced by Senator Durazo

February 22, 2019


An act to add Sections 6254.34 and 6259.5 to the Government Code, relating to public records.


LEGISLATIVE COUNSEL'S DIGEST


SB 749, as amended, Durazo. California Public Records Act. Act: trade secrets: reverse public records actions.
The California Public Records Act requires state and local agencies to make their records available for public inspection, unless an exemption from disclosure applies. Existing law provides that nothing in the act requires the disclosure of corporate proprietary information including trade secrets, among other things.
This bill would provide that records relating to wages, benefits, working hours, and other employment terms and conditions of employees working for a private industry employer pursuant to a contract with a state or local agency shall not be deemed to be trade secrets under the act. The bill would also provide that records of compliance with local, state, or federal domestic content requirements and records of a private industry employer’s compliance with job creation, job quality, or job retention obligations contained in a contract or agreement with a state or local agency shall not be deemed trade secrets under the act.
Under existing law, a person may seek injunctive or declaratory relief or a writ of mandate to enforce their right to inspect or receive a copy of a public record, as specified. Under existing case law, an agency’s decision to release a public record pursuant to the California Public Records Act is reviewable by a petition for a writ of mandate on the basis that the public record was confidential, which is known as a reverse public records act.
This bill would require the requester, as defined, to be named as a real party in interest in a reverse public records action, and would require a court to allow the requester to participate fully on the merits of the reverse public records action. The bill would require the person who initiated the reverse public records action to pay the requester’s court costs and reasonable attorney’s fees if the court denies the petition seeking to prevent the public agency from disclosing the record at issue. The bill would require a public agency to pay court costs and reasonable attorney’s fees to the requester under specified circumstances.
The California Constitution requires local agencies, for the purpose of ensuring public access to the meetings of public bodies and the writings of public officials and agencies, to comply with a statutory enactment that amends or enacts laws relating to public records or open meetings and contains findings demonstrating that the enactment furthers the constitutional requirements relating to this purpose.
This bill would make legislative findings to that effect.

The California Public Records Act requires state and local agencies to make their records available for public inspection, unless an exemption from disclosure applies. The act declares that access to information concerning the conduct of the people’s business is a fundamental and necessary right of every person in this state.

This bill would declare the intent of the Legislature to enact legislation relating to the California Public Records Act.

Vote: MAJORITY   Appropriation: NO   Fiscal Committee: NOYES   Local Program: NOYES  

The people of the State of California do enact as follows:


SECTION 1.

 Section 6254.34 is added to the Government Code, to read:

6254.34.
 (a) Notwithstanding any other law, records of wages, benefits, working hours, and other employment terms and conditions of employees working for a private industry employer, or a subcontractor of a private industry employer, pursuant to a contract with a state or local agency are not trade secrets and are public records for purposes of this chapter, except that nothing in this section requires the disclosure of the names and other personally identifying information of employees if that information is otherwise exempt from disclosure pursuant to the provisions of this chapter.
(b) Notwithstanding any other law, records of compliance with domestic content requirements specified in Section 5323(j) of Title 49 of the United States Code, or with any state or local law mandating domestic content in state or local agency procurement or limiting or prohibiting the use of articles, materials, or supplies mined, produced, or manufactured in foreign countries, are public records and are not trade secrets for purposes of this chapter.
(c) Notwithstanding any other law, records of a private industry employer’s compliance with job creation, job quality, or job retention obligations in a contract or agreement with a state or local agency or pursuant to a state or local law are not trade secrets and are public records for purposes of this chapter.

SEC. 2.

 Section 6259.5 is added to the Government Code, to read:

6259.5.
 (a) In any reverse public records action, the following requirements apply:
(1) The requestor shall be named as a real party in interest in the proceeding, and the person who initiated the reverse public records action shall serve a copy of any pleading on the requestor. If the person who initiated the action does not provide the court with proof of service upon the requestor, the court shall dismiss the reverse public records action with prejudice.
(2) If the requestor wishes, the court shall allow the requestor to participate fully on the merits of the reverse public records action.
(3) A person who files a reverse public records action shall label the action as such on the first page of the pleadings.
(4) A court may not base an order prohibiting the public agency from disclosing the record on the discretionary exceptions to disclosure set forth in Section 6254.
(b) (1) In a reverse public records action, if the court denies the petition seeking to prevent the public agency from disclosing the record that is at issue, the court shall order the person who initiated the reverse public records action to pay the requestor’s court costs and reasonable attorney’s fees. If the court finds that the public agency delayed disclosure of the record to facilitate the filing of the reverse public records action, or if the public agency declined to defend its position that the record was subject to disclosure in the reverse public records action, the court shall order the public entity to pay court costs and reasonable attorney’s fees to the requestor.
(2) In a reverse public records action, if the court orders the public agency to not disclose the record that is at issue, the court shall not order the requestor to pay court costs and reasonable attorney’s fees to the third party who filed the reverse public records action or to the public agency.
(c) For purposes of this section, the following terms have the following meanings:
(1) “Requestor” means the person who requested the record that is the subject of the reverse public records action.
(2) “Reverse public records action” means a petition for a writ of mandate pursuant to Section 1085 of the Code of Civil Procedure seeking declaratory or injunctive relief that requests that court enjoin a decision by a public agency to disclose a record in response to a request by a requestor.

SEC. 3.

 The Legislature finds and declares that Sections 1 and 2 of this act, which add Sections 6254.34 and 6259.5 to the Government Code, further, within the meaning of paragraph (7) of subdivision (b) of Section 3 of Article I of the California Constitution, the purposes of that constitutional section as it relates to the right of public access to the meetings of local public bodies or the writings of local public officials and local agencies. Pursuant to paragraph (7) of subdivision (b) of Section 3 of Article I of the California Constitution, the Legislature makes the following findings:
It is in the public interest to ensure that the records identified in Section 1 of this act are not considered trade secrets and are subject to disclosure under the California Public Records Act and to ensure that reverse public records actions are conducted in a manner that adequately protects the public's right of access to public records.
SECTION 1.

It is the intent of the Legislature to enact legislation relating to the California Public Records Act.