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AB-1235 Youth homelessness prevention centers.(2019-2020)

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Date Published: 09/27/2019 02:00 PM
AB1235:v94#DOCUMENT

Assembly Bill No. 1235
CHAPTER 341

An act to amend Sections 1502, 1502.35, 1507.6, 1522.44, 1530.8, 1536, 1538.7, 1538.8, 1538.9, 1548, and 1562 of the Health and Safety Code, and to amend Sections 319, 361.2, 450, 727, and 11400 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, relating to care facilities.

[ Approved by Governor  September 26, 2019. Filed with Secretary of State  September 26, 2019. ]

LEGISLATIVE COUNSEL'S DIGEST


AB 1235, Chu. Youth homelessness prevention centers.
Existing law, the California Community Care Facilities Act, provides for the licensing and regulation of runaway and homeless youth shelters by the State Department of Social Services. Existing law requires these shelters to offer short-term, 24-hour, nonmedical care and supervision and personal services to homeless youth and runaway youth, as those terms are defined, who voluntarily enter the shelter. Existing law defines “short-term” to mean no more than 21 consecutive days.
This bill would rename these facilities “youth homelessness prevention centers,” and would expand the categories of youth for which the center is required to provide services to also include youth at risk of homelessness and youth exhibiting status offender behavior, as those terms are defined by the bill. The bill would expand the definition of “short-term” to mean no more than 90 consecutive days, and would make technical, conforming changes to related provisions.
Vote: MAJORITY   Appropriation: NO   Fiscal Committee: YES   Local Program: NO  

The people of the State of California do enact as follows:


SECTION 1.

 Section 1502 of the Health and Safety Code is amended to read:

1502.
 As used in this chapter:
(a) “Community care facility” means any facility, place, or building that is maintained and operated to provide nonmedical residential care, day treatment, adult daycare, or foster family agency services for children, adults, or children and adults, including, but not limited to, the physically handicapped, mentally impaired, incompetent persons, and abused or neglected children, and includes the following:
(1) “Residential facility” means any family home, group care facility, or similar facility determined by the department, for 24-hour nonmedical care of persons in need of personal services, supervision, or assistance essential for sustaining the activities of daily living or for the protection of the individual.
(2) “Adult day program” means any community-based facility or program that provides care to persons 18 years of age or older in need of personal services, supervision, or assistance essential for sustaining the activities of daily living or for the protection of these individuals on less than a 24-hour basis.
(3) “Therapeutic day services facility” means any facility that provides nonmedical care, counseling, educational or vocational support, or social rehabilitation services on less than a 24-hour basis to persons under 18 years of age who would otherwise be placed in foster care or who are returning to families from foster care. Program standards for these facilities shall be developed by the department, pursuant to Section 1530, in consultation with therapeutic day services and foster care providers.
(4) “Foster family agency” means any public agency or private organization, organized and operated on a nonprofit basis, engaged in any of the following:
(A) Recruiting, certifying, approving, and training of, and providing professional support to, foster parents and resource families.
(B) Coordinating with county placing agencies to find homes for foster children in need of care.
(C) Providing services and supports to licensed or certified foster parents, county-approved resource families, and children to the extent authorized by state and federal law.
(5) “Foster family home” means any residential facility providing 24-hour care for six or fewer foster children that is owned, leased, or rented and is the residence of the foster parent or parents, including their family, in whose care the foster children have been placed. The placement may be by a public or private child placement agency or by a court order, or by voluntary placement by a parent, parents, or guardian. It also means a foster family home described in Section 1505.2.
(6) “Small family home” means any residential facility, in the licensee’s family residence, that provides 24-hour care for six or fewer foster children who have mental disorders or developmental or physical disabilities and who require special care and supervision as a result of their disabilities. A small family home may accept children with special health care needs, pursuant to subdivision (a) of Section 17710 of the Welfare and Institutions Code. In addition to placing children with special health care needs, the department may approve placement of children without special health care needs, up to the licensed capacity.
(7) “Social rehabilitation facility” means any residential facility that provides social rehabilitation services for no longer than 18 months in a group setting to adults recovering from mental illness who temporarily need assistance, guidance, or counseling. Program components shall be subject to program standards pursuant to Article 1 (commencing with Section 5670) of Chapter 2.5 of Part 2 of Division 5 of the Welfare and Institutions Code.
(8) “Community treatment facility” means any residential facility that provides mental health treatment services to children in a group setting and that has the capacity to provide secure containment. Program components shall be subject to program standards developed and enforced by the State Department of Health Care Services pursuant to Section 4094 of the Welfare and Institutions Code.
Nothing in this section shall be construed to prohibit or discourage placement of persons who have mental or physical disabilities into any category of community care facility that meets the needs of the individual placed, if the placement is consistent with the licensing regulations of the department.
(9) (A) “Full-service adoption agency” means any licensed entity engaged in the business of providing adoption services, that does all of the following:
(i) Assumes care, custody, and control of a child through relinquishment of the child to the agency or involuntary termination of parental rights to the child.
(ii) Assesses the birth parents, prospective adoptive parents, or child.
(iii) Places children for adoption.
(iv) Supervises adoptive placements.
(B) Private full-service adoption agencies shall be organized and operated on a nonprofit basis. As a condition of licensure to provide intercountry adoption services, a full-service adoption agency shall be accredited and in good standing according to Part 96 (commencing with Section 96.1) of Title 22 of the Code of Federal Regulations, or supervised by an accredited primary provider, or acting as an exempted provider, in compliance with Subpart F (commencing with Section 96.29) of Part 96 of Title 22 of the Code of Federal Regulations.
(10) (A) “Noncustodial adoption agency” means any licensed entity engaged in the business of providing adoption services, that does all of the following:
(i) Assesses the prospective adoptive parents.
(ii) Cooperatively matches children freed for adoption, who are under the care, custody, and control of a licensed adoption agency, for adoption, with assessed and approved adoptive applicants.
(iii) Cooperatively supervises adoption placements with a full-service adoptive agency, but does not disrupt a placement or remove a child from a placement.
(B) Private noncustodial adoption agencies shall be organized and operated on a nonprofit basis. As a condition of licensure to provide intercountry adoption services, a noncustodial adoption agency shall be accredited and in good standing according to Part 96 (commencing with Section 96.1) of Title 22 of the Code of Federal Regulations, or supervised by an accredited primary provider, or acting as an exempted provider, in compliance with Subpart F (commencing with Section 96.29) of Part 96 of Title 22 of the Code of Federal Regulations.
(11) “Transitional shelter care facility” means any group care facility that provides for 24-hour nonmedical care of persons in need of personal services, supervision, or assistance essential for sustaining the activities of daily living or for the protection of the individual. Program components shall be subject to program standards developed by the State Department of Social Services pursuant to Section 1502.3.
(12) “Transitional housing placement provider” means an organization licensed by the department pursuant to Section 1559.110 to provide transitional housing to foster children who are at least 16 years of age to promote their transition to adulthood. A transitional housing placement provider shall be privately operated and organized on a nonprofit basis.
(13) “Group home” means a residential facility that provides 24-hour care and supervision to children, delivered at least in part by staff employed by the licensee in a structured environment. The care and supervision provided by a group home shall be nonmedical, except as otherwise permitted by law.
(14) “Youth homelessness prevention center” means a group home licensed by the department to operate a program pursuant to Section 1502.35 to provide voluntary, short-term, shelter and personal services to homeless youth, youth who are at risk of homelessness, youth who are exhibiting status offender behavior, or runaway youth, as defined in paragraph (2) of subdivision (a) of Section 1502.35.
(15) “Enhanced behavioral supports home” means a facility certified by the State Department of Developmental Services pursuant to Article 3.6 (commencing with Section 4684.80) of Chapter 6 of Division 4.5 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, and licensed by the State Department of Social Services as an adult residential facility or a group home that provides 24-hour nonmedical care to individuals with developmental disabilities who require enhanced behavioral supports, staffing, and supervision in a homelike setting. An enhanced behavioral supports home shall have a maximum capacity of four consumers, shall conform to Section 441.530(a)(1) of Title 42 of the Code of Federal Regulations, and shall be eligible for federal Medicaid home- and community-based services funding.
(16) “Community crisis home” means a facility certified by the State Department of Developmental Services pursuant to Article 8 (commencing with Section 4698) of Chapter 6 of Division 4.5 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, and licensed by the State Department of Social Services pursuant to Article 9.7 (commencing with Section 1567.80), as an adult residential facility, providing 24-hour nonmedical care to individuals with developmental disabilities receiving regional center service, in need of crisis intervention services, and who would otherwise be at risk of admission to the acute crisis center at Fairview Developmental Center, Sonoma Developmental Center, an acute general hospital, acute psychiatric hospital, an institution for mental disease, as described in Part 5 (commencing with Section 5900) of Division 5 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, or an out-of-state placement. A community crisis home shall have a maximum capacity of eight consumers, as defined in subdivision (a) of Section 1567.80, shall conform to Section 441.530(a)(1) of Title 42 of the Code of Federal Regulations, and shall be eligible for federal Medicaid home- and community-based services funding.
(17) “Crisis nursery” means a facility licensed by the department to operate a program pursuant to Section 1516 to provide short-term care and supervision for children under six years of age who are voluntarily placed for temporary care by a parent or legal guardian due to a family crisis or stressful situation.
(18) “Short-term residential therapeutic program” means a residential facility operated by a public agency or private organization and licensed by the department pursuant to Section 1562.01 that provides an integrated program of specialized and intensive care and supervision, services and supports, treatment, and short-term, 24-hour care and supervision to children. The care and supervision provided by a short-term residential therapeutic program shall be nonmedical, except as otherwise permitted by law. Private short-term residential therapeutic programs shall be organized and operated on a nonprofit basis. A short-term residential therapeutic program may be operated as a children’s crisis residential program.
(19) “Private alternative boarding school” means a group home licensed by the department to operate a program pursuant to Section 1502.2 to provide youth with 24-hour residential care and supervision, which, in addition to providing educational services to youth, provides, or holds itself out as providing, behavioral-based services to youth with social, emotional, or behavioral issues. The care and supervision provided by a private alternative boarding school shall be nonmedical, except as otherwise permitted by law.
(20) “Private alternative outdoor program” means a group home licensed by the department to operate a program pursuant to Section 1502.21 to provide youth with 24-hour residential care and supervision, which provides, or holds itself out as providing, behavioral-based services in an outdoor living setting to youth with social, emotional, or behavioral issues. The care and supervision provided by a private alternative outdoor program shall be nonmedical, except as otherwise permitted by law.
(21) “Children’s crisis residential program” means a facility licensed by the department as a short-term residential therapeutic program pursuant to Section 1562.02 and approved by the State Department of Health Care Services, or a county mental health plan to which the State Department of Health Care Services has delegated approval authority, to operate a children’s crisis residential mental health program approval pursuant to Section 11462.011 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, to serve children experiencing mental health crises as an alternative to psychiatric hospitalization.
(b) “Department” or “state department” means the State Department of Social Services.
(c) “Director” means the Director of Social Services.

SEC. 2.

 Section 1502.35 of the Health and Safety Code is amended to read:

1502.35.
 (a) The department shall license a youth homelessness prevention center as a group home pursuant to this section. A youth homelessness prevention center shall meet all of the following requirements:
(1) The center shall offer short-term, 24-hour, nonmedical care and supervision and personal services to youth who voluntarily enter the center. As used in this paragraph, “short-term” means no more than 90 consecutive days from the date of admission.
(2) The center shall serve homeless youth, youth at risk of homelessness, youth exhibiting status offender behavior, and runaway youth.
(A) “Homeless youth” means a youth 12 to 17 years of age, inclusive, or 18 years of age if the youth is completing high school or its equivalent, who is in need of services and without a place of center.
(B) “Runaway youth” means a youth 12 to 17 years of age, inclusive, or 18 years of age if the youth is completing high school or its equivalent, who absents themself from home or place of legal residence without the permission of their family, legal guardian, or foster parent.
(C) “Youth at risk of homelessness” means a youth 12 to 17 years of age, inclusive, or 18 years of age if the youth is completing high school or its equivalent, to whom one or more of the following circumstances apply:
(i) Identification as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, or questioning (LGBTQ).
(ii) Financial stress, including, but not limited to, stress due to their own or family loss of income, low income, gambling, or change of family circumstances.
(iii) Housing affordability stress or housing crisis, including, but not limited to, pending evictions or foreclosures of the current home, or rental or mortgage arrears.
(iv) Inadequate or inappropriate dwelling conditions, including, but not limited to, accommodations that are unsafe, unsuitable, or overcrowded.
(v) Loss of previous housing accommodation.
(vi) Relationship or family breakdown.
(vii) Child abuse, neglect, or living in an environment where children are at risk of child abuse or neglect.
(viii) Sexual abuse.
(ix) Domestic or family violence.
(x) Nonfamily violence.
(xi) Mental health issues or other health problems.
(xii) Problematic alcohol, drug, or substance use.
(xiii) Employment difficulties or unemployment.
(xiv) Problematic gambling.
(xv) Transitions from custodial and care arrangements, including, but not limited to, out-of-home care, independent living arrangements for children under 18 years of age, or health and mental health care facilities or programs.
(xvi) Discrimination, including, but not limited to, racial discrimination.
(xvii) Disengagement with school or other education and training.
(xviii) Involvement in, or exposure to, criminal activities.
(xix) Antisocial behavior.
(xx) Lack of family or community support.
(xxi) Staying in boarding housing for 12 weeks or more without security of tenure.
(D) “Youth exhibiting status offender behavior” means a youth 12 to 17 years of age, inclusive, or 18 years of age if the youth is completing high school or its equivalent, who persistently or habitually refuses to obey the reasonable and proper orders or directions of their parents, guardian, or custodian, or who is beyond the control of that person, or who violates an ordinance of a city or county establishing a curfew based solely on age.
(3) The center shall have a maximum capacity of 25 youths.
(4) The center shall have a ratio of one staff person to every eight youths. For purposes of this paragraph, a volunteer may be counted in the staff-to-youth ratio if the volunteer has satisfied the same training requirements as a paid center staff member and other requirements set forth in regulations, and a paid center staff member is present during the time the volunteer is on duty.
(5) Bunk beds may be permitted in the center, but shall not consist of more than two tiers.
(6) The center shall be owned and operated on a nonprofit basis by a private nonprofit corporation, a nonprofit organization, or a public agency.
(b) Center staff shall, prior to admission into the center, determine if a youth poses a threat to self or others in the center. A youth may not be admitted into the center if it is determined that the youth poses such a threat.
(c) An assessment shall not be required for admission, but center staff shall assess youth served within 72 hours of admission to the center.
(d) Center staff shall assist youth served in obtaining emergency health-related services.
(e) The center shall establish procedures to assist youth in securing long-term stability that includes all of the following:
(1) Reconnecting the youth with their family, legal guardian, or nonrelative extended family members when possible to do so.
(2) Coordinating with appropriate individuals, local government agencies, or organizations to help foster youth secure a suitable foster care placement.
(f) The center shall ensure all youth at the center have fair and equal access to services, care, and treatment provided by the center, and are not subjected to discrimination or harassment on the basis of actual or perceived race, ethnic group identification, ancestry, national origin, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, mental or physical disability, or HIV status.
(g) Prior to employment or interaction with youth at a homeless youth prevention center, all persons specified in subdivision (b) of Section 1522 shall complete a criminal record review pursuant to Section 1522 and a Child Abuse Central Index check pursuant to Section 1522.1.
(h) A youth homelessness prevention center shall collect and maintain all of the following information in a monthly report, in a format specified by the department, and make the report available to the department upon request:
(1) Total number of youth served per month.
(2) Age of each youth served.
(3) Length of stay of each youth served.
(4) Number of times a youth accesses the center and services at the center.
(i) Notwithstanding Section 1522.43, the department shall not require a youth homelessness prevention center to maintain a needs and services plan, as defined in Section 84001 of Title 22 of the California Code of Regulations, for a youth served. Nothing in this subdivision precludes the department from requiring a youth homelessness prevention center to maintain an assessment, as defined by the department, for youths served.
(j) The department may license a center pursuant to this section if the center is operating in two physical locations on or before January 1, 2013, with only one physical location providing overnight residential care, and the center meets the requirements of this section. If a center described in this subdivision is licensed pursuant to this section, the department shall permit the center to retain its two physical locations and issue a license for each physical location.
(k) A youth homelessness prevention center is not an eligible placement option pursuant to Sections 319, 361.2, 450, and 727 of the Welfare and Institutions Code.
(l) A youth homelessness prevention center’s program shall not be eligible for a rate pursuant to Section 11462 of the Welfare and Institutions Code. This does not preclude a center from receiving reimbursement for providing services to a foster youth, as may be provided at the discretion of a county.
(m) The department shall adopt regulations to implement this section, in consultation with interested parties, including representatives of provider organizations that serve homeless or runaway youth. The regulations developed pursuant to this subdivision shall be contained in the regulations for group homes found in Chapter 5 (commencing with Section 84000) of Division 6 of Title 22 of the California Code of Regulations.
(n) Notwithstanding the Administrative Procedure Act (Chapter 3.5 (commencing with Section 11340) of Part 1 of Division 3 of Title 2 of the Government Code), the department may implement the applicable provisions of this section by publishing information releases or similar instructions from the director until the regulations adopted by the department pursuant to subdivision (m) become effective.

SEC. 3.

 Section 1507.6 of the Health and Safety Code is amended to read:

1507.6.
 (a) Mental health services, as deemed necessary by the placing agency, may be provided to children in a group home. Except for the physical safety and direct care and supervision of children placed in a group home, the State Department of Social Services and its agents shall not evaluate or have responsibility or liability for the evaluation of mental health services provided in the group homes. Supervision of mental health treatment services provided to a child in a group home shall be a case management responsibility of the placing agency.
(b) (1) Psychotropic medications shall be used only in accordance with the written directions of the physician prescribing the medication and as authorized by the juvenile court pursuant to Section 369.5 or 739.5 of the Welfare and Institutions Code.
(2) The facility shall maintain in a child’s records all of the following information:
(A) A copy of any court order authorizing the psychotropic medication for the child.
(B) A separate log for each psychotropic medication prescribed for the child, showing all of the following:
(i) The name of the medication.
(ii) The date of the prescription.
(iii) The quantity of medication and number of refills initially prescribed.
(iv) If applicable, any additional refills prescribed.
(v) The required dosage and directions for use as specified in writing by the physician prescribing the medication, including any changes directed by the physician.
(vi) The date and time of each dose taken by the child.
(3) This subdivision does not apply to a youth homelessness prevention center, as defined in Section 1502.
(4) The requirements regarding juvenile court authorization, as described in paragraph (1), and maintaining a copy of any court order, as described in subparagraph (A) of paragraph (2), shall only apply to private alternative boarding schools and private alternative outdoor programs, as defined in Section 1502, as otherwise required by applicable law.

SEC. 4.

 Section 1522.44 of the Health and Safety Code is amended to read:

1522.44.
 (a) It is the policy of the state that caregivers of children in foster care possess knowledge and skills relating to the reasonable and prudent parent standard, as defined in subdivision (c) of Section 362.05 of the Welfare and Institutions Code.
(b) Except for licensed foster family homes, certified family homes, and resource families approved by a foster family agency, each licensed community care facility that provides care and supervision to children and operates with staff shall designate at least one onsite staff member to apply the reasonable and prudent parent standard to decisions involving the participation of a child who is placed in the facility in age or developmentally appropriate activities in accordance with the requirements of Section 362.05 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, Section 671(a)(10) of Title 42 of the United States Code, and the regulations adopted by the department pursuant to this chapter.
(c) A licensed and certified foster parent, resource family, or facility staff member, as described in subdivision (b), shall receive training related to the reasonable and prudent parent standard that is consistent with Section 671(a)(24) of Title 42 of the United States Code. This training shall include knowledge and skills relating to the reasonable and prudent parent standard for the participation of the child in age or developmentally appropriate activities, including knowledge and skills relating to the developmental stages of the cognitive, emotional, physical, and behavioral capacities of a child, and knowledge and skills relating to applying the standard to decisions such as whether to allow the child to engage in extracurricular, enrichment, cultural, and social activities, including sports, field trips, and overnight activities lasting one or more days, and to decisions involving the signing of permission slips and arranging of transportation for the child to and from extracurricular, enrichment, and social activities.
(d) This section does not apply to a youth homelessness prevention center, a private alternative boarding school, or a private alternative outdoor program, as those terms are defined, respectively, in subdivision (a) of Section 1502.

SEC. 5.

 Section 1530.8 of the Health and Safety Code is amended to read:

1530.8.
 (a) (1) The department shall adopt regulations for community care facilities licensed as group homes, and for temporary shelter care facilities, as defined in subdivision (c), that care for dependent children, children placed by a regional center, or voluntary placements, who are younger than six years of age. The department shall adopt regulations that apply to short-term residential therapeutic programs that care for children younger than six years of age. The regulations shall include the standards set forth in subdivision (c) of Section 11467.1 of the Welfare and Institutions Code.
(2) The department shall adopt regulations under this section that apply to minor parent programs serving children younger than six years of age who reside in a group home with a minor parent who is the primary caregiver of the child. The department shall adopt regulations under this section that apply to short-term residential therapeutic programs that provide minor parent programs serving children younger than six years of age.
(3) To the extent that the department determines they are necessary, the department shall adopt regulations under this section that apply to group homes or short-term residential therapeutic programs that care for dependent children who are 6 to 12 years of age, inclusive. In order to determine whether such regulations are necessary, and what any resulting standards should include, the department shall consult with interested parties that include, but are not limited to, representatives of current and former foster youth, advocates for children in foster care, county welfare and mental health directors, chief probation officers, representatives of care providers, experts in child development, and representatives of the Legislature. The standards may provide normative guidelines differentiated by the needs specific to children in varying age ranges that fall between 6 and 12 years of age, inclusive. Prior to adopting regulations, the department shall submit for public comment, by July 1, 2017, any proposed regulations.
(b) The regulations shall include physical environment standards, including staffing and health and safety requirements, that meet or exceed state childcare standards under Title 5 and Title 22 of the California Code of Regulations.
(c) For purposes of this section, a “temporary shelter care facility” means any residential facility that meets all of the following requirements:
(1) It is owned and operated by the county or on behalf of a county by a private, nonprofit agency.
(2) It is a 24-hour facility that provides no more than 10 calendar days of residential care and supervision for children who have been removed from their homes as a result of abuse or neglect, as defined in Section 300 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, or both.
(d) (1) The department may license a temporary shelter care facility pursuant to this chapter on or after January 1, 2016. A temporary shelter care license may be issued only to a county operating a licensed group home, or to an agency on behalf of a county, as of January 1, 2016.
(2) The department shall consult with counties that operate these shelters as licensed group homes to develop a transition plan for the development of temporary shelter care facilities to address the unique circumstances and needs of the populations they serve, while remaining consistent with the principles of the act that added this subdivision.
(3) These transition plans shall describe circumstances under which children will be admitted for a period in excess of 24 hours and reflect necessary staffing levels or staffing transitions.
(e) (1) A group home license issued to a county will be forfeited by operation of law upon receipt of a license to operate a temporary shelter care facility, as described in Section 11462.022 of the Welfare and Institutions Code.
(2) This subdivision does not preclude a county from applying for and being licensed as a short-term residential therapeutic program pursuant to Section 1562.01 or a youth homelessness prevention center pursuant to Section 1502.35, or a foster family agency as authorized by subdivision (b) of Section 11462.02 of the Welfare and Institutions Code.

SEC. 6.

 Section 1536 of the Health and Safety Code is amended to read:

1536.
 (a) (1) At least annually, the department shall publish and make available to interested persons a list or lists covering all licensed community care facilities and the services for which each facility has been licensed or issued a special permit.
(2) For a group home, transitional housing placement provider, community treatment facility, youth homelessness prevention center, temporary shelter care facility, transitional shelter care facility, or short-term residential therapeutic program, the list shall include both of the following:
(A) The number of licensing complaints, types of complaints, and outcomes of complaints, including citations, fines, exclusion orders, license suspensions, revocations, and surrenders.
(B) The number, types, and outcomes of law enforcement contacts made by the facility staff or children, as reported pursuant to subdivision (a) of Section 1538.7.
(3) This subdivision does not apply to foster family homes or the certified family homes or resource families of foster family agencies.
(b) Subject to subdivision (c), to protect the personal privacy of foster family homes and the certified family homes and resource families of foster family agencies, and to preserve the security and confidentiality of the placements in the homes, the names, addresses, and other identifying information of facilities licensed as foster family homes and certified family homes and resource families of foster family agencies shall be considered personal information for purposes of the Information Practices Act of 1977 (Chapter 1 (commencing with Section 1798) of Title 1.8 of Part 4 of Division 3 of the Civil Code). This information shall not be disclosed by any state or local agency pursuant to the California Public Records Act (Chapter 3.5 (commencing with Section 6250) of Division 7 of Title 1 of the Government Code), except as necessary for administering the licensing program, facilitating the placement of children in these facilities, and providing names and addresses, upon request, only to bona fide professional foster parent organizations and to professional organizations educating foster parents, including the Foster and Kinship Care Education Program of the California Community Colleges.
(c) (1) Notwithstanding subdivision (b), the department, a county, or a foster family agency may request information from, or divulge information to, the department, a county, or a foster family agency, regarding a prospective certified parent, foster parent, or relative caregiver for the purpose of, and as necessary to, conduct a reference check to determine whether it is safe and appropriate to license, certify, or approve an applicant to be a certified parent, foster parent, or relative caregiver.
(2) This subdivision shall apply only to applications received on or before December 31, 2016, in accordance with Section 1517 or 1517.1 of this code or Section 16519.5 of the Welfare and Institutions Code.
(d) The department may issue a citation and, after the issuance of that citation, may assess a civil penalty of fifty dollars ($50) per day for each instance of a foster family agency’s failure to provide the department with a log of certified and decertified homes or a log of resource families that were approved or had approval rescinded during the month by the 10th day of the following month.
(e) The Legislature encourages the department, if funds are available for this purpose, to develop a database that would include all of the following information:
(1) Monthly reports by a foster family agency regarding certified family homes and resource families.
(2) A log of certified and decertified family homes, approved resource families, and resource families for which approval was rescinded, provided by a foster family agency to the department.
(3) Notification by a foster family agency to the department informing the department of a foster family agency’s determination to decertify a certified family home or rescind the approval of a resource family due to any of the following actions by the certified family parent or resource family:
(A) Violating licensing rules and regulations.
(B) Aiding, abetting, or permitting the violation of licensing rules and regulations.
(C) Conducting oneself in a way that is inimical to the health, morals, welfare, or safety of a child placed in that certified family home, or for a resource family, engaging in conduct that poses a risk or threat to the health and safety, protection, or well-being of a child or nonminor dependent.
(D) Being convicted of a crime while a certified family parent or resource family.
(E) Knowingly allowing any child to have illegal drugs or alcohol.
(F) Committing an act of child abuse or neglect or an act of violence against another person.
(f) At least annually, the department shall post on its internet website a statewide summary of the information gathered pursuant to Sections 1538.8 and 1538.9. The summary shall include only deidentified and aggregate information that does not violate the confidentiality of a child’s identity and records.

SEC. 7.

 Section 1538.7 of the Health and Safety Code is amended to read:

1538.7.
 (a) A group home, transitional housing placement provider, community treatment facility, youth homelessness prevention center, temporary shelter care facility, transitional shelter care facility, or short-term residential therapeutic program shall report to the department’s Community Care Licensing Division upon the occurrence of any incident concerning a child in the facility involving contact with law enforcement. At least every six months, the facility shall provide a followup report for each incident, including the type of incident; whether the incident involved an alleged violation of any crime described in Section 602 of the Welfare and Institutions Code by a child residing in the facility; whether staff, children, or both were involved; the gender, race, ethnicity, and age of children involved; and the outcomes, including arrests, removals of children from placement, or termination or suspension of staff.
(b) (1) If the department determines that, based on the licensed capacity, a facility has reported, pursuant to subdivision (a), a greater than average number of law enforcement contacts involving an alleged violation of any crime described in Section 602 of the Welfare and Institutions Code by a child residing in the facility, the department shall inspect the facility at least once a year.
(2) An inspection conducted pursuant to paragraph (1) does not constitute an unannounced inspection required pursuant to Section 1534.
(c) If an inspection is required pursuant to subdivision (b), the Community Care Licensing Division shall provide the report to the department’s Children and Family Services Division and to any other public agency that has certified the facility’s program or any component of the facility’s program including, but not limited to, the State Department of Health Care Services, which certifies group homes or approves short-term residential therapeutic programs pursuant to Section 4096.5 of the Welfare and Institutions Code.

SEC. 8.

 Section 1538.8 of the Health and Safety Code is amended to read:

1538.8.
 (a) (1) In order to review and evaluate the use of psychotropic medications in group homes and short-term residential therapeutic programs, the department shall compile, to the extent feasible and not otherwise prohibited by law and based on information received from the State Department of Health Care Services, at least annually, information concerning each group home and short-term residential therapeutic program, including, but not limited to, the child welfare psychotropic medication measures developed by the department and the following Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set (HEDIS) measures related to psychotropic medications:
(A) Follow-Up Care for Children Prescribed Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Medication (HEDIS ADD), which measures the number of children 6 to 12 years of age, inclusive, who have a visit with a provider with prescribing authority within 30 days of the new prescription.
(B) Use of Multiple Concurrent Antipsychotics in Children and Adolescents (HEDIS APC), which does both of the following:
(i) Measures the number of children receiving an antipsychotic medication for at least 60 out of 90 days and the number of children who additionally receive a second antipsychotic medication that overlaps with the first.
(ii) Reports a total rate and age stratifications including 6 to 11 years of age, inclusive, and 12 to 17 years of age, inclusive.
(C) Use of First-Line Psychosocial Care for Children and Adolescents on Antipsychotics (HEDIS APP), which measures whether a child has received psychosocial services 90 days before through 30 days after receiving a new prescription for an antipsychotic medication.
(D) Metabolic Monitoring for Children and Adolescents on Antipsychotics (HEDIS APM), which does both of the following:
(i) Measures testing for glucose or HbA1c and lipid or cholesterol of a child who has received at least two different antipsychotic prescriptions on different days.
(ii) Reports a total rate and age stratifications including 6 to 11 years of age, inclusive, and 12 to 17 years of age, inclusive.
(2) The department shall post the list of data to be collected pursuant to this subdivision on the department’s internet website.
(b) The data in subdivision (a) concerning psychotropic medication, mental health services, and placement shall be drawn from existing data maintained by the State Department of Health Care Services and the State Department of Social Services and shared pursuant to a data sharing agreement meeting the requirements of all applicable state and federal laws and regulations.
(c) This section does not apply to a youth homelessness prevention center, a private alternative boarding school, or a private alternative outdoor program, as those terms are defined, respectively, in Section 1502.

SEC. 9.

 Section 1538.9 of the Health and Safety Code is amended to read:

1538.9.
 (a) (1) (A) The department shall consult with the State Department of Health Care Services and stakeholders to establish a methodology for identifying those group homes providing care under the AFDC-FC program pursuant to Sections 11460 and 11462 of the Welfare and Institutions Code that have levels of psychotropic drug utilization warranting additional review. The methodology shall be adopted on or before July 1, 2016.
(B) Every three years after adopting the methodology developed under subparagraph (A), or earlier if needed, the department shall consult with the State Department of Health Care Services and stakeholders and revise the methodology, if necessary.
(2) If the department, applying the methodology described in paragraph (1), determines that a facility appears to have levels of psychotropic drug utilization warranting additional review, it shall inspect the facility at least once a year.
(3) The inspection of the facility shall include, but not be limited to, a review of the following:
(A) Plan of operation, policies, procedures, and practices.
(B) Child-to-staff ratios.
(C) Staff qualifications and training.
(D) Implementation of children’s needs and services plan.
(E) Availability of psychosocial and other alternative treatments to the use of psychotropic medications.
(F) Other factors that the department determines contribute to levels of psychotropic drug utilization that warrant additional review.
(G) Confidential interviews of children residing in the facility at the time of the inspection.
(4) The inspection of the facility may include, but is not limited to, the following:
(A) Confidential interviews of children who resided in the facility within the last six months.
(B) Confidential discussions with physicians identified as prescribing the medications.
(b) Following an inspection conducted pursuant to this section, the department, as it deems appropriate, may do either or both of the following:
(1) Share relevant information and observations with county placing agencies, social workers, probation officers, the court, dependency counsel, or the Medical Board of California, as applicable.
(2) Share relevant information and observations with the facility and require the facility to submit a plan, within 30 days of receiving the information and observations from the department, to address any identified risks within the control of the facility related to psychotropic medication. The department shall approve the plan and verify implementation of the plan to determine whether those risks have been remedied.
(c) (1) Notwithstanding the rulemaking provisions of the Administrative Procedure Act (Chapter 3.5 (commencing with Section 11340) of Part 1 of Division 3 of Title 2 of the Government Code), until emergency regulations are filed with the Secretary of State, the department may implement this section through all-county letters or similar instructions.
(2) On or before January 1, 2017, the department shall adopt regulations to implement this section. The initial adoption, amendment, or repeal of a regulation authorized by this subdivision is deemed to address an emergency, for purposes of Sections 11346.1 and 11349.6 of the Government Code, and the department is hereby exempted for that purpose from the requirements of subdivision (b) of Section 11346.1 of the Government Code. After the initial adoption, amendment, or repeal of an emergency regulation pursuant to this section, the department may twice request approval from the Office of Administrative Law to readopt the regulation as an emergency regulation pursuant to Section 11346.1 of the Government Code. The department shall adopt final regulations on or before January 1, 2018.
(d) This section does not do either of the following:
(1) Replaces or alters other requirements for responding to complaints and making inspections or visits to group homes, including, but not limited to, those set forth in Sections 1534 and 1538.
(2) Prevents or precludes the department from taking any other action permitted under any other law, including any regulation adopted pursuant to this chapter.
(e) The methodology developed pursuant to this section shall apply to short-term residential therapeutic programs, as defined in Section 1502, in a manner determined by the department.
(f) This section does not apply to a youth homelessness prevention center, a private alternative boarding school, or a private alternative outdoor program, as those terms are defined, respectively, in Section 1502.

SEC. 10.

 Section 1548 of the Health and Safety Code is amended to read:

1548.
 (a) In addition to the suspension, temporary suspension, or revocation of a license issued under this chapter, the department shall levy civil penalties as follows:
(b) (1) The amount of the civil penalty shall be one hundred dollars ($100) per day for each violation of this chapter if an agency or facility fails to correct a deficiency after being provided a specified length of time to correct that deficiency.
(A) If a licensee or a licensee’s representative submits evidence to the department that the licensee has corrected a deficiency, and the department, after reviewing that evidence, has determined that the deficiency has been corrected, the civil penalty shall cease as of the day the department received that evidence.
(B) If the department deems it necessary, the department shall inspect the facility within five working days after the department receives evidence pursuant to subparagraph (A) to confirm that the deficiency has been corrected.
(C) If the department determines that the deficiency has not been corrected, the civil penalty shall continue to accrue from the date of the original citation.
(D) If the department is able to verify that the deficiency was corrected prior to the date on which the department received the evidence pursuant to subparagraph (A), the civil penalty shall cease as of that earlier date.
(2) (A) If the department issues a notification of deficiency to an agency or facility for a repeat violation of a violation specified in paragraph (1), the department shall assess an immediate civil penalty of two hundred fifty dollars ($250) per repeat violation and one hundred dollars ($100) for each day the repeat violation continues after citation. The notification of deficiency shall state the manner in which the deficiency constitutes a repeat violation and shall be submitted to a supervisor for review and approval.
(B) For purposes of this section, “repeat violation” means a violation within 12 months of a prior violation of a statutory or regulatory provision designated by the same combination of letters or numerals, or both letters and numerals.
(C) Notwithstanding subparagraphs (A) and (B), the department, in its sole discretion, may reduce the civil penalty for the cited repeat violation to the level of the underlying violation, as applicable, if it determines that the cited repeat violation is not substantially similar to the original violation.
(3) If the nature or seriousness of the violation or the frequency of the violation warrants a higher penalty or an immediate civil penalty assessment, or both, as provided in this chapter, a correction of the deficiency shall not impact the imposition of a civil penalty.
(c) The department shall assess an immediate civil penalty of five hundred dollars ($500) per violation and one hundred dollars ($100) for each day the violation continues after citation for any of the following serious violations:
(1) Any violation that the department determines resulted in the injury or illness of a person in care.
(2) (A) Fire clearance violations, including, but not limited to, overcapacity, ambulatory status, inoperable smoke alarms, and inoperable fire alarm systems. The civil penalty shall not be assessed if the licensee has done either of the following:
(i) Requested the appropriate fire clearance based on ambulatory, nonambulatory, or bedridden status, and the decision is pending.
(ii) Initiated eviction proceedings.
(B) A licensee denied a clearance for bedridden residents may appeal to the fire authority, and, if that appeal is denied, may subsequently appeal to the Office of the State Fire Marshal, and shall not be assessed an immediate civil penalty until the final appeal is decided, or after 60 days has passed from the date of the citation, whichever is earlier.
(3) Absence of supervision, as required by statute or regulation.
(4) Accessible bodies of water, when prohibited in this chapter or regulations adopted pursuant to this chapter.
(5) Accessible firearms, ammunition, or both.
(6) Refused entry to a facility or any part of a facility in violation of Section 1533, 1534, or 1538.
(7) The presence of a person subject to a department Order of Exclusion on the premises.
(d) If the department issues a notification of deficiency to an agency or facility for a repeat violation specified in subdivision (c), the department shall assess an immediate civil penalty of one thousand dollars ($1,000) per repeat violation and one hundred dollars ($100) for each day the repeat violation continues after citation. The notification of deficiency shall state the manner in which the deficiency constitutes a repeat violation and shall be submitted to a supervisor for review and approval.
(e) (1) For a violation that the department determines resulted in the death of a resident at an adult residential facility, social rehabilitation facility, enhanced behavioral supports home licensed as an adult residential facility, adult residential facility for persons with special health care needs, or community crisis home, the civil penalty shall be fifteen thousand dollars ($15,000).
(2) For a violation that the department determines resulted in the death of a person receiving care at an adult day program, the civil penalty shall be assessed as follows:
(A) Seven thousand five hundred dollars ($7,500) for a facility licensed to care for 50 or fewer persons.
(B) Ten thousand dollars ($10,000) for a facility licensed to care for 51 or more persons.
(3) For a violation that the department determines resulted in the death of a person receiving care at a therapeutic day services facility, community treatment facility, transitional shelter care facility, transitional housing placement provider, small family home, crisis nursery, group home, enhanced behavioral supports home licensed as a group home, or short-term residential therapeutic program, the civil penalty shall be assessed as follows:
(A) Seven thousand five hundred dollars ($7,500) for a facility licensed to care for 40 or fewer children.
(B) Ten thousand dollars ($10,000) for a facility licensed to care for 41 to 100, inclusive, children.
(C) Fifteen thousand dollars ($15,000) for a facility licensed to care for more than 100 children.
(4) For a violation that the department determines resulted in the death of a youth receiving care at a youth homelessness prevention center licensed as a group home, the civil penalty shall be five thousand dollars ($5,000).
(5) For a violation that the department determines resulted in the death of a child receiving care through a foster family agency, the civil penalty shall be seven thousand five hundred dollars ($7,500).
(6) For a violation that the department determines resulted in the death of an individual receiving care or services through a full-service or noncustodial adoption agency, the civil penalty shall be seven thousand five hundred dollars ($7,500).
(f) (1) (A) For a violation that the department determines constitutes physical abuse, as defined in Section 15610.63 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, or resulted in serious bodily injury, as defined in Section 243 of the Penal Code, to a resident at an adult residential facility, social rehabilitation facility, enhanced behavioral supports home licensed as an adult residential facility, adult residential facility for persons with special health care needs, or community crisis home, the civil penalty shall be ten thousand dollars ($10,000).
(B) For a violation that the department determines constitutes physical abuse, as defined in Section 15610.63 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, or resulted in serious bodily injury, as defined in Section 243 of the Penal Code, to a person receiving care at an adult day program, the civil penalty shall be assessed as follows:
(i) Two thousand five hundred dollars ($2,500) for a facility licensed to care for 50 or fewer persons.
(ii) Five thousand dollars ($5,000) for a facility licensed to care for 51 or more persons.
(C) For a violation that the department determines constitutes physical abuse, as defined in paragraph (2), or resulted in serious bodily injury, as defined in Section 243 of the Penal Code, to a person receiving care at a therapeutic day services facility, community treatment facility, transitional shelter care facility, transitional housing placement provider, small family home, crisis nursery, group home, enhanced behavioral supports home licensed as a group home, or short-term residential therapeutic program, the civil penalty shall be assessed as follows:
(i) Two thousand five hundred dollars ($2,500) for a facility licensed to care for 40 or fewer children.
(ii) Five thousand dollars ($5,000) for a facility licensed to care for 41 to 100, inclusive, children.
(iii) Ten thousand dollars ($10,000) for a facility licensed to care for more than 100 children.
(D) For a violation that the department determines constitutes physical abuse, as defined in paragraph (2), or resulted in serious bodily injury, as defined in Section 243 of the Penal Code, to a youth receiving care at a youth homelessness prevention center licensed as a group home, the civil penalty shall be one thousand dollars ($1,000).
(E) For a violation that the department determines constitutes physical abuse, as defined in paragraph (2), or resulted in serious bodily injury, as defined in Section 243 of the Penal Code, to a child receiving care through a foster family agency, the civil penalty shall be two thousand five hundred dollars ($2,500).
(F) For a violation that the department determines constitutes physical abuse, as defined in paragraph (2), or resulted in serious bodily injury, as defined in Section 243 of the Penal Code, to an individual receiving care or services through a full-service or noncustodial adoption agency, the civil penalty shall be two thousand five hundred dollars ($2,500).
(2) For purposes of subparagraphs (C), (D), (E), and (F) of paragraph (1), “physical abuse” includes physical injury inflicted upon a child by another person by other than accidental means, sexual abuse as defined in Section 11165.1 of the Penal Code, neglect as defined in Section 11165.2 of the Penal Code, or unlawful corporal punishment or injury as defined in Section 11165.4 of the Penal Code when the person responsible for the child’s welfare is a licensee, administrator, or employee of any facility licensed to care for children.
(g) (1) Before the assessment of a civil penalty pursuant to subdivision (e) or (f), the decision shall be approved by the program administrator of the Community Care Licensing Division.
(2) (A) The department shall reduce the amount of a civil penalty due pursuant to subdivision (e) or (f) by the amount of the civil penalty already assessed for the underlying violation.
(B) If the amount of the civil penalty that the department has already assessed for the underlying violation exceeds the amount of the penalty pursuant to subdivision (e) or (f), the larger amount shall prevail and be due and payable as already assessed by the department.
(h) (1) A notification of a deficiency written by a representative of the department shall include a factual description of the nature of the deficiency fully stating the manner in which the licensee failed to comply with the specified statute or regulation, and, if applicable, the particular place or area of the facility in which the deficiency occurred. The department shall make a good faith effort to work with the licensee to determine the cause of the deficiency and ways to prevent any repeat violations.
(2) The department shall adopt regulations setting forth the appeal procedures for deficiencies.
(i) (1) A licensee shall have the right to submit to the department a written request for a formal review of a civil penalty assessed pursuant to subdivision (e) or (f) within 15 business days of receipt of the notice of a civil penalty assessment and shall provide all available supporting documentation at that time. The review shall be conducted by the deputy director of the Community Care Licensing Division. The licensee may submit additional supporting documentation that was unavailable at the time of submitting the request for review within the first 30 business days after submitting the request for review. If the department requires additional information from the licensee, that information shall be requested within the first 30 business days after receiving the request for review. The licensee shall provide this additional information within 30 business days of receiving the request from the department. If the deputy director determines that the civil penalty was not assessed, or the finding of deficiency was not made, in accordance with applicable statutes or regulations of the department, the deputy director may amend or dismiss the civil penalty or finding of deficiency. The licensee shall be notified in writing of the deputy director’s decision within 60 business days of the date when all necessary information has been provided to the department by the licensee.
(2) Upon exhausting the review described in paragraph (1), a licensee may further appeal that decision to an administrative law judge. Proceedings shall be conducted in accordance with Chapter 5 (commencing with Section 11500) of Part 1 of Division 3 of Title 2 of the Government Code, and the department shall have all the powers granted by those provisions. In all proceedings conducted in accordance with this section, the standard of proof shall be by a preponderance of the evidence.
(3) If, in addition to an assessment of civil penalties, the department elects to file an administrative action to suspend or revoke the facility license that includes violations relating to the assessment of the civil penalties, the department review of the pending appeal shall cease and the assessment of the civil penalties shall be heard as part of the administrative action process.
(4) Civil penalties shall be due and payable when administrative appeals have been exhausted. Unless payment arrangements have been made that are acceptable to the department, a civil penalty not paid within 30 days shall be subject to late fees, as specified by the department in regulation.
(j) (1) A licensee shall have the right to submit to the department a written request for a formal review of any other civil penalty or deficiency not described in subdivision (i) within 15 business days of receipt of the notice of a civil penalty assessment or a finding of a deficiency, and shall provide all available supporting documentation at that time. The review shall be conducted by a regional manager of the Community Care Licensing Division. The licensee may submit additional supporting documentation that was unavailable at the time of submitting the request for review within the first 30 business days after submitting the request for review. If the department requires additional information from the licensee, that information shall be requested within the first 30 business days after receiving the request for review. The licensee shall provide this additional information within 30 business days of receiving the request from the department. If the regional manager determines that the civil penalty was not assessed, or the finding of the deficiency was not made, in accordance with applicable statutes or regulations of the department, the regional manager may amend or dismiss the civil penalty or finding of deficiency. The licensee shall be notified in writing of the regional manager’s decision within 60 business days of the date when all necessary information has been provided to the department by the licensee.
(2) Upon exhausting the review described in paragraph (1), the licensee may further appeal that decision to the program administrator of the Community Care Licensing Division within 15 business days of receipt of notice of the regional manager’s decision. The licensee may submit additional supporting documentation that was unavailable at the time of appeal to the program administrator within the first 30 business days after requesting that appeal. If the department requires additional information from the licensee, that information shall be requested within the first 30 business days after receiving the request for the appeal. The licensee shall provide this additional information within 30 business days of receiving the request from the department. If the program administrator determines that the civil penalty was not assessed, or the finding of the deficiency was not made, in accordance with applicable statutes or regulations of the department, the program administrator may amend or dismiss the civil penalty or finding of deficiency. The licensee shall be notified in writing of the program administrator’s decision within 60 business days of the date when all necessary information has been provided to the department by the licensee. The program administrator’s decision is considered final and concludes the licensee’s administrative appeal rights regarding the appeal conducted pursuant to this paragraph.
(3) Civil penalties shall be due and payable when administrative appeals have been exhausted. Unless payment arrangements have been made that are acceptable to the department, a civil penalty not paid within 30 days shall be subject to late fees, as specified by the department in regulation.
(k) The department shall adopt regulations implementing this section.
(l) The department shall, by January 1, 2016, amend its regulations to reflect the changes to this section made by Section 2 of Chapter 813 of the Statutes of 2014.
(m) As provided in Section 11466.31 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, the department may offset civil penalties owed by a group home or short-term residential therapeutic program against moneys to be paid by a county for the care of minors after the group home or short-term residential therapeutic program has exhausted its appeal of the civil penalty assessment. The department shall provide the group home or short-term residential therapeutic program a reasonable opportunity to pay the civil penalty before instituting the offset provision.
(n) Notwithstanding the Administrative Procedure Act (Chapter 3.5 (commencing with Section 11340) of Part 1 of Division 3 of Title 2 of the Government Code), the department may implement and administer the changes made by the act that added this subdivision through all-county letters or similar written instructions until regulations are adopted pursuant to the Administrative Procedure Act.

SEC. 11.

 Section 1562 of the Health and Safety Code is amended to read:

1562.
 (a) The department shall ensure that operators and staff of community care facilities have appropriate training to provide the care and services for which a license or certificate is issued. The section shall not apply to a facility licensed as an Adult Residential Facility for Persons with Special Health Care Needs pursuant to Article 9 (commencing with Section 1567.50).
(b) It is the intent of the Legislature that children in foster care reside in the least restrictive, family-based settings that can meet their needs, and that group homes and short-term residential therapeutic programs will be used only for short-term, specialized, and intensive treatment purposes that are consistent with a case plan that is determined by a child’s best interests. Accordingly, the Legislature encourages the department to adopt policies, practices, and guidance that ensure that the education, qualification, and training requirements for childcare staff in group homes and short-term residential therapeutic programs are consistent with the intended role of group homes and short-term residential therapeutic programs to provide short-term, specialized, and intensive treatment, with a particular focus on crisis intervention, behavioral stabilization, and other treatment-related goals, as well as the connections between those efforts and work toward permanency for children.
(c) (1) Each person employed as a facility manager or staff member of a group home or short-term residential therapeutic program, as defined in paragraphs (13) and (18) of subdivision (a) of Section 1502, who provides direct care and supervision to children and youth residing in the group home or short-term residential therapeutic program shall be at least 21 years of age.
(2) Paragraph (1) shall not apply to a facility manager or staff member employed at the group home before October 1, 2014.
(3) For purposes of this subdivision, “group home” does not include a youth homelessness prevention center.

SEC. 12.

 Section 319 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

319.
 (a) At the initial petition hearing, the court shall examine the child’s parents, guardians, Indian custodian, or other persons having relevant knowledge and hear the relevant evidence as the child, the child’s parents or guardians, the child’s Indian custodian, the petitioner, the Indian child’s tribe, or their counsel desires to present. The court may examine the child, as provided in Section 350.
(b) The social worker shall report to the court on the reasons why the child has been removed from the parent’s, guardian’s, or Indian custodian’s physical custody, the need, if any, for continued detention, the available services and the referral methods to those services that could facilitate the return of the child to the custody of the child’s parents, guardians, or Indian custodian, and whether there are any relatives who are able and willing to take temporary physical custody of the child. If it is known or there is reason to know the child is an Indian child, the report shall also include all of the following:
(1) A statement of the risk of imminent physical damage or harm to the Indian child and any evidence that the emergency removal or placement continues to be necessary to prevent the imminent physical damage or harm to the child.
(2) The steps taken to provide notice to the child’s parents, custodians, and tribe about the hearing pursuant to this section.
(3) If the child’s parents and Indian custodians are unknown, a detailed explanation of what efforts have been made to locate and contact them, including contact with the appropriate Bureau of Indian Affairs regional director.
(4) The residence and the domicile of the Indian child.
(5) If either the residence or the domicile of the Indian child is believed to be on a reservation or in an Alaska Native village, the name of the tribe affiliated with that reservation or village.
(6) The tribal affiliation of the child and of the parents or Indian custodians.
(7) A specific and detailed account of the circumstances that caused the Indian child to be taken into temporary custody.
(8) If the child is believed to reside or be domiciled on a reservation in which the tribe exercises exclusive jurisdiction over child custody matters, a statement of efforts that have been made and that are being made to contact the tribe and transfer the child to the tribe’s jurisdiction.
(9) A statement of the efforts that have been taken to assist the parents or Indian custodians so the Indian child may safely be returned to their custody.
(c) The court shall order the release of the child from custody unless a prima facie showing has been made that the child comes within Section 300, the court finds that continuance in the parent’s or guardian’s home is contrary to the child’s welfare, and any of the following circumstances exist:
(1) There is a substantial danger to the physical health of the child or the child is suffering severe emotional damage, and there are no reasonable means by which the child’s physical or emotional health may be protected without removing the child from the parent’s or guardian’s physical custody.
(2) There is substantial evidence that a parent, guardian, or custodian of the child is likely to flee the jurisdiction of the court, and, in the case of an Indian child, fleeing the jurisdiction will place the child at risk of imminent physical damage or harm.
(3) The child has left a placement in which the child was placed by the juvenile court.
(4) The child indicates an unwillingness to return home, if the child has been physically or sexually abused by a person residing in the home.
(d) If the court knows or there is reason to know the child is an Indian child, the court may only detain the Indian child if it also finds that detention is necessary to prevent imminent physical damage or harm. The court shall state on the record the facts supporting this finding.
(e) (1) If the hearing pursuant to this section is continued pursuant to Section 322 or for any other reason, the court shall find that the continuance of the child in the parent’s or guardian’s home is contrary to the child’s welfare at the initial petition hearing or order the release of the child from custody.
(2) If the court knows or has reason to know the child is an Indian child, the hearing pursuant to this section may not be continued beyond 30 days unless the court finds all of the following:
(A) Restoring the child to the parent, parents, or Indian custodian would subject the child to imminent physical damage or harm.
(B) The court is unable to transfer the proceeding to the jurisdiction of the appropriate Indian tribe.
(C) It is not possible to initiate an Indian child custody proceeding as defined in Section 224.1.
(f) (1) The court shall also make a determination on the record, referencing the social worker’s report or other evidence relied upon, as to whether reasonable efforts were made to prevent or eliminate the need for removal of the child from their home, pursuant to subdivision (b) of Section 306, and whether there are available services that would prevent the need for further detention. Services to be considered for purposes of making this determination are case management, counseling, emergency shelter care, emergency in-home caretakers, out-of-home respite care, teaching and demonstrating homemakers, parenting training, transportation, and any other child welfare services authorized by the State Department of Social Services pursuant to Chapter 5 (commencing with Section 16500) of Part 4 of Division 9. The court shall also review whether the social worker has considered whether a referral to public assistance services pursuant to Chapter 2 (commencing with Section 11200) and Chapter 7 (commencing with Section 14000) of Part 3 of, Chapter 1 (commencing with Section 17000) of Part 5 of, and Chapter 10 (commencing with Section 18900) of Part 6 of, Division 9 would have eliminated the need to take temporary custody of the child or would prevent the need for further detention.
(2) If the court knows or has reason to know the child is an Indian child, the court shall also determine whether the county welfare department made active efforts to provide remedial services and rehabilitation programs designed to prevent the breakup of the Indian family. The court shall order the county welfare department to initiate or continue services or programs pending disposition pursuant to Section 358.
(3) If the child can be returned to the custody of their parent, guardian, or Indian custodian through the provision of those services, the court shall place the child with their parent, guardian, or Indian custodian and order that the services shall be provided. If the child cannot be returned to the physical custody of their parent or guardian, the court shall determine if there is a relative who is able and willing to care for the child, and has been assessed pursuant to Section 361.4.
(4) In order to preserve the bond between the child and the parent and to facilitate family reunification, the court shall consider whether the child can be returned to the custody of their parent who is enrolled in a certified substance abuse treatment facility that allows a dependent child to reside with their parent. The fact that the parent is enrolled in a certified substance abuse treatment facility that allows a dependent child to reside with their parent shall not be, for that reason alone, prima facie evidence of substantial danger. The court shall specify the factual basis for its conclusion that the return of the child to the custody of their parent would pose a substantial danger or would not pose a substantial danger to the physical health, safety, protection, or physical or emotional well-being of the child.
(g) If a court orders a child detained, the court shall state the facts on which the decision is based, specify why the initial removal was necessary, reference the social worker’s report or other evidence relied upon to make its determination whether continuance in the home of the parent or legal guardian is contrary to the child’s welfare, order temporary placement and care of the child to be vested with the county child welfare department pending the hearing held pursuant to Section 355 or further order of the court, and order services to be provided as soon as possible to reunify the child and their family, if appropriate.
(h) (1) (A) If the child is not released from custody, the court may order the temporary placement of the child in any of the following for a period not to exceed 15 judicial days:
(i) The home of a relative, an extended family member, as defined in Section 224.1 and Section 1903 of the federal Indian Child Welfare Act of 1978 (25 U.S.C. Sec. 1901 et seq.), or a nonrelative extended family member, as defined in Section 362.7, that has been assessed pursuant to Section 361.4.
(ii) The approved home of a resource family, as defined in Section 16519.5, or a home licensed or approved by the Indian child’s tribe.
(iii) An emergency shelter or other suitable licensed place.
(iv) A place exempt from licensure designated by the juvenile court.
(B) A youth homelessness prevention center licensed by the State Department of Social Services pursuant to Section 1502.35 of the Health and Safety Code shall not be a placement option pursuant to this section.
(C) If the court knows or has reason to know that the child is an Indian child, the Indian child shall be detained in a home that complies with the placement preferences set forth in Section 361.31 and in the federal Indian Child Welfare Act of 1978, unless the court finds good cause exists pursuant to Section 361.31 not to follow the placement preferences. If the court finds good cause not to follow the placement preferences for detention, this finding does not affect the requirement that a diligent search be made for a subsequent placement within the placement preferences.
(2) Relatives shall be given preferential consideration for placement of the child. As used in this section, “relative” means an adult who is related to the child by blood, adoption, or affinity within the fifth degree of kinship, including stepparents, stepsiblings, and all relatives whose status is preceded by the words “great,” “great-great,” or “grand,” or the spouse of any of these persons, even if the marriage was terminated by death or dissolution.
(3) When placing in the home of a relative, an extended family member, as defined in Section 224.1 and Section 1903 of the federal Indian Child Welfare Act of 1978, or nonrelative extended family member, the court shall consider the recommendations of the social worker based on the assessment pursuant to Section 361.4 of the home of the relative, extended family member, or nonrelative extended family member, including the results of a criminal records check and prior child abuse allegations, if any, before ordering that the child be placed with a relative or nonrelative extended family member. The court shall order the parent to disclose to the social worker the names, residences, and any known identifying information of any maternal or paternal relatives of the child. The social worker shall initiate the assessment pursuant to Section 361.3 of any relative to be considered for continuing placement.
(i) In the case of an Indian child, any order detaining the child pursuant to this section shall be considered an emergency removal within the meaning of Section 1922 of the federal Indian Child Welfare Act of 1978. The emergency proceeding shall terminate if the child is returned to the custody of the parent, parents, or Indian custodian, the child has been transferred to the custody and jurisdiction of the child’s tribe, or the agency or another party to the proceeding recommends that the child be removed from the physical custody of their parent or parents or Indian custodian pursuant to Section 361 or 361.2.
(j) (1) At the initial hearing upon the petition filed in accordance with subdivision (c) of Rule 5.520 of the California Rules of Court or anytime thereafter up until the time that the minor is adjudged a dependent child of the court or a finding is made dismissing the petition, the court may temporarily limit the right of the parent or guardian to make educational or developmental services decisions for the child and temporarily appoint a responsible adult to make educational or developmental services decisions for the child if all of the following conditions are found:
(A) The parent or guardian is unavailable, unable, or unwilling to exercise educational or developmental services rights for the child.
(B) The county placing agency has made diligent efforts to locate and secure the participation of the parent or guardian in educational or developmental services decisionmaking.
(C) The child’s educational and developmental services needs cannot be met without the temporary appointment of a responsible adult.
(2) If the court limits the parent’s educational rights under this subdivision, the court shall determine whether there is a responsible adult who is a relative, nonrelative extended family member, or other adult known to the child and who is available and willing to serve as the child’s educational representative before appointing an educational representative or surrogate who is not known to the child.
(3) If the court cannot identify a responsible adult to make educational decisions for the child and the appointment of a surrogate parent, as defined in subdivision (a) of Section 56050 of the Education Code, is not warranted, the court may, with the input of any interested person, make educational decisions for the child. If the child is receiving services from a regional center, the provision of any developmental services related to the court’s decision shall be consistent with the child’s individual program plan and pursuant to the Lanterman Developmental Disabilities Services Act (Division 4.5 (commencing with Section 4500)). If the court cannot identify a responsible adult to make developmental services decisions for the child, the court may, with the input of any interested person, make developmental services decisions for the child. If the court makes educational or developmental services decisions for the child, the court shall also issue appropriate orders to ensure that every effort is made to identify a responsible adult to make future educational or developmental services decisions for the child.
(4) A temporary appointment of a responsible adult and temporary limitation on the right of the parent or guardian to make educational or developmental services decisions for the child shall be specifically addressed in the court order. An order made under this section shall expire at the conclusion of the hearing held pursuant to Section 361 or upon dismissal of the petition. Upon the entering of disposition orders, additional needed limitation on the parent’s or guardian’s educational or developmental services rights shall be addressed pursuant to Section 361.
(5) This section does not remove the obligation to appoint surrogate parents for students with disabilities who are without parental representation in special education procedures, as required by state and federal law, including Section 1415(b)(2) of Title 20 of the United States Code, Section 56050 of the Education Code, Section 7579.5 of the Government Code, and Rule 5.650 of the California Rules of Court.
(6) If the court appoints a developmental services decisionmaker pursuant to this section, the developmental services decisionmaker shall have the authority to access the child’s information and records pursuant to subdivision (u) of Section 4514 and paragraph (23) of subdivision (a) of Section 5328, and to act on the child’s behalf for the purposes of the individual program plan process pursuant to Sections 4646, 4646.5, and 4648 and the fair hearing process pursuant to Chapter 7 (commencing with Section 4700) of Division 4.5, and as set forth in the court order.

SEC. 13.

 Section 361.2 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

361.2.
 (a) If a court orders removal of a child pursuant to Section 361, the court shall first determine whether there is a parent of the child, with whom the child was not residing at the time that the events or conditions arose that brought the child within the provisions of Section 300, who desires to assume custody of the child. If that parent requests custody, the court shall place the child with the parent unless it finds that placement with that parent would be detrimental to the safety, protection, or physical or emotional well-being of the child. The fact that the parent is enrolled in a certified substance abuse treatment facility that allows a dependent child to reside with their parent shall not be, for that reason alone, prima facie evidence that placement with that parent would be detrimental.
(b) If the court places the child with that parent, the court may do any of the following:
(1) Order that the parent become legal and physical custodian of the child. The court may also provide reasonable visitation by the noncustodial parent. The court shall then terminate its jurisdiction over the child. The custody order shall continue unless modified by a subsequent order of the superior court. The order of the juvenile court shall be filed in any domestic relation proceeding between the parents.
(2) Order that the parent assume custody subject to the jurisdiction of the juvenile court and require that a home visit be conducted within three months. In determining whether to take the action described in this paragraph, the court shall consider any concerns that have been raised by the child’s current caregiver regarding the parent. After the social worker conducts the home visit and files their report with the court, the court may then take the action described in paragraph (1), (3), or this paragraph. However, this paragraph does not imply that the court is required to take the action described in this paragraph as a prerequisite to the court taking the action described in either paragraph (1) or (3).
(3) Order that the parent assume custody subject to the supervision of the juvenile court. In that case the court may order that reunification services be provided to the parent or guardian from whom the child is being removed, or the court may order that services be provided solely to the parent who is assuming physical custody in order to allow that parent to retain later custody without court supervision, or that services be provided to both parents, in which case the court shall determine, at review hearings held pursuant to Section 366, which parent, if either, shall have custody of the child.
(c) The court shall make a finding, either in writing or on the record, of the basis for its determination under subdivisions (a) and (b).
(d) Part 6 (commencing with Section 7950) of Division 12 of the Family Code shall apply to the placement of a child pursuant to paragraphs (1) and (2) of subdivision (e).
(e) When the court orders removal pursuant to Section 361, the court shall order the care, custody, control, and conduct of the child to be under the supervision of the social worker who may place the child in any of the following:
(1) The home of a noncustodial parent, as described in subdivision (a), regardless of the parent’s immigration status.
(2) The approved home of a relative, or the home of a relative who has been assessed pursuant to Section 361.4 and is pending approval pursuant to Section 16519.5, regardless of the relative’s immigration status.
(3) The approved home of a nonrelative extended family member, as defined in Section 362.7, or the home of a nonrelative extended family member who has been assessed pursuant to Section 361.4 and is pending approval pursuant to Section 16519.5.
(4) The approved home of a resource family, as defined in Section 16519.5, or a home that is pending approval pursuant to paragraph (1) of subdivision (e) of Section 16519.5.
(5) A foster home considering first a foster home in which the child has been placed before an interruption in foster care, if that placement is in the best interest of the child and space is available.
(6) If it is known or there is reason to know that the child is an Indian child, as defined by Section 224.1, a home or facility in accordance with the placement preferences contained in Section 361.31 and the federal Indian Child Welfare Act (25 U.S.C. Sec. 1901 et seq.).
(7) A suitable licensed community care facility, except a youth homelessness prevention center licensed by the State Department of Social Services pursuant to Section 1502.35 of the Health and Safety Code.
(8) With a foster family agency, as defined in subdivision (g) of Section 11400 and paragraph (4) of subdivision (a) of Section 1502 of the Health and Safety Code, to be placed in a suitable family home certified or approved by the agency, with prior approval of the county placing agency.
(9) A community care facility licensed as a group home for children or a short-term residential therapeutic program, as defined in subdivision (ad) of Section 11400 of this code and paragraph (18) of subdivision (a) of Section 1502 of the Health and Safety Code. A child of any age who is placed in a community care facility licensed as a group home for children or a short-term residential therapeutic program shall have a case plan that indicates that placement is for purposes of providing short-term, specialized, and intensive treatment for the child, the case plan specifies the need for, nature of, and anticipated duration of this treatment, pursuant to paragraph (2) of subdivision (d) of Section 16501.1, and the case plan includes transitioning the child to a less restrictive environment and the projected timeline by which the child will be transitioned to a less restrictive environment. Any placement longer than six months shall be documented consistent with paragraph (3) of subdivision (a) of Section 16501.1 and, unless subparagraph (A) or (B) applies to the child, shall be approved by the deputy director or director of the county child welfare department no less frequently than every six months.
(A) A child under six years of age shall not be placed in a community care facility licensed as a group home for children, or a short-term residential therapeutic program except under the following circumstances:
(i) When the facility meets the applicable regulations adopted under Section 1530.8 of the Health and Safety Code and standards developed pursuant to Section 11467.1 of this code, and the deputy director or director of the county child welfare department has approved the case plan.
(ii) The short-term, specialized, and intensive treatment period shall not exceed 120 days, unless the county has made progress toward or is actively working toward implementing the case plan that identifies the services or supports necessary to transition the child to a family setting, circumstances beyond the county’s control have prevented the county from obtaining those services or supports within the timeline documented in the case plan, and the need for additional time pursuant to the case plan is documented by the caseworker and approved by a deputy director or director of the county child welfare department.
(iii) To the extent that placements pursuant to this paragraph are extended beyond an initial 120 days, the requirements of clauses (i) and (ii) shall apply to each extension. In addition, the deputy director or director of the county child welfare department shall approve the continued placement no less frequently than every 60 days.
(iv) In addition, if a case plan indicates that placement is for purposes of providing family reunification services, the facility shall offer family reunification services that meet the needs of the individual child and their family, permit parents, guardians, or Indian custodians to have reasonable access to their children 24 hours a day, encourage extensive parental involvement in meeting the daily needs of their children, and employ staff trained to provide family reunification services. In addition, one of the following conditions exists:
(I) The child’s parent, guardian, or Indian custodian is also under the jurisdiction of the court and resides in the facility.
(II) The child’s parent, guardian, or Indian custodian is participating in a treatment program affiliated with the facility and the child’s placement in the facility facilitates the coordination and provision of reunification services.
(III) Placement in the facility is the only alternative that permits the parent, guardian, or Indian custodian to have daily 24-hour access to the child in accordance with the case plan, to participate fully in meeting all of the daily needs of the child, including feeding and personal hygiene, and to have access to necessary reunification services.
(B) A child who is 6 to 12 years of age, inclusive, may be placed in a community care facility licensed as a group home for children or a short-term residential therapeutic program under the following conditions:
(i) The deputy director of the county welfare department shall approve the case prior to initial placement.
(ii) The short-term, specialized, and intensive treatment period shall not exceed six months, unless the county has made progress or is actively working toward implementing the case plan that identifies the services or supports necessary to transition the child to a family setting, circumstances beyond the county’s control have prevented the county from obtaining those services or supports within the timeline documented in the case plan, and the need for additional time pursuant to the case plan is documented by the caseworker and approved by a deputy director or director of the county child welfare department.
(iii) To the extent that placements pursuant to this paragraph are extended beyond an initial six months, the requirements of this subparagraph shall apply to each extension. In addition, the deputy director or director of the county child welfare department shall approve the continued placement no less frequently than every 60 days.
(10) Any child placed in a short-term residential therapeutic program shall be either of the following:
(A) A child who has been assessed as meeting one of the placement requirements set forth in subdivisions (b) and (e) of Section 11462.01.
(B) A child under six years of age who is placed with their minor parent or for the purpose of reunification pursuant to clause (iv) of subparagraph (A) of paragraph (9).
(11) This subdivision does not allow a social worker to place any dependent child outside the United States, except as specified in subdivision (f).
(f) (1) A child under the supervision of a social worker pursuant to subdivision (e) shall not be placed outside the United States prior to a judicial finding that the placement is in the best interest of the child, except as required by federal law or treaty.
(2) The party or agency requesting placement of the child outside the United States shall carry the burden of proof and shall show, by clear and convincing evidence, that placement outside the United States is in the best interest of the child.
(3) In determining the best interest of the child, the court shall consider, but not be limited to, all of the following factors:
(A) Placement with a relative.
(B) Placement of siblings in the same home.
(C) Amount and nature of any contact between the child and the potential guardian or caretaker.
(D) Physical and medical needs of the dependent child.
(E) Psychological and emotional needs of the dependent child.
(F) Social, cultural, and educational needs of the dependent child.
(G) Specific desires of any dependent child who is 12 years of age or older.
(4) If the court finds that a placement outside the United States is, by clear and convincing evidence, in the best interest of the child, the court may issue an order authorizing the social worker to make a placement outside the United States. A child subject to this subdivision shall not leave the United States prior to the issuance of the order described in this paragraph.
(5) For purposes of this subdivision, “outside the United States” shall not include the lands of any federally recognized American Indian tribe or Alaskan Natives.
(6) This subdivision shall not apply to the placement of a dependent child with a parent pursuant to subdivision (a).
(g) (1) If the child is taken from the physical custody of the child’s parent, guardian, or Indian custodian and unless the child is placed with relatives, the child shall be placed in foster care in the county of residence of the child’s parent, guardian, or Indian custodian in order to facilitate reunification of the family.
(2) If there are no appropriate placements available in the parent’s, guardian’s, or Indian custodian’s county of residence, a placement may be made in an appropriate place in another county, preferably a county located adjacent to the parent’s, guardian’s, or Indian custodian’s community of residence.
(3) This section does not require multiple disruptions of the child’s placement corresponding to frequent changes of residence by the parent, guardian, or Indian custodian. In determining whether the child should be moved, the social worker shall take into consideration the potential harmful effects of disrupting the placement of the child and the parent’s, guardian’s, or Indian custodian’s reason for the move.
(4) If it has been determined that it is necessary for a child to be placed in a county other than the child’s parent’s, guardian’s, or Indian custodian’s county of residence, the specific reason the out-of-county placement is necessary shall be documented in the child’s case plan. If the reason the out-of-county placement is necessary is the lack of resources in the sending county to meet the specific needs of the child, those specific resource needs shall be documented in the case plan.
(5) If it has been determined that a child is to be placed out of county either in a group home or with a foster family agency for subsequent placement in a certified foster family home, and the sending county is to maintain responsibility for supervision and visitation of the child, the sending county shall develop a plan of supervision and visitation that specifies the supervision and visitation activities to be performed and specifies that the sending county is responsible for performing those activities. In addition to the plan of supervision and visitation, the sending county shall document information regarding any known or suspected dangerous behavior of the child that indicates the child may pose a safety concern in the receiving county. Upon implementation of the Child Welfare Services Case Management System, the plan of supervision and visitation, as well as information regarding any known or suspected dangerous behavior of the child, shall be made available to the receiving county upon placement of the child in the receiving county. If placement occurs on a weekend or holiday, the information shall be made available to the receiving county on or before the end of the next business day.
(6) If it has been determined that a child is to be placed out of county and the sending county plans that the receiving county shall be responsible for the supervision and visitation of the child, the sending county shall develop a formal agreement between the sending and receiving counties. The formal agreement shall specify the supervision and visitation to be provided the child, and shall specify that the receiving county is responsible for providing the supervision and visitation. The formal agreement shall be approved and signed by the sending and receiving counties prior to placement of the child in the receiving county. In addition, upon completion of the case plan, the sending county shall provide a copy of the completed case plan to the receiving county. The case plan shall include information regarding any known or suspected dangerous behavior of the child that indicates the child may pose a safety concern to the receiving county.
(h) (1) Subject to paragraph (2), if the social worker must change the placement of the child and is unable to find a suitable placement within the county and must place the child outside the county, the placement shall not be made until the social worker has served written notice on the parent, guardian, Indian custodian, the child’s tribe, the child’s attorney, and, if the child is 10 years of age or older, on the child, at least 14 days prior to the placement, unless the child’s health or well-being is endangered by delaying the action or would be endangered if prior notice were given. The notice shall state the reasons that require placement outside the county. The child or parent, guardian, Indian custodian, or the child’s tribe may object to the placement not later than seven days after receipt of the notice and, upon objection, the court shall hold a hearing not later than five days after the objection and prior to the placement. The court shall order out-of-county placement if it finds that the child’s particular needs require placement outside the county.
(2) (A) The notice required prior to placement, as described in paragraph (1), may be waived if the child and family team has determined that the identified placement is in the best interest of the child, no member of the child and family team objects to the placement, and the child’s attorney has been informed of the intended placement and has no objection, and, if applicable, the Indian custodian or child’s tribe has been informed of the intended placement and has no objection.
(B) If the child is transitioning from a temporary shelter care facility, as described in Section 11462.022, and all of the circumstances set forth in subparagraph (A) do not exist, the county shall provide oral notice to the child’s parents, guardian, Indian custodian, the child’s tribe, the child’s attorney, and, if the child is 10 years of age or older, to the child no later than one business day after the determination that out-of-county placement is necessary and the circumstances in subparagraph (A) do not exist. The oral notice shall state the reasons that require placement outside the county and shall be immediately followed by written notice stating the reasons. The child, parent, guardian, Indian custodian, or tribe may object to the placement not later than seven days after oral notice is provided and, upon objection, the court shall hold a hearing not later than two judicial days after the objection is made. The court may authorize that the child remain in the temporary shelter care facility pending the outcome of the hearing. The court shall order out-of-county placement if it finds that the child’s particular needs require placement outside the county. This subparagraph does not preclude placement of the child without prior notice if the child’s health or well-being is endangered by delaying the action or would be endangered if prior notice were given.
(i) If the court has ordered removal of the child from the physical custody of the child’s parents pursuant to Section 361, the court shall consider whether the family ties and best interest of the child will be served by granting visitation rights to the child’s grandparents. The court shall clearly specify those rights to the social worker.
(j) If the court has ordered removal of the child from the physical custody of the child’s parents pursuant to Section 361, the court shall consider whether there are any siblings under the court’s jurisdiction, or any nondependent siblings in the physical custody of a parent subject to the court’s jurisdiction, the nature of the relationship between the child and their siblings, the appropriateness of developing or maintaining the sibling relationships pursuant to Section 16002, and the impact of the sibling relationships on the child’s placement and planning for legal permanence.
(k) (1) An agency shall ensure placement of a child in a home that, to the fullest extent possible, best meets the day-to-day needs of the child. A home that best meets the day-to-day needs of the child shall satisfy all of the following criteria:
(A) The child’s caregiver is able to meet the day-to-day health, safety, and well-being needs of the child.
(B) The child’s caregiver is permitted to maintain the least restrictive family setting that promotes normal childhood experiences and that serves the day-to-day needs of the child.
(C) The child is permitted to engage in reasonable, age-appropriate day-to-day activities that promote normal childhood experiences for the foster child.
(2) The foster child’s caregiver shall use a reasonable and prudent parent standard, as defined in paragraph (2) of subdivision (a) of Section 362.04, to determine day-to-day activities that are age appropriate to meet the needs of the child. This section does not permit a child’s caregiver to permit the child to engage in day-to-day activities that carry an unreasonable risk of harm, or subject the child to abuse or neglect.

SEC. 14.

 Section 450 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

450.
 (a) A minor or nonminor who satisfies all of the following criteria is within the transition jurisdiction of the juvenile court:
(1) (A) The minor is a ward who is older than 17 years and 5 months of age and younger than 18 years of age and in foster care placement, or the nonminor is a ward in foster care placement who was a ward subject to an order for foster care placement on the day the nonminor attained 18 years of age and has not attained 21 years of age.
(B) The minor or nonminor met or would meet the criteria in subparagraph (A), but for the fact that the underlying adjudication was vacated pursuant to Section 236.14 of the Penal Code, and the minor or nonminor has not attained 21 years of age.
(2) The ward meets any of the following conditions:
(A) The ward was removed from the physical custody of the ward’s parents or legal guardian, adjudged to be a ward of the juvenile court under Section 725, and ordered into foster care placement as a ward.
(B) The ward was removed from the custody of the ward’s parents or legal guardian as a dependent of the court with an order for foster care placement as a dependent in effect at the time the court adjudged them to be a ward of the juvenile court under Section 725.
(C) The minor or nonminor met or would meet the conditions described in subparagraph (A) or (B), but for the fact that the underlying adjudication was vacated pursuant to Section 236.14 of the Penal Code, and the minor or nonminor has not attained 21 years of age.
(3) The rehabilitative goals of the minor or nonminor, as set forth in the case plan, have been met, and juvenile court jurisdiction over the minor or nonminor as a ward is no longer required, or the underlying adjudication was vacated pursuant to Section 236.14 of the Penal Code.
(4) (A) If the ward is a minor, reunification services have been terminated; the matter has not been set for a hearing for termination of parental rights pursuant to Section 727.3 or for the establishment of guardianship pursuant to Section 728; the return of the child to the physical custody of the parents or legal guardian would create a substantial risk of detriment to the child’s safety, protection, or physical or emotional well-being; and the minor has indicated an intent to sign a mutual agreement, as described in subdivision (u) of Section 11400, with the responsible agency for placement in a supervised setting as a nonminor dependent.
(B) If the ward is a nonminor, the ward has signed a mutual agreement, as described in subdivision (u) of Section 11400, with the responsible agency for placement in a supervised setting as a nonminor dependent or has signed a voluntary reentry agreement, as described in subdivision (z) of Section 11400, for placement in a supervised setting as a nonminor dependent. A youth homelessness prevention center licensed by the State Department of Social Services pursuant to Section 1502.35 of the Health and Safety Code shall not be a placement option pursuant to this section.
(b) A minor who is subject to the court’s transition jurisdiction shall be referred to as a transition dependent.
(c) A youth subject to the court’s transition jurisdiction who is 18 years of age or older shall be referred to as a nonminor dependent.

SEC. 15.

 Section 727 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

727.
 (a) (1) If a minor or nonminor is adjudged a ward of the court on the ground that the minor or nonminor is a person described by Section 601 or 602, the court may make any reasonable orders for the care, supervision, custody, conduct, maintenance, and support of the minor or nonminor, including medical treatment, subject to further order of the court.
(2) In the discretion of the court, a ward may be ordered to be on probation without supervision of the probation officer. The court, in so ordering, may impose on the ward any and all reasonable conditions of behavior as may be appropriate under this disposition. A minor or nonminor who has been adjudged a ward of the court on the basis of the commission of any of the offenses described in subdivision (b) or paragraph (2) of subdivision (d) of Section 707, Section 459 of the Penal Code, or subdivision (a) of Section 11350 of the Health and Safety Code, shall not be eligible for probation without supervision of the probation officer. A minor or nonminor who has been adjudged a ward of the court on the basis of the commission of any offense involving the sale or possession for sale of a controlled substance, except misdemeanor offenses involving marijuana, as specified in Chapter 2 (commencing with Section 11053) of Division 10 of the Health and Safety Code, or of an offense in violation of Section 32625 of the Penal Code, shall be eligible for probation without supervision of the probation officer only when the court determines that the interests of justice would best be served and states reasons on the record for that determination.
(3) In all other cases, the court shall order the care, custody, and control of the minor or nonminor to be under the supervision of the probation officer.
(4) It is the responsibility, pursuant to Section 672(a)(2)(B) of Title 42 of the United States Code, of the probation agency to determine the appropriate placement for the ward once the court issues a placement order. In determination of the appropriate placement for the ward, the probation officer shall consider any recommendations of the child and family. The probation agency may place the minor or nonminor in any of the following:
(A) The approved home of a relative or the approved home of a nonrelative, extended family member, as defined in Section 362.7. If a decision has been made to place the minor in the home of a relative, the court may authorize the relative to give legal consent for the minor’s medical, surgical, and dental care and education as if the relative caregiver were the custodial parent of the minor.
(B) A foster home, the approved home of a resource family, as defined in Section 16519.5, or a home or facility in accordance with the federal Indian Child Welfare Act (25 U.S.C. Sec. 1901 et seq.).
(C) A suitable licensed community care facility, as identified by the probation officer, except a youth homelessness prevention center licensed by the State Department of Social Services pursuant to Section 1502.35 of the Health and Safety Code.
(D) A foster family agency, as defined in subdivision (g) of Section 11400 and paragraph (4) of subdivision (a) of Section 1502 of the Health and Safety Code, in a suitable certified family home or with a resource family.
(E) A minor or nonminor dependent may be placed in a group home or short-term residential therapeutic program, as defined in subdivision (ad) of Section 11400 and paragraph (18) of subdivision (a) of Section 1502 of the Health and Safety Code. The placing agency shall also comply with requirements set forth in paragraph (9) of subdivision (e) of Section 361.2, which includes, but is not limited to, authorization, limitation on length of stay, extensions, and additional requirements related to minors. For youth 13 years of age and older, the chief probation officer of the county probation department, or their designee, shall approve the placement if it is longer than 12 months, and no less frequently than every 12 months thereafter.
(F) (i) A minor adjudged a ward of the juvenile court shall be entitled to participate in age-appropriate extracurricular, enrichment, and social activities. A state or local regulation or policy shall not prevent, or create barriers to, participation in those activities. Each state and local entity shall ensure that private agencies that provide foster care services to wards have policies consistent with this section and that those agencies promote and protect the ability of wards to participate in age-appropriate extracurricular, enrichment, and social activities. A short-term residential therapeutic program or a group home administrator, a facility manager, or their responsible designee, and a caregiver, as defined in paragraph (1) of subdivision (a) of Section 362.04, shall use a reasonable and prudent parent standard, as defined in paragraph (2) of subdivision (a) of Section 362.04, in determining whether to give permission for a minor residing in foster care to participate in extracurricular, enrichment, and social activities. A short-term residential therapeutic program or a group home administrator, a facility manager, or their responsible designee, and a caregiver shall take reasonable steps to determine the appropriateness of the activity taking into consideration the minor’s age, maturity, and developmental level. For every minor placed in a setting described in subparagraphs (A) through (E), inclusive, age-appropriate extracurricular, enrichment, and social activities shall include access to computer technology and the internet.
(ii) A short-term residential therapeutic program or a group home administrator, facility manager, or their responsible designee, is encouraged to consult with social work or treatment staff members who are most familiar with the minor at the group home in applying and using the reasonable and prudent parent standard.
(G) For nonminors, an approved supervised independent living setting, as defined in Section 11400, including a residential housing unit certified by a licensed transitional housing placement provider.
(5) The minor or nonminor shall be released from juvenile detention upon an order being entered under paragraph (3), unless the court determines that a delay in the release from detention is reasonable pursuant to Section 737.
(b) (1) To facilitate coordination and cooperation among agencies, the court may, at any time after a petition has been filed, after giving notice and an opportunity to be heard, join in the juvenile court proceedings any agency that the court determines has failed to meet a legal obligation to provide services to a minor, for whom a petition has been filed under Section 601 or 602, to a nonminor, as described in Section 303, or to a nonminor dependent, as defined in subdivision (v) of Section 11400. In any proceeding in which an agency is joined, the court shall not impose duties upon the agency beyond those mandated by law. The purpose of joinder under this section is to ensure the delivery and coordination of legally mandated services to the minor. The joinder shall not be maintained for any other purpose. Nothing in this section shall prohibit agencies that have received notice of the hearing on joinder from meeting prior to the hearing to coordinate services.
(2) The court has no authority to order services unless it has been determined through the administrative process of an agency that has been joined as a party, that the minor, nonminor, or nonminor dependent is eligible for those services. With respect to mental health assessment, treatment, and case management services pursuant to an individualized education program developed pursuant to Article 2 (commencing with Section 56320) of Chapter 4 of Part 30 of Division 4 of Title 2 of the Education Code, the court’s determination shall be limited to whether the agency has complied with that chapter.
(3) For the purposes of this subdivision, “agency” means any governmental agency or any private service provider or individual that receives federal, state, or local governmental funding or reimbursement for providing services directly to a child, nonminor, or nonminor dependent.
(c) If a minor has been adjudged a ward of the court on the ground that the minor is a person described in Section 601 or 602, and the court finds that notice has been given in accordance with Section 661, and if the court orders that a parent or guardian shall retain custody of that minor either subject to or without the supervision of the probation officer, the parent or guardian may be required to participate with that minor in a counseling or education program, including, but not limited to, parent education and parenting programs operated by community colleges, school districts, or other appropriate agencies designated by the court.
(d) (1) The juvenile court may direct any reasonable orders to the parents and guardians of the minor who is the subject of any proceedings under this chapter as the court deems necessary and proper to carry out subdivisions (a), (b), and (c), including orders to appear before a county financial evaluation officer, to ensure the minor’s regular school attendance, and to make reasonable efforts to obtain appropriate educational services necessary to meet the needs of the minor.
(2) If counseling or other treatment services are ordered for the minor, the parent, guardian, or foster parent shall be ordered to participate in those services, unless participation by the parent, guardian, or foster parent is deemed by the court to be inappropriate or potentially detrimental to the minor.
(e) The court may, after receipt of relevant testimony and other evidence from the parties, affirm or reject the placement determination. If the court rejects the placement determination, the court may instruct the probation department to determine an alternative placement for the ward, or the court may modify the placement order to an alternative placement recommended by a party to the case after the court has received the probation department’s assessment of that recommendation and other relevant evidence from the parties.

SEC. 16.

 Section 11400 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

11400.
 For purposes of this article, and Article 6 (commencing with Section 11450), the following definitions shall apply:
(a) “Aid to Families with Dependent Children-Foster Care (AFDC-FC)” means the aid provided on behalf of needy children in foster care under the terms of this division.
(b) “Case plan” means a written document that, at a minimum, specifies the type of home in which the child shall be placed, the safety of that home, and the appropriateness of that home to meet the child’s needs. It shall also include the agency’s plan for ensuring that the child receive proper care and protection in a safe environment, and shall set forth the appropriate services to be provided to the child, the child’s family, and the foster parents, in order to meet the child’s needs while in foster care, and to reunify the child with the child’s family. In addition, the plan shall specify the services that will be provided or steps that will be taken to facilitate an alternate permanent plan if reunification is not possible.
(c) “Certified family home” means an individual or family certified by a licensed foster family agency and issued a certificate of approval by that agency as meeting licensing standards, and used exclusively by that foster family agency for placements.
(d) “Family home” means the family residence of a licensee in which 24-hour care and supervision are provided for children.
(e) “Small family home” means any residential facility, in the licensee’s family residence, which provides 24-hour care for six or fewer foster children who have mental disorders or developmental or physical disabilities and who require special care and supervision as a result of their disabilities.
(f) “Foster care” means the 24-hour out-of-home care provided to children whose own families are unable or unwilling to care for them, and who are in need of temporary or long-term substitute parenting.
(g) “Foster family agency” means a licensed community care facility, as defined in paragraph (4) of subdivision (a) of Section 1502 of the Health and Safety Code. Private foster family agencies shall be organized and operated on a nonprofit basis.
(h) “Group home” means a nondetention privately operated residential home, organized and operated on a nonprofit basis only, of any capacity, or a nondetention licensed residential care home operated by the County of San Mateo with a capacity of up to 25 beds, that accepts children in need of care and supervision in a group home, as defined by paragraph (13) of subdivision (a) of Section 1502 of the Health and Safety Code.
(i) “Periodic review” means review of a child’s status by the juvenile court or by an administrative review panel, that shall include a consideration of the safety of the child, a determination of the continuing need for placement in foster care, evaluation of the goals for the placement and the progress toward meeting these goals, and development of a target date for the child’s return home or establishment of alternative permanent placement.
(j) “Permanency planning hearing” means a hearing conducted by the juvenile court in which the child’s future status, including whether the child shall be returned home or another permanent plan shall be developed, is determined.
(k) “Placement and care” refers to the responsibility for the welfare of a child vested in an agency or organization by virtue of the agency or organization having (1) been delegated care, custody, and control of a child by the juvenile court, (2) taken responsibility, pursuant to a relinquishment or termination of parental rights on a child, (3) taken the responsibility of supervising a child detained by the juvenile court pursuant to Section 319 or 636, or (4) signed a voluntary placement agreement for the child’s placement; or to the responsibility designated to an individual by virtue of their being appointed the child’s legal guardian.
(l) “Preplacement preventive services” means services that are designed to help children remain with their families by preventing or eliminating the need for removal.
(m) “Relative” means an adult who is related to the child by blood, adoption, or affinity within the fifth degree of kinship, including stepparents, stepsiblings, and all relatives whose status is preceded by the words “great,” “great-great,” or “grand” or the spouse of any of these persons even if the marriage was terminated by death or dissolution.
(n) “Nonrelative extended family member” means an adult caregiver who has an established familial or mentoring relationship with the child, as described in Section 362.7.
(o) “Voluntary placement” means an out-of-home placement of a child by (1) the county welfare department, probation department, or Indian tribe that has entered into an agreement pursuant to Section 10553.1, after the parents or guardians have requested the assistance of the county welfare department and have signed a voluntary placement agreement, or (2) the county welfare department licensed public or private adoption agency, or the department acting as an adoption agency, after the parents have requested the assistance of either the county welfare department, the licensed public or private adoption agency, or the department acting as an adoption agency for the purpose of adoption planning, and have signed a voluntary placement agreement.
(p) “Voluntary placement agreement” means a written agreement between either the county welfare department, probation department, or Indian tribe that has entered into an agreement pursuant to Section 10553.1, licensed public or private adoption agency, or the department acting as an adoption agency, and the parents or guardians of a child that specifies, at a minimum, the following:
(1) The legal status of the child.
(2) The rights and obligations of the parents or guardians, the child, and the agency in which the child is placed.
(q) “Original placement date” means the most recent date on which the court detained a child and ordered an agency to be responsible for supervising the child or the date on which an agency assumed responsibility for a child due to termination of parental rights, relinquishment, or voluntary placement.
(r) (1) “Transitional housing placement provider” means an organization licensed by the State Department of Social Services pursuant to Section 1559.110 of the Health and Safety Code to provide supervised transitional housing services to foster children who are at least 16 years of age. A transitional housing placement provider shall be privately operated and organized on a nonprofit basis.
(2) Prior to licensure, a provider shall obtain certification from the applicable county, in accordance with Section 16522.1.
(s) “Transitional Housing Program-Plus” means a provider certified by the applicable county, in accordance with subdivision (c) of Section 16522, to provide transitional housing services to former foster youth who have exited the foster care system on or after their 18th birthday.
(t) “Whole family foster home” means a resource family, licensed foster family home, approved relative caregiver or nonrelative extended family member’s home, the home of a nonrelated legal guardian whose guardianship was established pursuant to Section 360 or 366.26, certified family home, or a host family of a transitional housing placement provider, that provides foster care for a minor or nonminor dependent parent and their child, and is specifically recruited and trained to assist the minor or nonminor dependent parent in developing the skills necessary to provide a safe, stable, and permanent home for their child. The child of the minor or nonminor dependent parent need not be the subject of a petition filed pursuant to Section 300 to qualify for placement in a whole family foster home.
(u) “Mutual agreement” means any of the following:
(1) A written voluntary agreement of consent for continued placement and care in a supervised setting between a minor or, on and after January 1, 2012, a nonminor dependent, and the county welfare services or probation department or tribal agency responsible for the foster care placement, that documents the nonminor’s continued willingness to remain in supervised out-of-home placement under the placement and care of the responsible county, tribe, consortium of tribes, or tribal organization that has entered into an agreement with the state pursuant to Section 10553.1, remain under the jurisdiction of the juvenile court as a nonminor dependent, and report any change of circumstances relevant to continued eligibility for foster care payments, and that documents the nonminor’s and social worker’s or probation officer’s agreement to work together to facilitate implementation of the mutually developed supervised placement agreement and transitional independent living case plan.
(2) An agreement, as described in paragraph (1), between a nonminor former dependent or ward in receipt of Kin-GAP payments under Article 4.5 (commencing with Section 11360) or Article 4.7 (commencing with Section 11385), and the agency responsible for the Kin-GAP benefits, provided that the nonminor former dependent or ward satisfies the conditions described in Section 11403.01, or one or more of the conditions described in paragraphs (1) to (5), inclusive, of subdivision (b) of Section 11403. For purposes of this paragraph and paragraph (3), “nonminor former dependent or ward” has the same meaning as described in subdivision (aa).
(3) An agreement, as described in paragraph (1), between a nonminor former dependent or ward in receipt of AFDC-FC payments under subdivision (e) or (f) of Section 11405 and the agency responsible for the AFDC-FC benefits, provided that the nonminor former dependent or ward described in subdivision (e) of Section 11405 satisfies one or more of the conditions described in paragraphs (1) to (5), inclusive, of subdivision (b) of Section 11403, and the nonminor described in subdivision (f) of Section 11405 satisfies the secondary school or equivalent training or certificate program conditions described in that subdivision.
(v) “Nonminor dependent” means, on and after January 1, 2012, a foster child, as described in Section 675(8)(B) of Title 42 of the United States Code under the federal Social Security Act who is a current dependent child or ward of the juvenile court, or who is a nonminor under the transition jurisdiction of the juvenile court, as described in Section 450, and who satisfies all of the following criteria:
(1) The nonminor dependent has attained 18 years of age while under an order of foster care placement by the juvenile court, and is not more than 19 years of age on or after January 1, 2012, not more than 20 years of age on or after January 1, 2013, or not more than 21 years of age on or after January 1, 2014, and as described in Section 10103.5.
(2) The nonminor dependent is in foster care under the placement and care responsibility of the county welfare department, county probation department, Indian tribe, consortium of tribes, or tribal organization that entered into an agreement pursuant to Section 10553.1.
(3) The nonminor dependent has a transitional independent living case plan pursuant to Section 475(8) of the federal Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. Sec. 675(8)), as contained in the federal Fostering Connections to Success and Increasing Adoptions Act of 2008 (Public Law 110-351), as described in Section 11403.
(w) “Supervised independent living placement” means, on and after January 1, 2012, an independent supervised setting, as specified in a nonminor dependent’s transitional independent living case plan, in which the youth is living independently, pursuant to Section 472(c) of the federal Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. Sec. 672(c)).
(x) “Supervised independent living setting,” pursuant to Section 472(c) of the federal Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. Sec. 672(c)), includes both a supervised independent living placement, as defined in subdivision (w), and a residential housing unit certified by the transitional housing placement provider operating a Transitional Housing Placement program for nonminor dependents, as described in paragraph (2) of subdivision (a) of Section 16522.1.
(y) “Transitional independent living case plan” means, on or after January 1, 2012, a child’s case plan submitted for the last review hearing held before the child reaches 18 years of age or the nonminor dependent’s case plan, updated every six months, that describes the goals and objectives of how the nonminor will make progress in the transition to living independently and assume incremental responsibility for adult decisionmaking, the collaborative efforts between the nonminor and the social worker, probation officer, or Indian tribal placing entity and the supportive services as described in the transitional independent living plan (TILP) to ensure active and meaningful participation in one or more of the eligibility criteria described in paragraphs (1) to (5), inclusive, of subdivision (b) of Section 11403, the nonminor’s appropriate supervised placement setting, and the nonminor’s permanent plan for transition to living independently, which includes maintaining or obtaining permanent connections to caring and committed adults, as set forth in paragraph (16) of subdivision (f) of Section 16501.1.
(z) “Voluntary reentry agreement” means a written voluntary agreement between a former dependent child or ward or a former nonminor dependent, who has had juvenile court jurisdiction terminated pursuant to Section 391, 452, or 607.2, and the county welfare or probation department or tribal placing entity that documents the nonminor’s desire and willingness to reenter foster care, to be placed in a supervised setting under the placement and care responsibility of the placing agency, the nonminor’s desire, willingness, and ability to immediately participate in one or more of the conditions of paragraphs (1) to (5), inclusive, of subdivision (b) of Section 11403, the nonminor’s agreement to work collaboratively with the placing agency to develop their transitional independent living case plan within 60 days of reentry, the nonminor’s agreement to report any changes of circumstances relevant to continued eligibility for foster care payments, and (1) the nonminor’s agreement to participate in the filing of a petition for juvenile court jurisdiction as a nonminor dependent pursuant to subdivision (e) of Section 388 within 15 judicial days of the signing of the agreement and the placing agency’s efforts and supportive services to assist the nonminor in the reentry process, or (2) if the nonminor meets the definition of a nonminor former dependent or ward, as described in subdivision (aa), the nonminor’s agreement to return to the care and support of their former juvenile court-appointed guardian and meet the eligibility criteria for AFDC-FC pursuant to subdivision (e) of Section 11405.
(aa) “Nonminor former dependent or ward” means, on and after January 1, 2012, either of the following:
(1) A nonminor who reached 18 years of age while subject to an order for foster care placement, and for whom dependency, delinquency, or transition jurisdiction has been terminated, and who is still under the general jurisdiction of the court.
(2) A nonminor who is over 18 years of age and, while a minor, was a dependent child or ward of the juvenile court when the guardianship was established pursuant to Section 360 or 366.26, or subdivision (d) of Section 728, and the juvenile court dependency or wardship was dismissed following the establishment of the guardianship.
(ab) “Youth homelessness prevention center” means a type of group home, as defined in paragraph (14) of subdivision (a) of Section 1502 of the Health and Safety Code, that is not an eligible placement option under Sections 319, 361.2, 450, and 727, and that is not eligible for AFDC-FC funding pursuant to subdivision (c) of Section 11402 or Section 11462.
(ac) “Transition dependent” is a minor between 17 years and five months and 18 years of age who is subject to the court’s transition jurisdiction under Section 450.
(ad) “Short-term residential therapeutic program” means a nondetention, licensed community care facility, as defined in paragraph (18) of subdivision (a) of Section 1502 of the Health and Safety Code, that provides an integrated program of specialized and intensive care and supervision, services and supports, and treatment for the child or youth, when the child’s or youth’s case plan specifies the need for, nature of, and anticipated duration of this specialized treatment. Short-term residential therapeutic programs shall be organized and operated on a nonprofit basis.
(ae) “Resource family” means an approved caregiver, as defined in subdivision (c) of Section 16519.5.
(af) “Core Services” mean services, made available to children, youth, and nonminor dependents either directly or secured through agreement with other agencies, which are trauma informed and culturally relevant as specified in Sections 11462 and 11463.