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ACR-105 Ukrainian Famine of 1932–1933.(2017-2018)

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ACR105:v97#DOCUMENT

Enrolled  September 15, 2017
Passed  IN  Senate  September 14, 2017
Passed  IN  Assembly  August 31, 2017
Amended  IN  Assembly  August 24, 2017

CALIFORNIA LEGISLATURE— 2017–2018 REGULAR SESSION

Assembly Concurrent Resolution No. 105


Introduced by Assembly Member Kiley
(Coauthors: Assembly Members Acosta, Arambula, Baker, Berman, Bigelow, Bloom, Bonta, Brough, Burke, Caballero, Calderon, Cervantes, Chau, Chávez, Chen, Chiu, Choi, Chu, Cooley, Cooper, Cunningham, Dababneh, Dahle, Daly, Eggman, Flora, Fong, Frazier, Friedman, Gallagher, Cristina Garcia, Gipson, Gloria, Gonzalez Fletcher, Grayson, Harper, Holden, Irwin, Jones-Sawyer, Kalra, Lackey, Limón, Maienschein, Mathis, Mayes, McCarty, Medina, Melendez, Mullin, Muratsuchi, Nazarian, Obernolte, O’Donnell, Patterson, Quirk, Rendon, Reyes, Rodriguez, Rubio, Salas, Santiago, Steinorth, Mark Stone, Thurmond, Ting, Voepel, Waldron, Weber, and Wood)

June 27, 2017


Relative to the Ukrainian Famine of 1932–1933.


LEGISLATIVE COUNSEL'S DIGEST


ACR 105, Kiley. Ukrainian Famine of 1932–1933.
This measure would remember and honor the millions of victims of the man-made Ukrainian Famine of 1932–1933, known as “Holodomor,” and their descendants who are living throughout California. The measure would also designate November 25, 2017, as Holodomor Remembrance Day.
Fiscal Committee: NO  

WHEREAS, The Ukrainian Famine of 1932–1933, known as “Holodomor,” was a man-made famine that caused the deaths of at least five million innocent men, women, and children in Ukraine, resulting in an annihilation of an estimated 25 percent of the rural population of that country, one of the most productive agricultural areas of the Soviet Union; and
WHEREAS, This man-made famine also resulted in the deaths of an estimated one to two million people in regions outside Ukraine, mostly in the largely ethnic Ukrainian North Caucasus territory; and
WHEREAS, These millions of people were starved to death by forced agricultural collectivization and grain seizures by the Soviet Union; and
WHEREAS, Western observers and scholars who accurately reported on the existence of the famine as it was occurring were subjected to disparagement and criticism for their reporting; and
WHEREAS, The Soviet Union and many scholars in the west denied the existence of the famine until the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991 when Soviet Union archives became accessible, thereby making the documentation of the premeditated nature of the famine and its harsh enforcement possible; and
WHEREAS, The final report of the United States Commission on the Ukraine Famine, established on December 13, 1985, concluded that the victims were “starved to death in a man-made famine”; and
WHEREAS, The United States Congress authorized the government of Ukraine on October 13, 2006, to establish a memorial on federal land in the District of Columbia to “honor the victims of the Ukrainian famine-genocide of 1932–1933”; and
WHEREAS, Although the famine was one of the greatest losses of human life in the 20th century, its occurrence remains insufficiently known in the United States and throughout the world; and
WHEREAS, The official recognition of the famine by the government of Ukraine and the Verkhovna Rada of Ukraine on November 28, 2006, represents a significant step in the reestablishment of Ukraine’s national identity and the advancement of efforts to establish a democratic and free Ukraine that is fully integrated into the Western community of nations; and
WHEREAS, Whether Ukrainian immigrants were fleeing political oppression or religious persecution to pursue better lives for themselves and their families, the desire to live in peace and enjoy liberty was so valued that it drew generations of Ukrainian immigrants to the United States and California in an effort to rebuild their lives; and
WHEREAS, California is now home to the third largest Ukrainian American population in the United States, and Ukrainians living in California have enriched our state through their leadership and contributions in agriculture, business, academia, government, and the arts; and
WHEREAS, In August 2015, a memorial to the millions who perished in the Ukrainian Famine of 1932–1933, known as “Holodomor,” was erected in the United States capital, and the dedication ceremony took place on November 7, 2015; now, therefore, be it
Resolved by the Assembly of the State of California, the Senate thereof concurring, That the millions of victims of the man-made Ukrainian Famine of 1932–1933, known as “Holodomor,” and their descendants living throughout California should be solemnly remembered and honored; and be it further
Resolved, That the Legislature designates November 25, 2017, as Holodomor Remembrance Day in California and encourages individual citizens, educators, businesses, groups, organizations, and public institutions to observe Holodomor Remembrance Day with appropriate activities designed to honor the victims and educate Californians about this tragedy; and be it further
Resolved, That the Chief Clerk of the Assembly transmit copies of this resolution to the author for appropriate distribution.