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AB-2242 Urban water management planning.(2017-2018)

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Date Published: 03/16/2018 04:00 AM
AB2242:v98#DOCUMENT

Amended  IN  Assembly  March 15, 2018

CALIFORNIA LEGISLATURE— 2017–2018 REGULAR SESSION

Assembly Bill No. 2242


Introduced by Assembly Member Rubio

February 13, 2018


An act to amend Section 10610.2 of add Section 10631.5 to the Water Code, relating to water.


LEGISLATIVE COUNSEL'S DIGEST


AB 2242, as amended, Rubio. Urban water management planning.
Existing law, the Urban Water Management Planning Act, requires every public and private urban water supplier that directly or indirectly provides water for municipal purposes to prepare and adopt an urban water management plan and to update its plan once every 5 years on or before December 31 in years ending in 5 and zero, except as specified. Existing law requires an urban water management plan, among other things, to describe the reliability of the water supply and vulnerability to seasonal or climatic shortage, to the extent practicable, and provide data for average, single-dry, and multiple-dry water years. Existing law requires that an urban water management plan provides an urban water shortage contingency analysis that includes, among other things, an estimate of the minimum water supply available during each of the following 3 water years based on the driest 3-year historic sequence for the agency’s water supply.
This bill would require an urban water supplier to include in its urban water management plan an assessment of the reliability of its water service, as specified, to its customers during normal, dry, and multiple dry years, including a repeat of the 5 consecutive historic driest years the urban water supplier has experienced.

Existing law declares that certain provisions relating to urban water management planning are intended to provide assistance to water agencies in carrying out their long-term resource planning responsibilities to ensure adequate water supplies to meet existing and future demands for water. Existing law makes related legislative findings and declarations.

This bill would make a nonsubstantive change in those findings and declarations.

Vote: MAJORITY   Appropriation: NO   Fiscal Committee: NO   Local Program: NO  

The people of the State of California do enact as follows:


SECTION 1.

 Section 10631.5 is added to the Water Code, to read:

10631.5.
 (a) In addition to the requirements of Section 10631, an urban water supplier shall include in its urban water management plan an assessment of the reliability of its water service to its customers during normal, dry, and multiple dry years, including a repeat of the five consecutive historic driest years the urban water supplier has experienced.
(b) As part of an assessment of the reliability of water service described in subdivision (a), an urban water supplier shall consider the reliability of its water service given the combination of supplies available to it, possible supply augmentation measures it is able to take, and the demand management measures it would likely implement in those scenarios.

SECTION 1.Section 10610.2 of the Water Code is amended to read:
10610.2.

(a)The Legislature finds and declares all of the following:

(1)The waters of the state are a limited and renewable resource subject to ever-increasing demands.

(2)The conservation and efficient use of urban water supplies are of statewide concern; however, the planning for that use and the implementation of those plans can best be accomplished at the local level.

(3)A long-term, reliable supply of water is essential to protect the productivity of California’s businesses and economic climate.

(4)As part of its long-range planning activities, every urban water supplier should make every effort to ensure the appropriate level of reliability in its water service sufficient to meet the needs of its various categories of customers during normal, dry, and multiple dry water years.

(5)

Public health issues have been raised over a number of contaminants that have been identified in some local and imported water supplies.

(6)

Implementing effective water management strategies, including groundwater storage projects and recycled water projects, may require specific water quality and salinity targets for meeting groundwater basins water quality objectives and promoting beneficial use of recycled water.

(7)

Water quality regulations are becoming an increasingly important factor in water agencies’ selection of raw water sources, treatment alternatives, and modifications to existing treatment facilities.

(8)

Changes in drinking water quality standards may also impact the usefulness of water supplies and may ultimately impact supply reliability.

(9)

The quality of source supplies can have a significant impact on water management strategies and supply reliability.

(b)This part is intended to provide assistance to water agencies in carrying out their long-term resource planning responsibilities to ensure adequate water supplies to meet existing and future demands for water.