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AB-1668 Water management planning.(2017-2018)

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Date Published: 09/08/2017 09:00 PM
AB1668:v92#DOCUMENT

Amended  IN  Senate  September 08, 2017
Amended  IN  Senate  September 06, 2017
Amended  IN  Senate  August 29, 2017
Amended  IN  Senate  August 21, 2017
Amended  IN  Senate  July 12, 2017
Amended  IN  Senate  July 03, 2017
Amended  IN  Assembly  April 18, 2017

CALIFORNIA LEGISLATURE— 2017–2018 REGULAR SESSION

Assembly Bill No. 1668


Introduced by Assembly Member Friedman
(Principal coauthors: Senators Hertzberg and Skinner)
(Coauthors: Senators Allen and Wiener)

February 17, 2017


An act to amend Sections 531.10, 1120, 10608.12, 10608.20, 10608.48, 10801, 10802, 10814, 10817, 10820, 10825, 10826, 10843, 10845, and 10910 of, to add Sections 1846.5 and 10826.2 to, and to add Chapter 9 (commencing with Section 10609) and Chapter 10 (commencing with Section 10609.40) to Part 2.55 of Division 6 of, the Water Code, relating to water.


LEGISLATIVE COUNSEL'S DIGEST


AB 1668, as amended, Friedman. Water management planning.
(1) Existing law requires the state to achieve a 20% reduction in urban per capita water use in California by December 31, 2020. Existing law requires each urban retail water supplier to develop urban water use targets and an interim urban water use target, as specified.
This bill would require the State Water Resources Control Board, in coordination with the Department of Water Resources, to adopt long-term standards for the efficient use of water, as provided, and performance measures for commercial, industrial, and institutional water use on or before June 30, 2021. The bill would require the department, in coordination with the board, to conduct necessary studies and investigations and make recommendations, no later than October 1, 2020, for purposes of these standards and performance measures. The bill, until January 1, 2025, would establish 55 gallons per capita daily as the standard for indoor residential water use, beginning January 1, 2025, would establish 52.5 gallons per capita daily as the standard for indoor residential water use, and beginning January 1, 2030, would establish 50 gallons per capita daily as the standard for indoor residential water use. The bill would require the department, in coordination with the board, to conduct necessary studies and investigations to jointly recommend to the Legislature a standard for indoor residential water use that more appropriately reflects best practices. The bill would impose civil liability for a violation of an order or regulation issued pursuant to these provisions, as specified.
The bill would require the department, in consultation with the board, to propose to the Governor and the Legislature, by January 1, 2019, recommendations and guidance relating to the development and implementation of countywide drought and water shortage contingency plans to address the planning needs of small water suppliers and rural communities, as provided. The bill would require the department, in consultation with the board and other relevant state and local agencies and stakeholders, to use available data to identify small water suppliers and rural communities that may be at risk of drought and water shortage vulnerability, no later than January 1, 2019, and would require the department to notify counties and groundwater sustainability agencies of those suppliers or communities.
(2) Existing law establishes procedures for reconsideration and amendment of specified decisions and orders of the board. Existing law authorizes any party aggrieved by a specified decision or order of the board to file, not later than 30 days from the date of final board action, a petition for writ of mandate for judicial review of the decision or order.
This bill would apply these procedures to decisions and orders of the board issued pursuant to the provisions described in paragraph (1), including existing provisions and those added by this bill.
(3) Existing law requires an agricultural water supplier to submit an annual report to the department that summarizes aggregated farm-gate delivery data using best professional practices.
This bill would require the annual report for the prior year to be submitted to the department by April 1 of each year, as provided, and to be organized by groundwater basin or subbasin within the service area of the agricultural water supplier, if applicable.
(4) Existing law requires an agricultural water supplier to prepare and adopt an agricultural water management plan with specified components on or before December 31, 2012, and to update those plans on or before December 31, 2015, and on or before December 31 every 5 years thereafter. Existing law requires the agricultural water supplier to submit copies of its plan to specified entities no later than 30 days after the adoption of the plan, and requires the department to prepare and submit to the Legislature, on or before December 31 in the years ending in 6 and one, a report summarizing the status of the plans.
This bill would revise the components of the plan and additionally require a plan to include an annual water budget based on the quantification of all inflow and outflow components for the service area of the agricultural water supplier and a drought plan describing the actions of the agricultural water supplier for drought preparedness and management of water supplies and allocations during drought conditions.
The bill would require an agricultural water supplier to update its agricultural water management plan on or before April 1, 2021, and thereafter on or before April 1 in the years ending in 6 and one. The bill would require an agricultural water supplier to submit its plan to the department no later than 30 days after the adoption of the plan. The bill would require the department to review an agricultural water management plan and notify an agricultural water supplier if the department determines that it is noncompliant, as provided. The bill would authorize the department, if it has not received a plan or determined that the plan submitted is noncompliant, to contract with certain entities to prepare or complete a plan on behalf of the agricultural water supplier.
The bill would require an agricultural water supplier to submit copies of its plan to specified entities no later than 30 days after the department’s review of the plan. The bill would require the department to submit its report summarizing the status of the plans to the Legislature on or before April 30 in the years ending in 7 and 2.
(5) This bill would make its operation contingent on the enactment of SB 606 of the 2017-18 Regular Session.
Vote: MAJORITY   Appropriation: NO   Fiscal Committee: YES   Local Program: NO  

The people of the State of California do enact as follows:


SECTION 1.

 Section 531.10 of the Water Code is amended to read:

531.10.
 (a) (1) An agricultural water supplier shall submit an annual report to the department that summarizes aggregated farm-gate delivery data, on a monthly or bimonthly basis, using best professional practices. The annual report for the prior year shall be submitted to the department by April 1 of each year. The annual report shall be organized by basin, as defined in Section 10721, within the service area of the agricultural water supplier, if applicable.
(2) The report, and any amendments to the report, submitted to the department pursuant to this subdivision shall be submitted electronically and shall include any standardized forms, tables, or displays specified by the department.
(3) The department shall post all reports on its Internet Web site in a manner that allows for comparisons across water suppliers. The department shall make the reports available for public viewing in a timely manner after it receives them.
(b) Nothing in this article shall be construed to require the implementation of water measurement programs or practices that are not locally cost effective.
(c) It is the intent of the Legislature that the requirements of this section shall complement and not affect the scope of authority granted to the department or the board by provisions of law other than this article.

SEC. 2.

 Section 1120 of the Water Code is amended to read:

1120.
 This chapter applies to any decision or order issued under this part or Section 275, Part 2 (commencing with Section 1200), Part 2 (commencing with Section 10500) of Division 6, Part 2.55 (commencing with Section 10608) of Division 6, or Chapter 11 (commencing with Section 10735) of Part 2.74 of Division 6, Article 7 (commencing with Section 13550) of Chapter 7 of Division 7, or the public trust doctrine.

SEC. 3.

 Section 1846.5 is added to the Water Code, to read:

1846.5.
 (a) An urban retail water supplier who commits any of the violations identified in subdivision (b) may be liable in an amount not to exceed the following, as applicable:
(1) If the violation occurs in a critically dry year immediately preceded by two or more consecutive below normal, dry, or critically dry years or during a period for which the Governor has issued a proclamation of a state of emergency under the California Emergency Services Act (Chapter 7 (commencing with Section 8550) of Division 1 of Title 2 of the Government Code) based on drought conditions, ten thousand dollars ($10,000) for each day in which the violation occurs.
(2) For all violations other than those described in paragraph (1), one thousand dollars ($1,000) for each day in which the violation occurs.
(b) Liability pursuant to this section may be imposed for any of the following violations:
(1) Violation of an order issued under Chapter 9 (commencing with Section 10609) of Part 2.55 of Division 6.
(2) Violation of a regulation issued under Chapter 9 (commencing with Section 10609) of Part 2.55 of Division 6, if the violation occurs after July 1, 2026.
(c) Civil liability may be imposed by the superior court. The Attorney General, upon the request of the board, shall petition the superior court to impose, assess, and recover those sums.
(d) Civil liability may be imposed administratively by the board pursuant to Section 1055.

SEC. 4.

 Section 10608.12 of the Water Code is amended to read:

10608.12.
 Unless the context otherwise requires, the following definitions govern the construction of this part:
(a) “Agricultural water supplier” means a water supplier, either publicly or privately owned, providing water to 10,000 or more irrigated acres, excluding recycled water. “Agricultural water supplier” includes a supplier or contractor for water, regardless of the basis of right, that distributes or sells water for ultimate resale to customers. “Agricultural water supplier” does not include the department.
(b) “Base daily per capita water use” means any of the following:
(1) The urban retail water supplier’s estimate of its average gross water use, reported in gallons per capita per day and calculated over a continuous 10-year period ending no earlier than December 31, 2004, and no later than December 31, 2010.
(2) For an urban retail water supplier that meets at least 10 percent of its 2008 measured retail water demand through recycled water that is delivered within the service area of an urban retail water supplier or its urban wholesale water supplier, the urban retail water supplier may extend the calculation described in paragraph (1) up to an additional five years to a maximum of a continuous 15-year period ending no earlier than December 31, 2004, and no later than December 31, 2010.
(3) For the purposes of Section 10608.22, the urban retail water supplier’s estimate of its average gross water use, reported in gallons per capita per day and calculated over a continuous five-year period ending no earlier than December 31, 2007, and no later than December 31, 2010.
(c) “Baseline commercial, industrial, and institutional water use” means an urban retail water supplier’s base daily per capita water use for commercial, industrial, and institutional users.
(d) “CII water use” means water used by commercial water users, industrial water users, institutional water users, and large landscape water users.
(e) “Commercial water user” means a water user that provides or distributes a product or service.
(f) “Compliance daily per capita water use” means the gross water use during the final year of the reporting period, reported in gallons per capita per day.
(g) “Disadvantaged community” means a community with an annual median household income that is less than 80 percent of the statewide annual median household income.
(h) “Gross water use” means the total volume of water, whether treated or untreated, entering the distribution system of an urban retail water supplier, excluding all of the following:
(1) Recycled water that is delivered within the service area of an urban retail water supplier or its urban wholesale water supplier.
(2) The net volume of water that the urban retail water supplier places into long-term storage.
(3) The volume of water the urban retail water supplier conveys for use by another urban water supplier.
(4) The volume of water delivered for agricultural use, except as otherwise provided in subdivision (f) of Section 10608.24.
(i) “Industrial water user” means a water user that is primarily a manufacturer or processor of materials as defined by the North American Industry Classification System code sectors 31 to 33, inclusive, or an entity that is a water user primarily engaged in research and development.
(j) “Institutional water user” means a water user dedicated to public service. This type of user includes, among other users, higher education institutions, schools, courts, churches, hospitals, government facilities, and nonprofit research institutions.
(k) “Interim urban water use target” means the midpoint between the urban retail water supplier’s base daily per capita water use and the urban retail water supplier’s urban water use target for 2020.
(l) “Large landscape” means a nonresidential landscape as described in the performance measures for CII water use adopted pursuant to Section 10609.10.
(m) “Locally cost effective” means that the present value of the local benefits of implementing an agricultural efficiency water management practice is greater than or equal to the present value of the local cost of implementing that measure.
(n) “Performance measures” means actions to be taken by urban retail water suppliers that will result in increased water use efficiency by CII water users. Performance measures include, but are not limited to, educating CII water users on best management practices, conducting water use audits, and preparing water management plans. Performance measures do not include process water.
(o) “Process water” means water used by industrial water users for producing a product or product content or water used for research and development. Process water includes, but is not limited to, continuous manufacturing processes, and water used for testing, cleaning, and maintaining equipment. Water used to cool machinery or buildings used in the manufacturing process or necessary to maintain product quality or chemical characteristics for product manufacturing or control rooms, data centers, laboratories, clean rooms, and other industrial facility units that are integral to the manufacturing or research and development process is process water. Water used in the manufacturing process that is necessary for complying with local, state, and federal health and safety laws, and is not incidental water, is process water. Process water does not mean incidental water uses.
(p) “Recycled water” means recycled water, as defined in subdivision (n) of Section 13050.
(q) “Regional water resources management” means sources of supply resulting from watershed-based planning for sustainable local water reliability or any of the following alternative sources of water:
(1) The capture and reuse of stormwater or rainwater.
(2) The use of recycled water.
(3) The desalination of brackish groundwater.
(4) The conjunctive use of surface water and groundwater in a manner that is consistent with the safe yield of the groundwater basin.
(r) “Reporting period” means the years for which an urban retail water supplier reports compliance with the urban water use targets.
(s) “Urban retail water supplier” means a water supplier, either publicly or privately owned, that directly provides potable municipal water to more than 3,000 end users or that supplies more than 3,000 acre-feet of potable water annually at retail for municipal purposes.
(t) “Urban water use objective” means an estimate of aggregate efficient water use for the previous year based on adopted water use efficiency standards and local service area characteristics for that year, as described in Section 10609.20.
(u) “Urban water use target” means the urban retail water supplier’s targeted future daily per capita water use.
(v) “Urban wholesale water supplier,” means a water supplier, either publicly or privately owned, that provides more than 3,000 acre-feet of water annually at wholesale for potable municipal purposes.

SEC. 5.

 Section 10608.20 of the Water Code is amended to read:

10608.20.
 (a) (1) Each urban retail water supplier shall develop urban water use targets and an interim urban water use target by July 1, 2011. Urban retail water suppliers may elect to determine and report progress toward achieving these targets on an individual or regional basis, as provided in subdivision (a) of Section 10608.28, and may determine the targets on a fiscal year or calendar year basis.
(2) It is the intent of the Legislature that the urban water use targets described in paragraph (1) cumulatively result in a 20-percent reduction from the baseline daily per capita water use by December 31, 2020.
(b) An urban retail water supplier shall adopt one of the following methods for determining its urban water use target pursuant to subdivision (a):
(1) Eighty percent of the urban retail water supplier’s baseline per capita daily water use.
(2) The per capita daily water use that is estimated using the sum of the following performance standards:
(A) For indoor residential water use, 55 gallons per capita daily water use as a provisional standard. Upon completion of the department’s 2016 report to the Legislature pursuant to Section 10608.42, this standard may be adjusted by the Legislature by statute.
(B) For landscape irrigated through dedicated or residential meters or connections, water efficiency equivalent to the standards of the Model Water Efficient Landscape Ordinance set forth in Chapter 2.7 (commencing with Section 490) of Division 2 of Title 23 of the California Code of Regulations, as in effect the later of the year of the landscape’s installation or 1992. An urban retail water supplier using the approach specified in this subparagraph shall use satellite imagery, site visits, or other best available technology to develop an accurate estimate of landscaped areas.
(C) For commercial, industrial, and institutional uses, a 10-percent reduction in water use from the baseline commercial, industrial, and institutional water use by 2020.
(3) Ninety-five percent of the applicable state hydrologic region target, as set forth in the state’s draft 20x2020 Water Conservation Plan (dated April 30, 2009). If the service area of an urban water supplier includes more than one hydrologic region, the supplier shall apportion its service area to each region based on population or area.
(4) A method that shall be identified and developed by the department, through a public process, and reported to the Legislature no later than December 31, 2010. The method developed by the department shall identify per capita targets that cumulatively result in a statewide 20-percent reduction in urban daily per capita water use by December 31, 2020. In developing urban daily per capita water use targets, the department shall do all of the following:
(A) Consider climatic differences within the state.
(B) Consider population density differences within the state.
(C) Provide flexibility to communities and regions in meeting the targets.
(D) Consider different levels of per capita water use according to plant water needs in different regions.
(E) Consider different levels of commercial, industrial, and institutional water use in different regions of the state.
(F) Avoid placing an undue hardship on communities that have implemented conservation measures or taken actions to keep per capita water use low.
(c) If the department adopts a regulation pursuant to paragraph (4) of subdivision (b) that results in a requirement that an urban retail water supplier achieve a reduction in daily per capita water use that is greater than 20 percent by December 31, 2020, an urban retail water supplier that adopted the method described in paragraph (4) of subdivision (b) may limit its urban water use target to a reduction of not more than 20 percent by December 31, 2020, by adopting the method described in paragraph (1) of subdivision (b).
(d) The department shall update the method described in paragraph (4) of subdivision (b) and report to the Legislature by December 31, 2014. An urban retail water supplier that adopted the method described in paragraph (4) of subdivision (b) may adopt a new urban daily per capita water use target pursuant to this updated method.
(e) An urban retail water supplier shall include in its urban water management plan due in 2010 pursuant to Part 2.6 (commencing with Section 10610) the baseline daily per capita water use, urban water use target, interim urban water use target, and compliance daily per capita water use, along with the bases for determining those estimates, including references to supporting data.
(f) When calculating per capita values for the purposes of this chapter, an urban retail water supplier shall determine population using federal, state, and local population reports and projections.
(g) An urban retail water supplier may update its 2020 urban water use target in its 2015 urban water management plan required pursuant to Part 2.6 (commencing with Section 10610).
(h) (1) The department, through a public process and in consultation with the California Urban Water Conservation Council, shall develop technical methodologies and criteria for the consistent implementation of this part, including, but not limited to, both of the following:
(A) Methodologies for calculating base daily per capita water use, baseline commercial, industrial, and institutional water use, compliance daily per capita water use, gross water use, service area population, indoor residential water use, and landscaped area water use.
(B) Criteria for adjustments pursuant to subdivisions (d) and (e) of Section 10608.24.
(2) The department shall post the methodologies and criteria developed pursuant to this subdivision on its Internet Web site, and make written copies available, by October 1, 2010. An urban retail water supplier shall use the methods developed by the department in compliance with this part.
(i) (1) The department shall adopt regulations for implementation of the provisions relating to process water in accordance with Section 10608.12, subdivision (e) of Section 10608.24, and subdivision (d) of Section 10608.26.
(2) The initial adoption of a regulation authorized by this subdivision is deemed to address an emergency, for purposes of Sections 11346.1 and 11349.6 of the Government Code, and the department is hereby exempted for that purpose from the requirements of subdivision (b) of Section 11346.1 of the Government Code. After the initial adoption of an emergency regulation pursuant to this subdivision, the department shall not request approval from the Office of Administrative Law to readopt the regulation as an emergency regulation pursuant to Section 11346.1 of the Government Code.
(j) (1) An urban retail water supplier is granted an extension to July 1, 2011, for adoption of an urban water management plan pursuant to Part 2.6 (commencing with Section 10610) due in 2010 to allow the use of technical methodologies developed by the department pursuant to paragraph (4) of subdivision (b) and subdivision (h). An urban retail water supplier that adopts an urban water management plan due in 2010 that does not use the methodologies developed by the department pursuant to subdivision (h) shall amend the plan by July 1, 2011, to comply with this part.
(2) An urban wholesale water supplier whose urban water management plan prepared pursuant to Part 2.6 (commencing with Section 10610) was due and not submitted in 2010 is granted an extension to July 1, 2011, to permit coordination between an urban wholesale water supplier and urban retail water suppliers.

SEC. 6.

 Section 10608.48 of the Water Code is amended to read:

10608.48.
 (a) On or before July 31, 2012, an agricultural water supplier shall implement efficient water management practices pursuant to subdivisions (b) and (c).
(b) Agricultural water suppliers shall implement both of the following critical efficient management practices:
(1) Measure the volume of water delivered to customers with sufficient accuracy to comply with subdivision (a) of Section 531.10 and to implement paragraph (2).
(2) Adopt a pricing structure for water customers based at least in part on quantity delivered.
(c) Agricultural water suppliers shall implement additional efficient management practices, including, but not limited to, practices to accomplish all of the following, if the measures are locally cost effective and technically feasible:
(1) Facilitate alternative land use for lands with exceptionally high water duties or whose irrigation contributes to significant problems, including drainage.
(2) Facilitate use of available recycled water that otherwise would not be used beneficially, meets all health and safety criteria, and does not harm crops or soils.
(3) Facilitate the financing of capital improvements for on-farm irrigation systems.
(4) Implement an incentive pricing structure that promotes one or more of the following goals:
(A) More efficient water use at the farm level.
(B) Conjunctive use of groundwater.
(C) Appropriate increase of groundwater recharge.
(D) Reduction in problem drainage.
(E) Improved management of environmental resources.
(F) Effective management of all water sources throughout the year by adjusting seasonal pricing structures based on current conditions.
(5) Expand line or pipe distribution systems, and construct regulatory reservoirs to increase distribution system flexibility and capacity, decrease maintenance, and reduce seepage.
(6) Increase flexibility in water ordering by, and delivery to, water customers within operational limits.
(7) Construct and operate supplier spill and tailwater recovery systems.
(8) Increase planned conjunctive use of surface water and groundwater within the supplier service area.
(9) Automate canal control structures.
(10) Facilitate or promote customer pump testing and evaluation.
(11) Designate a water conservation coordinator who will develop and implement the water management plan and prepare progress reports.
(12) Provide for the availability of water management services to water users. These services may include, but are not limited to, all of the following:
(A) On-farm irrigation and drainage system evaluations.
(B) Normal year and real-time irrigation scheduling and crop evapotranspiration information.
(C) Surface water, groundwater, and drainage water quantity and quality data.
(D) Agricultural water management educational programs and materials for farmers, staff, and the public.
(13) Evaluate the policies of agencies that provide the supplier with water to identify the potential for institutional changes to allow more flexible water deliveries and storage.
(14) Evaluate and improve the efficiencies of the supplier’s pumps.
(d) Agricultural water suppliers shall include in the agricultural water management plans required pursuant to Part 2.8 (commencing with Section 10800) a report on which efficient water management practices have been implemented and are planned to be implemented, an estimate of the water use efficiency improvements that have occurred since the last report, and an estimate of the water use efficiency improvements estimated to occur five and 10 years in the future. If an agricultural water supplier determines that an efficient water management practice is not locally cost effective or technically feasible, the supplier shall submit information documenting that determination.
(e) The department shall require information about the implementation of efficient water management practices to be reported using a standardized form developed pursuant to Section 10608.52.
(f) An agricultural water supplier may meet the requirements of subdivisions (d) and (e) by submitting to the department a water conservation plan submitted to the United States Bureau of Reclamation that meets the requirements described in Section 10828.
(g) On or before December 31, 2013, December 31, 2016, and December 31, 2021, the department, in consultation with the board, shall submit to the Legislature a report on the agricultural efficient water management practices that have been implemented and are planned to be implemented and an assessment of the manner in which the implementation of those efficient water management practices has affected and will affect agricultural operations, including estimated water use efficiency improvements, if any.
(h) The department may update the efficient water management practices required pursuant to subdivision (c), in consultation with the Agricultural Water Management Council, the United States Bureau of Reclamation, and the board. All efficient water management practices for agricultural water use pursuant to this chapter shall be adopted or revised by the department only after the department conducts public hearings to allow participation of the diverse geographical areas and interests of the state.
(i) (1) The department shall adopt regulations that provide for a range of options that agricultural water suppliers may use or implement to comply with the measurement requirement in paragraph (1) of subdivision (b).
(2) The initial adoption of a regulation authorized by this subdivision is deemed to address an emergency, for purposes of Sections 11346.1 and 11349.6 of the Government Code, and the department is hereby exempted for that purpose from the requirements of subdivision (b) of Section 11346.1 of the Government Code. After the initial adoption of an emergency regulation pursuant to this subdivision, the department shall not request approval from the Office of Administrative Law to readopt the regulation as an emergency regulation pursuant to Section 11346.1 of the Government Code.

SEC. 7.

 Chapter 9 (commencing with Section 10609) is added to Part 2.55 of Division 6 of the Water Code, to read:
CHAPTER  9. Urban Water Use Objectives and Water Use Reporting

10609.
 (a) The Legislature finds and declares that this chapter establishes a method to estimate the aggregate amount of water that would have been delivered the previous year by an urban retail water supplier if all that water had been used efficiently. This estimated aggregate water use is the urban retail water supplier’s urban water use objective. The method is based on water use efficiency standards and local service area characteristics for that year. By comparing the amount of water actually used in the previous year with the urban water use objective, local urban water suppliers will be in a better position to help eliminate unnecessary use of water; that is, water used in excess of that needed to accomplish the intended beneficial use.
(b) The Legislature further finds and declares all of the following:
(1) This chapter establishes standards and practices for the following water uses:
(A) Indoor residential use.
(B) Outdoor residential use.
(C) CII water use.
(D) Water losses.
(E) Other unique local uses and situations that can have a material effect on an urban water supplier’s total water use.
(2) This chapter further does all of the following:
(A) Establishes a method to calculate each urban water use objective.
(B) Considers recycled water quality in establishing efficient irrigation standards.
(C) Requires the department to provide or otherwise identify data regarding the unique local conditions to support the calculation of an urban water use objective.
(D) Provides for the use of alternative sources of data if alternative sources are shown to be as accurate as, or more accurate than, the data provided by the department.
(E) Requires annual reporting of the previous year’s water use with the urban water use objective.
(F) Provides a credit for the amount of potable recycled water used the previous year when comparing the previous year’s water use with the urban water use objective, of up to 10 percent of the urban water use objective.
(3) This chapter requires the department and the board to solicit broad public participation from stakeholders and other interested persons in the development of the standards and the adoption of regulations pursuant to this chapter.
(4) This chapter preserves the Legislature’s authority over long-term water use efficiency target setting and ensures appropriate legislative oversight of the implementation of this chapter by doing all of the following:
(A) Requiring the Legislative Analyst to conduct a review of the implementation of this act, including compliance with the adopted standards and regulations, accuracy of the data, use of alternate data, and other issues the Legislative Analyst deems appropriate.
(B) Stating legislative intent that the director of the department and the chairperson of the board appear before the appropriate Senate and Assembly policy committees to report on progress in implementing this chapter.
(C) Providing one-time-only authority to the department and board to adopt water use efficiency standards, except as explicitly provided in this chapter. Authorization to update the standards shall require separate legislation.
(c) It is the intent of the Legislature that the following principles apply to the development and implementation of long-term standards and urban water use objectives:
(1) Local urban retail water suppliers should have primary responsibility for meeting standards-based water use targets, and they shall retain the flexibility to develop their water supply portfolios, design and implement water conservation strategies, educate their customers, and enforce their rules.
(2) Long-term standards and urban water use objectives should advance the state’s goals to mitigate and adapt to climate change.
(3) Long-term standards and urban water use objectives should acknowledge the shade, air quality, and heat-island reduction benefits provided to communities by trees through the support of water-efficient irrigation practices that keep trees healthy.
(4) The state should identify opportunities for streamlined reporting, eliminate redundant data submissions, and incentivize open access to data collected by urban and agricultural water suppliers.

10609.2.
 (a) The board, in coordination with the department, shall adopt long-term standards for the efficient use of water pursuant to this chapter on or before June 30, 2021.
(b) Standards shall be adopted for all of the following:
(1) Outdoor residential water use.
(2) Outdoor irrigation of landscape areas with dedicated irrigation meters in connection with CII water use.
(3) A volume for water loss.
(c) When adopting the standards under this section, the board shall consider the policies of this chapter and the proposed efficiency standards’ effects on local wastewater management, developed and natural parklands, and urban tree health. The standards and potential effects shall be identified by May 30, 2021. The board shall allow for public comment on potential effects identified by the board under this subdivision.

(c)

(d) The long-term standards shall be set at a level designed so that together with the standard for indoor residential water use, the standards together would exceed the statewide conservation targets required pursuant to Chapter 3 (commencing with Section 10608.16).

(d)

(e) The board, in coordination with the department, may adopt by regulation variances recommended by the department pursuant to Section 10609.14 and guidelines and methodologies pertaining to the calculation of an urban retail water supplier’s urban water use objective recommended by the department pursuant to Section 10609.16.

10609.4.
 (a) (1) Until January 1, 2025, the standard for indoor residential water use shall be 55 gallons per capita daily.
(2) Beginning January 1, 2025, and until January 1, 2030, the standard for indoor residential water use shall be 52.5 gallons per capita daily.
(3) Beginning January 1, 2030, the standard for indoor residential water use shall be 50 gallons per capita daily.
(b) The department, in coordination with the board, shall conduct necessary studies and investigations to jointly recommend to the Legislature a standard for indoor residential water use that more appropriately reflects best practices for indoor residential water use than the standard described in subdivision (a). A recommendation pursuant to this subdivision, if there is one, shall be made to the chairpersons of the relevant policy committees of each house of the Legislature by January 1, 2020, and shall include information necessary to support the recommended standard.

10609.6.
 (a) (1) The department, in coordination with the board, shall conduct necessary studies and investigations and recommend, no later than October 1, 2020, standards for outdoor residential use for adoption by the board in accordance with this chapter.
(2) (A) The standards shall incorporate the principles of the model water efficient landscape ordinance adopted by the department pursuant to the Water Conservation in Landscaping Act (Article 10.8 (commencing with Section 65591) of Chapter 3 of Division 1 of Title 7 of the Government Code).
(B) The standards shall apply to irrigable lands.
(C) The standards shall include provisions for swimming pools, spas, and other water features. Ornamental water features that are artificially supplied with water, including ponds, lakes, waterfalls, and fountains, shall be analyzed separately from swimming pools and spas.
(b) The department shall, by January 1, 2020, provide each urban retail water supplier with data regarding the area of residential irrigable lands in a manner that can reasonably be applied to the standards adopted pursuant to this section.
(c) The department shall not recommend standards pursuant to this section until it has conducted pilot projects or studies, or some combination of the two, to ensure that the data provided to local agencies are reasonably accurate for the data’s intended uses, taking into consideration California’s diverse landscapes and community characteristics.

10609.8.
 (a) The department, in coordination with the board, shall conduct necessary studies and investigations and recommend, no later than October 1, 2020, standards for outdoor irrigation of landscape areas with dedicated irrigation meters or other means of calculating outdoor irrigation use in connection with CII water use for adoption by the board in accordance with this chapter.
(b) The standards shall incorporate the principles of the model water efficient landscape ordinance adopted by the department pursuant to the Water Conservation in Landscaping Act (Article 10.8 (commencing with Section 65591) of Chapter 3 of Division 1 of Title 7 of the Government Code).
(c) The standards shall include an exclusion for water for commercial agricultural use meeting the definition of subdivision (b) of Section 51201 of the Government Code.

10609.10.
 (a) The department, in coordination with the board, shall conduct necessary studies and investigations and recommend, no later than October 1, 2020, performance measures for CII water use for adoption by the board in accordance with this chapter.
(b) Prior to recommending performance measures for CII water use, the department shall solicit broad public participation from stakeholders and other interested persons relating to all of the following:
(1) Recommendations for a CII water use classification system for California that address significant uses of water.
(2) Recommendations for setting minimum size thresholds for converting mixed CII meters to dedicated irrigation meters, and evaluation of, and recommendations for, technologies that could be used in lieu of requiring dedicated irrigation meters.
(3) Recommendations for CII water use best management practices, including, but not limited to, water audits and water management plans for those CII customers that exceed a recommended size, volume of water use, or other threshold.
(c) Recommendations of appropriate performance measures for CII water use shall consider the October 21, 2013, report to the Legislature by the Commercial, Industrial, and Institutional Task Force entitled “Water Use Best Management Practices,” and shall support the economic productivity of California’s commercial, industrial, and institutional sectors.
(d) (1) The board, in coordination with the department, shall adopt performance measures for CII water use on or before June 30, 2021.
(2) Each urban retail water supplier shall implement the performance measures adopted by the board pursuant to paragraph (1).

10609.12.
 The standards for water loss for urban retail water suppliers shall be the standards adopted by the board pursuant to subdivision (i) of Section 10608.34.

10609.14.
 (a) The department, in coordination with the board, shall conduct necessary studies and investigations and, no later than October 1, 2020, recommend for adoption by the board in accordance with this chapter appropriate variances for unique uses that can have a material effect on an urban retail water supplier’s urban water use objective.
(b) Appropriate variances may include, but are not limited to, allowances for the following:
(1) Significant use of evaporative coolers.
(2) Significant populations of horses and other livestock.
(3) Significant fluctuations in seasonal populations.
(4) Significant landscaped areas irrigated with recycled water having high levels of total dissolved solids.
(5) Significant use of water for soil compaction and dust control.
(6) Significant use of water to supplement ponds and lakes to sustain wildlife.
(7) Significant use of water to irrigate vegetation for fire protection.
(8) Significant use of water for commercial or noncommercial agricultural use.

10609.16.
 The department, in coordination with the board, shall conduct necessary studies and investigations and recommend, no later than October 1, 2020, guidelines and methodologies for the board to adopt that identify how an urban retail water supplier calculates its urban water use objective. The guidelines and methodologies shall address, as necessary, all of the following:
(a) Determining the irrigable lands within the urban retail water supplier’s service area.
(b) Updating and revising methodologies described pursuant to subparagraph (A) of paragraph (1) of subdivision (h) of Section 10608.20, as appropriate, including methodologies for calculating the population in an urban retail water supplier’s service area.
(c) Using landscape area data provided by the department or alternative data.
(d) Incorporating precipitation data and climate data into estimates of a urban retail water supplier’s outdoor irrigation budget for its urban water use objective.
(e) Estimating changes in outdoor landscape area and population, and calculating the urban water use objective, for years when updated landscape imagery is not available from the department.
(f) Determining acceptable levels of accuracy for the supporting data and the urban water use objective.

10609.18.
 The department and the board shall solicit broad public participation from stakeholders and other interested persons in the development of the standards and the adoption of regulations pursuant to this chapter. The board shall hold at least one public meeting before taking any action on any standard or variance recommended by the department.

SEC. 8.

 Chapter 10 (commencing with Section 10609.40) is added to Part 2.55 of Division 6 of the Water Code, to read:
CHAPTER  10. Countywide Drought and Water Shortage Contingency Plans

10609.40.
 The Legislature finds and declares both of the following:
(a) Small water suppliers and rural communities are not covered by established water shortage planning requirements. Currently, most counties do not address water shortages or do so minimally in their general plan or the local hazard mitigation plan.
(b) The state should provide guidance to improve drought planning for small water suppliers and rural communities.

10609.42.
 (a) No later than January 1, 2019, the department, in consultation with the board and other relevant state and local agencies and stakeholders, shall use available data to identify small water suppliers and rural communities that may be at risk of drought and water shortage vulnerability. The department shall notify counties and groundwater sustainability agencies of those suppliers or communities that may be at risk within its jurisdiction, and may make the information publicly accessible on its Internet Web site.
(b) The department shall, in consultation with the board, by January 1, 2019, propose to the Governor and the Legislature recommendations and guidance relating to the development and implementation of countywide drought and water shortage contingency plans to address the planning needs of small water suppliers and rural communities. The department shall recommend how these plans can be included in county local hazard mitigation plans or otherwise integrated with complementary existing planning processes. The guidance from the department shall outline goals of the countywide drought and water shortage contingency plans and recommend components including, but not limited to, all of the following:
(1) Assessment of drought vulnerability.
(2) Actions to reduce drought vulnerability.
(3) Response, financing, and local communication and outreach planning efforts that may be implemented in times of drought.
(4) Data needs and reporting.
(5) Roles and responsibilities of interested parties and coordination with other relevant water management planning efforts.
(c) In formulating the proposal, the department shall utilize a public process involving state agencies, cities, counties, small communities, small water suppliers, and other stakeholders.

SEC. 9.

 Section 10801 of the Water Code is amended to read:

10801.
 The Legislature finds and declares all of the following:
(a) The waters of the state are a limited and renewable resource.
(b) The California Constitution requires that water in the state be used in a reasonable and beneficial manner.
(c) The efficient use of agricultural water supplies is of great statewide concern.
(d) There is a great amount of reuse of delivered water, both inside and outside the water service areas of agricultural water suppliers.
(e) Significant noncrop beneficial uses are associated with agricultural water use, including the preservation and enhancement of fish and wildlife resources.
(f) Significant opportunities exist in some areas, through improved irrigation water management, to conserve water or to reduce the quantity of highly saline or toxic drainage water.
(g) Changes in water management practices should be carefully planned and implemented to minimize adverse effects on other beneficial uses currently being served.
(h) Agricultural water suppliers that receive water from the federal Central Valley Project are required by federal law to prepare and implement water conservation plans.
(i) Agricultural water users applying for a permit to appropriate water from the board are required to prepare and implement water conservation plans.

SEC. 10.

 Section 10802 of the Water Code is amended to read:

10802.
 The Legislature finds and declares that all of the following are the policies of the state:
(a) The efficient use of water shall be pursued actively to protect both the people of the state and the state’s water resources.
(b) The efficient use of agricultural water supplies shall be an important criterion in public decisions with regard to water.
(c) Agricultural water suppliers shall be required to prepare water management plans to achieve greater efficiency in the use of water.

SEC. 11.

 Section 10814 of the Water Code is amended to read:

10814.
 “Person” has the same meaning as defined in Section 10614.

SEC. 12.

 Section 10817 of the Water Code is amended to read:

10817.
 “Water use efficiency” means the efficient management of water resources for beneficial uses, preventing waste, or accomplishing additional benefits with the same amount of water.

SEC. 13.

 Section 10820 of the Water Code is amended to read:

10820.
 (a) (1) Except as provided in paragraph (2), an agricultural water supplier shall prepare and adopt an agricultural water management plan in the manner set forth in this chapter on or before December 31, 2012, and shall update that plan on December 31, 2015.
(2) (A) The agricultural water management plan shall be updated on or before April 1, 2021, and thereafter on or before April 1 in the years ending in six and one. The plan shall satisfy the requirements of Section 10826.
(B) An agricultural water supplier shall submit its plan to the department no later than 30 days after the adoption of the plan. The plan shall be submitted electronically and shall include any standardized forms, tables, or displays specified by the department.
(b) (1) The department shall review each plan that is due pursuant to paragraph (2) of subdivision (a). The department may coordinate its review with the Department of Food and Agriculture and the board.
(2) The department shall notify an agricultural water supplier that it is not in compliance with this part if the department determines that actions are required to comply with the requirements of this part or if a supplier fails to update a plan as provided in paragraph (2) of subdivision (a). The department shall identify the specific deficiencies and the supplier shall have 120 days to remedy an identified deficiency. The department may provide additional time to remedy a deficiency if it finds that a supplier is making substantial progress toward remedying the deficiency. An agricultural water supplier that fails to submit corrective actions or a completed plan shall not be in compliance with this part.
(3) If the department has not received a plan or the department has determined that the plan submitted does not comply with the requirements of this part, and a revised plan has not been submitted, the department may undertake the following actions:
(A) Contract with a state academic institution or qualified entity to prepare or complete an agricultural water management plan on behalf of the supplier. The costs and expenses related to preparation or completion of a plan, including the costs of the contract and contract administration, shall be recoverable by the department from the supplier.
(B) If a supplier does not provide data necessary for the preparation or completion of a plan to the department or the contracting entity as determined by the department in accordance with subparagraph (A), the department may assess a fine of one thousand dollars ($1,000) per day, not to exceed twenty-five thousand dollars ($25,000), until data is made available.
(4) (A) A plan prepared or completed pursuant to paragraph (3) shall be deemed the adopted plan for the supplier.
(B) Any action to challenge or invalidate the adequacy of the plan prepared or completed pursuant to paragraph (3) shall be brought against the supplier for whom the plan was prepared.
(c) Every supplier that becomes an agricultural water supplier after December 31, 2012, shall prepare and adopt an agricultural water management plan within one year after the date it has become an agricultural water supplier.
(d) A water supplier that indirectly provides water to customers for agricultural purposes shall not prepare a plan pursuant to this part without the consent of each agricultural water supplier that directly provides that water to its customers.

SEC. 14.

 Section 10825 of the Water Code is amended to read:

10825.
 (a) It is the intent of the Legislature in enacting this part to allow levels of water management planning commensurate with the numbers of customers served and the volume of water supplied.
(b) This part does not require the implementation of water use efficiency programs or practices that are not locally cost effective.

SEC. 15.

 Section 10826 of the Water Code is amended to read:

10826.
 An agricultural water management plan shall be adopted in accordance with this chapter. The plan shall do all of the following:
(a) Describe the agricultural water supplier and the service area, including all of the following:
(1) Size of the service area.
(2) Location of the service area and its water management facilities.
(3) Terrain and soils.
(4) Climate.
(5) Operating rules and regulations.
(6) Water delivery measurements or calculations.
(7) Water rate schedules and billing.
(8) Water shortage allocation policies.
(b) Describe the quantity and quality of water resources of the agricultural water supplier, including all of the following:
(1) Surface water supply.
(2) Groundwater supply.
(3) Other water supplies, including recycled water.
(4) Source water quality monitoring practices.
(5) Water uses within the agricultural water supplier’s service area, including all of the following:
(A) Agricultural.
(B) Environmental.
(C) Recreational.
(D) Municipal and industrial.
(E) Groundwater recharge, including estimated flows from deep percolation from irrigation and seepage.
(c) Include an annual water budget based on the quantification of all inflow and outflow components for the service area of the agricultural water supplier. Components of inflow shall include surface inflow, groundwater pumping in the service area, and effective precipitation. Components of outflow shall include surface outflow, deep percolation, and evapotranspiration. An agricultural water supplier shall report the annual water budget on a water-year basis. The department shall provide tools and resources to assist agricultural water suppliers in developing and quantifying components necessary to develop a water budget.
(d) Include an analysis, based on available information, of the effect of climate change on future water supplies.
(e) Describe previous water management activities.
(f) Identify water management objectives based on the water budget to improve water system efficiency or to meet other water management objectives. The agricultural water supplier shall identify, prioritize, and implement actions to reduce water loss, improve water system management, and meet other water management objectives identified in the plan.
(g) Include in the plan information regarding efficient water management practices required pursuant to Section 10608.48.
(h) Quantify the efficiency of agricultural water use within the service area of the agricultural water supplier using the appropriate method or methods from among the four water use efficiency quantification methods developed by the department in the May 8, 2012, report to the Legislature entitled “A Proposed Methodology for Quantifying the Efficiency of Agricultural Water Use.” The agricultural water supplier shall account for all water uses, including crop water use, agronomic water use, environmental water use, and recoverable surface flows.

SEC. 16.

 Section 10826.2 is added to the Water Code, to read:

10826.2.
 As part of its agricultural water management plan, each agricultural water supplier shall develop a drought plan for periods of limited water supply describing the actions of the agricultural water supplier for drought preparedness and management of water supplies and allocations during drought conditions. The drought plan shall contain both of the following:
(a) Resilience planning, including all of the following:
(1) Data, indicators, and information needed to determine the water supply availability and levels of drought severity.
(2) Analyses and identification of potential vulnerability to drought.
(3) A description of the opportunities and constraints for improving drought resilience planning, including all of the following:
(A) The availability of new technology or information.
(B) The ability of the agricultural water supplier to obtain or use additional water supplies during drought conditions.
(C) A description of other actions planned for implementation to improve drought resilience.
(b) Drought response planning, including all of the following:
(1) Policies and a process for declaring a water shortage and for implementing water shortage allocations and related response actions.
(2) Methods and procedures for the enforcement or appeal of, or exemption from, triggered shortage response actions.
(3) Methods and procedures for monitoring and evaluation of the effectiveness of the drought plan.
(4) Communication protocols and procedures to inform and coordinate customers, the public, interested parties, and local, regional, and state government.
(5) A description of the potential impacts on the revenues, financial condition, and planned expenditures of the agricultural water supplier during drought conditions that reduce water allocations, and proposed measures to overcome those impacts, including reserve-level policies.

SEC. 17.

 Section 10843 of the Water Code is amended to read:

10843.
 (a) An agricultural water supplier shall submit to the entities identified in subdivision (b) a copy of its plan no later than 30 days after review of the plan pursuant to subdivision (b) of Section 10820.
(b) An agricultural water supplier shall submit a copy of its plan to each of the following entities:
(1) The department.
(2) Any city, county, or city and county within which the agricultural water supplier provides water supplies.
(3) Any groundwater management entity within which jurisdiction the agricultural water supplier extracts or provides water supplies.
(4) The California State Library.

SEC. 18.

 Section 10845 of the Water Code is amended to read:

10845.
 (a) The department shall prepare and submit to the Legislature, on or before April 30, 2022, and thereafter in the years ending in seven and years ending in two, a report summarizing the status of the plans adopted pursuant to this part.
(b) The report prepared by the department shall identify the outstanding elements of any plan adopted pursuant to this part. The report shall include an evaluation of the effectiveness of this part in promoting efficient agricultural water management practices and recommendations relating to proposed changes to this part, as appropriate.
(c) The department shall provide a copy of the report to each agricultural water supplier that has submitted its plan to the department. The department shall also prepare reports and provide data for any legislative hearing designed to consider the effectiveness of plans submitted pursuant to this part.
(d) This section does not authorize the department, in preparing the report, to approve, disapprove, or critique individual plans submitted pursuant to this part.

SEC. 19.

 Section 10910 of the Water Code is amended to read:

10910.
 (a) Any city or county that determines that a project, as defined in Section 10912, is subject to the California Environmental Quality Act (Division 13 (commencing with Section 21000) of the Public Resources Code) under Section 21080 of the Public Resources Code shall comply with this part.
(b) The city or county, at the time that it determines whether an environmental impact report, a negative declaration, or a mitigated negative declaration is required for any project subject to the California Environmental Quality Act pursuant to Section 21080.1 of the Public Resources Code, shall identify any water system whose service area includes the project site and any water system adjacent to the project site that is, or may become as a result of supplying water to the project identified pursuant to this subdivision, a public water system, as defined in Section 10912, that may supply water for the project. If the city or county is not able to identify any public water system that may supply water for the project, the city or county shall prepare the water assessment required by this part after consulting with any entity serving domestic water supplies whose service area includes the project site, the local agency formation commission, and any public water system adjacent to the project site.
(c) (1) The city or county, at the time it makes the determination required under Section 21080.1 of the Public Resources Code, shall request each public water system identified pursuant to subdivision (b) to determine whether the projected water demand associated with a proposed project was included as part of the most recently adopted urban water management plan adopted pursuant to Part 2.6 (commencing with Section 10610).
(2) If the projected water demand associated with the proposed project was accounted for in the most recently adopted urban water management plan, the public water system may incorporate the requested information from the urban water management plan in preparing the elements of the assessment required to comply with subdivisions (d), (e), (f), and (g).
(3) If the projected water demand associated with the proposed project was not accounted for in the most recently adopted urban water management plan, or the public water system has no urban water management plan, the water supply assessment for the project shall include a discussion with regard to whether the public water system’s total projected water supplies available during normal, single dry, and multiple dry water years during a 20-year projection will meet the projected water demand associated with the proposed project, in addition to the public water system’s existing and planned future uses, including agricultural and manufacturing uses.
(4) If the city or county is required to comply with this part pursuant to subdivision (b), the water supply assessment for the project shall include a discussion with regard to whether the total projected water supplies, determined to be available by the city or county for the project during normal, single dry, and multiple dry water years during a 20-year projection, will meet the projected water demand associated with the proposed project, in addition to existing and planned future uses, including agricultural and manufacturing uses.
(d) (1) The assessment required by this section shall include an identification of any existing water supply entitlements, water rights, or water service contracts relevant to the identified water supply for the proposed project, and a description of the quantities of water received in prior years by the public water system, or the city or county if either is required to comply with this part pursuant to subdivision (b), under the existing water supply entitlements, water rights, or water service contracts.
(2) An identification of existing water supply entitlements, water rights, or water service contracts held by the public water system, or the city or county if either is required to comply with this part pursuant to subdivision (b), shall be demonstrated by providing information related to all of the following:
(A) Written contracts or other proof of entitlement to an identified water supply.
(B) Copies of a capital outlay program for financing the delivery of a water supply that has been adopted by the public water system.
(C) Federal, state, and local permits for construction of necessary infrastructure associated with delivering the water supply.
(D) Any necessary regulatory approvals that are required in order to be able to convey or deliver the water supply.
(e) If no water has been received in prior years by the public water system, or the city or county if either is required to comply with this part pursuant to subdivision (b), under the existing water supply entitlements, water rights, or water service contracts, the public water system, or the city or county if either is required to comply with this part pursuant to subdivision (b), shall also include in its water supply assessment pursuant to subdivision (c), an identification of the other public water systems or water service contractholders that receive a water supply or have existing water supply entitlements, water rights, or water service contracts, to the same source of water as the public water system, or the city or county if either is required to comply with this part pursuant to subdivision (b), has identified as a source of water supply within its water supply assessments.
(f) If a water supply for a proposed project includes groundwater, the following additional information shall be included in the water supply assessment:
(1) A review of any information contained in the urban water management plan relevant to the identified water supply for the proposed project.
(2) (A) A description of any groundwater basin or basins from which the proposed project will be supplied.
(B) For those basins for which a court or the board has adjudicated the rights to pump groundwater, a copy of the order or decree adopted by the court or the board and a description of the amount of groundwater the public water system, or the city or county if either is required to comply with this part pursuant to subdivision (b), has the legal right to pump under the order or decree.
(C) For a basin that has not been adjudicated that is a basin designated as high- or medium-priority pursuant to Section 10722.4, information regarding the following:
(i) Whether the department has identified the basin as being subject to critical conditions of overdraft pursuant to Section 12924.
(ii) If a groundwater sustainability agency has adopted a groundwater sustainability plan or has an approved alternative, a copy of that alternative or plan.
(D) For a basin that has not been adjudicated that is a basin designated as low- or very low priority pursuant to Section 10722.4, information as to whether the department has identified the basin or basins as overdrafted or has projected that the basin will become overdrafted if present management conditions continue, in the most current bulletin of the department that characterizes the condition of the groundwater basin, and a detailed description by the public water system, or the city or county if either is required to comply with this part pursuant to subdivision (b), of the efforts being undertaken in the basin or basins to eliminate the long-term overdraft condition.
(3) A detailed description and analysis of the amount and location of groundwater pumped by the public water system, or the city or county if either is required to comply with this part pursuant to subdivision (b), for the past five years from any groundwater basin from which the proposed project will be supplied. The description and analysis shall be based on information that is reasonably available, including, but not limited to, historic use records.
(4) A detailed description and analysis of the amount and location of groundwater that is projected to be pumped by the public water system, or the city or county if either is required to comply with this part pursuant to subdivision (b), from any basin from which the proposed project will be supplied. The description and analysis shall be based on information that is reasonably available, including, but not limited to, historic use records.
(5) An analysis of the sufficiency of the groundwater from the basin or basins from which the proposed project will be supplied to meet the projected water demand associated with the proposed project. A water supply assessment shall not be required to include the information required by this paragraph if the public water system determines, as part of the review required by paragraph (1), that the sufficiency of groundwater necessary to meet the initial and projected water demand associated with the project was addressed in the description and analysis required by subparagraph (D) of paragraph (4) of subdivision (b) of Section 10631.
(g) (1) Subject to paragraph (2), the governing body of each public water system shall submit the assessment to the city or county not later than 90 days from the date on which the request was received. The governing body of each public water system, or the city or county if either is required to comply with this act pursuant to subdivision (b), shall approve the assessment prepared pursuant to this section at a regular or special meeting.
(2) Prior to the expiration of the 90-day period, if the public water system intends to request an extension of time to prepare and adopt the assessment, the public water system shall meet with the city or county to request an extension of time, which shall not exceed 30 days, to prepare and adopt the assessment.
(3) If the public water system fails to request an extension of time, or fails to submit the assessment notwithstanding the extension of time granted pursuant to paragraph (2), the city or county may seek a writ of mandamus to compel the governing body of the public water system to comply with the requirements of this part relating to the submission of the water supply assessment.
(h) Notwithstanding any other provision of this part, if a project has been the subject of a water supply assessment that complies with the requirements of this part, no additional water supply assessment shall be required for subsequent projects that were part of a larger project for which a water supply assessment was completed and that has complied with the requirements of this part and for which the public water system, or the city or county if either is required to comply with this part pursuant to subdivision (b), has concluded that its water supplies are sufficient to meet the projected water demand associated with the proposed project, in addition to the existing and planned future uses, including, but not limited to, agricultural and industrial uses, unless one or more of the following changes occurs:
(1) Changes in the project that result in a substantial increase in water demand for the project.
(2) Changes in the circumstances or conditions substantially affecting the ability of the public water system, or the city or county if either is required to comply with this part pursuant to subdivision (b), to provide a sufficient supply of water for the project.
(3) Significant new information becomes available that was not known and could not have been known at the time when the assessment was prepared.
(i) For the purposes of this section, hauled water is not considered as a source of water.

SEC. 20.

 This act shall become operative only if Senate Bill 606 of the 2017–18 Regular Session is enacted and becomes effective.