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AB-1088 Multiunit residential housing: energy programs.(2017-2018)

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Date Published: 02/17/2017 02:00 PM
AB1088:v99#DOCUMENT


CALIFORNIA LEGISLATURE— 2017–2018 REGULAR SESSION

Assembly Bill No. 1088


Introduced by Assembly Member Eggman

February 17, 2017


An act to add Chapter 7.4 (commencing with Section 25640) to Division 15 of the Public Resources Code, relating to energy.


LEGISLATIVE COUNSEL'S DIGEST


AB 1088, as introduced, Eggman. Multiunit residential housing: energy programs.
The Warren-Alquist State Energy Resources Conservation and Development Act establishes the State Energy Resources Conservation and Development Commission (Energy Commission) and requires the Energy Commission to carry out studies, technical assessments, research projects, and data collection directed to reducing wasteful, inefficient, unnecessary, or uneconomic uses of energy. The Energy Conservation Act of 2001 states the intent of the Legislature to establish incentives in the form of grants and loans to low-income residents, small businesses, and residential property owners for constructing and retrofitting buildings to be more energy efficient. The act requires the Energy Commission, in consultation with the Public Utilities Commission, to undertake certain actions for the purpose of full or partial funding of an eligible construction or retrofit project. The Clean Energy and Pollution Reduction Act of 2015 requires the Energy Commission to establish annual targets for statewide energy efficiency savings and demand reduction that will achieve a cumulative doubling of statewide energy efficiency savings in electricity and natural gas final end uses of retail customers by January 1, 2030, including measures specific to disadvantaged communities, as specified.
The California Renewables Portfolio Standard Program requires the Public Utilities Commission to establish a renewables portfolio standard requiring all retail sellers, as defined, to procure a minimum quantity of electricity products from eligible renewable energy resources, as defined, so that the total kilowatthours of those products sold to their retail end-use customers achieves 25% of retail sales by December 31, 2016, 33% by December 31, 2020, 40% by December 31, 2024, 45% by December 31, 2027, and 50% by December 31, 2030, with the 2024 to 2030 requirements imposed by the Clean Energy and Pollution Reduction Act of 2015.
This bill would require the Energy Commission to set a statewide goal by 2030 to scale upgrades and reduce energy burdens for the multiunit residential market, taking into consideration the state’s requirements for reducing emissions of greenhouse gases in disadvantaged communities and the climate equity, doubling of energy efficiency, and increased use of renewable energy resources requirements set forth in the Clean Energy and Pollution Reduction Act of 2015. The bill would require the Energy Commission to set common program eligibility definitions across, and adopt regulations to enable access to combined program funding for, housing, health, water, energy efficiency, zero- and near-zero emission vehicle infrastructure, renewable energy resources, and resiliency programs for multiunit residential properties. The bill would require the Energy Commission to report to the Legislature by January 1, 2019, on the extent to which renters and owners of low-income multiunit residential properties have sufficient technical and financial support to participate in existing programs and complete upgrades.
Vote: MAJORITY   Appropriation: NO   Fiscal Committee: YES   Local Program: NO  

The people of the State of California do enact as follows:


SECTION 1.

 The Legislature finds and declares all of the following:
(a) Over four million California households live in multifamily apartment buildings or complexes with two or more units and nearly half of the apartments in these multifamily apartment buildings or complexes are occupied by households making 200 percent or less of federal poverty guidelines, or $32,040 for a family of two. Multiunit rental properties have unique attributes, which can inhibit building upgrades to improve public health, reduce utility bills, and reduce emissions of greenhouse gases.
(b) Section 38566 of the Health and Safety Code directs the State Air Resources Board (state board) to ensure that statewide emissions of greenhouse gases are reduced to at least 40 percent below the statewide greenhouse gas emissions limit by no later than December 31, 2030, and to achieve the state’s stringent requirements for reducing emissions of greenhouse gases in a manner that benefits the state’s most disadvantaged communities.
(c) The Clean Energy and Pollution Reduction Act of 2015 (Chapter 547 of the Statutes of 2015) directs the State Energy Resources Conservation and Development Commission (Energy Commission) to establish annual targets for statewide energy efficiency savings and demand reduction that will achieve a cumulative doubling of statewide energy efficiency savings by January 1, 2030. It also directs the Energy Commission and state board to publish a study on barriers for low-income customers and disadvantaged communities to access energy efficiency and weatherization investments, zero-emission transportation options, renewables, and local small business contracting.
(d) The Energy Commission’s completed study found several barriers to accessing the clean energy economy, including (1) in rental markets, owner and tenant incentives for upgrades are not aligned, (2) older buildings often need structural health and safety improvements to facilitate efficiency and renewable energy resource upgrades, and (3) there is a significant need to coordinate programs, share data, set common metrics, and set common goals.
(e) Streamlining eligibility and compliance requirements, setting common goals and metrics, and making it easier to combine funding across programs will increase the efficacy of state funding, increase participation in existing programs, and yield greater greenhouse gas reductions, energy bill savings, and public health benefits for California residents.

SEC. 2.

 Chapter 7.4 (commencing with Section 25640) is added to Division 15 of the Public Resources Code, to read:
CHAPTER  7.4. Multi-Unit Residential Housing Programs

25640.
 (a) The commission shall set a statewide goal by 2030 to scale upgrades and reduce energy burdens for the multiunit residential market, taking into consideration the state’s requirements for reducing emissions of greenhouse gases in Section 38566 of the Health and Safety Code, and the climate equity, doubling of energy efficiency, and increased use of renewable energy resources requirements set forth in the Clean Energy and Pollution Reduction Act of 2015 (Chapter 547 of the Statutes of 2015).
(b) The commission shall set common program eligibility definitions across housing, health, water, energy efficiency, zero- and near-zero emission vehicle infrastructure, renewable energy resources, and resiliency programs for multiunit residential properties.
(c) The commission shall adopt regulations to enable access to combined program funding for health, water, energy efficiency, zero- and near-zero emission vehicle infrastructure, renewable energy resources, and resiliency, across programs and state agencies for multiunit residential properties.
(d) (1) By January 1, 2019, the commission, in consultation with relevant state agencies and the public, shall report to the Legislature on the extent to which renters and owners of low-income multiunit residential properties have sufficient technical and financial support to participate in existing programs and complete upgrades.
(2) The report to be submitted pursuant to this subdivision shall be submitted in compliance with Section 9795 of the Government Code.
(3) The requirement for submitting a report pursuant to this subdivision is inoperative on January 1, 2023, pursuant to Section 10231.5 of the Government Code.