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SB-184 Judges’ Retirement System II: deferred retirement.(2019-2020)

Senate:
1st
Cmt
2nd
3rd
Pass
Pass
Veto
Assembly:
1st
Cmt
2nd
3rd
Pass
Bill Status
SB-184
Moorlach (S)
Brough (A) , Cooley (A)
Borgeas (S) , Calderon (A)
Judges’ Retirement System II: deferred retirement.
03/02/19
An act to amend Sections 22760, 22814, 75521, 75523, 75553, 75570, 75571.5, and 75590 of, and to add Sections 75522.5 and 75591.5 to, the Government Code, relating to judges’ retirement, and making an appropriation therefor.
Senate
09/12/19
09/03/19

Type of Measure
Active Bill - In Floor Process
Majority Vote Required
Appropriation
Fiscal Committee
Non-State-Mandated Local Program
Non-Urgency
Non-Tax levy
Last 5 History Actions
Date Action
10/13/19 In Senate. Consideration of Governor's veto pending.
10/13/19 Vetoed by the Governor.
09/17/19 Enrolled and presented to the Governor at 2 p.m.
09/10/19 Assembly amendments concurred in. (Ayes 40. Noes 0. Page 2784.) Ordered to engrossing and enrolling.
09/10/19 Ordered to special consent calendar.
Governor's Veto Message
To the Members of the California State Senate:

I am returning Senate Bill 184 without my signature.

This bill would lower the minimum age at which a judge who is a member of the Judges' Retirement System (JRS) II can retire from judicial service and still maintain eligibility for full pension benefits. Specifically, SB 184 would allow a judge to leave the bench at age 60, retire, and defer receiving a monthly defined benefit allowance until the judge reaches age 65 (with at least 20 years of service) or age 70 (with at least five years of service) - as long as all other current requirements for receiving retirement benefits are met.

The costs of modifying the current rules on judicial retirement as proposed in SB 184 are steep and would in some cases result in a judge receiving more generous benefits than what the same judge can currently receive. These concerns are not new and have been raised in previous iterations of this bill. It is also difficult to overlook the possibility that current rules may in some cases incentivize judges who are in poor health to prolong their service rather than retire and care for themselves or others.

I encourage the Legislature to work collaboratively with my Administration as well as the California Public Employees' Retirement System on a more narrow solution to these issues.

Sincerely,




Gavin Newsom