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AB-589 Employment: unfair immigration-related practices.(2019-2020)

Senate:
1st
Cmt
2nd
3rd
2nd
3rd
Pass
Assembly:
1st
Cmt
2nd
3rd
Pass
Pass
Veto
Bill Status
AB-589
Gonzalez (A)
-
-
Employment: unfair immigration-related practices.
03/17/19
An act to add Sections 1019.3 and 1019.5 to the Labor Code, relating to employment.
Assembly
09/16/19
09/04/19

Type of Measure
Inactive Bill - Vetoed
Majority Vote Required
Non-Appropriation
Fiscal Committee
State-Mandated Local Program
Non-Urgency
Non-Tax levy
Last 5 History Actions
Date Action
10/12/19 Vetoed by Governor.
09/23/19 Enrolled and presented to the Governor at 3:30 p.m.
09/11/19 Senate amendments concurred in. To Engrossing and Enrolling. (Ayes 65. Noes 9. Page 3393.).
09/11/19 Assembly Rule 77 suspended. (Page 3370.)
09/10/19 In Assembly. Concurrence in Senate amendments pending. May be considered on or after September 12 pursuant to Assembly Rule 77.
Governor's Veto Message
To the Members of the California State Assembly:

I am returning Assembly Bill 589 without my signature.

This bill makes it unlawful for an employer to knowingly destroy, conceal, remove, confiscate, or possess any passport, immigration document or government identification in the course of committing human trafficking or a coercive labor practice. Employers who violate this provision are subject to criminal and civil penalties.

The bill also requires all employers to provide a "Worker's Bill of Rights" to every employee.

Human trafficking is a problem of international proportions, and California must continue to act forcefully to protect workers against these heinous crimes. The provision in this bill that levies a hefty civil penalty on employers who engage in document abuse in order to commit trafficking is a step in the right direction. 

Nonetheless, I take issue with the bill's requirement that every employer in the state provide each employee with an enumerated list of rights. Workers should be informed of their rights, including protections against document abuse and trafficking. But the proposed notice requirement is not the answer. It is overly burdensome for law-abiding employers and may not actually help workers who are the targets of trafficking.

Sincerely,





Gavin Newsom