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SB-168 Petitions: compensation for signatures.(2011-2012)

Senate:
1st
Cmt
2nd
3rd
Pass
Pass
Veto
Assembly:
1st
Cmt
2nd
3rd
Pass
Bill Status
SB-168
Corbett (S)
-
-
Petitions: compensation for signatures.
03/06/11
An act to add Section 102.5 to the Elections Code, relating to petitions.
Senate
07/15/11

Type of Measure
Inactive Bill - Vetoed
Majority Vote Required
Non-Appropriation
Fiscal Committee
State-Mandated Local Program
Non-Urgency
Non-Tax levy
Last 5 History Actions
Date Action
02/02/12 Consideration of Governor's veto stricken from file.
08/01/11 In Senate. Consideration of Governor's veto pending.
08/01/11 Vetoed by the Governor.
07/19/11 Enrolled and presented to the Governor at 1 p.m.
07/14/11 In Senate. Ordered to engrossing and enrolling.
Governor's Veto Message
To the Members of the California State Senate:

I am returning Senate Bill 168 without my signature.

This bill makes it a crime for a person to pay or receive money (or any other thing of value) based-directly or indirectly--on the number of signatures obtained on a state or local initiative, referendum, or recall petition.

While I understand the potential abuses of the current per-signature payment system, I believe this bill is flawed for two reasons.

First, this bill would effectively prohibit organizations from even setting targets or quotas for those they hire to gather signatures. It doesn't seem very practical to me to create a system that makes productivity goals a crime.

Second, per-signature payment is often the most cost-effective method for collecting the hundreds of thousands of signatures needed to qualify a ballot measure. Eliminating this option will drive up the cost of circulating ballot measures, thereby further favoring the wealthiest interests.

This is a dramatic change to a long established democratic process in California. After reviewing the materials submitted in support of this bill, I am not persuaded that the unintended consequences won't be worse than the abuses the bill aims to prevent.


Sincerely,




Edmund G. Brown Jr.