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SB-823 Juvenile justice realignment: Office of Youth and Community Restoration.(2019-2020)

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Date Published: 10/02/2020 02:00 PM
SB823:v95#DOCUMENT

Senate Bill No. 823
CHAPTER 337

An act to amend, repeal, and add Section 12803 of, to repeal Article 1 (commencing with Section 12820) of Chapter 1 of Part 2.5 of Division 3 of Title 2 of, and to repeal and add Sections 12838 and 12838.1 of, the Government Code, to add Section 13015 to, to repeal Section 830.5 of, and to repeal and add Sections 830.5 and 2816 to, the Penal Code, and to amend Sections 207.1, 207.2, 209, 210.2, 707.1, and 912 of, to add Sections 733.1, 736.5, and 1955.2 to, to amend and repeal Section 731 of, to amend, repeal, and add Sections 607 and 730 of, to add Section 736.5 to, to add Chapter 1.7 (commencing with Section 1990) to Division 2.5 of, to add Chapter 4 (commencing with Section 2200) to, to add Chapter 6 (commencing with Section 2260) to Division 2.5 of, to add and repeal Chapter 5 (commencing with Section 2250) of Division 2.5 of, to repeal Sections 207.6, 2201, and 2202 of, and to repeal and add Sections 208.5, 1703, 1710, 1711, 1712, 1714, 1731.5, 1752.2, and 1762 of, the Welfare and Institutions Code, relating to juveniles, and making an appropriation therefor, to take effect immediately, bill related to the budget.

[ Approved by Governor  September 30, 2020. Filed with Secretary of State  September 30, 2020. ]

LEGISLATIVE COUNSEL'S DIGEST


SB 823, Committee on Budget and Fiscal Review. Juvenile justice realignment: Office of Youth and Community Restoration.
(1) Existing law establishes the Division of Juvenile Justice within the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation to operate facilities to house specified juvenile offenders. Existing law, commencing July 1, 2020, establishes the Department of Youth and Community Restoration in the California Health and Human Services Agency and vests the Department of Youth and Community Restoration with all the powers, functions, duties, responsibilities, obligations, liabilities, and jurisdiction of the Division of Juvenile Justice. An existing executive order delays the deadline for transferring the Division of Juvenile Justice to the Department of Youth and Community Restoration from July 1, 2020, to July 1, 2021, inclusive.
This bill would repeal the provisions that would have created the Department of Youth and Community Restoration and the provisions that would have transferred the responsibilities of the Division of Juvenile Justice to that department. Among other things, the bill would, commencing July 1, 2021, prohibit further commitment of wards to the Division of Juvenile Justice, except as specified, and would require that all wards committed to the division prior to that date remain within the custody of the division until the ward is discharged, released, or transferred. The bill would declare the intent of the Legislature to close the Division of Juvenile Justice through the shifting of this responsibility, as specified. The bill would, commencing July 1, 2021, establish the Office of Youth and Community Restoration in the California Health and Human Services Agency to administer these provisions and for other specified purposes to support this transition.
The bill would establish a Juvenile Justice Realignment Block Grant program to provide county-based custody, care, and supervision of youth who are realigned from the Division of Juvenile Justice or who would have otherwise been eligible for commitment to the division. The bill would appropriate moneys from the General Fund in specified amounts for these purposes, as specified. The bill would specify how those funds would be allocated to counties based on specified criteria.
By changing county responsibilities with respect to juvenile offenders, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program.
(2) Under existing law, the jurisdiction of the juvenile court may continue until a ward attains 25 years of age, if the ward committed specified offenses.
This bill would reduce that age to 23 years, unless the ward would, in criminal court, have faced an aggregate sentence of 7 years or more, in which case the juvenile court’s jurisdiction would continue until the ward attains 25 years of age.
(3) Existing law authorizes a district attorney or other appropriate prosecuting officer to file an accusatory pleading in a court of criminal jurisdiction against a minor who is alleged to have violated a criminal statute or ordinance and who has been declared not a fit and proper subject to be dealt with under the juvenile court law or as to whom charges in a petition in the juvenile court have been transferred to a court of criminal jurisdiction. Existing law requires, except as specified, a minor declared not a fit and proper subject to be dealt with under the juvenile court law, if detained, to remain in the juvenile hall pending final disposition by the criminal court or until the minor attains 18 years of age, whichever occurs first.
Existing law authorizes the detention of minors in jails or other security facilities for the confinement of adults only under specified conditions, including under circumstances upon which a minor is found not a fit and proper subject to be dealt with under the juvenile court law, their case is transferred to a court of criminal jurisdiction, and it is found that, among other things, the minor’s further detention in the juvenile hall would endanger the safety of the public or other minors in the juvenile hall.
This bill would revise and recast those provisions and repeal specified provisions that authorize the detention of minors in an adult facility. The bill would instead require any person whose case originated in juvenile court to remain in a county juvenile facility until they turn 25 years of age, except as specified. The bill would make technical and conforming changes to related provisions.
By requiring local entities to retain custody of those persons in county juvenile facilities, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program.
(4) Existing law requires the Department of Justice to collect certain criminal justice data from specified persons and agencies and to present an annual report to the Governor containing the criminal statistics of the preceding calendar year. Existing law allows the department to serve as a statistical and research agency to the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation and the Division of Juvenile Justice.
This bill would require the Department of Justice to submit a plan for the replacement of the Juvenile Court and Probation Statistical System with a modern database and reporting system. The bill would require the department to convene a working group consisting of key stakeholders, as provided, for this purpose.
(5) The bill would also appropriate moneys from the General Fund to the Youth Programs and Facilities Grant Program, to be administered by the Board of State and Community Corrections, to award one-time grants, to counties for the purpose of providing resources for infrastructure related needs and improvements to assist counties in the development of a local continuum of care.
(6) The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.
This bill would provide that, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that the bill contains costs mandated by the state, reimbursement for those costs shall be made pursuant to the statutory provisions noted above.
(7) This bill would declare that it is to take effect immediately as a bill providing for appropriations related to the Budget Bill.
Vote: MAJORITY   Appropriation: YES   Fiscal Committee: YES   Local Program: YES  

The people of the State of California do enact as follows:


SECTION 1.

 (a) Evidence has demonstrated that justice system-involved youth are more successful when they remain connected to their families and communities. Justice system-involved youth who remain in their communities have lower recidivism rates and are more prepared for their transition back into the community.
(b) To ensure that justice-involved youth are closer to their families and communities and receive age-appropriate treatment, it is necessary to close the Division of Juvenile Justice and move the jurisdiction of these youth to local county jurisdiction.
(c) Counties will receive funding to meet the needs of youth by providing and implementing public health approaches to support positive youth development, building the capacity of a continuum of community based approaches, and reducing crime by youth.
(d) It is the intent of the Legislature and the administration that the youth firecamp at Pine Grove, whether through a state-local partnership, or other management arrangement, remain open and functioning to train justice-involved youth in wildland firefighting skills, and to retain the camp as a training resource for youth in California and create pipelines from Pine Grove to gainful employment.
(e) It is the intent of the Legislature and the administration for counties to use evidence-based and promising practices and programs that improve the outcomes of youth and public safety, reduce the transfer of youth into the adult criminal justice system, ensure that dispositions are in the least restrictive appropriate environment, reduce and then eliminate racial and ethnic disparities, and reduce the use of confinement in the juvenile justice system by utilizing community-based responses and interventions.
(f) It is the intent of the Legislature to end the practice of placing youth in custodial or confinement facilities that are operated by private entities whose primary business is the custodial confinement of adults or youth in a secure setting. It is further the intent of the Legislature to end placements of justice system-involved youth in out of state facilities that do not appropriately address the programming, service, safety, and other needs of placed youth once appropriate and sufficient capacity within California is achieved.

SEC. 2.

 Section 12803 of the Government Code, as amended by Section 1 of Chapter 38 of the Statutes of 2019, is amended to read:

12803.
 (a) The California Health and Human Services Agency consists of the following departments: Aging; Community Services and Development; Developmental Services; Health Care Services; Managed Health Care; Public Health; Rehabilitation; Social Services; and State Hospitals.
(b) The agency also includes the Emergency Medical Services Authority, the Office of Health Information Integrity, the Office of Patient Advocate, the Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development, the Office of Systems Integration, the Office of Law Enforcement Support, the Office of the Surgeon General, and the State Council on Developmental Disabilities.
(c) The Department of Child Support Services is hereby created within the agency and is the single organizational unit designated as the state’s Title IV-D agency with the responsibility for administering the state plan and providing services relating to the establishment of paternity or the establishment, modification, or enforcement of child support obligations as required by Section 654 of Title 42 of the United States Code. State plan functions shall be performed by other agencies as required by law, by delegation of the department, or by cooperative agreements.
(d) This section shall become inoperative on July 1, 2021, and, as of January 1, 2022, is repealed.

SEC. 3.

 Section 12803 of the Government Code, as added by Section 2 of Chapter 38 of the Statutes of 2019, is repealed.

SEC. 4.

 Section 12803 is added to the Government Code, to read:

12803.
 (a) The California Health and Human Services Agency consists of the following departments: Aging; Community Services and Development; Developmental Services; Health Care Services; Managed Health Care; Public Health; Rehabilitation; Social Services; and State Hospitals.
(b) The agency also includes the Emergency Medical Services Authority, the Office of Health Information Integrity, the Office of Patient Advocate, the Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development, the Office of Systems Integration, the Office of Law Enforcement Support, the Office of the Surgeon General, the Office of Youth and Community Restoration, and the State Council on Developmental Disabilities.
(c) The Department of Child Support Services is hereby created within the agency and is the single organizational unit designated as the state’s Title IV-D agency with the responsibility for administering the state plan and providing services relating to the establishment of paternity or the establishment, modification, or enforcement of child support obligations as required by Section 654 of Title 42 of the United States Code. State plan functions shall be performed by other agencies as required by law, by delegation of the department, or by cooperative agreements.
(d) This section shall become operative on July 1, 2021.

SEC. 5.

 Article 1 (commencing with Section 12820) of Chapter 1 of Part 2.5 of Division 3 of Title 2 of the Government Code is repealed.

SEC. 6.

 Section 12838 of the Government Code, as added by Section 22 of Chapter 25 of the Statutes of 2019, is repealed.

SEC. 7.

 Section 12838 is added to the Government Code, to read:

12838.
 (a) There is hereby created in state government the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, to be headed by a secretary, who shall be appointed by the Governor, subject to Senate confirmation, and shall serve at the pleasure of the Governor. The Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation shall consist of Adult Operations, Adult Programs, Health Care Services, Juvenile Justice, the Board of Parole Hearings, the Board of Juvenile Hearings, the State Commission on Juvenile Justice, the Prison Industry Authority, and the Prison Industry Board.
(b) The Governor, upon recommendation of the secretary, may appoint three undersecretaries of the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, subject to Senate confirmation. The undersecretaries shall hold office at the pleasure of the Governor. One undersecretary shall oversee administration, one undersecretary shall oversee health care services, and one undersecretary shall oversee operations for the department.
(c) The Governor, upon recommendation of the secretary, shall appoint a Chief for the Office of Victim Services, and a Chief for the Office of Correctional Safety, both of whom shall serve at the pleasure of the Governor.

SEC. 8.

 Section 12838.1 of the Government Code, as added by Section 24 of Chapter 25 of the Statutes of 2019, is repealed.

SEC. 9.

 Section 12838.1 is added to the Government Code, to read:

12838.1.
 (a) There is hereby created within the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, under the Undersecretary for Administration, the following divisions:
(1) The Division of Enterprise Information Services, the Division of Facility Planning, Construction, and Management, and the Division of Administrative Services. Each division shall be headed by a director, who shall be appointed by the Governor, upon recommendation of the secretary, subject to Senate confirmation, who shall serve at the pleasure of the Governor.
(2) The Division of Correctional Policy Research and Internal Oversight. This division shall be headed by a director, who shall be appointed by the Governor, upon recommendation of the secretary, who shall serve at the pleasure of the Governor.
(b) There is hereby created in the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, under the Undersecretary for Health Care Services, the Division of Health Care Operations and the Division of Health Care Policy and Administration. Each division shall be headed by a director, who shall be appointed by the Governor, upon recommendation of the secretary, subject to Senate confirmation, who shall serve at the pleasure of the Governor.
(c) There is hereby created within the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, under the Undersecretary for Operations, the Division of Adult Institutions, the Division of Adult Parole Operations, the Division of Juvenile Justice, and the Division of Rehabilitative Programs. Each division shall be headed by a director, who shall be appointed by the Governor, upon recommendation of the secretary, subject to Senate confirmation, who shall serve at the pleasure of the Governor.
(d) The Governor shall, upon recommendation of the secretary, appoint four subordinate officers to the Division of Adult Institutions, subject to Senate confirmation, who shall serve at the pleasure of the Governor. Each subordinate officer appointed pursuant to this subdivision shall oversee an identified category of adult institutions, one of which shall be female offender facilities.
(e) (1) Unless the context clearly requires otherwise, whenever the term “Chief Deputy Secretary for Adult Operations” appears in any statute, regulation, or contract, it shall be construed to refer to the Director of the Division of Adult Institutions.
(2) Unless the context clearly requires otherwise, whenever the term “Chief Deputy Secretary for Adult Programs” appears in any statute, regulation, or contract, it shall be construed to refer to the Director of the Division of Rehabilitative Programs.
(3) Unless the context clearly requires otherwise, whenever the term “Chief Deputy Secretary for Juvenile Justice” appears in any statute, regulation, or contract, it shall be construed to refer to the Director of the Division of Juvenile Justice.

SEC. 10.

 Section 830.5 of the Penal Code, as added by Section 31 of Chapter 25 of the Statutes of 2019, is repealed.

SEC. 11.

 Section 830.5 is added to the Penal Code, to read:

830.5.
 The following persons are peace officers whose authority extends to any place in the state while engaged in the performance of the duties of their respective employment and for the purpose of carrying out the primary function of their employment or as required under Sections 8597, 8598, and 8617 of the Government Code. Except as specified in this section, these peace officers may carry firearms only if authorized and under those terms and conditions specified by their employing agency:
(a) A parole officer of the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, or the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, Division of Juvenile Parole Operations, probation officer, deputy probation officer, or a board coordinating parole agent employed by the Juvenile Parole Board. Except as otherwise provided in this subdivision, the authority of these parole or probation officers shall extend only as follows:
(1) To conditions of parole, probation, mandatory supervision, or postrelease community supervision by any person in this state on parole, probation, mandatory supervision, or postrelease community supervision.
(2) To the escape of any inmate or ward from a state or local institution.
(3) To the transportation of persons on parole, probation, mandatory supervision, or postrelease community supervision.
(4) To violations of any penal provisions of law which are discovered while performing the usual or authorized duties of the officer’s employment.
(5) (A) To the rendering of mutual aid to any other law enforcement agency.
(B) For the purposes of this subdivision, “parole agent” shall have the same meaning as parole officer of the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation or of the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, Division of Juvenile Justice.
(C) Any parole officer of the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, or the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, Division of Juvenile Parole Operations, is authorized to carry firearms, but only as determined by the director on a case-by-case or unit-by-unit basis and only under those terms and conditions specified by the director or chairperson. The Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, Division of Juvenile Justice, shall develop a policy for arming peace officers of the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, Division of Juvenile Justice, who comprise “high-risk transportation details” or “high-risk escape details” no later than June 30, 1995. This policy shall be implemented no later than December 31, 1995.
(D) The Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, Division of Juvenile Justice, shall train and arm those peace officers who comprise tactical teams at each facility for use during “high-risk escape details.”
(b) A correctional officer employed by the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, or of the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, Division of Juvenile Justice, having custody of wards or any employee of the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation designated by the secretary or any correctional counselor series employee of the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation or any medical technical assistant series employee designated by the secretary or designated by the secretary and employed by the State Department of State Hospitals or any employee of the Board of Parole Hearings designated by the secretary or employee of the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, Division of Juvenile Justice, designated by the secretary or any superintendent, supervisor, or employee having custodial responsibilities in an institution operated by a probation department, or any transportation officer of a probation department.
(c) The following persons may carry a firearm while not on duty: a parole officer of the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, or the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, Division of Juvenile Justice, a correctional officer or correctional counselor employed by the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, or an employee of the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, Division of Juvenile Justice, having custody of wards or any employee of the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation designated by the secretary or any medical technical assistant series employee designated by the secretary or designated by the secretary and employed by the State Department of State Hospitals. A parole officer of the Juvenile Parole Board may carry a firearm while not on duty only when so authorized by the chairperson of the board and only under the terms and conditions specified by the chairperson. Nothing in this section shall be interpreted to require licensure pursuant to Section 25400. The director or chairperson may deny, suspend, or revoke for good cause a person’s right to carry a firearm under this subdivision. That person shall, upon request, receive a hearing, as provided for in the negotiated grievance procedure between the exclusive employee representative and the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, Division of Juvenile Justice, or the Juvenile Parole Board, to review the director’s or the chairperson’s decision.
(d) Persons permitted to carry firearms pursuant to this section, either on or off duty, shall meet the training requirements of Section 832 and shall qualify with the firearm at least quarterly. It is the responsibility of the individual officer or designee to maintain their eligibility to carry concealable firearms off duty. Failure to maintain quarterly qualifications by an officer or designee with any concealable firearms carried off duty shall constitute good cause to suspend or revoke that person’s right to carry firearms off duty.
(e) The Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation shall allow reasonable access to its ranges for officers and designees of either department to qualify to carry concealable firearms off duty. The time spent on the range for purposes of meeting the qualification requirements shall be the person’s own time during the person’s off-duty hours.
(f) The secretary shall promulgate regulations consistent with this section.
(g) “High-risk transportation details” and “high-risk escape details” as used in this section shall be determined by the secretary, or the secretary’s designee. The secretary, or the secretary’s designee, shall consider at least the following in determining “high-risk transportation details” and “high-risk escape details”: protection of the public, protection of officers, flight risk, and violence potential of the wards.
(h) “Transportation detail” as used in this section shall include transportation of wards outside the facility, including, but not limited to, court appearances, medical trips, and interfacility transfers.

SEC. 12.

 Section 830.53 of the Penal Code is repealed.

SEC. 13.

 Section 2816 of the Penal Code, as added by Section 40 of Chapter 25 of the Statutes of 2019, is repealed.

SEC. 14.

 Section 2816 is added to the Penal Code, to read:

2816.
 (a) With the approval of the Department of Finance, there shall be transferred to, or deposited in, the Prison Industries Revolving Fund for purposes authorized by this section, money appropriated from any source including sources other than state appropriations.
(b) Notwithstanding subdivision (i) of Section 2808, the Secretary of the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation may order any authorized public works project involving the construction, renovation, or repair of prison facilities to be performed by inmate labor or juvenile justice facilities to be performed by ward labor, when the total expenditure does not exceed the project limit established by the first paragraph of Section 10108 of the Public Contract Code. Projects entailing expenditure of greater than the project limit established by the first paragraph of Section 10108 of the Public Contract Code shall be reviewed and approved by the chairperson, in consultation with the board.
(c) Money so transferred or deposited shall be available for expenditure by the department for the purposes for which appropriated, contributed, or made available, without regard to fiscal years and irrespective of the provisions of Sections 13340 and 16304 of the Government Code. Money transferred or deposited pursuant to this section shall be used only for purposes authorized in this section.

SEC. 15.

 Section 13015 is added to the Penal Code, to read:

13015.
 (a) The Department of Justice shall submit a plan for the replacement of the Juvenile Court and Probation Statistical System (JCPSS) with a modern database and reporting system. The plan shall be submitted to the Assembly and Senate budget subcommittees on public safety, and the Assembly and Senate Public Safety Committees by January 1, 2023.
(b) In devising the plan, the department shall convene a working group consisting of key stakeholders and experts, including, but not limited to, representatives from the Juvenile Justice Data Working Group established within the Board of State and Community Corrections pursuant to Section 6032, agencies that are responsible for the collection and submission of juvenile justice data to department, advocates with experience in the collection, analysis, and utilization of juvenile justice data in California, academic institutions or research organizations with experience in collecting, analyzing, or using juvenile justice data in California, and people directly impacted by the justice system.
(c) The plan shall consider the relevant findings and recommendations submitted by the Juvenile Justice Data Working Group in their January 2016 final report. The plan shall, at minimum, include the following:
(1) An overall description of the goals of the new data system.
(2) A description of all data elements proposed to be captured by the new system, including, but not limited to, all of the following:
(A) All data elements currently capture by JCPSS that are to be retained.
(B) Data and outcome measures needed to produce, at minimum, recidivism reports for youth organized by age, gender identity, race, ethnicity, and other demographic factors.
(C) Data and outcome measures needed to document caseload and placement changes due to the realignment of the state Division of Juvenile Justice to counties.
(D) How the revised system will document all of the following:
(i) Subsequent referrals to the justice system for violations of probation and warrants.
(ii) The use of preadjudication and postadjudication detention, including length of stay.
(iii) The use of detention alternatives, such as electronic monitoring, house arrest, or home supervision.
(iv) Dispositional placement outcomes by facility type, including length of stay in facilities. “Facility type” includes juvenile halls, group homes, foster care, county camp or ranch, and local facilities developed as an alternative to Division of Juvenile Justice facilities.
(3) The use of individual unique identifiers.
(4) An analysis of what features must be included to allow users to access and analyze data easily through standard or customized reports, and an analysis of how system data can be made publicly available on the department’s internet website.
(5) A discussion of how the new system can be designed to ensure that it may be modified in the future to reflect relevant changes to the juvenile justice system.
(6) An analysis of how this new system may impact state and local agencies that provide the department with data for inclusion in JCPSS, including an assessment of how state and local data systems may need to be modified to ensure that comprehensive and high-quality data is collected and transmitted to the department.
(7) Major challenges or obstacles, if any, to implementing a new system and recommendations for addressing those challenges.
(8) A cost estimate or estimates for the new system and for implementing and funding a new system. These recommendations may include, but are not limited to, a phased implementation approach, providing various options based on a system with differing data capabilities, or providing funding recommendations based on specific system components.
(10) A projected implementation timeline.
(d) The plan shall also include an assessment of the operational and fiscal feasibility of including both of the following capacities in the new system:
(1) Adult court dispositions of youth.
(2) Youth development and wellness data including, but not limited to, education attainment, employment, mental health, housing, family connections, foster care, and other wellness outcomes as recommended by the Juvenile Justice Data Working Group in their January 2016 final report.

SEC. 16.

 Section 207.1 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

207.1.
 (a) A court, judge, referee, peace officer, or employee of a detention facility shall not knowingly detain any minor in a jail or lockup, unless otherwise permitted by any other law.
(b) (1) A minor 14 years of age or older who is taken into temporary custody by a peace officer on the basis of being a person described by Section 602, and who, in the reasonable belief of the peace officer, presents a serious security risk of harm to self or others, may be securely detained in a law enforcement facility that contains a lockup for adults, if all of the following conditions are met:
(A) The minor is held in temporary custody for the purpose of investigating the case, facilitating release of the minor to a parent or guardian, or arranging transfer of the minor to an appropriate juvenile facility.
(B) The minor is detained in the law enforcement facility for a period that does not exceed six hours except as provided in subdivision (d).
(C) The minor is informed at the time the minor is securely detained of the purpose of the secure detention, of the length of time the secure detention is expected to last, and of the maximum six-hour period the secure detention is authorized to last. In the event an extension is granted pursuant to subdivision (d), the minor shall be informed of the length of time the extension is expected to last.
(D) Contact between the minor and adults confined in the facility is restricted in accordance with Section 208.
(E) The minor is adequately supervised.
(F) A log or other written record is maintained by the law enforcement agency showing the offense that is the basis for the secure detention of the minor in the facility, the reasons and circumstances forming the basis for the decision to place the minor in secure detention, and the length of time the minor was securely detained.
(2) Any other minor, other than a minor to which paragraph (1) applies, who is taken into temporary custody by a peace officer on the basis that the minor is a person described by Section 602 may be taken to a law enforcement facility that contains a lockup for adults and may be held in temporary custody in the facility for the purposes of investigating the case, facilitating the release of the minor to a parent or guardian, or arranging for the transfer of the minor to an appropriate juvenile facility. While in the law enforcement facility, the minor may not be securely detained and shall be supervised in a manner so as to ensure that there will be no contact with adults in custody in the facility. If the minor is held in temporary, nonsecure custody within the facility, the peace officer shall exercise one of the dispositional options authorized by Sections 626 and 626.5 without unnecessary delay and, in every case, within six hours.
(3) “Law enforcement facility,” as used in this subdivision, includes a police station or a sheriff’s station, but does not include a jail, as defined in subdivision (g).
(c) The Board of State and Community Corrections shall assist law enforcement agencies, probation departments, and courts with the implementation of this section by doing all of the following:
(1) The board shall advise each law enforcement agency, probation department, and court affected by this section as to its existence and effect.
(2) The board shall make available and, upon request, shall provide, technical assistance to each governmental agency that reported the confinement of a minor in a jail or lockup in calendar year 1984 or 1985. The purpose of this technical assistance is to develop alternatives to the use of jails or lockups for the confinement of minors. These alternatives may include secure or nonsecure facilities located apart from an existing jail or lockup, improved transportation or access to juvenile halls or other juvenile facilities, and other programmatic alternatives recommended by the board. The technical assistance shall take any form the board deems appropriate for effective compliance with this section.
(d) (1) (A) Under the limited conditions of inclement weather, acts of God, or natural disasters that result in the temporary unavailability of transportation, an extension of the six-hour maximum period of detention set forth in paragraph (2) of subdivision(b) may be granted to a county by the Board of Corrections. The extension may be granted only by the board, on an individual, case-by-case basis. If the extension is granted, the detention of minors under those conditions shall not exceed the duration of the special conditions, plus a period reasonably necessary to accomplish transportation of the minor to a suitable juvenile facility, not to exceed six hours after the restoration of available transportation.
(B) A county that receives an extension under this paragraph shall comply with the requirements set forth in subdivision (b). The county also shall provide a written report to the board that specifies when the inclement weather, act of God, or natural disaster ceased to exist, when transportation availability was restored, and when the minor was delivered to a suitable juvenile facility. If the minor was detained in excess of 24 hours, the board shall verify the information contained in the report.
(2) Under the limited condition of temporary unavailability of transportation, an extension of the six-hour maximum period of detention set forth in paragraph (2) of subdivision(b) may be granted by the board to an offshore law enforcement facility. The extension may be granted only by the board, on an individual, case-by-case basis. If the extension is granted, the detention of minors under those conditions shall extend only until the next available mode of transportation can be arranged.
An offshore law enforcement facility that receives an extension under this paragraph shall comply with the requirements set forth in subdivision (b). The facility also shall provide a written report to the board that specifies when the next mode of transportation became available, and when the minor was delivered to a suitable juvenile facility. If the minor was detained in excess of 24 hours, the board shall verify the information contained in the report.
(3) At least annually, the board shall review and report on extensions sought and granted under this subdivision. If, upon that review, the board determines that a county has sought one or more extensions resulting in the excessive confinement of minors in adult facilities, or that a county is engaged in a pattern and practice of seeking extensions, it shall require the county to submit a detailed explanation of the reasons for the extensions sought and an assessment of the need for a conveniently located and suitable juvenile facility. Upon receiving this information, the board shall make available, and the county shall accept, technical assistance for the purpose of developing suitable alternatives to the confinement of minors in adult lockups.
(e) Any county that did not have a juvenile hall on January 1, 1987, may establish a special purpose juvenile hall, as defined by the Board of Corrections, for the detention of minors for a period not to exceed 96 hours. Any county that had a juvenile hall on January 1, 1987, also may establish, in addition to the juvenile hall, a special purpose juvenile hall. The board shall prescribe minimum standards for that type of facility.
(f) No part of a building or a building complex that contains a jail may be converted or utilized as a secure juvenile facility unless all of the following criteria are met:
(1) The juvenile facility is physically, or architecturally, separate and apart from the jail or lockup such that there could be no contact between juveniles and incarcerated adults.
(2) Sharing of nonresidential program areas only occurs where there are written policies and procedures that assure that there is time-phased use of those areas that prevents contact between juveniles and incarcerated adults.
(3) The juvenile facility has a dedicated and separate staff from the jail or lockup, including management, security, and direct care staff. Staff who provide specialized services such as food, laundry, maintenance, engineering, or medical services, who are not normally in contact with detainees, or whose infrequent contacts occur under conditions of separation of juveniles and adults, may serve both populations.
(4) The juvenile facility complies with all applicable state and local statutory, licensing, and regulatory requirements for juvenile facilities of its type.
(g) (1) “Jail,” as used in this chapter, means a locked facility administered by a law enforcement or governmental agency, the purpose of which is to detain adults who have been charged with violations of criminal law and are pending trial, or to hold convicted adult criminal offenders sentenced for less than one year.
(2) “Lockup,” as used in this chapter, means any locked room or secure enclosure under the control of a sheriff or other peace officer that is primarily for the temporary confinement of adults upon arrest.
(3) “Offshore law enforcement facility,” as used in this section, means a sheriff’s station containing a lockup for adults that is located on an island located at least 22 miles from the California coastline.
(h) This section shall not be deemed to prevent a peace officer or employee of an adult detention facility or jail from escorting a minor into the detention facility or jail for the purpose of administering an evaluation, test, or chemical test pursuant to Section 23157 of the Vehicle Code, if all of the following conditions are met:
(1) The minor is taken into custody by a peace officer on the basis of being a person described by Section 602 and there is no equipment for the administration of the evaluation, test, or chemical test located at a juvenile facility within a reasonable distance of the point where the minor was taken into custody.
(2) The minor is not locked in a cell or room within the adult detention facility or jail, is under the continuous, personal supervision of a peace officer or employee of the detention facility or jail, and is not permitted to come in contact or remain in contact with in-custody adults.
(3) The evaluation, test, or chemical test administered pursuant to Section 23157 of the Vehicle Code is performed as expeditiously as possible, so that the minor is not delayed unnecessarily within the adult detention facility or jail. Upon completion of the evaluation, test, or chemical test, the minor shall be removed from the detention facility or jail as soon as reasonably possible. A minor shall not be held in custody in an adult detention facility or jail under the authority of this paragraph in excess of two hours.

SEC. 17.

 Section 207.2 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

207.2.
 A minor who is held in temporary custody in a law enforcement facility that contains a lockup for adults pursuant to subdivision (b) of Section 207.1 may be released to a parent, guardian, or responsible relative by the law enforcement agency operating the facility, or may at the discretion of the law enforcement agency be released into their own custody, provided that a minor released into their own custody is furnished, upon request, with transportation to their home or to the place where the minor was taken into custody.

SEC. 18.

 Section 207.6 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is repealed.

SEC. 19.

 Section 208.5 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is repealed.

SEC. 20.

 Section 208.5 is added to the Welfare and Institutions Code, to read:

208.5.
 (a) Notwithstanding any other law, any person whose case originated in juvenile court shall remain, if the person is held in secure detention, in a county juvenile facility until the person attains 25 years of age, except as provided in subdivisions (b) and (c) of this section and paragraph (4) of subdivision (a) of Section 731. This section is not intended to authorize confinement in a juvenile facility where authority would not otherwise exist.
(b) The probation department may petition the court to house a person who is 19 years of age or older in an adult facility, including a jail or other facility established for the purpose of confinement of adults.
(c) Upon receipt of a petition to house a person who is 19 years of age or older in an adult facility, the court shall hold a hearing. There shall be a rebuttable presumption that the person will be retained in a juvenile facility. At the hearing, the court shall determine whether the person will be moved to an adult facility, and make written findings of its decision based on the totality of the following criteria:
(1) The impact of being held in an adult facility on the physical and mental health and well-being of the person.
(2) The benefits of continued programming at the juvenile facility and whether required education and other services called for in any juvenile court disposition or otherwise required by law or court order can be provided in the adult facility.
(3) The capacity of the adult facility to separate younger and older people as needed and to provide them with safe and age-appropriate housing and program opportunities.
(4) The capacity of the juvenile facility to provide needed separation of older from younger people given the youth currently housed in the facility.
(5) Evidence demonstrating that the juvenile facility is unable to currently manage the person’s needs without posing a significant danger to staff or other youth in the facility.
(d) If a person who is 18 to 24 years of age, inclusive, is removed from a juvenile facility pursuant to this section, upon the motion of any party and a showing of changed circumstances, the court shall consider the criteria in subdivision (c) and determine whether the person should be housed at a juvenile facility.
(e) A person who is 19 years of age or older and who has been committed to a county juvenile facility or a facility of a contracted entity shall remain in the facility and shall not be subject to a petition for transfer to an adult facility. This section is not intended to authorize or extend confinement in a juvenile facility where authority would not otherwise exist.

SEC. 21.

 Section 209 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

209.
 (a) (1) The judge of the juvenile court of a county, or, if there is more than one judge, any of the judges of the juvenile court shall, at least annually, inspect any jail, juvenile hall, or special purpose juvenile hall that, in the preceding calendar year, was used for confinement, for more than 24 hours, of any minor.
(2) The judge shall promptly notify the operator of the jail, juvenile hall, or special purpose juvenile hall of any observed noncompliance with minimum standards for juvenile facilities adopted by the Board of State and Community Corrections under Section 210. Based on the facility’s subsequent compliance with the provisions of subdivisions (d) and (e), the judge shall thereafter make a finding whether the facility is a suitable place for the confinement of minors and shall note the finding in the minutes of the court.
(3) The Board of State and Community Corrections shall conduct a biennial inspection of each jail, juvenile hall, lockup, or special purpose juvenile hall situated in this state that, during the preceding calendar year, was used for confinement, for more than 24 hours, of any minor. The board shall promptly notify the operator of any jail, juvenile hall, lockup, or special purpose juvenile hall of any noncompliance found, upon inspection, with any of the minimum standards for juvenile facilities adopted by the Board of State and Community Corrections under Section 210 or 210.2.
(4) If either a judge of the juvenile court or the board, after inspection of a jail, juvenile hall, special purpose juvenile hall, or lockup, finds that it is not being operated and maintained as a suitable place for the confinement of minors, the juvenile court or the board shall give notice of its finding to all persons having authority to confine minors pursuant to this chapter and commencing 60 days thereafter the facility shall not be used for confinement of minors until the time the judge or board, as the case may be, finds, after reinspection of the facility that the conditions that rendered the facility unsuitable have been remedied, and the facility is a suitable place for confinement of minors.
(5) The custodian of each jail, juvenile hall, special purpose juvenile hall, and lockup shall make any reports as may be requested by the board or the juvenile court to effectuate the purposes of this section.
(b) (1) The Board of State and Community Corrections may inspect any law enforcement facility that contains a lockup for adults and that it has reason to believe may not be in compliance with the requirements of subdivision (b) of Section 207.1 or with the certification requirements or standards adopted under Section 210.2. A judge of the juvenile court shall conduct an annual inspection, either in person or through a delegated member of the appropriate county or regional juvenile justice commission, of any law enforcement facility that contains a lockup for adults which, in the preceding year, was used for the secure detention of any minor. If the law enforcement facility is observed, upon inspection, to be out of compliance with the requirements of subdivision (b) of Section 207.1, or with any standard adopted under Section 210.2, the board or the judge shall promptly notify the operator of the law enforcement facility of the specific points of noncompliance.
(2) If either the judge or the board finds after inspection that the facility is not being operated and maintained in conformity with the requirements of subdivision (b) of Section 207.1 or with the certification requirements or standards adopted under Section 210.2, the juvenile court or the board shall give notice of its finding to all persons having authority to securely detain minors in the facility, and, commencing 60 days thereafter, the facility shall not be used for the secure detention of a minor until the time the judge or the board, as the case may be, finds, after reinspection, that the conditions that rendered the facility unsuitable have been remedied, and the facility is a suitable place for the confinement of minors in conformity with all requirements of law.
(3) The custodian of each law enforcement facility that contains a lockup for adults shall make any report as may be requested by the board or by the juvenile court to effectuate the purposes of this subdivision.
(c) The board shall collect biennial data on the number, place, and duration of confinements of minors in jails and lockups, as defined in subdivision (g) of Section 207.1, and shall publish biennially this information in the form as it deems appropriate for the purpose of providing public information on continuing compliance with the requirements of Section 207.1.
(d) Except as provided in subdivision (e), a juvenile hall, special purpose juvenile hall, law enforcement facility, or jail shall be unsuitable for the confinement of minors if it is not in compliance with one or more of the minimum standards for juvenile facilities adopted by the Board of State and Community Corrections under Section 210 or 210.2, and if, within 60 days of having received notice of noncompliance from the board or the judge of the juvenile court, the juvenile hall, special purpose juvenile hall, law enforcement facility, or jail has failed to file an approved corrective action plan with the Board of State and Community Corrections to correct the condition or conditions of noncompliance of which it has been notified. The corrective action plan shall outline how the juvenile hall, special purpose juvenile hall, law enforcement facility, or jail plans to correct the issue of noncompliance and give a reasonable timeframe, not to exceed 90 days, for resolution, that the board shall either approve or deny. In the event the juvenile hall, special purpose juvenile hall, law enforcement facility, or jail fails to meet its commitment to resolve noncompliance issues outlined in its corrective action plan, the board shall make a determination of suitability at its next scheduled meeting.
(e) If a juvenile hall is not in compliance with one or more of the minimum standards for juvenile facilities adopted by the Board of State and Community Corrections under Section 210, and where the noncompliance arises from sustained occupancy levels that are above the population capacity permitted by applicable minimum standards, the juvenile hall shall be unsuitable for the confinement of minors if the board or the judge of the juvenile court determines that conditions in the facility pose a serious risk to the health, safety, or welfare of minors confined in the facility. In making its determination of suitability, the board or the judge of the juvenile court shall consider, in addition to the noncompliance with minimum standards, the totality of conditions in the juvenile hall, including the extent and duration of overpopulation as well as staffing, program, physical plant, and medical and mental health care conditions in the facility. The Board of State and Community Corrections may develop guidelines and procedures for its determination of suitability in accordance with this subdivision and to assist counties in bringing their juvenile halls into full compliance with applicable minimum standards. This subdivision shall not be interpreted to exempt a juvenile hall from having to correct, in accordance with subdivision (d), any minimum standard violations that are not directly related to overpopulation of the facility.
(f) In accordance with the federal Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of 2002 (42 U.S.C. Sec. 5601 et seq.), the Corrections Standards Authority shall inspect and collect relevant data from any facility that may be used for the secure detention of minors.
(g) All reports and notices of findings prepared by the Board of State and Community Corrections pursuant to this section shall be posted on the Board of State and Community Corrections’ internet website in a manner in which they are accessible to the public.

SEC. 22.

 Section 210.2 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

210.2.
 (a) The Board of Corrections shall adopt regulations establishing standards for law enforcement facilities which contain lockups for adults and which are used for the temporary, secure detention of minors upon arrest under subdivision (b) of Section 207.1. The standards shall identify appropriate conditions of confinement for minors in law enforcement facilities, including standards for places within a police station or sheriff’s station where minors may be securely detained; standards regulating contact between minors and adults in custody in lockup, booking, or common areas; standards for the supervision of minors securely detained in these facilities; and any other related standard as the board deems appropriate to effectuate compliance with subdivision (b) of Section 207.1.
(b) Every person in charge of a law enforcement facility which contains a lockup for adults and which is used in any calendar year for the secure detention of any minor shall certify annually that the facility is in conformity with the regulations adopted by the board under subdivision (a). The certification shall be endorsed by the sheriff or chief of police of the jurisdiction in which the facility is located and shall be forwarded to and maintained by the board. The board may provide forms and instructions to local jurisdictions to facilitate compliance with this requirement.

SEC. 23.

 Section 607 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

607.
 (a) The court may retain jurisdiction over a person who is found to be a ward or dependent child of the juvenile court until the ward or dependent child attains 21 years of age, except as provided in subdivisions (b), (c), and (d).
(b) The court may retain jurisdiction over a person who is found to be a person described in Section 602 by reason of the commission of an offense listed in subdivision (b) of Section 707, until that person attains 25 years of age if the person was committed to the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, Division of Juvenile Facilities.
(c) The court shall not discharge a person from its jurisdiction who has been committed to the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, Division of Juvenile Facilities while the person remains under the jurisdiction of the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, Division of Juvenile Facilities, including periods of extended control ordered pursuant to Section 1800.
(d) The court may retain jurisdiction over a person described in Section 602 by reason of the commission of an offense listed in subdivision (b) of Section 707, who has been confined in a state hospital or other appropriate public or private mental health facility pursuant to Section 702.3 until that person attains 25 years of age, unless the court that committed the person finds, after notice and hearing, that the person’s sanity has been restored.
(e) The court may retain jurisdiction over a person while that person is the subject of a warrant for arrest issued pursuant to Section 663.
(f) Notwithstanding subdivisions (b) and (d), a person who is committed by the juvenile court to the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, Division of Juvenile Facilities on or after July 1, 2012, but before July 1, 2018, and who is found to be a person described in Section 602 by reason of the commission of an offense listed in subdivision (b) of Section 707 shall be discharged upon the expiration of a two-year period of control, or when the person attains 23 years of age, whichever occurs later, unless an order for further detention has been made by the committing court pursuant to Article 6 (commencing with Section 1800) of Chapter 1 of Division 2.5. This subdivision does not apply to a person who is committed to the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, Division of Juvenile Facilities, or to a person who is confined in a state hospital or other appropriate public or private mental health facility, by a court prior to July 1, 2012, pursuant to subdivisions (b) and (d).
(g) (1) Notwithstanding subdivision (f), a person who is committed by the juvenile court to the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, Division of Juvenile Facilities, on or after July 1, 2018, and who is found to be a person described in Section 602 by reason of the commission of an offense listed in subdivision (c) of Section 290.008 of the Penal Code or subdivision (b) of Section 707 of this code, shall be discharged upon the expiration of a two-year period of control, or when the person attains 23 years of age, whichever occurs later, unless an order for further detention has been made by the committing court pursuant to Article 6 (commencing with Section 1800) of Chapter 1 of Division 2.5.
(2) A person who, at the time of adjudication of a crime or crimes, would, in criminal court, have faced an aggregate sentence of seven years or more, shall be discharged upon the expiration of a two-year period of control, or when the person attains 25 years of age, whichever occurs later, unless an order for further detention has been made by the committing court pursuant to Article 6 (commencing with Section 1800) of Chapter 1 of Division 2.5.
(3) This subdivision does not apply to a person who is committed to the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, Division of Juvenile Facilities, or to a person who is confined in a state hospital or other appropriate public or private mental health facility, by a court prior to July 1, 2018, as described in subdivision (f).
(h) The amendments to this section made by Chapter 342 of the Statutes of 2012 apply retroactively.
(i) This section does not change the period of juvenile court jurisdiction for a person committed to the Division of Juvenile Facilities prior to July 1, 2018.
(j) This section shall become inoperative on July 1, 2021, and, as of January 1, 2022, is repealed.

SEC. 24.

 Section 607 is added to the Welfare and Institutions Code, to read:

607.
 (a) The court may retain jurisdiction over a person who is found to be a ward or dependent child of the juvenile court until the ward or dependent child attains 21 years of age, except as provided in subdivisions (b), (c), and (d).
(b) The court may retain jurisdiction over a person who is found to be a person described in Section 602 by reason of the commission of an offense listed in subdivision (b) of Section 707, until that person attains 23 years of age, subject to the provisions of subdivision (c).
(c) The court may retain jurisdiction over a person who is found to be a person described in Section 602 by reason of the commission of an offense listed in subdivision (b) of Section 707 until that person attains 25 years of age if the person, at the time of adjudication of a crime or crimes, would, in criminal court, have faced an aggregate sentence of seven years or more.
(d) The court shall not discharge a person from its jurisdiction who has been committed to the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, Division of Juvenile Justice while the person remains under the jurisdiction of the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, Division of Juvenile Justice, including periods of extended control ordered pursuant to Section 1800.
(e) The court may retain jurisdiction over a person described in Section 602 by reason of the commission of an offense listed in subdivision (b) of Section 707, who has been confined in a state hospital or other appropriate public or private mental health facility pursuant to Section 702.3 until that person attains 25 years of age, unless the court that committed the person finds, after notice and hearing, that the person’s sanity has been restored.
(f) The court may retain jurisdiction over a person while that person is the subject of a warrant for arrest issued pursuant to Section 663.
(g) Notwithstanding subdivisions (b) and (d), a person who is committed by the juvenile court to the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, Division of Juvenile Justice on or after July 1, 2012, but before July 1, 2018, and who is found to be a person described in Section 602 by reason of the commission of an offense listed in subdivision (b) of Section 707 shall be discharged upon the expiration of a two-year period of control, or when the person attains 23 years of age, whichever occurs later, unless an order for further detention has been made by the committing court pursuant to Article 6 (commencing with Section 1800) of Chapter 1 of Division 2.5. This subdivision does not apply to a person who is committed to the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, Division of Juvenile Justice, or to a person who is confined in a state hospital or other appropriate public or private mental health facility, by a court prior to July 1, 2012, pursuant to subdivisions (b) and (d).
(h) (1) Notwithstanding subdivision (f), a person who is committed by the juvenile court to the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, Division of Juvenile Facilities, on or after July 1, 2018, and who is found to be a person described in Section 602 by reason of the commission of an offense listed in subdivision (c) of Section 290.008 of the Penal Code or subdivision (b) of Section 707 of this code, shall be discharged upon the expiration of a two-year period of control, or when the person attains 23 years of age, whichever occurs later, unless an order for further detention has been made by the committing court pursuant to Article 6 (commencing with Section 1800) of Chapter 1 of Division 2.5.
(2) A person who, at the time of adjudication of a crime or crimes, would, in criminal court, have faced an aggregate sentence of seven years or more, shall be discharged upon the expiration of a two-year period of control, or when the person attains 25 years of age, whichever occurs later, unless an order for further detention has been made by the committing court pursuant to Article 6 (commencing with Section 1800) of Chapter 1 of Division 2.5.
(3) This subdivision does not apply to a person who is committed to the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, Division of Juvenile Facilities, or to a person who is confined in a state hospital or other appropriate public or private mental health facility, by a court prior to July 1, 2018, as described in subdivision (f).
(i) The amendments to this section made by Chapter 342 of the Statutes of 2012 apply retroactively.
(j) This section does not change the period of juvenile court jurisdiction for a person committed to the Division of Juvenile Facilities prior to July 1, 2018.
(k) This section shall become operative July 1, 2021.

SEC. 25.

 Section 707.1 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

707.1.
 (a)  If, pursuant to a transfer hearing, the minor’s case is transferred from juvenile court to a court of criminal jurisdiction, the district attorney or other appropriate prosecuting officer may file an accusatory pleading against the minor in a court of criminal jurisdiction. The case shall proceed from that point according to the laws applicable to a criminal case. If a prosecution has been commenced in another court but has been suspended while juvenile court proceedings are being held, it shall be ordered that the proceedings upon that prosecution shall resume.
(b) A minor whose case is transferred to a court of criminal jurisdiction shall, upon the conclusion of the transfer hearing, be entitled to release on bail or on their own recognizance on the same circumstances, terms, and conditions as an adult alleged to have committed the same offense.

SEC. 26.

 Section 730 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

730.
 (a) When a minor is adjudged a ward of the court on the ground that they are a person described by Section 602, the court may order any of the types of treatment referred to in Section 727, and as an additional alternative, may commit the minor to a juvenile home, ranch, camp, or forestry camp. If there is no county juvenile home, ranch, camp, or forestry camp within the county, the court may commit the minor to the county juvenile hall.
(b) When a ward described in subdivision (a) is placed under the supervision of the probation officer or committed to the care, custody, and control of the probation officer, the court may make any and all reasonable orders for the conduct of the ward including the requirement that the ward go to work and earn money for the support of their dependents or to effect reparation and in either case that the ward keep an account of their earnings and report the same to the probation officer and apply these earnings as directed by the court. The court may impose and require any and all reasonable conditions that it may determine fitting and proper to the end that justice may be done and the reformation and rehabilitation of the ward enhanced.
(c) When a ward described in subdivision (a) is placed under the supervision of the probation officer or committed to the care, custody, and control of the probation officer, and is required as a condition of probation to participate in community service or graffiti cleanup, the court may impose a condition that if the minor unreasonably fails to attend or unreasonably leaves prior to completing the assigned daily hours of community service or graffiti cleanup, a law enforcement officer may take the minor into custody for the purpose of returning the minor to the site of the community service or graffiti cleanup.
(d) When a minor is adjudged or continued as a ward of the court on the ground that the minor is a person described by Section 602 by reason of the commission of rape, sodomy, oral copulation, or an act of sexual penetration specified in Section 289 of the Penal Code, the court shall order the minor to complete a sex offender treatment program, if the court determines, in consultation with the county probation officer, that suitable programs are available. In determining what type of treatment is appropriate, the court shall consider all of the following: the seriousness and circumstances of the offense, the vulnerability of the victim, the minor’s criminal history and prior attempts at rehabilitation, the sophistication of the minor, the threat to public safety, the minor’s likelihood of reoffending, and any other relevant information presented. If ordered by the court to complete a sex offender treatment program, the minor shall pay all or a portion of the reasonable costs of the sex offender treatment program after a determination is made of the ability of the minor to pay.
(e) This section shall remain in effect only until July 1, 2021, and as of that date is repealed.

SEC. 27.

 Section 730 is added to the Welfare and Institutions Code, to read:

730.
 (a) (1) When a minor is adjudged a ward of the court on the ground that they are a person described by Section 602, the court may order any of the types of treatment referred to in Section 727, and as an additional alternative, may commit the minor to a juvenile home, ranch, camp, or forestry camp. If there is no county juvenile home, ranch, camp, or forestry camp within the county, the court may commit the minor to the county juvenile hall. In addition, the court may also make any of the following orders:
(A) Order the ward to make restitution, to pay a fine up to two hundred fifty dollars ($250) for deposit in the county treasury if the court finds that the minor has the financial ability to pay the fine, or to participate in uncompensated work programs.
(B) Commit the ward to a sheltered-care facility.
(C) Order that the ward and the ward’s family or guardian participate in a program of professional counseling as arranged and directed by the probation officer as a condition of continued custody of the ward.
(2) A court shall not commit a juvenile to any juvenile facility for a period that exceeds the middle term of imprisonment that could be imposed upon an adult convicted of the same offense.
(b) When a ward described in subdivision (a) is placed under the supervision of the probation officer or committed to the care, custody, and control of the probation officer, the court may make any and all reasonable orders for the conduct of the ward including the requirement that the ward go to work and earn money for the support of the ward’s dependents or to effect reparation and in either case that the ward keep an account of the ward’s earnings and report the same to the probation officer and apply these earnings as directed by the court. The court may impose and require any and all reasonable conditions that it may determine fitting and proper to the end that justice may be done and the reformation and rehabilitation of the ward enhanced.
(c) When a ward described in subdivision (a) is placed under the supervision of the probation officer or committed to the care, custody, and control of the probation officer, and is required as a condition of probation to participate in community service or graffiti cleanup, the court may impose a condition that if the minor unreasonably fails to attend or unreasonably leaves prior to completing the assigned daily hours of community service or graffiti cleanup, a law enforcement officer may take the minor into custody for the purpose of returning the minor to the site of the community service or graffiti cleanup.
(d) When a minor is adjudged or continued as a ward of the court on the ground that the ward is a person described by Section 602 by reason of the commission of rape, sodomy, oral copulation, or an act of sexual penetration specified in Section 289 of the Penal Code, the court shall order the minor to complete a sex offender treatment program, if the court determines, in consultation with the county probation officer, that suitable programs are available. In determining what type of treatment is appropriate, the court shall consider all of the following: the seriousness and circumstances of the offense, the vulnerability of the victim, the minor’s criminal history and prior attempts at rehabilitation, the sophistication of the minor, the threat to public safety, the minor’s likelihood of reoffending, and any other relevant information presented. If ordered by the court to complete a sex offender treatment program, the minor shall pay all or a portion of the reasonable costs of the sex offender treatment program after a determination is made of the ability of the minor to pay.
(e) This section shall become operative July 1, 2021.

SEC. 28.

 Section 731 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

731.
 (a) If a minor is adjudged a ward of the court on the ground that the minor is a person described by Section 602, the court may order any of the types of treatment referred to in Sections 727 and 730 and, in addition, may do any of the following:
(1) Order the ward to make restitution, to pay a fine up to two hundred fifty dollars ($250) for deposit in the county treasury if the court finds that the minor has the financial ability to pay the fine, or to participate in uncompensated work programs.
(2) Commit the ward to a sheltered-care facility.
(3) Order that the ward and the ward’s family or guardian participate in a program of professional counseling as arranged and directed by the probation officer as a condition of continued custody of the ward.
(4) Commit the ward to the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, Division of Juvenile Facilities, if the ward has committed an offense described in subdivision (b) of Section 707 or subdivision (c) of Section 290.008 of the Penal Code, and is not otherwise ineligible for commitment to the division under Section 733.
(b) The Division of Juvenile Facilities shall notify the Department of Finance when a county recalls a ward pursuant to Section 731.1. The division shall provide the department with the date the ward was recalled and the number of months the ward has served in a state facility. The division shall provide this information in the format prescribed by the department and within the timeframes established by the department.
(c) A ward committed to the Division of Juvenile Justice shall not be confined in excess of the term of confinement set by the committing court. The court shall set a maximum term based upon the facts and circumstances of the matter or matters that brought or continued the ward under the jurisdiction of the court and as deemed appropriate to achieve rehabilitation. The court shall not commit a ward to the Division of Juvenile Justice for a period that exceeds the middle term of imprisonment that could be imposed upon an adult convicted of the same offense. This subdivision does not limit the power of the Board of Juvenile Hearings to discharge a ward committed to the Division of Juvenile Justice pursuant to Sections 1719 and 1769. Upon discharge, the committing court may retain jurisdiction of the ward pursuant to Section 607.1 and establish the conditions of supervision pursuant to subdivision (b) of Section 1766.
(d) This section shall become inoperative on July 1, 2021, and, as of January 1, 2022, is repealed.

SEC. 29.

 Section 733.1 is added to the Welfare and Institutions Code, to read:

733.1.
 (a) Notwithstanding any other law, except as otherwise provided in this section, a ward of the juvenile court shall not be committed to the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, Division of Juvenile Justice on or after July 1, 2021.
(b) A court may commit a ward to the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, Division of Juvenile Justice as authorized in subdivision (c) of Section 736.5.
(c) Effective July 1, 2021, a person adjudged a ward of the court pursuant to Section 602, shall not be committed to the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, Division of Juvenile Justice, as long as allocations required by Section 1991 are authorized in statute and disbursed by September 1, 2021, and September 1 annually thereafter. To the extent that the allocations required by Section 1991 are not authorized in statute and disbursed annually thereafter, it is the intent of this section that wards adjudged wards of the court pursuant to Section 602 for an offense described in subdivision (b) of Section 707 of this code or subdivision (c) of Section 290.008 of the Penal Code may be committed to a state-funded facility pursuant to Sections 731, 733, and 734. For the purpose of determining the state’s compliance with this subdivision, the presumption shall be that the state is meeting its commitment in Section 1991 if that section is not materially changed from the law in effect on the operative date of this section.

SEC. 30.

 Section 736.5 is added to the Welfare and Institutions Code, to read:

736.5.
 (a) It is the intent of the Legislature to close the Division of Juvenile Justice within the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, through shifting responsibility for all youth adjudged a ward of the court, commencing July 1, 2021, to county governments and providing annual funding for county governments to fulfill this new responsibility.
(b) Beginning July 1, 2021, a ward shall not be committed to the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, Division of Juvenile Justice, except as described in subdivision (c).
(c) Pending the final closure of the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, Division of Juvenile Justice, a court may commit a ward who is otherwise eligible to be committed under existing law and in whose case a motion to transfer the minor from juvenile court to a court of criminal jurisdiction was filed.
(d) All wards committed to the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, Division of Juvenile Justice prior to July 1, 2021 or pursuant to (c), shall remain within its custody until the ward is discharged, released or otherwise moved pursuant to law.
(e) It is the intent of the Legislature to establish a separate dispositional track for higher-need youth by March 1, 2021. The framework for consideration shall be the processes laid out in Section 30 of Senate Bill 823 as amended on August 24, 2020.

SEC. 31.

 Section 912 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

912.
 (a) A county from which a person is committed to the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, Division of Juvenile Facilities, shall pay to the state an annual rate of twenty-four thousand dollars ($24,000) while the person remains in an institution under the direct supervision of the division, or in an institution, boarding home, foster home, or other private or public institution in which the person is placed by the division, and cared for and supported at the expense of the division, as provided in this subdivision. This subdivision applies to a person who is committed to the division by a juvenile court on or after July 1, 2012.
The Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, Division of Juvenile Facilities, shall present to the county, not more frequently than monthly, a claim for the amount due to the state under this subdivision, which the county shall process and pay pursuant to Chapter 4 (commencing with Section 29700) of Division 3 of Title 3 of the Government Code.
(b) A county from which a person is committed to the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, Division of Juvenile Facilities, on or after July 1, 2018, shall pay to the state an annual rate of twenty-four thousand dollars ($24,000) for the time the person remains in an institution under the direct supervision of the division, or in an institution, boarding home, foster home, or other private or public institution in which the person is placed by the division, and cared for and supported at the expense of the division, as provided in this subdivision. A county shall not pay the annual rate of twenty-four thousand dollars ($24,000) for a person who is 23 years of age or older. This subdivision applies to a person committed to the division by a juvenile court on or after July 1, 2018.
(c) A county from which a person is committed to the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, Division of Juvenile Justice, on or after July 1, 2021, shall pay to the state an annual rate of one-hundred and twenty-five thousand dollars ($125,000) for the time the person remains in an institution under the direct supervision of the division, or in an institution, boarding home, foster home, or other private or public institution in which the person is placed by the division, and cared for and supported at the expense of the division, as provided in this subdivision. A county shall not pay the annual rate of one-hundred and twenty-five thousand dollars ($125,000) for a person who is 23 years of age or older. This subdivision applies to a person committed to the division by a juvenile court on or after July 1, 2021.
(d) Consistent with Article 1 (commencing with Section 6024) of Chapter 5 of Title 7 of Part 3 of the Penal Code, the Board of State and Community Corrections shall collect and maintain available information and data about the movement of juvenile offenders committed by a juvenile court and placed in any institution, boarding home, foster home, or other private or public institution in which they are cared for, supervised, or both, by the division or the county while they are on parole, probation, or otherwise.

SEC. 32.

 Section 1703 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, as added by Section 56 of Chapter 25 of the Statutes of 2019, is repealed.

SEC. 33.

 Section 1703 is added to the Welfare and Institutions Code, to read:

1703.
 As used in this chapter the following terms have the following meanings:
(a) “Public offenses” means public offenses as that term is defined in the Penal Code.
(b) “Court” includes any official authorized to impose sentence for a public offense.
(c) “Youth Authority,” “Authority,” “authority,” or “division” means the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, Division of Juvenile Facilities.
(d) “Board” or “board” means the Board of Parole Hearings, until January 1, 2007, at which time “board” shall refer to the body created to hear juvenile parole matters under the jurisdiction of the Director of the Division of Juvenile Justice in the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation.
(e) The masculine pronoun includes the feminine.

SEC. 34.

 Section 1710 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, as added by Section 58 of Chapter 25 of the Statutes of 2019, is repealed.

SEC. 35.

 Section 1710 is added to the Welfare and Institutions Code, to read:

1710.
 (a) Any reference to the Department of the Youth Authority in this code or any other code refers to the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, Division of Juvenile Justice.
(b) The Legislature finds and declares the following:
(1) The purpose of the Division of Juvenile Justice within the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation is to protect society from the consequences of criminal activity by providing for the secure placement of youth, and to effectively and efficiently operate and manage facilities housing youthful offenders under the jurisdiction of the department, consistent with the purposes set forth in Section 1700.
(2) The purpose of the Division of Juvenile Programs within the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation is to provide comprehensive education, training, treatment, and rehabilitative services to youthful offenders under the jurisdiction of the department, that are designed to promote community restoration, family ties, and victim restoration, and to produce youth who become law-abiding and productive members of society, consistent with the purposes set forth in Section 202.
(3) The purpose of the Division of Juvenile Parole Operations within the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation is to monitor and supervise the reentry into society of youthful offenders under the jurisdiction of the department, and to promote the successful reintegration of youthful offenders into society, in order to reduce the rate of recidivism, thereby increasing public safety.

SEC. 36.

 Section 1711 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, as added by Section 60 of Chapter 25 of the Statutes of 2019, is repealed.

SEC. 37.

 Section 1711 is added to the Welfare and Institutions Code, to read:

1711.
 Any reference to the Director of the Youth Authority shall be to the Director of the Division of Juvenile Justice in the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, unless otherwise expressly provided.

SEC. 38.

 Section 1712 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, as added by Section 62 of Chapter 25 of the Statutes of 2019, is repealed.

SEC. 39.

 Section 1712 is added to the Welfare and Institutions Code, to read:

1712.
 (a) All powers, duties, and functions pertaining to the care and treatment of wards provided by any provision of law and not specifically and expressly assigned to the Juvenile Justice branch of the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, or to the Board of Parole Hearings, shall be exercised and performed by the Secretary of the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation. The secretary shall be the appointing authority for all civil service positions of employment in the department. The secretary may delegate the powers and duties vested in the secretary by law, in accordance with Section 7.
(b) Commencing July 1, 2005, the secretary is authorized to make and enforce all rules appropriate to the proper accomplishment of the functions of the Division of Juvenile Facilities, Division of Juvenile Programs, and Division of Juvenile Parole Operations. The rules shall be promulgated and filed pursuant to Chapter 3.5 (commencing with Section 11340) of Part 1 of Division 3 of Title 2 of the Government Code, and shall, to the extent practical, be stated in language that is easily understood by the general public.
(c) The secretary shall maintain, publish, and make available to the general public, a compendium of rules and regulations promulgated by the department pursuant to this section.
(d) The following exceptions to the procedures specified in this section shall apply to the department:
(1) The department may specify an effective date that is any time more than 30 days after the rule or regulation is filed with the Secretary of State; provided that no less than 20 days prior to that effective date, copies of the rule or regulation shall be posted in conspicuous places throughout each institution and shall be mailed to all persons or organizations who request them.
(2) The department may rely upon a summary of the information compiled by a hearing officer; provided that the summary and the testimony taken regarding the proposed action shall be retained as part of the public record for at least one year after the adoption, amendment, or repeal.

SEC. 40.

 Section 1714 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, as added by Section 64 of Chapter 25 of the Statutes of 2019, is repealed.

SEC. 41.

 Section 1714 is added to the Welfare and Institutions Code, to read:

1714.
 The Secretary of the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation may transfer persons confined in one institution or facility of the Division of Juvenile Justice to another. Proximity to family shall be one consideration in placement.

SEC. 42.

 Section 1731.5 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, as added by Section 66 of Chapter 25 of the Statutes of 2019, is repealed.

SEC. 43.

 Section 1731.5 is added to the Welfare and Institutions Code, to read:

1731.5.
 (a) After certification to the Governor as provided in this article, a court may commit to the Division of Juvenile Justice any person who meets all of the following:
(1) Is convicted of an offense described in subdivision (b) of Section 707 or subdivision (c) of Section 290.008 of the Penal Code.
(2) Is found to be less than 21 years of age at the time of apprehension.
(3) Is not sentenced to death, imprisonment for life, with or without the possibility of parole, whether or not pursuant to Section 190 of the Penal Code, imprisonment for 90 days or less, or the payment of a fine, or after having been directed to pay a fine, defaults in the payment thereof, and is subject to imprisonment for more than 90 days under the judgment.
(4) Is not granted probation, or was granted probation and that probation is revoked and terminated.
(b) The Division of Juvenile Justice shall accept a person committed to it pursuant to this article if it believes that the person can be materially benefited by its reformatory and educational discipline, and if it has adequate facilities to provide that care.
(c) A person under 18 years of age who is not committed to the division pursuant to this section may be transferred to the division by the Secretary of the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation with the approval of the Director of the Division of Juvenile Justice. In sentencing a person under 18 years of age, the court may order that the person be transferred to the custody of the Division of Juvenile Justice pursuant to this subdivision. If the court makes this order and the division fails to accept custody of the person, the person shall be returned to court for resentencing. The transfer shall be solely for the purposes of housing the inmate, allowing participation in the programs available at the institution by the inmate, and allowing division parole supervision of the inmate, who, in all other aspects shall be deemed to be committed to the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation and shall remain subject to the jurisdiction of the Secretary of the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation and the Board of Parole Hearings. Notwithstanding subdivision (b) of Section 2900 of the Penal Code, the secretary, with the concurrence of the director, may designate a facility under the jurisdiction of the director as a place of reception for a person described in this subdivision. The director has the same powers with respect to an inmate transferred pursuant to this subdivision as if the inmate had been committed or transferred to the Division of Juvenile Justice either under the Arnold-Kennick Juvenile Court Law or subdivision (a). The duration of the transfer shall extend until any of the following occurs:
(1) The director orders the inmate returned to the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation.
(2) The inmate is ordered discharged by the Board of Parole Hearings.
(3) The inmate reaches 18 years of age. However, if the inmate’s period of incarceration would be completed on or before the inmate’s 25th birthday, the director may continue to house the inmate until the period of incarceration is completed.
(d) The amendments to subdivision (c), as that subdivision reads on July 1, 2018, made by the act adding this subdivision, apply retroactively.

SEC. 44.

 Section 1752.2 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, as added by Section 70 of Chapter 25 of the Statutes of 2019, is repealed.

SEC. 45.

 Section 1752.2 is added to the Welfare and Institutions Code, to read:

1752.2.
 (a) The Division of Juvenile Justice, in partnership with the California Conservation Corps and participating certified local conservation corps, shall develop and establish a precorps transitional training program within the Division of Juvenile Justice. This program shall operate within a facility identified by the Division of Juvenile Justice, with partnering state and local conservation corps responsible for program content, delivery, and administration. This program shall provide participating Division of Juvenile Justice corps members with a training and development program to approximate the experience of serving in a conservation corps, and include opportunities for skill building, job readiness training, community service, and conservation activities. Training shall include, but is not limited to, transferable professional skills known as “soft skills,” social emotional learning, transitional life skills, and conservation jobs skills. Division of Juvenile Justice participants who successfully complete program curriculum shall qualify for a paid full-time placement within a local community corps program, and may be considered for a placement in the California Conservation Corps. This program shall be considered for expansion to additional Division of Juvenile Justice facilities if effective at reducing recidivism among participants.
(b) The Division of Juvenile Justice and the California Conservation Corps shall enter into an interagency agreement to implement this section. The agreement shall include input from participating certified local conservation corps.

SEC. 46.

 Section 1762 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, as added by Section 4 of Chapter 857 of the Statutes of 2019, is repealed.

SEC. 47.

 Section 1762 is added to the Welfare and Institutions Code, to read:

1762.
 (a) It is the intent of the Legislature that youth with a high school diploma or California high school equivalency certificate who are detained in, or committed to, a Division of Juvenile Justice facility shall have access to rigorous postsecondary academic and career technical education programs that fulfill the requirements for transfer to the University of California and the California State University and prepare them for career entry, respectively.
(b) (1) The Division of Juvenile Justice shall, to the extent feasible using available resources, ensure that youth with a high school diploma or California high school equivalency certificate who are detained in, or committed to, a Division of Juvenile Justice facility have access to, and can choose to participate in, public postsecondary academic and career technical courses and programs offered online, and for which they are eligible based on eligibility criteria and course schedules of the public postsecondary education campus providing the course or program. The division is also encouraged to develop other educational partnerships with local public postsecondary campuses, as is feasible, to provide programs on campus and onsite at the Division of Juvenile Justice facility.
(2) These programs shall be considered part of the current responsibilities of the Division of Juvenile Justice to provide and coordinate services for youth that enable the youth to be law-abiding and productive members of their families and communities.
(c) For purposes of this section, “youth” means any person detained in, or committed to, a Division of Juvenile Justice facility.
(d) This section does not preclude youth who have not yet completed their high school graduation requirements from concurrently participating in postsecondary academic and career technical education programs.

SEC. 48.

 Section 1955.2 is added to the Welfare and Institutions Code, to read:

1955.2.
 Notwithstanding subdivision (c) of Section 1731.5, when an individual under 18 years of age is convicted of an offense in superior court on or after July 1, 2021, and sentenced to state prison, that individual shall remain in a county juvenile facility until the individual reaches 18 years of age and may be transferred to state prison. The Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation shall pay a daily rate of six hundred fourteen dollars and forty-four cents ($616.44) to a county for the number of days a qualifying individual is in a local juvenile facility. This section only applies once an individual has been convicted and is under 18 years of age. This section does not require the county of conviction to enter into a contract with the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation for the care and custody of the individuals described in this section.

SEC. 49.

 Chapter 1.7 (commencing with Section 1990) is added to Division 2.5 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, to read:
CHAPTER  1.7. Juvenile Justice Realignment Block Grant

1990.
 (a) The Juvenile Justice Realignment Block Grant program is hereby established for the purpose of providing county based custody, care, and supervision of youth who are realigned from the state Division of Juvenile Justice or who were otherwise eligible for commitment to the Division of Juvenile Justice prior to its closure.
(b) The realignment target population for the grant program shall be defined as youth who were eligible for commitment to the Division of Juvenile Justice prior to its closure, and shall further be defined as persons who are adjudicated to be a ward of the juvenile court based on an offense described in subdivision (b) of Section 707 or on offense described in Section 290.008 of the Penal Code.

1991.
 (a) Commencing with the 2021-22 fiscal year, and annually thereafter, there shall be an allocation to the county for use by the county to provide appropriate rehabilitative housing and supervision services for the population specified in subdivision (b) of Section 1990. In making allocations, the Board of Supervisors shall consider the plan required in Section 1995. Any entity receiving a direct allocation of funding from the Board of Supervisors under this section for any secure residential placement for court ordered detention will be subject to existing regulations. A local public agency that has primary responsibility for prosecuting or making arrests or detentions shall not provide rehabilitative and supervision services for the population specified in subdivision (b) of Section 1990 or receive funding pursuant to this section:
(1) For the 2021-22 fiscal year, thirty-nine million nine hundred forty-nine thousand dollars ($39,949,000) shall be appropriated from the General Fund to provide appropriate rehabilitative and supervision services for the population specified in subdivision (b) of Section 1990 based on a projected average daily population of 177.6 wards. The by-county distribution shall be based on 30 percent of the per-county percentage of the average number of wards committed to the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, Division of Juvenile Justice, as of December 31, 2018, June 30, 2019, and December 31, 2019, 50 percent of the by-county distribution of juveniles adjudicated for certain violent and serious felony crime categories per 2018 Juvenile Court and Probation Statistical System data, updated annually based on the most recently available data, and 20 percent of the by-county distribution of all individuals between 10 and 17 years of age, inclusive, from the preceding calendar year.
(2) For the 2022-23 fiscal year, one hundred eighteen million three hundred thirty-nine thousand dollars ($118,339,000) shall be appropriated from the General Fund to provide appropriate rehabilitative and supervision services for the population specified in subdivision (b) of Section 1990. The by-county distribution is based the per-county percentage referenced in paragraph (1) of subdivision (a) and a projected average daily population of 526 wards.
(3) For the 2023-24 fiscal year, one hundred ninety two million thirty-seven thousand dollars ($192,037,000) shall be appropriated from the General Fund to provide appropriate rehabilitative and supervision services for the population specified in subdivision (b) Section 1990. The by-county distribution is based the per-county percentage referenced in paragraph (1) of subdivision (a) and a projected average daily population of 853.5 wards.
(4) For the 2024-25 fiscal year and each year thereafter, two hundred eight million eight hundred thousand dollars ($208,800,000) shall be appropriated from the General Fund to provide appropriate rehabilitative and supervision services for the population specified in subdivision (b) of Section 1990 based on a projected average daily population of 928 wards. The Governor and the Legislature shall work with stakeholders to establish a distribution methodology for the funding in this paragraph by January 10, 2024, and ongoing that improves outcomes for this population.
(5) The Department of Finance shall increase to no more than two hundred fifty thousand dollars ($250,000) the award amount for any county whose allocation as calculated pursuant to paragraphs (1), (2), (3), and (4) totals less than two hundred fifty thousand dollars ($250,000). The appropriation in paragraphs (1), (2), (3), and (4) shall be increased by the amount(s) needed to bring each counties allocation to $250,000.
(b) Commencing with the 2024-25 fiscal year, the allocations determined by paragraphs (4) and (5) of subdivision (a) and shall be adjusted annually by a rate commensurate with any applicable growth in the Juvenile Justice Growth Special Account in the prior fiscal year. Each year this growth shall become additive to the next year’s base allocation.
(c) By September 1, 2021, and each September 1 annually thereafter, the Department of Finance shall allocate the amount calculated in paragraphs (1), (2), (3), (4), and (5) of subdivision (a) from the General Fund and provide a schedule for the allocation of funds among counties to the State Controller. The State Controller shall allocate these funds in monthly installments according to the same schedule for allocations from the Youthful Offender Block Grant Special Account.

1995.
 (a) To be eligible for funding described in Section 1991, a county shall create a subcommittee of the multiagency juvenile justice coordinating council, as described in Section 749.22, to develop a plan describing the facilities, programs, placements, services, supervision and reentry strategies that are needed to provide appropriate rehabilitation and supervision services for the population described in subdivision (b) of Section 1990.
(b) The subcommittee shall be composed of the chief probation officer, as chair, and one representative each from the district attorney’s office, the public defender’s office, the department of social services, the department of mental health, the county office of education or a school district, and a representative from the court.  The subcommittee shall also include no fewer than three community members who shall be defined as individuals who have experience providing community-based youth services, youth justice advocates with expertise and knowledge of the juvenile justice system, or have been directly involved in the juvenile justice system.
(c) The plan described in subdivision (a) shall include all of the following elements:
(1) A description of the realignment target population in the county that is to be supported or served by allocations from the block grant program, including the numbers of youth served, disaggregated by factors including their ages, offense and offense histories, gender, race or ethnicity, and other characteristics, and by the programs, placements, or facilities to which they are referred.
(2) A description of the facilities, programs, placements, services and service providers, supervision, and other responses that will be provided to the target population.
(3) A description of how grant funds will be applied to address each of the following areas of need or development for realigned youth:
(A) Mental health, sex offender treatment, or related behavioral or trauma-based needs.
(B) Support programs or services that promote the healthy adolescent development.
(C) Family engagement in programs.
(D) Reentry, including planning and linkages to support employment, housing, and continuing education.
(E) Evidence-based, promising, trauma-informed, and culturally responsive.
(F) Whether and how the plan will include services or programs for realigned youth that are provided by nongovernmental or community-based providers.
(4) A detailed facility plan indicating which facilities will be used to house or confine realigned youth at varying levels of offense severity and treatment need, and improvements to accommodate long-term commitments. This element of the plan shall also include information on how the facilities will ensure the safety and protection of youth having different ages, genders, special needs, and other relevant characteristics.
(5) A description of how the plan will incentivize or facilitate the retention of realigned youth within the jurisdiction and rehabilitative foundation of the juvenile justice system in lieu of transfers of realigned youth into the adult criminal justice system.
(6) A description of any regional agreements or arrangements to be supported by the block grant allocation pursuant to this chapter.
(7) A description of how data will be collected on the youth served and outcomes for youth served by the block grant program, including a description the outcome measures that will be utilized to measure or determine the results of programs and interventions supported by block grant funds.
(e) In order to receive 2022-2023 funding pursuant to Section 1991, a plan shall be filed with the Office of Youth and Community Restoration by January 1, 2022. In order to continue receiving funding, the subcommittee shall convene to consider the plan every third year, but at a minimum submit the most recent plan regardless of changes. The plan shall be submitted to the Office of Youth and Community Restoration by May 1 of each year.
(f) The Office of Youth and Community Restoration shall review the plan to ensure that the plan contains the all elements described in this section and may return the plan to the county for revision as necessary prior to final acceptance of the plan.
(g) The Office of Youth and Community Restoration shall prepare and make available to the public on its internet website a summary and a copy of the annual county plans submitted pursuant to this section.

SEC. 50.

 Chapter 4 (commencing with Section 2200) is added to Division 2.5 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, to read:
CHAPTER  4. Office of Youth and Community Restoration

2200.
 (a) Commencing July 1, 2021, there is in the California Health and Human Services Agency the Office of Youth and Community Restoration.
(b) The office’s mission is to promote trauma responsive, culturally informed services for youth involved in the juvenile justice system that support the youths’ successful transition into adulthood and help them become responsible, thriving, and engaged members of their communities.
(c) The office shall have the following responsibility and authority:
(1) Once data becomes available as a result of the plan developed to Section 13015 of the Penal Code, develop a report on youth outcomes in the juvenile justice system.
(2) Identify policy recommendations for improved outcomes and integrated programs and services to best support delinquent youth.
(3) Identify and disseminate best practices to help inform rehabilitative and restorative youth practices, including education, diversion, re-entry, religious and victims’ services.
(4) Provide technical assistance as requested to develop and expand local youth diversion opportunities to meet the varied needs of the delinquent youth population, including but not limited to sex offender, substance abuse, and mental health treatment.
(5) Report annually on the work of the Office of Youth and Community Restoration.
(d) The office shall have an ombudsman that has the authority to do all of the following:
(1) Investigate complaints from youth, families, staff, and others about harmful conditions or practices, violations of laws and regulations governing facilities, and circumstances presenting an emergency situation.
(2) Decide, in its discretion, whether to investigate a complaint, or refer complaints to another body for investigation.
(3) Resolve complaints when possible, collaborating with facility administrators and staff to develop resolutions that may include training.
(4) Publish and provide regular reports to the Legislature about complaints received and subsequent findings and actions taken. The report shall comply with all confidentiality laws.
(e) The Office of Youth and Community Restoration shall evaluate the efficacy of local programs being utilized for realigned youth. No later than July 1, 2025, the office shall report its findings to the Governor and the legislature.
(f) Juvenile grants shall not be awarded by the Board of State and Community Corrections without the concurrence of the office. All juvenile justice grant administration functions in the Board of State and Community Corrections shall be moved to the office no later than January 1, 2025.

2201.
 (a) Until July 1, 2023, the committee established pursuant to Section 12824 of the Government Code shall be responsible for advising and providing recommendations related to policies, programs, and approaches that improve youth outcomes, reduce youth detention, and reduce recidivism for the population in subdivision (b) of Section 1990.
(b) The committee established pursuant to Section 12824 of the Government Code shall work directly with the Office of Youth and Community Restoration, the Division of Juvenile Justice, and shall be staffed by the California Health and Human Services Agency.

SEC. 51.

 Chapter 5 (commencing with Section 2250) is added to Division 2.5 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, to read:
CHAPTER  5. Regional Youth Programs and Facilities Grant Program

2250.
 (a) Nine million six hundred thousand dollars ($9,600,000) is hereby appropriated from the General Fund to the Youth Programs and Facilities Grant Program, which shall be administered by the Board of State and Community Corrections, to award one-time grants, to counties for the purpose of providing resources for infrastructure related needs and improvements to assist counties in the development of a local continuum of care.
(b) Each entity receiving a grant from the Youth Programs and Facilities Grant Program shall submit a detailed report to the office with the following information:
(1) An accounting of expenditures.
(2) A description of the physical and system enhancements made.
(3) How many regional placement beds were supported with the funding.
(4) What proportion of the regional placement beds were contracted to other counties and which counties.
(c) A local public agency that has responsibility for making arrests and detaining suspects as its primary responsibility, or which is responsible for prosecutions, is ineligible to apply for this grant.
(d) Funds from the Youth Programs and Facilities Grant Program shall not be used by counties to enter into contracts with private entities whose primary business is the custodial confinement of adults or youth in a prison or prison-like setting.
(e) (1) The Board of State and Community Corrections shall complete and submit, no later than October 1, 2024, a report to the budget and public safety policy committees of the Legislature describing the expenditures of the Youth Programs and Facilities Grant Program, including, but not limited to, recipients and award amounts, how funding was spent, how many regional placements were supported and a detailed description of the counties that contracted to utilize the regional facility beds. The report shall also be made available to the public on the board’s internet website.
(2) The report required by paragraph (1) shall be submitted in compliance with Section 9795 of the Government Code.
(f) Any costs incurred by the office in connection with the development or administration of the grant program shall be deducted from the amount appropriated before awarding any grants, not to exceed five percent of the amount appropriated.
(g) This chapter shall remain in effect only until January 1, 2026, and as of that date is repealed.

SEC. 52.

  If the Commission on State Mandates determines that this act contains costs mandated by the state, reimbursement to local agencies and school districts for those costs shall be made pursuant to Part 7 (commencing with Section 17500) of Division 4 of Title 2 of the Government Code.

SEC. 53.

  This act is a bill providing for appropriations related to the Budget Bill within the meaning of subdivision (e) of Section 12 of Article IV of the California Constitution, has been identified as related to the budget in the Budget Bill, and shall take effect immediately.