Bill Text

Bill Information

PDF |Add To My Favorites |Track Bill | print page

SB-710 Crimes: parole, theft, and DNA collection.(2019-2020)

SHARE THIS:share this bill in Facebookshare this bill in Twitter
Date Published: 02/22/2019 09:00 PM
SB710:v99#DOCUMENT


CALIFORNIA LEGISLATURE— 2019–2020 REGULAR SESSION

Senate Bill
No. 710


Introduced by Senator Bates

February 22, 2019


An act to amend Sections 296, 459.5, 490.2, 3003, 3041, 3454, and 3455 of, and to add Sections 490.3, 3040.1, 3040.2, 3040.3, and 3040.4 to, the Penal Code, relating to crimes.


LEGISLATIVE COUNSEL'S DIGEST


SB 710, as introduced, Bates. Crimes: parole, theft, and DNA collection.
(1) Existing law, as amended by the DNA Fingerprint, Unsolved Crime and Innocence Protection Act, Proposition 69, approved by the voters at the November 2, 2004, statewide general election (the DNA act), requires a person who has been convicted of a felony offense to provide buccal swab samples, right thumbprints, and a full palm print impression of each hand, and any blood specimens or other biological samples required for law enforcement identification analysis. Existing law makes this requirement retroactive, regardless of when the crime charged or committed became a qualifying offense. Existing law authorizes amendments to the DNA act that are consistent with its purposes.
This bill would also require persons convicted of specified misdemeanors to provide buccal swab samples, right thumbprints, and a full palm print impression of each hand, and any blood specimens or other biological samples required for law enforcement identification analysis. By imposing additional duties on local law enforcement agencies to collect and forward these samples, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program.
(2) Existing law, the Safe Neighborhoods and Schools Act, enacted as an initiative statute by Proposition 47, as approved by the electors at the November 4, 2014, statewide general election, makes the theft of money, labor, or property petty theft, punishable as a misdemeanor, whenever the value of the property taken does not exceed $950. Proposition 47 requires shoplifting, defined as entering a commercial establishment with the intent to commit larceny if the value of the property taken does not exceed $950, to be punished as a misdemeanor. Proposition 47 requires the crime of shoplifting to be charged as shoplifting and prohibits a person who is charged with shoplifting from being charged with burglary or theft of the same property. Existing law authorizes the Legislature to amend the provisions of the act by a 2/3 vote of each house of the Legislature if it is consistent with, and furthers the purpose of, the act.
This bill would recast the shoplifting provisions as entering a commercial establishment with the intent to steal retail property or merchandise, as defined. By amending the definition of shoplifting enacted by Proposition 47, this bill would require a 2/3 vote.
Existing law, the Safe Neighborhoods and Schools Act, makes a registered sex offender or a person with a prior conviction for certain serious or violent felonies, such as a sexually violent offense, who commits petty theft, subject to imprisonment in the county jail for up to one year or in the state prison for 16 months, or 2 or 3 years.
This bill would apply that penalty to a person who has 2 prior convictions for specified offenses, including certain felonies, and including petty theft and shoplifting, who is subsequently convicted of petty theft or shoplifting if the value of the money, labor, or real or personal property taken exceeds $250.
(3) Existing provisions of the California Constitution make a person who was convicted of a nonviolent offense and sentenced to state prison eligible for parole consideration after completing the full term of the person’s primary offense. Existing law enumerates various felonies as violent.
This bill would classify other existing felonies as “violent felonies” for those purposes, and would apply that definition to persons currently incarcerated in state prison, regardless of the date on which their sentence was imposed.
Existing law provides for postrelease community supervision of felons, as provided, including the imposition of intermediate sanctions for noncompliant offender activity, including, among other things, incarceration in jail not exceeding 10 days, mandatory community service, and the revocation of postrelease community supervision by a court or a revocation hearing officer. Existing law requires the supervising county agency who has determined, following application of its assessment processes, that intermediate sanctions are not appropriate, to petition the court to revoke, modify, or terminate postrelease community supervision.
This bill would apply that requirement to the circumstance of a supervised offender who has violated the offender’s conditions of release 3 times. The bill would also require a county probation department, upon a decision to impose a period of flash incarceration, to notify the court, public defender, district attorney, and sheriff of each imposition of flash incarceration. By imposing additional duties on local governments, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program.
(4) The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.
This bill would provide that with regard to certain mandates no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason.
With regard to any other mandates, this bill would provide that, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that the bill contains costs so mandated by the state, reimbursement for those costs shall be made pursuant to the statutory provisions noted above.
Vote: 2/3   Appropriation: NO   Fiscal Committee: YES   Local Program: YES  

The people of the State of California do enact as follows:


SECTION 1.

 This act shall be known and may be cited as the Reducing Crime and Keeping California Safe Act of 2019.

SEC. 2.

 The Legislature finds and declares the following:
(a) This act will remedy three related problems created by recent laws that have created threats to the public safety of Californians and their children from violent criminals. This act will accomplish the following:
(1) Reform the parole system so violent felons are not released early from prison, strengthen oversight of postrelease community supervision, and tighten penalties for violations of terms of postrelease community supervision.
(2) Reform theft laws to restore accountability for serial thieves and organized theft rings.
(3) Expand DNA collection from persons convicted of drug, theft, and domestic violence-related crimes to help solve violent crimes and exonerate the innocent.
(b) This act will prevent the early release of violent felons. Protecting every person in our state, including our most vulnerable children, from violent crime is of the utmost importance. Murderers, rapists, child molesters, and other violent criminals should not be released early from prison.
(c) Since 2014, California has had a larger increase in violent crime than the rest of the United States. Since 2013, violent crime in Los Angeles has increased 69.5 percent. Violent crime in Sacramento rose faster during the first six months of 2015 than in any of the 25 largest United States cities tracked by the FBI.
(d) Recent changes to parole laws allowed the early release of dangerous criminals by the law’s failure to define certain crimes as “violent.” These changes allowed individuals convicted of sex trafficking of children, rape of an unconscious person, felony assault with a deadly weapon, battery on a police officer or firefighter, and felony domestic violence to be considered “nonviolent offenders.”
(e) As a result, these so-called “nonviolent” offenders are eligible for early release from prison after serving only a fraction of the sentence ordered by a judge.
(f) Violent offenders are also being allowed to remain free in our communities even when they commit new crimes and violate the terms of their postrelease community supervision, like the gang member charged with the murder of Whittier Police Officer, Keith Boyer.
(g) Californians need better protection from these violent criminals.
(h) Californians need better protection from felons who repeatedly violate the terms of their postrelease community supervision.
(i) This act reforms the law so felons who violate the terms of their release can be brought back to court and held accountable for those violations.
(j) This act reforms the law to define certain crimes as “violent felonies” for purposes of early release.
(k) This act does not create additional “strike” offenses which would increase the state prison population.
(l) This act does not affect the ability of the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation to award educational and merit credits.
(m) Recent changes to California law allow individuals who steal repeatedly to face few consequences, regardless of their criminal record or how many times they steal. As a result, between 2014 and 2016, California had the second-highest increase in theft and property crimes in the United States, while most states have seen a steady decline. According to the Department of Justice, the value of property stolen in 2015 was $2.5 billion with an increase of 13 percent since 2014, the largest single-year increase in at least 10 years.
(n) Individuals who repeatedly steal often do so to support their drug habit. Recent changes to California law have reduced judges’ ability to order individuals convicted of repeated theft crimes into effective drug treatment programs.
(o) California needs stronger laws for those who are repeatedly convicted of theft-related crimes, which will encourage those who repeatedly steal to support their drug problem to enter into existing drug treatment programs. This act enacts those reforms.
(p) This act will restore DNA collection to solve violent crime. Collecting DNA from criminals is essential to solving violent crimes. Over 450 violent crimes, including murder, rape, and robbery, have gone unsolved because DNA is being collected from fewer criminals.
(q) DNA collected in 2015 from a convicted child molester solved the rape-murders of two six-year-old boys that occurred three decades ago in Los Angeles County. DNA collected in 2016 from an individual caught driving a stolen car solved the 2012 San Francisco Bay area rape and murder of an 83-year-old woman.
(r) Recent changes to California law unintentionally eliminated DNA collection for theft and drug crimes. This act restores DNA collection from persons convicted for those offenses.
(s) Permitting collection of more DNA samples will help identify suspects, clear the innocent, and free the wrongly convicted.
(t) This act does not affect existing legal safeguards that protect the privacy of individuals by allowing for the removal of their DNA profile if they are not charged with a crime, are acquitted, or are found innocent.

SEC. 3.

 Section 296 of the Penal Code is amended to read:

296.
 (a) The following persons shall provide buccal swab samples, right thumbprints, and a full palm print impression of each hand, and any blood specimens or other biological samples required pursuant to this chapter for law enforcement identification analysis:
(1) Any A person, including any juvenile, who is convicted of or pleads guilty or no contest to any felony offense, or is found not guilty by reason of insanity of any felony offense, or any juvenile who is adjudicated under Section 602 of the Welfare and Institutions Code for committing any felony offense.
(2) Any An adult person who is arrested for or charged with any of the following felony offenses:
(A) Any A felony offense specified in Section 290 or attempt to commit any felony offense described in Section 290, or any felony offense that imposes upon a person the duty to register in California as a sex offender under Section 290.
(B) Murder or voluntary manslaughter or any attempt to commit murder or voluntary manslaughter.
(C) Commencing on January 1 of the fifth year following enactment of the act that added this subparagraph, as amended, any An adult person arrested or charged with any felony offense.
(3) Any A person, including any juvenile, who is required to register under Section 290 Sections 290 to 290.009, inclusive, or 457.1 because of the commission of, or the attempt to commit, a felony or misdemeanor offense, or any a person, including any a juvenile, who is housed in a mental health facility or sex offender treatment program after referral to such that facility or program by a court after being charged with any felony offense.
(4) A person, excluding a juvenile, who is convicted of, or pleads guilty or no contest to, any of the following offenses:
(A) A misdemeanor violation of Section 459.5.
(B) A violation of subdivision (a) of Section 473 that is punishable as a misdemeanor pursuant to subdivision (b) of Section 473.
(C) A violation of subdivision (a) of Section 476a that is punishable as a misdemeanor pursuant to subdivision (b) of Section 476a.
(D) A violation of Section 487 that is punishable as a misdemeanor pursuant to Section 490.2.
(E) A violation of Section 496 that is punishable as a misdemeanor.
(F) A misdemeanor violation of subdivision (a) of Section 11350 of the Health and Safety Code.
(G) A misdemeanor violation of subdivision (a) of Section 11377 of the Health and Safety Code.
(H) A misdemeanor violation of paragraph (1) of subdivision (e) of Section 243.
(I) A misdemeanor violation of Section 273.5.
(J) A misdemeanor violation of paragraph (1) of subdivision (b) of Section 368.
(K) Any misdemeanor violation where the victim is defined as set forth in Section 6211 of the Family Code.
(L) A misdemeanor violation of paragraph (3) of subdivision (b) of Section 647.

(4)

(5) The term “felony” as used in this subdivision includes an attempt to commit the offense.

(5)Nothing in this

(6) This chapter shall be construed as prohibiting does not prohibit the collection and analysis of specimens, samples, or print impressions as a condition of a plea for a non-qualifying nonqualifying offense.
(b) The provisions of this chapter and its requirements for submission of specimens, samples samples, and print impressions as soon as administratively practicable shall apply to all qualifying persons regardless of sentence imposed, including any sentence of death, life without the possibility of parole, or any life or indeterminate term, or any other disposition rendered in the case of an adult or juvenile tried as an adult, or whether the person is diverted, fined, or referred for evaluation, and regardless of disposition rendered or placement made in the case of a juvenile who is found to have committed any a felony offense or is adjudicated under Section 602 of the Welfare and Institutions Code.
(c) The provisions of this chapter and its requirements for submission of specimens, samples, and print impressions as soon as administratively practicable by a qualified persons as described in subdivision (a) person, as described in subdivision (a), shall apply regardless of placement or confinement in any a mental hospital or other public or private treatment facility, and shall include, but not be limited to, the following persons, including juveniles:
(1) Any A person committed to a state hospital or other treatment facility as a mentally disordered sex offender under former Article 1 (commencing with Section 6300) of Chapter 2 of Part 2 of Division 6 of the Welfare and Institutions Code.
(2) Any A person who has a severe mental disorder as set forth within the provisions of Article 4 (commencing with Section 2960) of Chapter 7 of Title 1 of Part 3 of the Penal Code.
(3) Any A person found to be a sexually violent predator pursuant to Article 4 (commencing with Section 6600) of Chapter 2 of Part 2 of Division 6 of the Welfare and Institutions Code.
(d) The provisions of this chapter are mandatory and apply whether or not the court advises a person, including any a juvenile, that he or she the juvenile must provide the data bank and database specimens, samples, and print impressions as a condition of probation, parole, or any a plea of guilty, no contest, or not guilty by reason of insanity, or any admission to any of the offenses described in subdivision (a).
(e) If at any stage of court proceedings the prosecuting attorney determines that specimens, samples, and print impressions required by this chapter have not already been taken from any person, as defined under subdivision (a) of Section 296, the prosecuting attorney shall notify the court orally on the record, or in writing, and request that the court order collection of the specimens, samples, and print impressions required by law. However, a failure by the prosecuting attorney or any other law enforcement agency to notify the court shall not relieve a person of the obligation to provide specimens, samples, and print impressions pursuant to this chapter.
(f) Prior to final disposition or sentencing in the case the court shall inquire and verify that the specimens, samples, and print impressions required by this chapter have been obtained and that this fact is included in the abstract of judgment or dispositional order in the case of a juvenile. The abstract of judgment issued by the court shall indicate that the court has ordered the person to comply with the requirements of this chapter and that the person shall be included in the state’s DNA and Forensic Identification Data Base and Data Bank program and be subject to this chapter.
However, failure by the court to verify specimen, sample, and print impression collection or enter these facts in the abstract of judgment or dispositional order in the case of a juvenile shall not invalidate an arrest, plea, conviction, or disposition, or otherwise relieve a person from the requirements of this chapter.

SEC. 4.

 Section 459.5 of the Penal Code is amended to read:

459.5.
 (a) Notwithstanding Section 459, shoplifting is defined as entering a commercial establishment with intent to commit larceny steal retail property or merchandise while that establishment is open during regular business hours, where if the value of the property that is taken or intended to be taken does not exceed nine hundred fifty dollars ($950). Any other entry into a commercial establishment with intent to commit larceny is burglary. Shoplifting shall be punished as a misdemeanor, except that a person with one or more prior convictions for an offense specified in clause (iv) of subparagraph (C) of paragraph (2) of subdivision (e) of Section 667 or for an offense requiring registration pursuant to subdivision (c) of Section 290 may be punished pursuant to subdivision (h) of Section 1170.
(b) Any act of shoplifting as defined in subdivision (a) shall be charged as shoplifting. No A person who is charged with shoplifting may shall not also be charged with burglary or theft of the same property.
(c) “Retail property or merchandise” means any article, product, commodity, item, or component intended to be sold in retail commerce.
(d) “Value” means the retail value of an item as advertised by the affected retail establishment, including applicable taxes.
(e) This section shall not apply to theft of a firearm, forgery, the unlawful sale, transfer, or conveyance of an access card pursuant to Section 484e, forgery of an access card pursuant to Section 484f, the unlawful use of an access card pursuant to Section 484g, theft from an elder pursuant to subdivision (e) of Section 368, receiving stolen property, embezzlement, or identity theft pursuant to Section 530.5, or the theft or unauthorized use of a vehicle pursuant to Section 10851 of the Vehicle Code.

SEC. 5.

 Section 490.2 of the Penal Code is amended to read:

490.2.
 (a) Notwithstanding Section 487 or any other provision of law defining grand theft, obtaining any property by theft where if the value of the money, labor, real or personal property taken does not exceed nine hundred fifty dollars ($950) shall be considered is petty theft and shall be punished as a misdemeanor, except that such the person may instead be punished pursuant to subdivision (h) of Section 1170 if that person has one or more prior convictions for an offense specified in clause (iv) of subparagraph (C) of paragraph (2) of subdivision (e) of Section 667 or for an offense requiring registration pursuant to subdivision (c) of Section 290.
(b) This section shall not be applicable to any theft that may be charged as an infraction pursuant to any other provision of law.
(c) This section shall not apply to theft of a firearm. firearm, forgery, the unlawful sale, transfer, or conveyance of an access card pursuant to Section 484e, forgery of an access card pursuant to Section 484f, the unlawful use of an access card pursuant to Section 484g, theft from an elder pursuant to subdivision (e) of Section 368, receiving stolen property, embezzlement, or identity theft pursuant to Section 530.5, or the theft or unauthorized use of a vehicle pursuant to Section 10851 of the Vehicle Code.

SEC. 6.

 Section 490.3 is added to the Penal Code, to read:

490.3.
 (a) This section applies to the following crimes:
(1) Petty theft.
(2) Shoplifting.
(3) Grand theft.
(4) Burglary.
(5) Carjacking.
(6) Robbery.
(7) A crime against an elder or dependent adult within the meaning of subdivision (d) or (e) of Section 368.
(8) Any violation of Section 496.
(9) Unlawful taking or driving of a vehicle within the meaning of Section 10851 of the Vehicle Code.
(10) Forgery.
(11) The unlawful sale, transfer, or conveyance of an access card pursuant to Section 484e.
(12) Forgery of an access card pursuant to Section 484f.
(13) The unlawful use of an access card pursuant to Section 484g.
(14) Identity theft pursuant to Section 530.5.
(15) The theft or unauthorized use of a vehicle pursuant to Section 10851 of the Vehicle Code.
(b) Notwithstanding paragraph (3) of subdivision (h) of Section 1170, paragraphs (2) and (4) of subdivision (a) of Section 1170.12, and paragraphs (2) and (4) of subdivision (c) of Section 667, any person who, having been previously convicted of two or more of the offenses specified in subdivision (a), which offenses were committed on separate occasions, and who is subsequently convicted of petty theft or shoplifting where the value of the money, labor, or real or personal property taken exceeds two hundred fifty dollars ($250), shall be punished by imprisonment in the county jail not exceeding one year, or imprisonment pursuant to subdivision (h) of Section 1170.
(c) This section does not prohibit a person or persons from being charged with any violation of law arising out of the same criminal transaction that violates this section.

SEC. 7.

 Section 3003 of the Penal Code is amended to read:

3003.
 (a) Except as otherwise provided in this section, an inmate who is released on parole or postrelease community supervision as provided by Title 2.05 (commencing with Section 3450) shall be returned to the county that was the last legal residence of the inmate prior to his or her the inmate’s incarceration. An inmate who is released on parole or postrelease community supervision as provided by Title 2.05 (commencing with Section 3450) and who was committed to prison for a sex offense for which registration is required pursuant to Section 290, shall, through all efforts reasonably possible, be returned to the city that was the last legal residence of the inmate prior to incarceration or a close geographic location in which he or she the inmate has family, social ties, or economic ties and access to reentry services, unless return to that location would violate any other law or pose a risk to his or her the inmate’s victim. For purposes of this subdivision, “last legal residence” shall not be construed to mean the county or city wherein the inmate committed an offense while confined in a state prison or local jail facility or while confined for treatment in a state hospital.
(b) Notwithstanding subdivision (a), an inmate may be returned to another county or city if that would be in the best interests of the public. If the Board of Parole Hearings setting the conditions of parole for inmates sentenced pursuant to subdivision (b) of Section 1168, as determined by the parole consideration panel, or the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation setting the conditions of parole for inmates sentenced pursuant to Section 1170, decides on a return to another county or city, it shall place its reasons in writing in the parolee’s permanent record and include these reasons in the notice to the sheriff or chief of police pursuant to Section 3058.6. In making its decision, the paroling authority shall consider, among others, the following factors, giving the greatest weight to the protection of the victim and the safety of the community:
(1) The need to protect the life or safety of a victim, the parolee, a witness, or any other person.
(2) Public concern that would reduce the chance that the inmate’s parole would be successfully completed.
(3) The verified existence of a work offer, or an educational or vocational training program.
(4) The existence of family in another county with whom the inmate has maintained strong ties and whose support would increase the chance that the inmate’s parole would be successfully completed.
(5) The lack of necessary outpatient treatment programs for parolees receiving treatment pursuant to Section 2960.
(c) The Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, in determining an out-of-county commitment, shall give priority to the safety of the community and any witnesses and victims.
(d) In making its decision about an inmate who participated in a joint venture program pursuant to Article 1.5 (commencing with Section 2717.1) of Chapter 5, the paroling authority shall give serious consideration to releasing him or her the inmate to the county where the joint venture program employer is located if that employer states to the paroling authority that he or she the employer intends to employ the inmate upon release.
(e) (1) The following information, if available, shall be released by the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation to local law enforcement agencies regarding a paroled inmate or inmate placed on postrelease community supervision pursuant to Title 2.05 (commencing with Section 3450) who is released in their jurisdictions:
(A) Last, first, and middle names.
(B) Birth date.
(C) Sex, race, height, weight, and hair and eye color.
(D) Date of parole or placement on postrelease community supervision and discharge.
(E) Registration status, if the inmate is required to register as a result of a controlled substance, sex, or arson offense.
(F) California Criminal Information Number, FBI number, social security number, and driver’s license number.
(G) County of commitment.
(H) A description of scars, marks, and tattoos on the inmate.
(I) Offense or offenses for which the inmate was convicted that resulted in parole or postrelease community supervision in this instance.
(J) Address, including all of the following information:
(i) Street name and number. Post office box numbers are not acceptable for purposes of this subparagraph.
(ii) City and ZIP Code.
(iii) Date that the address provided pursuant to this subparagraph was proposed to be effective.
(K) Contact officer and unit, including all of the following information:
(i) Name and telephone number of each contact officer.
(ii) Contact unit type of each contact officer such as units responsible for parole, registration, or county probation.
(L) A digitized image of the photograph and at least a single digit fingerprint of the parolee.
(M) A geographic coordinate for the inmate’s residence location for use with a Geographical Information System (GIS) or comparable computer program.
(N) Copies of the record of supervision during any prior period of parole.
(2) Unless the information is unavailable, the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation shall electronically transmit to the county agency identified in subdivision (a) of Section 3451 the inmate’s tuberculosis status, specific medical, mental health, and outpatient clinic needs, and any medical concerns or disabilities for the county to consider as the offender transitions onto postrelease community supervision pursuant to Section 3450, for the purpose of identifying the medical and mental health needs of the individual. All transmissions to the county agency shall be in compliance with applicable provisions of the federal Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA) (Public Law 104-191), the federal Health Information Technology for Clinical Health Act (HITECH) (Public Law 111-005), and the implementing of privacy and security regulations in Parts 160 and 164 of Title 45 of the Code of Federal Regulations. This paragraph shall not take effect until the Secretary of the United States Department of Health and Human Services, or his or her the secretary’s designee, determines that this provision is not preempted by HIPAA.
(3) Except for the information required by paragraph (2), the information required by this subdivision shall come from the statewide parolee database. The information obtained from each source shall be based on the same timeframe.
(4) All of the information required by this subdivision shall be provided utilizing a computer-to-computer transfer in a format usable by a desktop computer system. The transfer of this information shall be continually available to local law enforcement agencies upon request.
(5) The unauthorized release or receipt of the information described in this subdivision is a violation of Section 11143.
(f) Notwithstanding any other law, if the victim or witness has requested additional distance in the placement of the inmate on parole, and if the Board of Parole Hearings or the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation finds that there is a need to protect the life, safety, or well-being of the victim or witness, an inmate who is released on parole shall not be returned to a location within 35 miles of the actual residence of a victim of, or a witness to, any of the following crimes:
(1) A violent felony as defined in paragraphs (1) to (7), inclusive, and paragraphs (11) and (16) of subdivision (c) of Section 667.5. 667.5 or subdivision (a) of Section 3040.1.
(2) A felony in which the defendant inflicts great bodily injury on a person, other than an accomplice, that has been charged and proved as provided for in Section 12022.53, 12022.7, or 12022.9.
(3) A violation of paragraph (1), (3), or (4) of subdivision (a) of Section 261, subdivision (f), (g), or (i) of Section 286, subdivision (f), (g), or (i) of Section 288a, 287, or subdivision (b), (d), or (e) of Section 289.
(g) Notwithstanding any other law, an inmate who is released on parole for a violation of Section 288 or 288.5 whom the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation determines poses a high risk to the public shall not be placed or reside, for the duration of his or her the inmate’s parole, within one-half mile of a public or private school including any or all of kindergarten and grades 1 to 12, inclusive.
(h) Notwithstanding any other law, an inmate who is released on parole or postrelease community supervision for a stalking offense shall not be returned to a location within 35 miles of the victim’s or witness’ actual residence or place of employment if the victim or witness has requested additional distance in the placement of the inmate on parole or postrelease community supervision, and if the Board of Parole Hearings or the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, or the supervising county agency, as applicable, finds that there is a need to protect the life, safety, or well-being of the victim. If an inmate who is released on postrelease community supervision cannot be placed in his or her the inmate’s county of last legal residence in compliance with this subdivision, the supervising county agency may transfer the inmate to another county upon approval of the receiving county.
(i) The authority shall give consideration to the equitable distribution of parolees and the proportion of out-of-county commitments from a county compared to the number of commitments from that county when making parole decisions.
(j) An inmate may be paroled to another state pursuant to any other law. The Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation shall coordinate with local entities regarding the placement of inmates placed out of state on postrelease community supervision pursuant to Title 2.05 (commencing with Section 3450).
(k) (1) Except as provided in paragraph (2), the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation shall be the agency primarily responsible for, and shall have control over, the program, resources, and staff implementing the Law Enforcement Automated Data System (LEADS) in conformance with subdivision (e). County agencies supervising inmates released to postrelease community supervision pursuant to Title 2.05 (commencing with Section 3450) shall provide any information requested by the department to ensure the availability of accurate information regarding inmates released from state prison. This information may include all records of supervision, the issuance of warrants, revocations, or the termination of postrelease community supervision. On or before August 1, 2011, county agencies designated to supervise inmates released to postrelease community supervision shall notify the department that the county agencies have been designated as the local entity responsible for providing that supervision.
(2) Notwithstanding paragraph (1), the Department of Justice shall be the agency primarily responsible for the proper release of information under LEADS that relates to fingerprint cards.
(l) In addition to the requirements under subdivision (k), the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation shall submit to the Department of Justice data to be included in the supervised release file of the California Law Enforcement Telecommunications System (CLETS) so that law enforcement can be advised through CLETS of all persons on postrelease community supervision and the county agency designated to provide supervision. The data required by this subdivision shall be provided via electronic transfer.

SEC. 8.

 Section 3040.1 is added to the Penal Code, to read:

3040.1.
 (a) For purposes of early release or parole consideration under the authority of Section 32 of Article I of the California Constitution, Sections 12838.4 and 12838.5 of the Government Code, Sections 3000.1, 3041.5, 3041.7, 3052, 5000, 5054, 5055, and 5076.2 of this code, and the rulemaking authority granted by Section 5058 of this code, the following shall be defined as “violent felony offenses”:
(1) Murder or voluntary manslaughter.
(2) Mayhem.
(3) Rape as defined in paragraph (2) or (6) of subdivision (a) of Section 261 or paragraph (1) or (4) of subdivision (a) of Section 262.
(4) Sodomy as defined in subdivision (c) or (d) of Section 286.
(5) Oral copulation as defined in subdivision (c) or (d) of Section 287.
(6) A lewd or lascivious act as defined in subdivision (a) or (b) of Section 288.
(7) A felony punishable by death or imprisonment in the state prison for life.
(8) A felony in which the defendant inflicts great bodily injury on a person other than an accomplice that has been charged and proved as provided for in Section 12022.7, 12022.8, or 12022.9 on or after July 1, 1977, or as specified prior to July 1, 1977, in Sections 213, 264, and 461, or a felony in which the defendant uses a firearm which use has been charged and proved as provided in subdivision (a) of Section 12022.3, or Section 12022.5 or 12022.55.
(9) Robbery.
(10) Arson, in violation of subdivision (a) or (b) of Section 451.
(11) Sexual penetration as defined in subdivision (a) or (j) of Section 289.
(12) Attempted murder.
(13) A violation of Section 18745, 18750, or 18755.
(14) Kidnapping.
(15) Assault with the intent to commit a specified felony, in violation of Section 220.
(16) Continuous sexual abuse of a child, in violation of Section 288.5.
(17) Carjacking, as defined in subdivision (a) of Section 215.
(18) Rape, spousal rape, or sexual penetration, in concert, in violation of Section 264.1.
(19) Extortion, as defined in Section 518, which would constitute a felony violation of Section 186.22.
(20) Threats to victims or witnesses, as defined in subdivision (c) of Section 136.1.
(21) Burglary of the first degree, as defined in subdivision (a) of Section 460, in which it is charged and proved that another person, other than an accomplice, was present in the residence during the commission of the burglary.
(22) A violation of Section 12022.53.
(23) A violation of subdivision (b) or (c) of Section 11418.
(24) Solicitation to commit murder.
(25) Felony assault with a firearm in violation of paragraph (2) of subdivision (a) and subdivision (b) of Section 245.
(26) Felony assault with a deadly weapon in violation of paragraph (1) of subdivision (a) of Section 245.
(27) Felony assault with a deadly weapon upon the person of a peace officer or firefighter in violation of subdivisions (c) and (d) of Section 245.
(28) Felony assault by means of force likely to produce great bodily injury in violation of paragraph (4) of subdivision (a) of Section 245.
(29) Assault with caustic chemicals in violation of Section 244.
(30) False imprisonment in violation of Section 210.5.
(31) Felony discharging of a firearm in violation of Section 247.
(32) Discharge of a firearm from a motor vehicle in violation of subdivision (c) of Section 26100.
(33) Felony domestic violence resulting in a traumatic condition in violation of Section 273.5.
(34) Felony use of force or threats against a witness or victim of a crime in violation of Section 140.
(35) Felony resisting of a peace officer and causing death or serious injury in violation of Section 148.10.
(36) A felony hate crime punishable pursuant to Section 422.7.
(37) Felony elder or dependent adult abuse in violation of subdivision (b) of Section 368.
(38) Rape in violation of paragraph (1), (3), or (4) of subdivision (a) of Section 261.
(39) Rape in violation of Section 262.
(40) Sexual penetration in violation of subdivision (b), (d), or (e) of Section 289.
(41) Sodomy in violation of subdivision (f), (g), or (i) of Section 286.
(42) Oral copulation in violation of subdivision (f), (g), or (i) of Section 287.
(43) Abduction of a minor for purposes of prostitution in violation of Section 267.
(44) Human trafficking in violation of subdivision (a), (b), or (c) of Section 236.1.
(45) Child abuse in violation of Section 273ab.
(46) Possessing, exploding, or igniting a destructive device in violation of Section 18740.
(47) Two or more violations of subdivision (c) of Section 451.
(48) An attempt to commit an offense described in this subdivision.
(49) A felony in which it is pled and proven that the defendant personally used a dangerous or deadly weapon.
(50) An offense resulting in lifetime sex offender registration pursuant to sections 290 to 290.009, inclusive.
(51) A conspiracy to commit an offense described in this section.
(b) The provisions of this section apply to an inmate serving a custodial prison sentence on or after January 1, 2020, regardless of the date on which the sentence was imposed.

SEC. 9.

 Section 3040.2 is added to the Penal Code, to read:

3040.2.
 (a) Upon conducting a nonviolent offender parole consideration review, the hearing officer for the Board of Parole Hearings shall consider all relevant, reliable information about the inmate.
(b) The standard of review shall be whether the inmate will pose an unreasonable risk of creating victims as a result of felonious conduct if released from prison.
(c) In reaching this determination, the hearing officer shall consider the following factors:
(1) Circumstances surrounding the current conviction.
(2) The inmate’s criminal history, including involvement in other criminal conduct, both juvenile and adult, which is reliably documented.
(3) The inmate’s institutional behavior, including both rehabilitative programming and institutional misconduct.
(4) Any input from the inmate, any victim, whether registered or not at the time of the referral, and the prosecuting agency or agencies.
(5) The inmate’s past and present mental condition as documented in records in the possession of the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation.
(6) The inmate’s past and present attitude about the crime.
(7) Any other information which bears on the inmate’s suitability for release.
(d) The following circumstances shall be considered by the hearing officer in determining whether the inmate is unsuitable for release:
(1) Multiple victims were involved in the current commitment offense.
(2) A victim was particularly vulnerable due to age or physical or mental condition.
(3) The inmate took advantage of a position of trust in the commission of the crime.
(4) The inmate was armed with or used a firearm or other deadly weapon in the commission of the crime.
(5) A victim suffered great bodily injury during the commission of the crime.
(6) The inmate committed the crime in association with a criminal street gang.
(7) The inmate occupied a position of leadership or dominance over other participants in the commission of the crime, or the inmate induced others to participate in the commission of the crime.
(8) During the commission of the crime, the inmate had a clear opportunity to cease, but instead continued.
(9) The inmate has engaged in other reliably documented criminal conduct that was an integral part of the crime for which the inmate is currently committed to prison.
(10) The manner in which the crime was committed created a potential for serious injury to a person other than the victim of the crime.
(11) The inmate was on probation, parole, postrelease community supervision, mandatory supervision, or was in custody or had escaped from custody at the time of the commitment offense.
(12) The inmate was on any form of pre- or post-conviction release at the time of the commitment offense.
(13) The inmate’s prior history of violence, whether as a juvenile or adult.
(14) The inmate has engaged in misconduct in prison or jail.
(15) The inmate is incarcerated for multiple cases from the same or different counties or jurisdictions.
(e) The following circumstances shall be considered by the hearing officer in determining whether the inmate is suitable for release:
(1) The inmate does not have a juvenile record of assaulting others or committing crimes with a potential of harm to victims.
(2) The inmate lacks any history of violent crime.
(3) The inmate has demonstrated remorse.
(4) The inmate’s present age reduces the risk of recidivism.
(5) The inmate has made realistic plans if released or has developed marketable skills that can be put to use upon release.
(6) The inmate’s institutional activities demonstrate an enhanced ability to function within the law upon release.
(7) The inmate participated in the crime under partially excusable circumstances that do not amount to a legal defense.
(8) The inmate had no apparent predisposition to commit the crime, but was induced by others to participate in its commission.
(9) The inmate has minimal or no criminal history other than the crime for which the inmate is currently serving time.
(10) The inmate was a passive participant or played a minor role in the commission of the crime.
(11) The crime was committed during or due to an unusual situation unlikely to reoccur.

SEC. 10.

 Section 3040.3 is added to the Penal Code, to read:

3040.3.
 (a) An inmate whose current commitment includes a concurrent, consecutive, or stayed sentence for an offense defined as violent by subdivision (c) of Section 667.5 or subdivision (a) of Section 3040.1 is a violent offender for purposes of Section 32 of Article I of the California Constitution.
(b) An inmate whose current commitment includes an indeterminate sentence is a violent offender for purposes of Section 32 of Article I of the California Constitution.
(c) An inmate whose current commitment includes any enhancement that makes the underlying offense violent pursuant to subdivision (c) of Section 667.5 is a violent offender for purposes of Section 32 of Article I of the California Constitution.
(d) For purposes of Section 32 of Article I of the California Constitution, the “full term” of the “primary offense” shall be calculated based only on actual days served on the commitment offense.

SEC. 11.

 Section 3040.4 is added to the Penal Code, to read:

3040.4.
 Pursuant to subdivision (b) of Section 28 of Article I of the California Constitution, the department shall give reasonable notice to a victim of crime prior to an inmate being reviewed for early parole and release. The department shall provide a victim with the right to be heard regarding early parole consideration and to participate in the review process. The department shall consider the safety of the victim, the victim’s family, and the general public when making a determination on early release.
(a) Prior to conducting a review for early parole, the department shall provide notice to the prosecuting agency or agencies and to registered victims, and shall make reasonable efforts to locate and notify victims who are not registered.
(b) The prosecuting agency shall have the right to review all information available to the hearing officer, including, but not limited to, the inmate’s central file, documented adult and juvenile criminal history, institutional behavior including both rehabilitative programming and institutional misconduct, any input from a person or organization advocating on behalf of the inmate, and any information submitted by the public.
(c) A victim shall have a right to submit a statement for purposes of early parole consideration, including a confidential statement.
(d) All prosecuting agencies, any involved law enforcement agency, and all victims, whether or not registered, shall have the right to respond to the board in writing.
(e) Responses to the board by prosecuting agencies, law enforcement agencies, and victims must be made within 90 days of the date of notification of the inmate’s eligibility for early parole review or consideration.
(f) The board shall notify the prosecuting agencies, law enforcement agencies, and the victims of the nonviolent offender parole decision within 10 days of the decision being made.
(g) Within 30 days of the notice of the final decision concerning nonviolent offender parole consideration, the inmate and the prosecuting agencies may request review of the decision.
(h) If an inmate is denied early release under the nonviolent offender parole provisions of Section 32 of Article I of the California Constitution, the inmate shall not be eligible for early nonviolent offender parole consideration for two calendar years from the date of the final decision of the previous denial.

SEC. 12.

 Section 3041 of the Penal Code is amended to read:

3041.
 (a) (1) In the case of any inmate sentenced pursuant to any law, other than Chapter 4.5 (commencing with Section 1170) of Title 7 of Part 2, the Board of Parole Hearings shall meet with each inmate during the sixth year before the inmate’s minimum eligible parole date for the purposes of reviewing and documenting the inmate’s activities and conduct pertinent to parole eligibility. During this consultation, the board shall provide the inmate information about the parole hearing process, legal factors relevant to his or her the inmate’s suitability or unsuitability for parole, and individualized recommendations for the inmate regarding his or her the inmate’s work assignments, rehabilitative programs, and institutional behavior. Within 30 days following the consultation, the board shall issue its positive and negative findings and recommendations to the inmate in writing.
(2) One year before the inmate’s minimum eligible parole date date, a panel of two or more commissioners or deputy commissioners shall again meet with the inmate and shall normally grant parole as provided in Section 3041.5. No more than one member of the panel shall be a deputy commissioner.
(3) In the event of a tie vote, the matter shall be referred for an en banc review of the record that was before the panel that rendered the tie vote. Upon en banc review, the board shall vote to either grant or deny parole and render a statement of decision. The en banc review shall be conducted pursuant to subdivision (e).
(4) Upon a grant of parole, the inmate shall be released subject to all applicable review periods. However, an inmate shall not be released before reaching his or her the inmate’s minimum eligible parole date as set pursuant to Section 3046 unless the inmate is eligible for earlier release pursuant to his or her the inmate’s youth offender parole eligibility date or elderly parole eligible date.
(5) At least one commissioner of the panel shall have been present at the last preceding meeting, unless it is not feasible to do so or where the last preceding meeting was the initial meeting. Any person on the hearing panel may request review of any decision regarding parole for an en banc hearing by the board. In case of a review, a majority vote in favor of parole by the board members participating in an en banc review is required to grant parole to any inmate.
(b) (1) The panel or the board, sitting en banc, shall grant parole to an inmate unless it determines that the gravity of the current convicted offense or offenses, or the timing and gravity of current or past convicted offense or offenses, is such that consideration of the public safety requires a more lengthy period of incarceration for this individual. The panel or the board, sitting en banc, shall consider the entire criminal history of the inmate, including all current or past convicted offenses, in making this determination.
(2) After July 30, 2001, any decision of the parole panel finding an inmate suitable for parole shall become final within 120 days of the date of the hearing. During that period, the board may review the panel’s decision. The panel’s decision shall become final pursuant to this subdivision unless the board finds that the panel made an error of law, or that the panel’s decision was based on an error of fact, or that new information should be presented to the board, any of which when corrected or considered by the board has a substantial likelihood of resulting in a substantially different decision upon a rehearing. In making this determination, the board shall consult with the commissioners who conducted the parole consideration hearing.
(3) A decision of a panel shall not be disapproved and referred for rehearing except by a majority vote of the board, sitting en banc, following a public meeting.
(c) For the purpose of reviewing the suitability for parole of those inmates eligible for parole under prior law at a date earlier than that calculated under Section 1170.2, the board shall appoint panels of at least two persons to meet annually with each inmate until the time the person is released pursuant to proceedings or reaches the expiration of his or her the inmate’s term as calculated under Section 1170.2.
(d) It is the intent of the Legislature that, during times when there is no backlog of inmates awaiting parole hearings, life parole consideration hearings, or life rescission hearings, hearings will be conducted by a panel of three or more members, the majority of whom shall be commissioners. The board shall report monthly on the number of cases where an inmate has not received a completed initial or subsequent parole consideration hearing within 30 days of the hearing date required by subdivision (a) of Section 3041.5 or paragraph (2) of subdivision (b) of Section 3041.5, unless the inmate has waived the right to those timeframes. That report shall be considered the backlog of cases for purposes of this section, and shall include information on the progress toward eliminating the backlog, and on the number of inmates who have waived their right to the above timeframes. The report shall be made public at a regularly scheduled meeting of the board and a written report shall be made available to the public and transmitted to the Legislature quarterly.
(e) For purposes of this section, an en banc review by the board means a review conducted by a majority of commissioners holding office on the date the matter is heard by the board. An en banc review shall be conducted in compliance with the following:
(1) The commissioners conducting the review shall consider the entire record of the hearing that resulted in the tie vote.
(2) The review shall be limited to the record of the hearing. The record shall consist of the transcript or audiotape of the hearing, written or electronically recorded statements actually considered by the panel that produced the tie vote, and any other material actually considered by the panel. New evidence or comments shall not be considered in the en banc proceeding.
(3) The board shall separately state reasons for its decision to grant or deny parole.
(4) A commissioner who was involved in the tie vote shall be recused from consideration of the matter in the en banc review.

SEC. 13.

 Section 3454 of the Penal Code is amended to read:

3454.
 (a) Each supervising county agency, as established by the county board of supervisors pursuant to subdivision (a) of Section 3451, shall establish a review process for assessing and refining a person’s program of postrelease supervision. Any additional postrelease supervision conditions shall be reasonably related to the underlying offense for which the offender spent time in prison, or to the offender’s risk of recidivism, and the offender’s criminal history, and be otherwise consistent with law.
(b) Each county agency responsible for postrelease supervision, as established by the county board of supervisors pursuant to subdivision (a) of Section 3451, may determine additional appropriate conditions of supervision listed in Section 3453 consistent with public safety, including the use of continuous electronic monitoring as defined in Section 1210.7, order the provision of appropriate rehabilitation and treatment services, determine appropriate incentives, and determine and order appropriate responses to alleged violations, which can include, but shall not be limited to, immediate, structured, and intermediate sanctions up to and including referral to a reentry court pursuant to Section 3015, or flash incarceration in a city or county jail. Periods of flash incarceration are encouraged as one method of punishment for violations of an offender’s condition of postrelease supervision.
(c) As used in this title, “flash incarceration” is a period of detention in a city or county jail due to a violation of an offender’s conditions of postrelease supervision. The length of the detention period can range between one and 10 consecutive days. Flash incarceration is a tool that may be used by each county agency responsible for postrelease supervision. Shorter, but if necessary more frequent, periods of detention for violations of an offender’s postrelease supervision conditions shall appropriately punish an offender while preventing the disruption in a work or home establishment that typically arises from longer term revocations.
(d) Upon a decision to impose a period of flash incarceration, the probation department shall notify the court, public defender, district attorney, and sheriff of each imposition of flash incarceration.

SEC. 14.

 Section 3455 of the Penal Code is amended to read:

3455.
 (a) If the supervising county agency has determined, following application of its assessment processes, that intermediate sanctions as authorized in subdivision (b) of Section 3454 are not appropriate, or if the supervised person has violated the terms of release for a third time, the supervising county agency shall petition the court pursuant to Section 1203.2 to revoke, modify, or terminate postrelease community supervision. At any point during the process initiated pursuant to this section, a person may waive, in writing, his or her the right to counsel, admit the violation of his or her the postrelease community supervision, waive a court hearing, and accept the proposed modification of his or her the person’s postrelease community supervision. The petition shall include a written report that contains additional information regarding the petition, including the relevant terms and conditions of postrelease community supervision, the circumstances of the alleged underlying violation, the history and background of the violator, and any recommendations. The Judicial Council shall adopt forms and rules of court to establish uniform statewide procedures to implement this subdivision, including the minimum contents of supervision agency reports. Upon a finding that the person has violated the conditions of postrelease community supervision, the revocation hearing officer shall have authority to do all of the following:
(1) Return the person to postrelease community supervision with modifications of conditions, if appropriate, including a period of incarceration in a county jail.
(2) Revoke and terminate postrelease community supervision and order the person to confinement in a county jail.
(3) Refer the person to a reentry court pursuant to Section 3015 or other evidence-based program in the court’s discretion.
(b) (1) At any time during the period of postrelease community supervision, if a peace officer or a probation officer has probable cause to believe a person subject to postrelease community supervision is violating any term or condition of his or her the person’s release, or has failed to appear at a hearing pursuant to Section 1203.2 to revoke, modify, or terminate postrelease community supervision, the officer may, without a warrant or other process, arrest the person and bring him or her the person before the supervising county agency established by the county board of supervisors pursuant to subdivision (a) of Section 3451. Additionally, an officer employed by the supervising county agency may seek a warrant and a court or its designated hearing officer appointed pursuant to Section 71622.5 of the Government Code shall have the authority to issue a warrant for that person’s arrest.
(2) The court or its designated hearing officer shall have the authority to issue a warrant for a person who is the subject of a petition filed under this section who has failed to appear for a hearing on the petition or for any reason in the interests of justice, or to remand to custody a person who does appear at a hearing on the petition for any reason in the interests of justice.
(3) Unless a person subject to postrelease community supervision is otherwise serving a period of flash incarceration, whenever a person who is subject to this section is arrested, with or without a warrant or the filing of a petition for revocation, the court may order the release of the person under supervision from custody under any terms and conditions the court deems appropriate.
(c) The revocation hearing shall be held within a reasonable time after the filing of the revocation petition. Except as provided in paragraph (3) of subdivision (b), based upon a showing of a preponderance of the evidence that a person under supervision poses an unreasonable risk to public safety, or that the person may not appear if released from custody, or for any reason in the interests of justice, the supervising county agency shall have the authority to make a determination whether the person should remain in custody pending the first court appearance on a petition to revoke postrelease community supervision, and upon that determination, may order the person confined pending his or her the person’s first court appearance.
(d) Confinement pursuant to paragraphs (1) and (2) of subdivision (a) shall not exceed a period of 180 days in a county jail for each custodial sanction.
(e) A person shall not remain under supervision or in custody pursuant to this title on or after three years from the date of the person’s initial entry onto postrelease community supervision, except when his or her the person’s supervision is tolled pursuant to Section 1203.2 or subdivision (b) of Section 3456.

SEC. 15.

 No reimbursement is required by this act pursuant to Section 6 of Article XIII B of the California Constitution for certain costs that may be incurred by a local agency or school district because, in that regard, this act creates a new crime or infraction, eliminates a crime or infraction, or changes the penalty for a crime or infraction, within the meaning of Section 17556 of the Government Code, or changes the definition of a crime within the meaning of Section 6 of Article XIII B of the California Constitution.
However, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that this act contains other costs mandated by the state, reimbursement to local agencies and school districts for those costs shall be made pursuant to Part 7 (commencing with Section 17500) of Division 4 of Title 2 of the Government Code.