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AB-79 Human services omnibus.(2019-2020)

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Date Published: 06/30/2020 02:00 PM
AB79:v94#DOCUMENT

Assembly Bill No. 79
CHAPTER 11

An act to amend, repeal, and add Section 17504 of the Family Code, to amend Section 6253.2 of, and to add Section 14669.22 to, the Government Code, to amend Sections 1267.75, 1506, 1506.3, 1517, 1531.15, and 1569.682 of, to add Section 1562.2 to, and to repeal Section 1567.70 of, the Health and Safety Code, to amend Section 246 of the Labor Code, to amend, repeal, and add Sections 1001.20, 1001.21, 1001.22, 1001.23, and 1001.29 of the Penal Code, and to amend Sections 4418.7, 4646.5, 4684.81, 4684.82, 4685.8, 4691.12, 7502.5, 11265, 11265.1, 11320.3, 11323.2, 11333, 11402.2, 11403.2, 11403.3, 11454.5, 11461.36, 11463, 11523, 11523.1, 12305.7, 12305.71, 15204.2, 16519.5, 16521.8, 16527, 16529, 16530, 18900.8, 18901, 18901.1, 18901.10, 18901.25, and 18927 of, to amend and repeal Sections 11322.85, 11322.86, 11322.87, and 12301.24 of, to amend, repeal, and add Sections 10831, 11265.2, 11265.45, 11320.15, 11322.8, 11325.21, 11325.24, 11454, and 17021 of, to add Sections 10004, 11265.15, 11454.1 18910.2, and 18918.1 to, to add and repeal Sections 11523.05 and 18906.55 of, and to repeal Sections 4684.87, 10832, and 11454.2 of, the Welfare and Institutions Code, relating to human services, and making an appropriation therefor, to take effect immediately, bill related to the budget.

[ Approved by Governor  June 29, 2020. Filed with Secretary of State  June 29, 2020. ]

LEGISLATIVE COUNSEL'S DIGEST


AB 79, Committee on Budget. Human services omnibus.
(1) Existing federal law provides for the allocation of federal funds through the federal Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) block grant program to eligible states. Existing law provides for the California Work Opportunity and Responsibility to Kids (CalWORKs) program under which, through a combination of state and county funds and federal funds received through the TANF program, each county provides cash assistance and other benefits to qualified low-income families. Existing law, until January 1, 2021, requires the State Department of Social Services to implement and maintain a nonbiometric identity verification method in the CalWORKs program.
This bill would repeal the January 1, 2021, repeal date, thereby extending that provision indefinitely, and would also provide, commencing July 1, 2020, that the methods approved by the department as of July 1, 2018, satisfy that requirement for nonbiometric identity verification methods in the CalWORKs program.
Under existing law, a recipient of CalWORKs aid is required to assign to the county any rights to support from any other person that the recipient may have, on their behalf, or on behalf of any other family member for whom the recipient is receiving aid, not exceeding the total amount of CalWORKs cash assistance provided to the family. Existing law also requires the first $50 of any amount of child support collected in a month in payment of the required child support obligation for that month to be paid to a recipient of CalWORKs aid, and prohibits this amount from being considered income or resources of the recipient family or being deducted from the amount of aid to which the family would otherwise be eligible.
This bill would, commencing January 1, 2022, or when the State Department of Social Services and the Department of Child Support Services provides the Legislature with a specified notification, whichever date is later, increase that amount to $100 for a family with one child and $200 for a family with 2 or more children. The bill would require the State Department of Social Services to issue an all-county letter or similar instruction no later than September 1, 2020, to facilitate automation changes necessary and would authorize the Department of Social Services and the Department of Child Support Services to implement, interpret, or make specific the increase by means of all-county letters or similar instructions from the departments until regulations are adopted.
Existing law provides that a parent or caretaker relative shall not be eligible for CalWORKs aid when the parent or caretaker has received aid for a cumulative total of 48 months, and provides that any month in which specified conditions exist is not counted toward that 48-month time limit. Existing law requires a recipient of CalWORKs to participate in welfare-to-work activities as a condition of eligibility, except when exempt under specified conditions. Existing law requires that necessary supportive services be available to participants in welfare-to-work activities, including, among other things, childcare.
This bill would clarify that individuals who are not required to participate, and express an intent to participate voluntarily, or sanctioned participants who indicate an intent to engage in any program activity or employment, pursuant to program rules, are eligible to receive childcare under these provisions. The bill would require a participant, after securing childcare services, to sign a welfare-to-work plan or a curing plan, whichever is appropriate, or other agreement that may be developed and approved for use on a statewide basis by the State Department of Social Services.
Existing law establishes the Cal-Learn Program and requires certain CalWORKs recipients who are under 19 years of age and are pregnant or custodial parents to participate in the program until the participant earns a high school diploma or equivalent. Existing law requires counties to arrange for the provision of education and supportive services that teenage parents need to successfully participate in the Cal-Learn Program. Existing law requires counties to contract for the provision of case management services with public or nonprofit agencies or school districts that administer services under the Adolescent Family Life Program.
This bill would instead require counties to contract for the provision of intensive case management services with public or nonprofit agencies or school districts that administer services pursuant to various intensive case management models, including a home visiting model, and to include approved contractors in their planning and implementation of the Cal-Learn Program.
Existing law provides for childcare for CalWORKs recipients and requires the county welfare department to manage the first of 3 stages of childcare, as described, which begins upon the entry of a person into the program and during which a family receives a childcare subsidy for any legal care chosen by the parent.
Existing law also states the intent of the Legislature that the annual Budget Act appropriate state and federal funds in a single allocation to counties for the support of administrative activities undertaken by the counties to provide benefit payments to recipients of aid under the CalWORKs program, as specified. Existing law requires, commencing with the 2020–21 fiscal year, that the funding provided for stage one childcare be allocated to counties separately from the single allocation for purposes of providing direct stage one childcare services and stage one childcare-related administration.
This bill would instead make that requirement applicable commencing with the 2021–22 fiscal year and for each fiscal year thereafter.
Existing law provides for the California Work Opportunity and Responsibility to Kids (CalWORKs) program, under which each county provides cash assistance and other benefits to qualified low-income families and individuals. Existing law requires the State Department of Social Services to establish, by July 1, 2019, the CalWORKs Outcomes and Accountability Review (Cal-OAR) to facilitate a local accountability system that fosters continuous quality improvement in county CalWORKs programs and in the collection and dissemination by the State Department of Social Services of best practices in service delivery. Existing law requires Cal-OAR to consist of performance indicators, a county CalWORKs self-assessment process, and a county CalWORKs system improvement plan. Existing law establishes a 3-year Cal-OAR cycle, and requires performance indicator data to be used to establish both county and statewide baselines for each of the process measures during the first 3-year Cal-OAR cycle. Existing law also requires the county CalWORKs self-assessment process and the county CalWORKs system improvement plan to be completed by the county every 3 years. Under existing law, a county is required to fulfill any components of its CalWORKs system improvement plan that it can do with existing resources, but is not required to fulfill any components of its CalWORKs system improvement plan that creates new costs unless funds are appropriated for this purpose in the annual Budget Act.
This bill would instead establish a 5-year Cal-OAR cycle, would require the county CalWORKs self-assessment process and the county CalWORKs system improvement plan to be completed every 5 years, and would make the implementation of the Cal-OAR continuous quality improvement components optional for counties for the 2020–21 fiscal year. The bill would exempt specified contracts or grants necessary for the State Department of Social Service to implement or evaluate the Cal-OAR from prescribed requirements, including review and approval by the Department of General Services or the Department of Technology. Commencing on January 10, 2021, the bill would require the department to provide a summary of executed and pending contracts and grants relating to Cal-OAR on the State Department of Social Services’ website. The bill would make these provisions on contracts and grants inoperative on July 1, 2023, and would repeal it as of January 1, 2024.
Existing law continuously appropriates moneys from the General Fund to defray a portion of county costs under the CalWORKs program.
This bill would provide that the continuous appropriation would not be made for purposes of implementing the bill.
(2) Existing federal law provides for the federal Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), known in California as CalFresh, under which supplemental nutrition assistance benefits allocated to the state by the federal government are distributed to eligible individuals by each county. Existing law requires each county human services agency to carry out the local administrative responsibilities of this program, subject to the supervision of the State Department of Social Services and to rules and regulations adopted by the department. Among other requirements, existing law requires each county welfare department to, if appropriate, exempt a household from complying with face-to-face interview requirements for purposes of determining eligibility at initial application and recertification.
This bill would require the department to establish verification policies and procedures for CalFresh applicants and beneficiaries to verify required information, which would require counties to first seek verification from available electronic sources or self-attestation before requesting additional information, to the extent permitted by federal law. The bill would require the department to issue guidance that prohibits a county human services agency from requesting additional documents to verify dependent care expenses, except as specified. The bill would require county welfare departments to take specified actions by January 1, 2022, in an effort to expand CalFresh program outreach and retention and improve dual enrollment between the CalFresh and Medi-Cal programs, and to provide prepopulated CalFresh applications to Medi-Cal beneficiaries who are apparently CalFresh eligible and not dually enrolled during the Medi-Cal renewal process, as specified. The bill would also require county welfare departments to implement specified scheduling techniques for purposes of scheduling and rescheduling eligibility interviews by July 1, 2021, and would authorize the department, in consultation with counties and client advocates, to authorize additional scheduling techniques that may also be used to fulfill this requirement.
Existing law requires each county to provide cash assistance and other social services to needy families through the California Work Opportunity and Responsibility to Kids (CalWORKs) program using federal Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF) block grant program, state, and county funds. Under existing law, the county is required to annually redetermine eligibility for CalWORKs benefits and, at the time of redetermination, require the family to complete a certificate of eligibility. Existing law additionally requires the county to redetermine recipient eligibility and grant amounts on a semiannual basis and requires the recipient to submit a semiannual report form during the first semiannual reporting period following the application or annual redetermination of eligibility. Existing law requires, to the extent permitted by federal law, the department to implement the semiannual reporting system, including the use of the semiannual report form, in the CalFresh program.
This bill would require the department to convene a workgroup to consider semiannual reporting for purposes of reducing the reporting burden on recipients and the workload for county eligibility staff. The bill would require the workgroup to consider federally allowable reporting structures implemented in other state, and would require the workgroup’s recommendations to be submitted to the Legislature by October 1, 2021. The bill would also make various changes to the existing semiannual reporting requirements, including by, among other things, requiring counties to attempt to collect necessary information to complete a recipient’s semiannual report form if the recipient has failed to complete the form by a specified date. The bill would require the department to work with specified entities to develop and implement the necessary system changes to prepopulate the semiannual report form, among other requirements. The bill would also add to the eligibility redetermination certification requirements that a recipient is required to provide information on the certificate about income received during the 30 days prior to submission. The bill would also make technical and conforming changes.
By imposing a higher level of service on county welfare departments, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program.
Existing law requires current and future CalFresh benefits to be reduced to recover a benefit overissuance caused by intentional program violation, inadvertent household error, or administrative error, as specified. Existing law prohibits the establishment or collection of a CalFresh overissuance caused by administrative error or inadvertent household error for a household that is no longer receiving CalFresh benefits, if the overissuance is less than $400.
This bill would prohibit the establishment or collection of the above-described overissuance if the overissuance is in an amount that is higher than $400 if approved by the United States Department of Agriculture, as specified.
Existing law, until July 1, 2020, requires the State Department of Social Services to create the Safe Drinking Water Supplemental Benefit Pilot Program to provide time-limited additional CalFresh nutrition benefits to residents of prioritized disadvantaged communities that are served by public water systems that consistently fail to meet primary drinking water standards.
The bill would extend that program to July 1, 2024, and would repeal those provisions on January 1, 2025.
Under existing law, the state pays 70% of the nonfederal costs of administering the CalFresh program and the counties pay the remaining share of administering the program.
For the 2021–21 and 2021–22 fiscal years, this bill would limit a county’s share of cost contributions for the nonfederal costs for administering the CalFresh program to the amount of county funds that the county was required to match to receive its full General Fund allocation under the Budget Act of 2019, and would provide that the General Fund allocation for administration of CalFresh, for the 2021–21 and 2021–22 fiscal year, be equal to 35% of the total federal and nonfederal projected funding for administration of that program.
This bill would make these provisions inoperative on July 1, 2022, and would repeal it as of January 1, 2023.
Existing law requires the State Department of Social Services to work with representatives of county human services agencies and the County Welfare Directors Association of California to update the budgeting methodology used to determine the annual funding for county administration of the CalFresh program beginning with the 2020–21 fiscal year.
This bill would instead require the department to work with those entities to update that budgeting methodology beginning with the 2021–22 fiscal year.
Existing law, the California Community Care Facilities Act, provides for the licensing and regulation by the State Department of Social Services of community care facilities. Under existing law, community care facilities include, among others, various types of adult residential facilities. Under existing law, a violation of the act is a misdemeanor.
Existing law separately licenses and regulates residential care facilities for the elderly (RCFE), which provide housing and other specified services for persons 60 years of age and older. Existing law requires an RCFE, prior to transferring a resident to another facility or to an independent living arrangement as a result of the forfeiture of a license or change in use of the facility, to take certain specified actions. Among other provisions, existing law requires an RCFE, if 7 or more residents of the facility will be transferred as a result of the forfeiture of a license or the change in the use of a facility, to submit a proposed closure plan for the affected residents to the department for review, and requires the department to approve or disapprove the plan.
This bill would require the licensee of an RCFE that has submitted a closure plan to inform the city and county in which the facility is located of the proposed closure, including whether the licensee intends to sell the property or business, no later than 180 days before the proposed closure. The bill would also require the licensee of an adult residential facility that is planning to close to provide this notice to the city and county in which the facility is located. Because a violation of the bill’s requirements by an adult residential facility would be a misdemeanor, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program.
(3) Existing law provides for the implementation of the resource family approval process, which replaces the multiple processes for licensing foster family homes, certifying foster homes by foster family agencies, approving relatives and nonrelative extended family members as foster care providers, and approving guardians and adoptive families. Existing law requires the department to annually conduct reviews of resource families to ensure that approval standards are probably applied and requires counties and foster family agencies to update resource family approval annually.
This bill would instead require the department to conduct those reviews biennially and require counties and foster family agencies to update resource family approval biennially.
Existing law, the California Community Care Facilities Act, among other things, provides for the licensure and regulation of foster family agencies, which are organizations engaged in the recruiting, certifying, and training of, and providing professional support to, foster parents and resource families, or in finding homes for foster children in need of care. Existing law requires social work personnel for a foster family agency to have a master’s degree or higher from an accredited or state-approved graduate school in social work or social welfare, or equivalent education and experience, and to complete specified coursework and field practice. In addition to those requirements, existing law requires social work personnel to meet core competencies, as specified, to participate in an assessment and evaluation of an applicant or resource family.
This bill would authorize nonsocial work personnel, who have a minimum of a bachelor’s degree in social work, psychology, or a similar field, and who have specified experience and core competencies, to complete a resource family home health and safety assessment if the assessment is reviewed and approved by a social worker. The bill would also authorize those nonsocial work personnel to complete orientation of potential resource family applicants.
Existing interim licensing standards set by the State Department of Social Services require a foster family agency to employ one full-time social worker for every 15 children or fraction thereof in placement.
This bill would instead require a foster family agency to employ one full-time social worker for every 18 children or fraction thereof in placement.
Existing law requires the State Department of Social Services to develop a payment system for foster family agencies that provide treatment, intensive treatment, and therapeutic foster care programs. Existing law, commencing July 1, 2019, requires that the rates paid to foster family agencies, except for the rate paid to a certified family home or resource family agency, be 4.15% higher than the rates paid to foster family agencies in the 2018–19 fiscal year, and suspends that rate increase on December 31, 2021, unless a specified circumstance applies.
The bill would state the intent of the Legislature to offset any General Fund moneys appropriated for the above-described rate increase if, during the 2020–21 fiscal year, the State Department of Social Services and the Department of Finance identify additional federal funds due to the ability of the State Department of Social Services to implement a foster family agency Social Worker Time Study, and would require an update on the results of that study to be provided to specified committees of the Legislature.
Existing law provides for the temporary or emergency placement of dependent children of the juvenile court and nonminor dependents with relative caregivers or nonrelative extended family members under specified circumstances. Existing law requires counties to provide a specified payment to an emergency caregiver if, among other things, the emergency caregiver has completed an application for resource family approval and an application for the Emergency Assistance Program. Existing law requires these payments to be made from Emergency Assistance Program funds included in the state’s TANF block grant, with the county solely responsible for the nonfederal share of cost, except as specified. Under existing law, during the 2019–20 fiscal year, these payments are ineligible for the federal or state share of payment upon approval or denial of the resource family application or beyond 120 days, whichever comes first, subject to an extension beyond those payments, for up to 365 days of payments, if certain conditions are met by the county, including, among others, the provision of monthly documentation showing good cause for the delay in approving the resource family application that is outside the control of the county. For the 2020–21 fiscal year, and each fiscal year thereafter, existing law makes these payments ineligible for the federal or state share of payment upon approval or denial of the resource family application or beyond 90 days, whichever comes first, and authorizes the department to consider extending the required payments beyond 90 days if the resource family approval process cannot be completed within 90 days due to circumstances outside of a county’s control.
This bill would instead apply the time limits for the 2019–20 fiscal year to the 2020–21 fiscal year, and would delete the department’s authority, as described above, to consider extending the required payment. For the 2021–22 fiscal year and each fiscal year thereafter, the bill would prescribe that these payments be made from Emergency Assistance Program funds included in the state’s TANF block grant, with the county solely responsible for the nonfederal share of cost, except as specified, and would authorizes the department to consider extending the required payments beyond 90 days if the resource family approval process cannot be completed within 90 days due to circumstances outside of a county’s control.
Existing law establishes the supervised independent living placement as an independent supervised setting that is specified in a nonminor dependent’s transitional independent living case plan and in which the nonminor dependent is living independently.
This bill would authorize a county to complete an inspection of a supervised independent living placement through a method other than an in-person visit and would authorize a county, for the 2020–21 fiscal year, to temporarily approve the supervised independent living placement pending the submission of required forms by the nonminor dependent, based on the nonminor dependent’s agreement that the forms will be submitted.
Existing law makes transitional housing available to any former foster youth who is at least 18 years of age and not more than 24 years of age who has exited from the foster care system on or after their 18th birthday and has elected to participate in the Transitional Housing Program-Plus, as defined, if they have not received services pursuant to these provisions for more than a total of 24 months. Existing law provides for the establishment of rates to be paid to providers of transitional housing.
This bill would authorize a county to extend the provision of services to former foster youth who are participating in the Transitional Housing Program-Plus as of July 1, 2020, without regard to their age or the length of time they have received services, until July 1, 2021. This bill would require, subject to an appropriation in the annual budget act, and commencing July 1, 2021, or September 1, 2022, as specified, that rate to be supplemented with a housing supplement to be calculated by the State Department of Social Services. The bill would specify the method to be used by the State Department of Social Services to calculate that supplement and would require the department to notify county welfare agencies by November 1 of each year of the amount of the supplement by means of all-county letters or similar written instructions. To the extent that this bill would expand the duties of county welfare agencies with regard to the administration of the transitional housing programs, it would impose a state-mandated local program.
Existing law requires the State Department of Social Services to establish a statewide hotline as the entry point for a Family Urgent Response System, as defined, to respond to calls from caregivers or current or former foster children or youth during moments of instability, as specified. Existing law requires the hotline to include, among other things, referrals to a county-based mobile response system, as specified, for further support and in-person response.
Existing law also requires county child welfare, probation, and behavioral health agencies, in each county or region of counties, as specified, to establish a joint county-based mobile response system that includes a mobile response and stabilization team for the purpose of providing supportive services to, among other things, address situations of instability, preserve the relationship of the caregiver and the child or youth, and stabilize the situation. Existing law requires the statewide hotline and each county-based mobile response system to become operational on the same date, no sooner than January 1, 2021, and authorizes a county or region of counties to receive an extension, not to exceed six months, to implement that system after that date upon submission of a written request.
This bill would authorize the statewide hotline to operate sooner than January 1, 2021, or before the date that each county has created a county mobile response system, upon notification from each county to the department that the county satisfies prescribed requirements. The bill would modify the requirements for a county or region of counties to receive the above-specified extension on system implementation. The bill would authorize county-based mobile response systems to be temporarily adapted to address circumstances associated with COVID-19.
Existing law establishes a child welfare public health nursing early intervention program in the County of Los Angeles to improve outcomes for youth who are at risk of entering the foster care system. Existing law requires the program to be administered by the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health (DPH), in cooperation with the county’s Department of Children and Family Services (DCFS). Existing law requires the DPH and the DCFS to develop appropriate outcome measures to determine the effectiveness of the program in achieving its objectives and report, commencing January 1, 2021, and each January 1 thereafter, its findings and recommendations to the Legislature. Existing law requires the State Department of Health Care Services and the county to seek federal approvals necessary to implement the program and maximize federal financial participation, and requires the State Department of Social Services, contingent upon an appropriation in the annual Budget Act, to provide funds to the DPH for the program. Existing law suspends the implementation of these provisions on December 31, 2021, unless the Department of Finance makes a specified determination relating to the 2021–22 and 2022–23 fiscal years.
This bill would instead require the DPH to report, on January 1 during the fiscal year when funding has been provided to the DPH by the State Department of Social Services, and each January 1 thereafter, to the Legislature on the program. Before January 1, 2021, and to the extent enabled by existing resources or appropriated funds, the bill would additionally require the State Department of Health Care Services and the county to determine the steps required to seek federal approvals necessary to claim federal financial participation for those allowable Medicaid activities of the program, and to seek those federal approvals. The bill would require the County of Los Angeles to submit to the State Department of Health Care Services specified information relating to that department’s determinations on those federal approvals, and would condition the implementation of Medicaid activities under this program on that department obtaining federal approval.
Existing law establishes the California Child and Family Service Review System to review all county child welfare systems, as specified. Among other provisions, existing law requires child and family service reviews to maximize compliance with the federal regulations for the receipt of designated federal funding. Under existing law, if a federal disallowance or other financial penalty is imposed on the state based on the results of the federal Children and Family Services Review, the State Department of Social Services, in consultation with the California State Association of Counties, is required to develop an apportionment of the total counties’ share of the penalty, as prescribed.
This bill would require counties to be held harmless, and the state to provide a funding backfill, for any loss of federal funding associated with a reduction in federal financial participation for failure to meet federal monthly visitation requirements, and federal disallowances due to specified federal review findings, during months when a statewide or locally declared disaster or state of emergency is in effect, or in a fiscal year when specified conditions exist relating to the availability of county revenues.
(4) Existing law provides for the county-administered In-Home Supportive Services (IHSS) program, under which qualified aged, blind, and disabled persons are provided with services in order to permit them to remain in their own homes and avoid institutionalization. Existing law permits services to be provided under the IHSS program either through the employment of individual providers, a contract between the county and an entity for the provision of services, the creation by the county of a public authority, or a contract between the county and a nonprofit consortium. Existing law provides that the public authority or nonprofit consortium shall be deemed to be the employer of in-home supportive services personnel for the purposes of collective bargaining over wages, hours, and other terms and conditions of employment. Existing law requires prospective providers of in-home supportive services to complete a provider orientation at the time of enrollment, and requires representatives of the recognized employee organization in the county to be permitted to make a presentation of up to 30 minutes at that orientation.
Existing law requires each public employer, as defined, to provide the exclusive representative mandatory access to its new employee orientations, and requires the parties, upon request of the employer or the exclusive representative, to negotiate regarding the structure, time, and manner of that access. Existing law, until July 1, 2021, applies that requirement to negotiate IHSS provider orientations in the Counties of Los Angeles, Merced, and Orange.
This bill would delete that requirement for the Counties of Los Angeles, Merced, and Orange. The bill would, among other things, prohibit counties from discouraging prospective providers from attending, participating, or listening to the orientation presentation of the recognized employee organization, but would authorize prospective providers to choose not to participate in the recognized employee organization presentation. This bill would, prior to scheduling a provider orientation, require counties to provide the recognized employee with not less than 10 days advance notice of the planned date, time, and location of the orientation, and to make reasonable efforts to schedule the orientation so the recognized employee organization can attend if notified by the organization of its unavailability on the planned date, time, and location, unless waived, as specified. The bill would, to the extent that the orientation is modified from an onsite and in-person orientation, impose the same requirements for counties in regards to the recognized employee organization presentation, as previously described. By imposing new requirements on counties, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program.
Existing law prohibits a person from providing supportive services if the person has been convicted of specified crimes in the previous 10 years. Existing law requires the State Department of Social Services and the State Department of Health Care Services to develop a provider enrollment form that each person seeking to provide supportive services shall complete, sign under penalty of perjury, and submit to the county, containing designated statements relating to the provider’s criminal history. Existing law, the California Public Records Act, requires state and local agencies to make public records available for inspection by the public, subject to specified criteria and with specified exceptions. The act exempts from public inspection specified information regarding persons paid by the state to provide in-home supportive services or personal care services.
This bill would additionally exempt from public inspection specified information regarding persons who have completed the above-described provider enrollment form.
Existing law requires the State Department of Social Services to develop a standardized curriculum, training materials, and work aids, and operate an ongoing, statewide training program on the supportive services uniformity system for specified staff involved in the provision of IHSS services.
This bill would require that training to address, at a minimum, statutes, regulations, and policies related to in-home supportive services and service assessment and authorization, including the functional index ranks and statewide hourly task guidelines, and would require the department to develop a one-day refresher training program on service assessment and authorization, including the functional index ranks and statewide hourly task guidelines. The bill would require staff in certain positions who were hired after a specified date to complete the training within 6 months of being hired and require staff in those positions who were hired prior to that date and who either have not taken the training or took the training prior to July 1, 2019, to complete the refresher training program by December 31, 2021. By imposing additional training requirements on county staff, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program.
Existing law requires counties to perform specified quality assurance activities in connection with the provision of services under the IHSS program.
This bill, until December 31, 2020, would authorize a county to request, and authorize the department to approve, a reduction of quality assurance and program integrity activities to address staffing shortages and enable the county to repurpose staff to support critical IHSS administrative functions for a prescribed time period. The bill, until December 31, 2020, would authorize a county to perform required quality assurance and program integrity activities remotely, as specified.
Existing law, the Medi-Cal Benefits Program, permits a person to receive “waiver personal care services” upon approval by the State Department of Social Services after meeting certain conditions and in accordance with a waiver approved under federal law for persons who would otherwise require care in a nursing home. Existing law defines “waiver personal care services” to mean personal care services authorized by the department for persons who are eligible for either nursing or model nursing facility waiver services, as specified.
Existing law, the Healthy Workplaces, Healthy Families Act of 2014, with certain exceptions, entitles an employee who works in California for the same employer for 30 or more days within a year from the commencement of employment to paid sick days in accordance with certain provisions. Existing law entitles, among others, a provider of in-home supportive services, as defined, who meets certain requirements, to paid sick days commencing July 1, 2018. Existing law authorizes the State Department of Social Services to implement and interpret these provisions.
This bill would entitle an individual provider of “waiver personal care services” who also provides in-home supportive services in an applicable month to paid sick days commencing July 1, 2019. The bill would, for a provider of waiver personal care services, require eligibility to be determined based on the aggregate number of monthly hours worked between in-home supportive services and waiver personal care services, subject to use and accrual limitations.
(5) Existing law vests in the State Department of Developmental Services jurisdiction over various state hospitals, referred to as developmental centers, to provide care to persons with developmental disabilities. Existing law prohibits the admission of a person to a developmental center except under certain circumstances, including when the person is experiencing an acute crisis and is committed by a court to the acute crisis center at the Fairview Developmental Center or the Sonoma Developmental Center. Existing law includes those acute crisis centers in the definition of an acute crisis home and establishes certain procedures to be followed prior to, and following, a consumer’s admission to an acute crisis home.
This bill would authorize the department to execute leases, lease-purchases, or leases with the option to purchase for real property necessary for the establishment or maintenance of Stabilization, Training, Assistance and Reintegration (STAR) homes to serve as acute crisis homes operated by the department.
Existing law requires a state department, board, or commission to obtain prior approval of the Department of General Services to engage in any lease activity and subjects a lease agreement to approval by the department.
This bill would exempt the State Department of Developmental Services from the requirement to receive lease approval from the Department of General Services for the lease, lease-purchase, or lease with the option to purchase the STAR homes known as North STAR Home 1 and North STAR Home 2, both located in the City of Vacaville.
Existing law, the Lanterman Developmental Disabilities Services Act, requires the State Department of Developmental Services to contract with regional centers to provide services and supports to individuals with developmental disabilities and their families. Under existing law, the regional centers purchase needed services and supports for individuals with developmental disabilities through approved service providers, or arrange for their provision through other publicly funded agencies. The services and supports to be provided to a regional center consumer are contained in an individual program plan (IPP), developed in accordance with prescribed requirements. Existing law requires an individual program plan to be reviewed and modified by the planning team no less often than once every 3 years, but provides that if the consumer, consumer’s parents, legal guardian, authorized representative, or conservator requests an individual program plan review, the individual program plan is required to be reviewed within 30 days after the request is submitted.
This bill would require the individual program plan to be reviewed no later than 7 days after the request is submitted if necessary for the consumer’s health and safety or to maintain the consumer in their home.
Existing law requires the department, contingent upon approval of federal funding, to establish and implement a state Self-Determination Program, as defined, that would be available in every regional center catchment area to provide participants and their families, within an individual budget, increased flexibility and choice, and greater control over decisions, resources, and needed and desired services and supports to implement their IPP, in accordance with prescribed requirements.
Existing law authorizes the State Council on Developmental Disabilities, in collaboration with a specified protection and advocacy agency and the federally funded University Centers for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities Education, Research, and Service, to work with regional centers to survey participants regarding participant satisfaction under the Self-Determination Program. Existing law requires those entities to issue a report to the Legislature, no later than 3 years following the approval of the federal funding on the status of the Self-Determination Program.
This bill would instead require those entities to issue the report to the Legislature by December 31, 2022. The bill would additionally require the council to issue an interim report to the Legislature, no later than June 30, 2021, on the status of the Self-Determination Program, barriers to implementation, and recommendations to enhance the effectiveness of the program, as specified. The bill would require the department to assist in providing available information to the council in order to facilitate the timely issuance of the report.
Existing law requires the department, effective January 1, 2020, and subject to certain conditions, to provide a rate increase for specified services, including supported employment services and vouchered community-based services. Existing law suspends the implementation of these rate increases on December 31, 2021, unless the Department of Finance makes a specified determination relating to General Fund revenues and expenditures.
This bill would require the department, effective January 1, 2021, and subject to those same conditions, to provide a rate increase to independent living programs, infant development programs, and early start specialized therapeutic services, and would suspend this rate increase on, and delay the suspension described above until, December 31, 2021, unless the Department of Finance makes that specified determination.
(6) Executive Order No. N-29-20, signed by the Governor on March 17, 2020, suspended for 90 days, any state law that would have required a redetermination of benefits under various public programs, including the IHSS program and the Cash Assistance Program for Aged, Blind, and Disabled Legal Immigrants, for an individual eligible for benefits on the date the executive order was signed.
This bill would make a specified exception for reassessments under the IHSS program that were due between the issuance of the executive order and June 30, 2020, but not completed due to the waiver authority, and would provide for the authorization of those reassessments to be conducted remotely using telehealth. For the Cash Assistance Program for Aged, Blind, and Disabled Legal Immigrants, the bill would provide for the authorization of eligibility interviews to be conducted electronically, as specified. The bill would repeal those provisions on January 1, 2024.
(7) Existing law requires, until January 1, 2021, the State Department of Developmental Services to implement a pilot project using community placement plan funds, as appropriated in the State Department of Developmental Services’ annual budget, to test the effectiveness of providing enhanced behavioral supports in homelike community settings. Among other things, the pilot project authorizes an enhanced behavioral supports home using delayed egress devices to also utilize secured perimeters, but limits the number of these homes using delayed egress devices in combination with a secured perimeter that may be certified during the pilot program to 6.
Existing law, until January 1, 2021, requires these homes to be licensed pursuant to the California Community Care Facilities Act by the State Department of Developmental Services and certified by the State Department of Social Services. The act defines an “enhanced behavioral supports home,” as an adult residential facility or a group home that provides 24-hour nonmedical care to individuals with developmental disabilities who require enhanced behavioral supports, staffing, and supervision in a homelike setting. A violation of the act is a misdemeanor.
This bill would make the licensing, regulation, and other requirements for enhanced behavioral supports homes operative statewide, indefinitely. The bill would also increase the number of homes using delayed egress devices in combination with a secured perimeter that may be certified to 11. By extending the operative date of crimes, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program.
(8) Existing law imposes a statewide maximum of 150 beds permitted in various types of facilities for persons with developmental disabilities that utilize delayed egress devices in combination with secured perimeters.
This bill would increase the maximum number of beds in those facilities to 174.
(9) Existing law establishes a process for diversion of a defendant in a criminal proceeding for an offense that is charged as, or reduced to, a misdemeanor, if the defendant has been evaluated by a regional center to have a cognitive developmental disability, as defined, the court determines from reports from the regional center, the prosecutor, and the probation department that diversion is acceptable, and the defendant consents to diversion. Existing law excludes persons who have been previously diverted from participating in the program.
This bill, commencing January 1, 2021, would revise those provisions to refer instead to “developmental disability,” which would mean a disability as defined in the Lanterman Developmental Disabilities Services Act and for which a regional center finds eligibility for services under the act, and would expand the offenses to which the diversion program would apply to include any misdemeanor or felony offense, with specified exceptions. The bill would specify circumstances when a court may hold a hearing to reinstitute diverted criminal proceedings, based on subsequent actions of the defendant. By expanding the availability of a program that provides for services by local probation offices, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program.
(10) Existing law vests in the State Department of Developmental Services jurisdiction over various state hospitals, referred to as developmental centers, for the provision of care to persons with developmental disabilities. Existing law authorizes the State Department of Developmental Services to admit an adult committed by a court to the Porterville Developmental Center secure treatment program if the adult is a defendant found mentally incompetent to stand trial, or is a person with a developmental disability, found to be a danger to self or others as a result of involvement with the criminal justice system, and the court has determined the person is mentally incompetent to stand trial. Existing law also requires other conditions to be met for admittance to that secure treatment facility, including that the population of the secure treatment facility is no more than 211 persons.
This bill would, until June 30, 2023, increase the maximum population of the secure treatment facility at Porterville Developmental Center to 231.
(11) The Budget Act of 2020 makes appropriations for the support of state government for the 2020-21 fiscal year, including funding to the California Department of Aging and the State Department of Social Services.
This bill would suspend $17,500,000 of that funding appropriated to the California Department of Aging for the Senior Nutrition Program on December 31, 2021, unless specified conditions are met. The bill would suspend funding appropriated to the State Department of Social Services for the Emergency Child Care Bridge Program, unless specified conditions apply, and would declare the intent of the Legislature to consider alternatives to restore the Emergency Child Care Bridge Program if the suspension takes effect.
(12) This bill would make legislative findings and declarations as to the necessity of a special statute for the County of Los Angeles.
(13) The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.
This bill would provide that with regard to certain mandates no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason.
With regard to any other mandates, this bill would provide that, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that the bill contains costs so mandated by the state, reimbursement for those costs shall be made pursuant to the statutory provisions noted above.
(14) The bill would appropriate $234,000 from the General Fund to the State Department of Developmental Services for the purposes of carrying out provisions of the bill, as specified.
(15) Existing constitutional provisions require that a statute that limits the right of access to the meetings of public bodies or the writings of public officials and agencies be adopted with findings demonstrating the interest protected by the limitation and the need for protecting that interest.
This bill would make legislative findings to that effect.
(16) This bill would declare that it is to take effect immediately as a bill providing for appropriations related to the Budget Bill.
Vote: MAJORITY   Appropriation: YES   Fiscal Committee: YES   Local Program: YES  

The people of the State of California do enact as follows:


SECTION 1.

 Section 17504 of the Family Code is amended to read:

17504.
 (a) The first fifty dollars ($50) of any amount of child support collected in a month in payment of the required support obligation for that month shall be paid to a recipient of aid under Article 2 (commencing with Section 11250) of Chapter 2 of Part 3 of Division 9 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, except recipients of foster care payments under Article 5 (commencing with Section 11400) of Chapter 2 of Part 3 of Division 9 of the Welfare and Institutions Code shall not be considered income or resources of the recipient family, and shall not be deducted from the amount of aid to which the family would otherwise be eligible. The local child support agency in each county shall ensure that payments are made to recipients as required by this section.
(b) This section shall become inoperative on January 1, 2022, or when the State Department of Social Services and the Department of Child Support Services notify the Legislature that the Statewide Automated Welfare System and the Child Support Enforcement System can perform the necessary automation to implement this section, as amended by the act that added this subdivision, whichever date is later, and as of that date, or, if this section becomes inoperative on a date other than January 1, 2022, on January 1 of the following year, is repealed.
(c) The State Department of Social Services shall issue an all-county letter or similar instruction no later than September 1, 2020, to facilitate automation changes necessary to implement this section and Section 17504, as added by Section 2 of the act that added this subdivision.

SEC. 2.

 Section 17504 is added to the Family Code, to read:

17504.
 (a) The first one hundred dollars ($100) of any amount of child support collected in a month for a family with one child, or the first two hundred dollars ($200) for a family with two or more children, in payment of the required support obligation for that month shall be paid to a recipient of aid under Article 2 (commencing with Section 11250) of Chapter 2 of Part 3 of Division 9 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, except recipients of foster care payments under Article 5 (commencing with Section 11400) of Chapter 2 of Part 3 of Division 9 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, and shall not be considered income or resources of the recipient family, and shall not be deducted from the amount of aid to which the family would otherwise be eligible. The local child support agency in each county shall ensure that payments are made to recipients as required by this section.
(b) Notwithstanding the rulemaking provisions of the Administrative Procedure Act (Chapter 3.5 (commencing with Section 11340) of Part 1 of Division 3 of Title 2 of the Government Code), the State Department of Social Services and the Department of Child Support Services may implement, interpret, or make specific this section by means of all-county letters or similar instructions from the department until regulations are adopted. These all-county letters or similar written instructions shall have the same force and effect as regulations until the adoption of regulations.
(c) This section shall become operative on January 1, 2022, or when the State Department of Social Services and the Department of Child Support Services notify the Legislature that the Statewide Automated Welfare System and Child Support Enforcement System can perform the necessary automation to implement this section, whichever date is later.

SEC. 3.

 Section 6253.2 of the Government Code is amended to read:

6253.2.
 (a) Notwithstanding any other provision of this chapter, information regarding persons paid by the state to provide in-home supportive services pursuant to Article 7 (commencing with Section 12300) of Chapter 3 of Part 3 of Division 9 of the Welfare and Institutions Code or personal care services pursuant to Section 14132.95, 14132.952, 14132.956, or 14132.97 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, and information about persons who have completed the form described in subdivision (a) of Section 12305.81 of the Welfare and Institutions Code for the provider enrollment process, is not subject to public disclosure pursuant to this chapter, except as provided in subdivision (b).
(b) Copies of names, addresses, home telephone numbers, written or spoken languages, if known, personal cellular telephone numbers, and personal email addresses of persons described in subdivision (a) shall be made available, upon request, to an exclusive bargaining agent and to any labor organization seeking representation rights pursuant to subdivision (c) of Section 12301.6 or Section 12302.25 of the Welfare and Institutions Code or Chapter 10 (commencing with Section 3500) of Division 4. This information shall not be used by the receiving entity for any purpose other than the employee organizing, representation, and assistance activities of the labor organization.
(c) This section applies solely to individuals who provide services under the In-Home Supportive Services Program (Article 7 (commencing with Section 12300) of Chapter 3 of Part 3 of Division 9 of the Welfare and Institutions Code), the Personal Care Services Program pursuant to Section 14132.95 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, the In-Home Supportive Services Plus Option Program pursuant to Section 14132.952 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, the Community First Choice Option Program pursuant to Section 14132.956 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, or the Waiver Personal Care Services Program pursuant to Section 14132.97 of the Welfare and Institutions Code.
(d) This section does not alter the rights of parties under the Meyers-Milias-Brown Act (Chapter 10 (commencing with Section 3500) of Division 4) or any other labor relations law.

SEC. 4.

 Section 14669.22 is added to the Government Code, to read:

14669.22.
 Notwithstanding any other law, the director shall exempt from the director’s approval, or approval of the department, transactions entered into by the State Department of Developmental Services for the lease, lease-purchase, or lease with the option to purchase the Stabilization, Training, Assistance and Reintegration (STAR) homes known as North STAR Home 1, located in the City of Vacaville, and as North STAR Home 2, located in the City of Vacaville, and which serve individuals with developmental disabilities. The State Department of Developmental Services may, in its sole discretion, consult with the department in the review or preparation of any lease executed pursuant to this section.

SEC. 5.

 Section 1267.75 of the Health and Safety Code is amended to read:

1267.75.
 (a) A licensee of an intermediate care facility/developmentally disabled habilitative, as defined in subdivision (e) of Section 1250, or of an intermediate care facility/developmentally disabled, as defined in subdivision (g) of Section 1250, for no more than six residents, except for the larger facilities provided for in paragraph (1) of subdivision (k), may install and utilize delayed egress devices of the time delay type in combination with secured perimeters in accordance with the provisions of this section.
(b) For purposes of this section, the following definitions shall apply:
(1) “Delayed egress device” means a device that precludes the use of exits for a predetermined period of time. These devices shall not delay any resident’s departure from the facility for longer than 30 seconds.
(2) “Secured perimeters” means fences that meet the requirements prescribed by this section.
(c) Only individuals meeting all of the following conditions may be admitted to or reside in a facility described in subdivision (a) utilizing delayed egress devices of the time delay type in combination with secured perimeters:
(1) The person shall have a developmental disability as defined in Section 4512 of the Welfare and Institutions Code.
(2) The person shall be receiving services and case management from a regional center under the Lanterman Developmental Disabilities Services Act (Division 4.5 (commencing with Section 4500) of the Welfare and Institutions Code).
(3) (A) The person shall be 14 years of age or older.
(B) Notwithstanding subparagraph (A), a child who is at least 10 years of age and less than 14 years of age may be placed in a licensed facility described in subdivision (a) using delayed egress devices of the time delay type in combination with secured perimeters only if both of the following occur:
(i) A comprehensive assessment is conducted and an individual program plan meeting is convened to determine the services and supports needed for the child to receive services in a less restrictive, unlocked residential setting in California, and the regional center requests assistance from the State Department of Developmental Services’ statewide specialized resource service to identify options to serve the child in a less restrictive, unlocked residential setting in California.
(ii) The regional center requests placement of the child in a facility described in subdivision (a) using delayed egress devices of the time delay type in combination with secured perimeters on the basis that the placement is necessary to prevent out-of-state placement or placement in a more restrictive, locked residential setting such as a developmental center, institution for mental disease, or psychiatric facility, and the State Department of Developmental Services approves the request.
(4) (A) An interdisciplinary team, through the individual program plan (IPP) process pursuant to Section 4646.5 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, shall have determined that the person lacks hazard awareness or impulse control and, for the person’s safety and security, requires the level of supervision afforded by a facility equipped with delayed egress devices of the time delay type in combination with secured perimeters and that, but for this placement, the person would be at risk of admission to, or would have no option but to remain in, a more restrictive placement. The individual program planning team shall convene every 90 days after admission to determine and document the continued appropriateness of the current placement and progress in implementing the transition plan.
(B) The clients’ rights advocate for the regional center shall be notified of the proposed admission and the individual program plan meeting and may participate in the individual program plan meeting, unless the consumer objects on their own behalf.
(d) The licensee shall be subject to all applicable fire and building codes, regulations, and standards, and shall receive approval by the county or city fire department, the local fire prevention district, or the State Fire Marshal for the installed devices and secured perimeters.
(e) The licensee shall provide staff training regarding the use and operation of the delayed egress devices of the time delay type and secured perimeters, protection of residents’ personal rights, lack of hazard awareness and impulse control behavior, and emergency evacuation procedures.
(f) The licensee shall revise its facility plan of operation. These revisions shall first be approved by the State Department of Developmental Services. The plan of operation shall not be approved by the State Department of Public Health unless the licensee provides certification that the plan was approved by the State Department of Developmental Services. The plan shall include, but not be limited to, all of the following:
(1) A description of how the facility is to be equipped with secured perimeters that are consistent with regulations adopted by the State Fire Marshal pursuant to Section 13143.6.
(2) A description of how the facility will provide training for staff.
(3) A description of how the facility will ensure the protection of the residents’ personal rights consistent with Sections 4502, 4503, and 4504 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, and any applicable personal rights provided in Title 22 of the California Code of Regulations.
(4) A description of how the facility will manage residents’ lack of hazard awareness and impulse control behavior, which shall emphasize positive behavioral supports and techniques that are alternatives to physical, chemical, or mechanical restraints, or seclusion.
(5) A description of the facility’s emergency evacuation procedures.
(6) A description of how the facility will comply with applicable health and safety standards.
(g) Delayed egress devices of the time delay type in combination with secured perimeters shall not substitute for adequate staff.
(h) Emergency fire and earthquake drills shall be conducted on each shift in accordance with existing licensing requirements, and shall include all facility staff providing resident care and supervision on each shift.
(i) Interior and exterior space shall be available on the facility premises to permit clients to move freely and safely.
(j) For the purposes of using secured perimeters, the licensee shall not be required to obtain a waiver or exception to a regulation that would otherwise prohibit the locking of a perimeter fence or gate.
(k) The state shall not authorize or fund more than a combined total of 174 beds statewide in facilities with secured perimeters under this section and under Section 1531.15. The department shall notify the appropriate fiscal and policy committees of the Legislature through the January and May budget estimates prior to authorizing an increase above a combined total of 100 beds statewide in facilities with secured perimeters under this section and under Section 1531.15.
(1) A minimum of 50 beds shall be available within programs designed for individuals who are designated incompetent to stand trial pursuant to Section 1370.1 of the Penal Code. These beds shall be within facilities that are exclusively used to provide care for individuals who are placed and participating in forensic competency training pursuant to Section 1370.1 of the Penal Code, except as provided in paragraph (2). No more than half of these facilities may have more than 6 beds and no facility may have more than 15 beds.
(2) When, in the joint determination of the regional center and the facility administrator, an individual would be most appropriately served in a specific program, regardless of whether the facility meets the criteria established in paragraph (1), individuals who are not similarly designated may be placed in the same facility. That placement may occur only when the individual’s planning team determines that the placement and the facility plan of operation meet the individual’s needs and that placement is not incompatible with the needs and safety of other facility residents.
(l) This section shall become operative only upon the filing of emergency regulations by the State Department of Developmental Services. These regulations shall be developed with stakeholders, including the State Department of Public Health, consumer advocates, and regional centers. The regulations shall establish program standards for homes that include delayed egress devices of the time delay type in combination with secured perimeters, including requirements and timelines for the completion and updating of a comprehensive assessment of the consumer’s needs, including the identification through the individual program plan process of the services and supports needed to transition the consumer to a less restrictive living arrangement, and a timeline for identifying or developing those services and supports. The regulations shall establish a statewide limit on the total number of beds in homes with delayed egress devices of the time delay type in combination with secured perimeters. The adoption of these regulations shall be deemed to be an emergency and necessary for the immediate preservation of the public peace, health and safety, or general welfare.
(m) This section shall not apply to developmental centers and state-operated community facilities.

SEC. 6.

 Section 1506 of the Health and Safety Code is amended to read:

1506.
 (a) (1) A foster family agency may use only a certified family home or a resource family that has been certified or approved by that agency or, pursuant to Section 1506.5, a licensed foster family home or a county-approved resource family approved for this use by the county.
(2) A home selected and certified or approved for the reception and care of children by a foster family agency is not subject to Section 1508. A certified family home or a resource family of a foster family agency shall not be licensed as a residential facility.
(3) A child with a developmental disability who is placed in a certified family home or with a resource family by a foster family agency that is operating under agreement with the regional center responsible for that child may remain in the certified family home or with the resource family after 18 years of age. The determination regarding whether and how long the resident may remain as a resident after 18 years of age shall be made through the agreement of all parties involved, including the resident, the certified parent or resource family, the foster family agency social worker, the resident’s regional center case manager, and the resident’s parent, legal guardian, or conservator, as appropriate. This determination shall include a needs and service plan that contains an assessment of the child’s needs to ensure continued compatibility with the other children in placement. The needs and service plan shall be completed no more than six months prior to the child’s 18th birthday. The assessment shall be documented and maintained in the child’s file with the foster family agency.
(4) (A) A certified family home or resource family of a foster family agency may be concurrently certified as a host family pursuant to Section 1559.110 if the home is certified by the same private, nonprofit organization licensed to operate as a transitional housing placement provider and foster family agency.
(B) Notwithstanding subdivision (c) of Section 1559.110, a host family certified pursuant to subparagraph (A) shall comply with the laws applicable to a certified family home or resource family, as determined by the department, for each participant placed with the host family.
(b) (1) A foster family agency shall certify to the department that the certified family home has met the department’s licensing standards. A foster family agency may require a certified family home to meet additional standards or be compatible with its treatment approach.
(2) The foster family agency shall issue a certificate of approval to the certified family home upon its determination that it has met the standards established by the department and before the placement of any child in the home. The certificate shall be valid for a period not to exceed one year. The annual recertification shall require a certified family home to complete at least eight hours of structured applicable training or continuing education. At least one hour of training during the first six months following initial certification shall be dedicated to meeting the requirements of paragraph (1) of subdivision (b) of Section 11174.1 of the Penal Code.
(3) If the agency determines that the home no longer meets the standards, it shall notify the department and the local placing agency.
(4) This subdivision shall apply to foster family agencies only until December 31, 2019, in accordance with Section 1517.
(c) As used in this chapter, “certified family home” means an individual or family certified by a licensed foster family agency and issued a certificate of approval by that agency as meeting licensing standards, and used exclusively by that foster family agency for placements.
(d) (1) A foster family agency shall not accept applications to certify foster homes and shall instead approve resource families pursuant to Section 1517.
(2) (A) A foster family agency that chooses not to approve resource families shall not recruit any new applicants, but may continue to coordinate with county placing agencies to find homes for foster children with its existing certified family homes, as authorized by the department.
(B) No later than July 1, 2017, a foster family agency described in subparagraph (A) shall, in addition to the notification required in paragraph (4) of subdivision (f) of Section 1517, notify its certified family homes that, in order to care for foster children after December 31, 2019, a certified family is required to submit an application for resource family approval to the county in which the home is located or to a foster family agency that approves resource families and shall complete the approval process no later than December 31, 2019.
(e) (1) Social work personnel for a foster family agency shall have a master’s degree or higher from an accredited or state-approved graduate school in social work or social welfare, or equivalent education and experience, as determined by the department.
(2) Persons who possess a master’s degree or higher from an accredited or state-approved graduate school in any of the following areas, or equivalent education and experience, as determined by the department, shall be considered to be qualified to perform social work activities in a foster family agency:
(A) Marriage, family, and child counseling.
(B) Child psychology.
(C) Child development.
(D) Counseling psychology.
(E) Social psychology.
(F) Clinical psychology.
(G) Educational psychology, consistent with the scope of practice as described in Section 4989.14 of the Business and Professions Code.
(H) Education, with emphasis on counseling.
(I) An area that includes the core content areas required for licensure as a Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor, as specified in Sections 4999.32 and 4999.33 of the Business and Professions Code.
(J) A subject area that is functionally equivalent to those listed in subparagraphs (A) to (I), inclusive, as set forth by the department.
(f) (1) In addition to the degree specifications in subdivision (e), all of the following coursework and field practice or experience, as defined in departmental regulations, shall be required of all new hires for the position of social work personnel effective January 1, 1995:
(A) At least three semester units of field practice at the master’s level or six months’ full-time equivalent experience in a public or private social service agency setting.
(B) At least nine semester units of coursework related to human development or human behavior, or, within the first year of employment, experience working with children and families as a major responsibility of the position under the supervision of a supervising social worker.
(C) At least three semester units in working with minority populations or six months of experience in working with minority populations or training in cultural competency and working with minority populations within the first six months of employment as a condition of employment.
(D) At least three semester units in child welfare or at least six months of experience in a public or private child welfare social services setting for a nonsupervisory social worker. A supervising social worker shall have two years’ experience in a public or private child welfare social services setting.
(2) (A) Persons who do not meet the requirements specified in subdivision (e) or this subdivision may apply for an exception as provided for in subdivisions (h) and (i).
(B) Exceptions granted by the department prior to January 1, 1995, shall remain in effect.
(3) (A) Persons who are hired as social work personnel on or after January 1, 1995, who do not meet the requirements listed in this subdivision shall be required to successfully meet those requirements in order to be employed as social work personnel in a foster family agency.
(B) Employees who were hired prior to January 1, 1995, shall not be required to meet the requirements of this subdivision in order to remain employed as social work personnel in a foster family agency.
(4) Coursework and field practice or experience completed to fulfill the degree requirements of subdivision (e) may be used to satisfy the requirements of this subdivision.
(g) (1) In addition to the degree specifications in subdivision (e) and the coursework and field practice or experience described in subdivision (f), social work personnel shall meet core competencies to participate in the assessment and evaluation of an applicant or resource family, as determined by the department in written directives or regulations adopted pursuant to Section 16519.5 of the Welfare and Institutions Code.
(2) (A) A resource family home health and safety assessment may be completed by nonsocial work personnel that meet the requirements of subparagraph (C), if the assessment is reviewed and approved by a social worker.
(B) The orientation of potential resource family applicants may be completed by nonsocial work personnel that meet the requirements of subparagraph (C).
(C) Nonsocial work personnel completing an assessment or orientation pursuant to this paragraph shall have a minimum of a bachelor’s degree in social work, psychology, or a similar field, and experience and core competencies necessary to competently participate in the resource family home health and safety assessment or the orientation of an applicant or resource family. The department shall consult with stakeholders to issue guidance that may include exceptions for when nonsocial work personnel have the background and experience to competently complete the assessment or orientation.
(h) Individuals seeking an exception to the requirements of subdivision (e) or (f) based on completion of equivalent education and experience shall apply to the department by the process established by the department.
(i) The department shall complete the process for the exception to minimum education and experience requirements described in subdivisions (e) and (f) within 30 days of receiving the exception application of social work personnel or supervising social worker qualifications from the foster family agency.
(j) For purposes of this section, “social work personnel” means supervising social workers and nonsupervisory social workers.

SEC. 7.

 Section 1506.3 of the Health and Safety Code is amended to read:

1506.3.
 (a) A foster family agency shall employ one full-time social work supervisor for every eight social workers or fraction thereof in the agency.
(b) A foster family agency shall employ one full-time social worker for every 18 children or fraction thereof in placement.

SEC. 8.

 Section 1517 of the Health and Safety Code is amended to read:

1517.
 (a) (1) Pursuant to subdivision (a) of Section 16519.5 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, the State Department of Social Services shall implement a unified, family friendly, and child-centered resource family approval process to replace the existing multiple processes for licensing foster family homes, certifying foster homes by licensed foster family agencies, approving relatives and nonrelative extended family members as foster care providers, and approving guardians and adoptive families.
(2) For purposes of this chapter, a “resource family” means an individual or family that has successfully met both the home environment assessment and the permanency assessment criteria, as set forth in Section 16519.5 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, necessary for providing care for a child placed by a public or private child placement agency by court order, or voluntarily placed by a parent or legal guardian.
(3) There is no fundamental right to approval as a resource family.
(4) (A) A resource family shall be considered eligible to provide foster care for children in out-of-home placement and shall be considered approved for adoption and guardianship.
(B) (i) Notwithstanding subparagraph (A), a foster family agency may approve a resource family to care for a specific child, as specified in the written directives or regulations adopted pursuant to Section 16519.5 of the Welfare and Institutions Code.
(ii) In the case of an Indian child for whom the child’s tribe is not exercising its right to approve a home, the foster family agency shall apply the prevailing social and cultural standards of the Indian community to resource family approval for that child, as required by subdivision (f) of Section 361.31 of the Welfare and Institutions Code and the federal Indian Child Welfare Act of 1978 (25 U.S.C. Sec. 1901 et seq.). The department shall engage in the tribal consultation process and develop regulations to implement this clause. Notwithstanding the rulemaking provisions of the Administrative Procedure Act (Chapter 3.5 (commencing with Section 11340) of Part 1 of Division 3 of Title 2 of the Government Code), the department may provide guidance to foster family agencies regarding consistent implementation of this clause through the issuance of written directives that shall have the same force and effect as regulations, until regulations are adopted.
(5) For purposes of this chapter, “resource family approval” means that the applicant or resource family successfully meets the home environment assessment and permanency assessment standards adopted pursuant to subdivision (d) of Section 16519.5 of the Welfare and Institutions Code. This approval is in lieu of a certificate of approval issued by a licensed foster family agency pursuant to subdivision (b) of Section 1506.
(6) Approval of a resource family does not guarantee an initial, continued, or adoptive placement of a child with a resource family. Approval of a resource family does not guarantee the establishment of a legal guardianship of a child with a resource family.
(7) (A) Notwithstanding paragraphs (1) to (6), inclusive, a foster family agency shall cease any further review of an application if the applicant has had a previous application denial within the preceding year by the department or county, or if the applicant has had a previous rescission, revocation, or exemption denial or exemption rescission by the department or county within the preceding two years.
(B) If an individual was excluded from a resource family home or facility licensed by the department, a foster family agency shall cease review of the individual’s application unless the excluded individual has been reinstated pursuant to subdivision (g) of Section 16519.6 of the Welfare and Institutions Code or Section 1569.53, subdivision (h) of Section 1558, subdivision (h) of Section 1569.58, or subdivision (h) of Section 1596.8897 of this code.
(C) The cessation of review shall not constitute a denial of the application for purposes of this section, Section 16519.5 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, or any other law.
(D) For purposes of this section, the date of a previous denial, rescission, revocation, exemption denial or exemption rescission, or exclusion shall be either of the following:
(i) The effective date of a final decision or order upholding a notice of action or exclusion order.
(ii) The date on the notice of the decision to deny, rescind, revoke, or exclude if the notice was not appealed or otherwise constitutes a final decision.
(8) A resource family shall meet the approval standards set forth in Section 16519.5 and, as applicable, Chapter 6.3 (commencing with Section 18360) of Part 6 of Division 9 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, comply with the written directives or regulations adopted pursuant to Section 16519.5 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, and comply with other applicable federal and state laws in order to maintain approval.
(9) A resource family may be approved by a county child welfare department or probation department pursuant to Section 16519.5 of the Welfare and Institutions Code or by a foster family agency pursuant to this section.
(10) A resource family shall not be licensed to operate a residential facility, as defined in Section 1502, a residential care facility for the elderly, as defined in Section 1569.2, or a residential care facility for persons with chronic life-threatening illnesses, as defined in Section 1568.01, on the same premises used as the residence of the resource family.
(11) (A) An applicant who withdraws an application prior to its approval or denial may resubmit the application within 12 months of the withdrawal.
(B) This section does not preclude a foster family agency from requiring an applicant to complete an application activity, including if that activity was previously completed.
(b) (1) A foster family agency that approves resource families shall comply with this section.
(2) Notwithstanding any other law, a foster family agency shall require its applicants and resource families to meet the resource family approval standards set forth in Section 16519.5 and, as applicable, Chapter 6.3 (commencing with Section 18360) of Part 6 of Division 9 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, the written directives or regulations adopted thereto, and other applicable laws prior to approval and in order to maintain approval.
(3) A foster family agency shall be responsible for all of the following:
(A) Complying with the applicable provisions of this chapter, the regulations for foster family agencies, the resource family approval standards and requirements set forth in Article 2 (commencing with Section 16519.5) of Chapter 5 of Part 4 of Division 9 and, as applicable, Chapter 6.3 (commencing with Section 18360) of Part 6 of Division 9 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, and the applicable written directives or regulations adopted thereto by the department.
(B) Implementing the requirements for the resource family approval and utilizing standardized documentation established by the department.
(C) Ensuring staff have the education, experience, and core competencies necessary to participate in the assessment and evaluation of an applicant or resource family.
(D) Taking the following actions, as applicable:
(i) (I) Approving or denying resource family applications, including preparing a written report that evaluates the applicant’s capacity to foster, adopt, or provide legal guardianship of a child based on all of the information gathered through the resource family application and assessment processes.
(II) The applicant’s preference to provide a specific level of permanency, including adoption, guardianship, or, in the case of a relative, placement with a fit and willing relative, shall not be a basis to deny an application.
(ii) Rescinding approvals of resource families.
(E) Providing to the department a log of resource families that were approved or had approval rescinded during the month by the 10th day of the following month.
(F) (i) Updating resource family approval biennially and as necessary to address any changes that have occurred in the resource family’s circumstances, including, but not limited to, moving to a new home location or commencing operation of a family day care home, as defined in Section 1596.78.
(ii) A foster family agency shall conduct an announced inspection of a resource family home during the biennial update, and as necessary to address any changes specified in clause (i), to ensure that the resource family is conforming to all applicable laws and the written directives or regulations adopted pursuant to Section 16519.5 of the Welfare and Institutions Code.
(G) Monitoring resource families through all of the following:
(i) Ensuring that social workers who identify a condition in the home that may not meet the resource family approval standards while in the course of a routine visit to children subsequently placed with a resource family take appropriate action as needed.
(ii) Requiring resource families to meet the approval standards set forth in Section 16519.5 and, as applicable, Chapter 6.3 (commencing with Section 18360) of Part 6 of Division 9 of the Welfare and Institutions Code and to comply with the written directives or regulations adopted thereto, other applicable laws, and corrective action plans as necessary to correct identified deficiencies. If corrective action is not completed as specified in the plan, the foster family agency or the department may rescind the approval of the resource family or take other administrative action in accordance with applicable law or the written directives or regulations adopted pursuant to Section 16519.5 and, as applicable, Chapter 6.3 (commencing with Section 18360) of Part 6 of Division 9 of the Welfare and Institutions Code.
(iii) Requiring resource families to report to the foster family agency any incidents, as specified in the written directives or regulations adopted pursuant to Section 16519.5 of the Welfare and Institutions Code.
(iv) Inspecting resource family homes as often as necessary to ensure the quality of care provided.
(H) Performing corrective action as required by the department.
(I) Submitting information and data that the department determines is necessary to study, monitor, and prepare the report specified in paragraph (6) of subdivision (f) of Section 16519.5 of the Welfare and Institutions Code.
(J) (i) Ensuring applicants and resource families meet the training requirements, and, if applicable, the specialized training requirements set forth in Section 16519.5 of the Welfare and Institutions Code.
(ii) This section does not preclude a foster family agency from requiring training in excess of the requirements in this section.
(4) A foster family agency may cooperatively match a child who is under the care, custody, and control of a county with a resource family for initial placement.
(c) In addition to subdivision (f) of Section 16519.5 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, the State Department of Social Services shall be responsible for all of the following:
(1) Requiring foster family agencies to monitor resource families, including, but not limited to, inspecting resource family homes, developing and monitoring resource family corrective action plans to correct identified deficiencies, and rescinding resource family approval if compliance with a corrective action plan is not achieved.
(2) Investigating all complaints regarding a resource family approved by a foster family agency and taking any action it deems necessary. This shall include investigating any incidents reported about a resource family indicating that the approval standard is not being maintained. Complaint investigations shall be conducted in accordance with the written directives or regulations adopted pursuant to Section 16519.5 of the Welfare and Institutions Code. A foster family agency shall not conduct an internal investigation regarding an incident report or complaint against a resource family that interferes with an investigation being conducted by the department.
(3) Rescinding approvals of a resource family approved by a foster family agency.
(4) Excluding a resource family parent or applicant or other individual from presence in any resource family home or licensed community care facility consistent with the established standard, from being a member of the board of directors, an executive director, or an officer of a licensed community care facility, or prohibiting a licensed community care facility from employing the resource family parent or other individual, if appropriate.
(5) Issuing a temporary suspension order that suspends the resource family approval prior to a hearing, when urgent action is needed to protect a child from physical or mental abuse, abandonment, or any other substantial threat to health or safety.
(6) Providing a resource family parent, applicant, excluded individual, or individual who is the subject of a criminal record exemption denial or rescission with due process pursuant to this chapter and subdivisions (g) to (n), inclusive, of Section 16519.6 of the Welfare and Institutions Code if the department has ordered a foster family agency to deny a resource family application or rescind the approval of a resource family, has excluded an individual, has denied or rescinded a criminal record exemption, or has taken other administrative action.
(d) (1) The department may enter and inspect the home of a resource family approved by a foster family agency to secure compliance with the resource family approval standards, investigate a complaint or incident, or ensure the quality of care provided.
(2) Upon a finding of noncompliance, the department may require a foster family agency to deny a resource family application, rescind the approval of a resource family, or take other action the department may deem necessary for the protection of a child placed with the resource family.
(A) If the department requires a foster family agency to deny an application, rescind the approval of a resource family, or take another action, the department shall serve an order of denial or rescission, or another order, that notifies the resource family or applicant and foster family agency of the basis of the department’s action and of the resource family’s or applicant’s right to a hearing.
(B) (i) Except as otherwise specified in this section, a hearing conducted pursuant to this section shall be conducted in accordance with Section 1551.
(ii) Notwithstanding the time for hearings set forth in this chapter, a hearing conducted pursuant to this section shall be held within the timelines specified in subdivisions (f) to (h), inclusive, of Section 16519.6 of the Welfare and Institutions Code.
(iii) Consistent with subdivision (h) of Section 16519.6 of the Welfare and Institutions Code and notwithstanding Section 1550.5, proceedings regarding the temporary suspension of a resource family approval shall not include an interim hearing.
(C) The department’s order of the application denial, rescission of the approval, or another action shall remain in effect until the hearing is completed and the department has made a final determination on the merits.
(D) A foster family agency’s failure to comply with the department’s order to deny an application or rescind the approval of a resource family, or another order, by placing or retaining a child in care shall be grounds for disciplining the foster family agency pursuant to Section 1550.
(e) This section and Article 2 (commencing with Section 16519.5) of Chapter 5 of Part 4 of Division 9 of the Welfare and Institutions Code do not limit the authority of the department to inspect, evaluate, investigate a complaint or incident, or initiate a disciplinary action against a foster family agency pursuant to this chapter, nor do these provisions limit the department’s authority to take any action it may deem necessary for the health and safety of children placed with the foster family agency.
(f) (1) The applicable certification and oversight processes shall continue to be administered for foster homes certified by a foster family agency prior to January 1, 2017, or as specified in paragraph (2), until the certification is revoked or forfeited by operation of law pursuant to this subdivision.
(2) Notwithstanding paragraph (3), a foster family agency shall approve or deny all certified family home applications received on or before December 31, 2016, in accordance with this chapter.
(3) On and after January 1, 2017, a foster family agency shall not accept applications to certify foster homes and shall approve resource families in lieu of certifying foster homes.
(4) No later than July 1, 2019, each foster family agency shall provide the following information to its certified family homes:
(A) A detailed description of the resource family approval program.
(B) Notification that, in order to care for a foster child, resource family approval is required by December 31, 2020.
(C) Notification that a certificate of approval shall be forfeited by operation of law, as specified in paragraph (8).
(5) The following shall apply to all certified family homes:
(A) A certified family home with an approved adoptive home study, completed prior to January 1, 2018, shall be deemed to be a resource family.
(B) A certified family home that had a child in placement at any time between January 1, 2017, and December 31, 2017, inclusive, may be approved as a resource family on the date of successful completion of a family evaluation pursuant to Section 16519.5 of the Welfare and Institutions Code.
(C) A certified family home that provided county-authorized respite services at any time between January 1, 2017, and December 31, 2017, inclusive, may be approved as a resource family on the date of successful completion of a family evaluation pursuant to Section 16519.5 of the Welfare and Institutions Code.
(6) A foster family agency may provide supportive services to all certified family homes with a child in placement to assist with the resource family transition and to minimize placement disruptions.
(7) An individual who is approved as a resource family pursuant to subparagraph (B) or (C) of paragraph (5) shall be fingerprinted pursuant to Section 8712 of the Family Code upon filing an application for adoption.
(8) All certificates of approval for certified family homes shall be forfeited by operation of law on December 31, 2020, except as provided in this paragraph:
(A) All certified family homes that did not have a child in placement or did not provide county-authorized respite services at any time between January 1, 2017, and December 31, 2017, inclusive, shall forfeit the certificate of approval by operation of law on January 1, 2018.
(B) For certified family homes with a pending resource family application on December 31, 2020, the certificate of approval shall be forfeited by operation of law upon approval as a resource family. If approval is denied, forfeiture by operation of law shall occur on the date of completion of any proceedings required by law to ensure due process.
(C) A certificate of approval shall be forfeited by operation of law upon approval as a resource family.
(g) A foster family agency may obtain any arrest or conviction records or reports from any law enforcement agency as necessary to the performance of its duties, as provided in this section.
(h) A foster family agency may review and discuss with an applicant the data contained in the statewide child welfare database, and provided to the foster family agency by a county, that is pertinent to conducting a family evaluation, as specified in the written directives or regulations adopted pursuant to Section 16519.5 of the Welfare and Institutions Code.

SEC. 9.

 Section 1531.15 of the Health and Safety Code is amended to read:

1531.15.
 (a) A licensee of an adult residential facility, short-term residential therapeutic program, or group home for no more than six residents, except for the larger facilities provided for in paragraph (1) of subdivision (k), that is utilizing delayed egress devices pursuant to Section 1531.1, may install and utilize secured perimeters in accordance with the provisions of this section.
(b) As used in this section, “secured perimeters” means fences that meet the requirements prescribed by this section.
(c) Only individuals meeting all of the following conditions may be admitted to or reside in a facility described in subdivision (a) utilizing secured perimeters:
(1) The person shall have a developmental disability as defined in Section 4512 of the Welfare and Institutions Code.
(2) The person shall be receiving services and case management from a regional center under the Lanterman Developmental Disabilities Services Act (Division 4.5 (commencing with Section 4500) of the Welfare and Institutions Code).
(3) (A) The person shall be 14 years of age or older, except as specified in subparagraph (B).
(B) Notwithstanding subparagraph (A), a child who is at least 10 years of age and less than 14 years of age may be placed in a licensed group home described in subdivision (a) using secured perimeters only if both of the following occur:
(i) A comprehensive assessment is conducted and an individual program plan meeting is convened to determine the services and supports needed for the child to receive services in a less restrictive, unlocked residential setting in California, and the regional center requests assistance from the State Department of Developmental Services’ statewide specialized resource service to identify options to serve the child in a less restrictive, unlocked residential setting in California.
(ii) The regional center requests placement of the child in a licensed group home described in subdivision (a) using secured perimeters on the basis that the placement is necessary to prevent out-of-state placement or placement in a more restrictive, locked residential setting such as a developmental center, institution for mental disease or psychiatric facility, and the State Department of Developmental Services approves the request.
(4) The person is not a foster child under the jurisdiction of the juvenile court pursuant to Section 300, 450, 601, or 602 of the Welfare and Institutions Code.
(5) (A) An interdisciplinary team, through the individual program plan (IPP) process pursuant to Section 4646.5 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, shall have determined the person lacks hazard awareness or impulse control and, for the person’s safety and security, requires the level of supervision afforded by a facility equipped with secured perimeters, and, but for this placement, the person would be at risk of admission to, or would have no option but to remain in, a more restrictive placement. The individual program planning team shall convene every 90 days after admission to determine and document the continued appropriateness of the current placement and progress in implementing the transition plan.
(B) The clients’ rights advocate for the regional center shall be notified of the proposed admission and the individual program plan meeting and may participate in the individual program plan meeting unless the consumer objects on their own behalf.
(d) The licensee shall be subject to all applicable fire and building codes, regulations, and standards, and shall receive approval by the county or city fire department, the local fire prevention district, or the State Fire Marshal for the installed secured perimeters.
(e) The licensee shall provide staff training regarding the use and operation of the secured perimeters, protection of residents’ personal rights, lack of hazard awareness and impulse control behavior, and emergency evacuation procedures.
(f) The licensee shall revise its facility plan of operation. These revisions shall first be approved by the State Department of Developmental Services. The plan of operation shall not be approved by the State Department of Social Services unless the licensee provides certification that the plan was approved by the State Department of Developmental Services. The plan shall include, but not be limited to, all of the following:
(1) A description of how the facility is to be equipped with secured perimeters that are consistent with regulations adopted by the State Fire Marshal pursuant to Section 13143.6.
(2) A description of how the facility will provide training for staff.
(3) A description of how the facility will ensure the protection of the residents’ personal rights consistent with Sections 4502, 4503, and 4504 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, and any applicable personal rights provided in Title 22 of the California Code of Regulations.
(4) A description of how the facility will manage residents’ lack of hazard awareness and impulse control behavior, which shall emphasize positive behavioral supports and techniques that are alternatives to physical, chemical, or mechanical restraints, or seclusion.
(5) A description of the facility’s emergency evacuation procedures.
(6) A description of how the facility will comply with applicable health and safety standards.
(g) Secured perimeters shall not substitute for adequate staff.
(h) Emergency fire and earthquake drills shall be conducted on each shift in accordance with existing licensing requirements, and shall include all facility staff providing resident care and supervision on each shift.
(i) Interior and exterior space shall be available on the facility premises to permit clients to move freely and safely.
(j) For the purpose of using secured perimeters, the licensee shall not be required to obtain a waiver or exception to a regulation that would otherwise prohibit the locking of a perimeter fence or gate.
(k) The state shall not authorize or fund more than a combined total of 174 beds statewide in facilities with secured perimeters under this section and under Section 1267.75. The department shall notify the appropriate fiscal and policy committees of the Legislature through the January and May budget estimates prior to authorizing an increase above a combined total of 100 beds statewide in facilities with secured perimeters under this section and under Section 1267.75.
(1) A minimum of 50 beds shall be available within programs designed for individuals who are designated incompetent to stand trial pursuant to Section 1370.1 of the Penal Code. These beds shall be within facilities that are exclusively used to provide care for individuals who are placed and participating in forensic competency training pursuant to Section 1370.1 of the Penal Code, except as provided in paragraph (2). No more than half of these facilities may have more than 6 beds and no facility may have more than 15 beds.
(2) When, in the joint determination of the regional center and the facility administrator, an individual would be most appropriately served in a specific program, regardless of whether the facility meets the criteria established in paragraph (1), individuals who are not similarly designated may be placed in the same facility. That placement may occur only when the individual’s planning team determines that the placement and the facility plan of operation meet the individual’s needs and that placement is not incompatible with the needs and safety of other facility residents.
(l) This section shall become operative only upon the publication in Title 17 of the California Code of Regulations of emergency regulations filed by the State Department of Developmental Services. These regulations shall be developed with stakeholders, including the State Department of Social Services, consumer advocates, and regional centers. The regulations shall establish program standards for homes that include secured perimeters, including requirements and timelines for the completion and updating of a comprehensive assessment of each consumer’s needs, including the identification through the individual program plan process of the services and supports needed to transition the consumer to a less restrictive living arrangement, and a timeline for identifying or developing those services and supports. The regulations shall establish a statewide limit on the total number of beds in homes with secured perimeters. The adoption of these regulations shall be deemed to be an emergency and necessary for the immediate preservation of the public peace, health and safety, or general welfare.

SEC. 10.

 Section 1562.2 is added to the Health and Safety Code, to read:

1562.2.
 A licensee of an adult residential facility shall inform the city and county in which the facility is located of a proposed closure, including whether the licensee intends to sell the property or business, no later than 180 days before its proposed closure, or as soon as practicably possible.

SEC. 11.

 Section 1569.682 of the Health and Safety Code is amended to read:

1569.682.
 (a) A licensee of a licensed residential care facility for the elderly shall, prior to transferring a resident of the facility to another facility or to an independent living arrangement as a result of the forfeiture of a license, as described in subdivision (a), (b), or (f) of Section 1569.19, or a change of use of the facility pursuant to the department’s regulations, take all reasonable steps to transfer affected residents safely and to minimize possible transfer trauma, and shall, at a minimum, do all of the following:
(1) Prepare, for each resident, a relocation evaluation of the needs of that resident, which shall include both of the following:
(A) Recommendations on the type of facility that would meet the needs of the resident based on the current service plan.
(B) A list of facilities, within a 60-mile radius of the resident’s current facility, that meet the resident’s present needs.
(2) Provide each resident or the resident’s responsible person with a written notice no later than 60 days before the intended eviction. The notice shall include all of the following:
(A) The reason for the eviction, with specific facts to permit a determination of the date, place, witnesses, and circumstances concerning the reasons.
(B) A copy of the resident’s current service plan.
(C) The relocation evaluation.
(D) A list of referral agencies.
(E) The right of the resident or resident’s legal representative to contact the department to investigate the reasons given for the eviction pursuant to Section 1569.35.
(F) The contact information for the local long-term care ombudsman, including address and telephone number.
(3) Discuss the relocation evaluation with the resident and the resident’s legal representative within 30 days of issuing the notice of eviction.
(4) Submit a written report of any eviction to the licensing agency within five days.
(5) Upon issuing the written notice of eviction, a licensee shall not accept new residents or enter into new admission agreements.
(6) (A) For paid preadmission fees in excess of five hundred dollars ($500), the resident is entitled to a refund in accordance with all of the following:
(i) A 100-percent refund if preadmission fees were paid within six months of notice of eviction.
(ii) A 75-percent refund if preadmission fees were paid more than six months but not more than 12 months before notice of eviction.
(iii) A 50-percent refund if preadmission fees were paid more than 12 months but not more than 18 months before notice of eviction.
(iv) A 25-percent refund if preadmission fees were paid more than 18 months but less than 25 months before notice of eviction.
(B) No preadmission refund is required if preadmission fees were paid 25 months or more before the notice of eviction.
(C) The preadmission refund required by this paragraph shall be paid within 15 days of issuing the eviction notice. In lieu of the refund, the resident may request that the licensee provide a credit toward the resident’s monthly fee obligation in an amount equal to the preadmission fee refund due.
(7) If the resident gives notice five days before leaving the facility, the licensee shall refund to the resident or the resident’s legal representative a proportional per diem amount of any prepaid monthly fees at the time the resident leaves the facility and the unit is vacated. Otherwise the licensee shall pay the refund within seven days from the date that the resident leaves the facility and the unit is vacated.
(8) Within 10 days of all residents having left the facility, the licensee, based on information provided by the resident or resident’s legal representative, shall submit a final list of names and new locations of all residents to the department and the local ombudsman program.
(b) If seven or more residents of a residential care facility for the elderly will be transferred as a result of the forfeiture of a license or change in the use of the facility pursuant to subdivision (a), the licensee shall submit a proposed closure plan to the department for approval. The department shall approve or disapprove the closure plan, and monitor its implementation, in accordance with the following requirements:
(1) Upon submission of the closure plan, the licensee shall be prohibited from accepting new residents and entering into new admission agreements for new residents.
(2) The closure plan shall meet the requirements described in subdivision (a), and describe the staff available to assist in the transfers. The department’s review shall include a determination as to whether the licensee’s closure plan contains a relocation evaluation for each resident.
(3) Within 15 working days of receipt, the department shall approve or disapprove the closure plan prepared pursuant to this subdivision, and, if the department approves the plan, it shall become effective upon the date the department grants its written approval of the plan.
(4) If the department disapproves a closure plan, the licensee may resubmit an amended plan, which the department shall promptly either approve or disapprove, within 10 working days of receipt by the department of the amended plan. If the department fails to approve a closure plan, it shall inform the licensee, in writing, of the reasons for the disapproval of the plan.
(5) If the department fails to take action within 20 working days of receipt of either the original or the amended closure plan, the plan, or amended plan, as the case may be, shall be deemed approved.
(6) Until the department has approved a licensee’s closure plan, the facility shall not issue a notice of transfer or require any resident to transfer.
(7) Upon approval by the department, the licensee shall send a copy of the closure plan to the local ombudsman program.
(c) A licensee shall inform the city and county in which the facility is located of a proposed closure, including whether the licensee intends to sell the property or business, no later than 180 days before the proposed closure, or as soon as practicably possible.
(d) (1) If a licensee fails to comply with the requirements of this section, or if the director determines that it is necessary to protect the residents of a facility from physical or mental abuse, abandonment, or any other substantial threat to health or safety, the department shall take any necessary action to minimize trauma for the residents, including caring for the residents through the use of a temporary manager or receiver as provided for in Sections 1569.481 and 1569.482 when the director determines the immediate relocation of the residents is not feasible based on transfer trauma or other considerations such as the unavailability of alternative placements. The department shall contact any local agency that may have assessment, placement, protective, or advocacy responsibility for the residents, and shall work together with those agencies to locate alternative placement sites, contact relatives or other persons responsible for the care of these residents, provide onsite evaluation of the residents, and assist in the transfer of residents.
(2) The participation of the department and local agencies in the relocation of residents from a residential care facility for the elderly does not relieve the licensee of any responsibility under this section. A licensee that fails to comply with the requirements of this section shall be required to reimburse the department and local agencies for the cost of providing the relocation services or the costs incurred in caring for the residents through the use of a temporary manager or receiver as provided for in Sections 1569.481 and 1569.482. If the licensee fails to provide the relocation services required in this section, then the department may request that the Attorney General’s office, the city attorney’s office, or the local district attorney’s office seek injunctive relief and damages in the same manner as provided for in Chapter 5 (commencing with Section 17200) of Part 2 of Division 7 of the Business and Professions Code, including restitution to the department of any costs incurred in caring for the residents through the use of a temporary manager or receiver as provided for in Sections 1569.481 and 1569.482.
(e) A licensee who fails to comply with requirements of this section shall be liable for the imposition of civil penalties in the amount of one hundred dollars ($100) per violation per day for each day that the licensee is in violation of this section, until such time that the violation has been corrected. The civil penalties shall be issued immediately following the written notice of violation. However, if the violation does not present an immediate or substantial threat to the health or safety of residents and the licensee corrects the violation within three days after receiving the notice of violation, the licensee shall not be liable for payment of any civil penalties pursuant to this subdivision related to the corrected violation.
(f) A licensee, on and after January 1, 2015, who fails to comply with this section and abandons the facility and the residents in care resulting in an immediate and substantial threat to the health and safety of the abandoned residents, in addition to forfeiture of the license pursuant to Section 1569.19, shall be excluded from licensure in facilities licensed by the department without the right to petition for reinstatement.
(g) A resident of a residential care facility for the elderly covered under this section may bring a civil action against any person, firm, partnership, or corporation who owns, operates, establishes, manages, conducts, or maintains a residential care facility for the elderly who violates the rights of a resident, as set forth in this section. Any person, firm, partnership, or corporation who owns, operates, establishes, manages, conducts, or maintains a residential care facility for the elderly who violates this section shall be responsible for the acts of the facility’s employees and shall be liable for costs and attorney’s fees. Any such residential care facility for the elderly may also be enjoined from permitting the violation to continue. The remedies specified in this section are in addition to any other remedy provided by law.
(h) This section does not apply to a licensee that has obtained a certificate of authority to offer continuing care contracts, as defined in paragraph (8) of subdivision (c) of Section 1771.

SEC. 12.

 Section 1567.70 of the Health and Safety Code is repealed.

SEC. 13.

 Section 246 of the Labor Code is amended to read:

246.
 (a) (1) An employee who, on or after July 1, 2015, works in California for the same employer for 30 or more days within a year from the commencement of employment is entitled to paid sick days as specified in this section. For an individual provider of waiver personal care services under Section 14132.97 of the Welfare and Institutions Code who also provides in-home supportive services in an applicable month, eligibility shall be determined based on the aggregate number of monthly hours worked between in-home supportive services and waiver personal care services pursuant to subdivision (d) of Section 14132.971.
(2) On and after July 1, 2018, a provider of in-home supportive services under Section 14132.95, 14132.952, or 14132.956 of, or Article 7 (commencing with Section 12300) of Chapter 3 of Part 3 of Division 9 of, the Welfare and Institutions Code, who works in California for 30 or more days within a year from the commencement of employment is entitled to paid sick days as specified in subdivision (e) and subject to the rate of accrual in paragraph (1) of subdivision (b). For an individual provider of waiver personal care services under Section 14132.97 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, entitlement to paid sick days begins on July 1, 2019.
(b) (1) An employee shall accrue paid sick days at the rate of not less than one hour per every 30 hours worked, beginning at the commencement of employment or the operative date of this article, whichever is later, subject to the use and accrual limitations set forth in this section.
(2) An employee who is exempt from overtime requirements as an administrative, executive, or professional employee under a wage order of the Industrial Welfare Commission is deemed to work 40 hours per workweek for the purposes of this section, unless the employee’s normal workweek is less than 40 hours, in which case the employee shall accrue paid sick days based upon that normal workweek.
(3) An employer may use a different accrual method, other than providing one hour per every 30 hours worked, provided that the accrual is on a regular basis so that an employee has no less than 24 hours of accrued sick leave or paid time off by the 120th calendar day of employment or each calendar year, or in each 12-month period.
(4) An employer may satisfy the accrual requirements of this section by providing not less than 24 hours or three days of paid sick leave that is available to the employee to use by the completion of the employee’s 120th calendar day of employment.
(c) An employee shall be entitled to use accrued paid sick days beginning on the 90th day of employment, after which day the employee may use paid sick days as they are accrued.
(d) Accrued paid sick days shall carry over to the following year of employment. However, an employer may limit an employee’s use of accrued paid sick days to 24 hours or three days in each year of employment, calendar year, or 12-month period. This section shall be satisfied and no accrual or carryover is required if the full amount of leave is received at the beginning of each year of employment, calendar year, or 12-month period. The term “full amount of leave” means three days or 24 hours.
(e) For a provider of in-home supportive services under Section 14132.95, 14132.952, or 14132.956 of, or Article 7 (commencing with Section 12300) of Chapter 3 of Part 3 of Division 9 of, and an individual provider of waiver personal care services under Section 14132.97 of, the Welfare and Institutions Code, the term “full amount of leave” is defined as follows:
(1) Eight hours or one day in each year of employment, calendar year, or 12-month period beginning July 1, 2018.
(2) Sixteen hours or two days in each year of employment, calendar year, or 12-month period beginning when the minimum wage, as set forth in paragraph (1) of subdivision (b) of Section 1182.12 and accounting for any years postponed under subparagraph (D) of paragraph (3) of subdivision (d) of Section 1182.12, has reached thirteen dollars ($13) per hour.
(3) Twenty-four hours or three days in each year of employment, calendar year, or 12-month period beginning when the minimum wage, as set forth in paragraph (1) of subdivision (b) of Section 1182.12 and accounting for any years postponed under subparagraph (D) of paragraph (3) of subdivision (d) of Section 1182.12, has reached fifteen dollars ($15) per hour.
(f) An employer is not required to provide additional paid sick days pursuant to this section if the employer has a paid leave policy or paid time off policy, the employer makes available an amount of leave applicable to employees that may be used for the same purposes and under the same conditions as specified in this section, and the policy satisfies one of the following:
(1) Satisfies the accrual, carryover, and use requirements of this section.
(2) Provided paid sick leave or paid time off to a class of employees before January 1, 2015, pursuant to a sick leave policy or paid time off policy that used an accrual method different than providing one hour per 30 hours worked, provided that the accrual is on a regular basis so that an employee, including an employee hired into that class after January 1, 2015, has no less than one day or eight hours of accrued sick leave or paid time off within three months of employment of each calendar year, or each 12-month period, and the employee was eligible to earn at least three days or 24 hours of sick leave or paid time off within nine months of employment. If an employer modifies the accrual method used in the policy it had in place prior to January 1, 2015, the employer shall comply with any accrual method set forth in subdivision (b) or provide the full amount of leave at the beginning of each year of employment, calendar year, or 12-month period. This section does not prohibit the employer from increasing the accrual amount or rate for a class of employees covered by this subdivision.
(3) Notwithstanding any other law, sick leave benefits provided pursuant to the provisions of Sections 19859 to 19868.3, inclusive, of the Government Code, or annual leave benefits provided pursuant to the provisions of Sections 19858.3 to 19858.7, inclusive, of the Government Code, or by provisions of a memorandum of understanding reached pursuant to Section 3517.5 that incorporate or supersede provisions of Section 19859 to 19868.3, inclusive, or Sections 19858.3 to 19858.7, inclusive of the Government Code, meet the requirements of this section.
(g) (1) Except as specified in paragraph (2), an employer is not required to provide compensation to an employee for accrued, unused paid sick days upon termination, resignation, retirement, or other separation from employment.
(2) If an employee separates from an employer and is rehired by the employer within one year from the date of separation, previously accrued and unused paid sick days shall be reinstated. The employee shall be entitled to use those previously accrued and unused paid sick days and to accrue additional paid sick days upon rehiring, subject to the use and accrual limitations set forth in this section. An employer is not required to reinstate accrued paid time off to an employee that was paid out at the time of termination, resignation, or separation of employment.
(h) An employer may lend paid sick days to an employee in advance of accrual, at the employer’s discretion and with proper documentation.
(i) An employer shall provide an employee with written notice that sets forth the amount of paid sick leave available, or paid time off leave an employer provides in lieu of sick leave, for use on either the employee’s itemized wage statement described in Section 226 or in a separate writing provided on the designated pay date with the employee’s payment of wages. If an employer provides unlimited paid sick leave or unlimited paid time off to an employee, the employer may satisfy this section by indicating on the notice or the employee’s itemized wage statement “unlimited.” The penalties described in this article for a violation of this subdivision shall be in lieu of the penalties for a violation of Section 226. This subdivision shall apply to employers covered by Wage Order 11 or 12 of the Industrial Welfare Commission only on and after January 21, 2016.
(j) An employer has no obligation under this section to allow an employee’s total accrual of paid sick leave to exceed 48 hours or 6 days, provided that an employee’s rights to accrue and use paid sick leave are not limited other than as allowed under this section.
(k) An employee may determine how much paid sick leave they need to use, provided that an employer may set a reasonable minimum increment, not to exceed two hours, for the use of paid sick leave.
(l) For the purposes of this section, an employer shall calculate paid sick leave using any of the following calculations:
(1) Paid sick time for nonexempt employees shall be calculated in the same manner as the regular rate of pay for the workweek in which the employee uses paid sick time, whether or not the employee actually works overtime in that workweek.
(2) Paid sick time for nonexempt employees shall be calculated by dividing the employee’s total wages, not including overtime premium pay, by the employee’s total hours worked in the full pay periods of the prior 90 days of employment.
(3) Paid sick time for exempt employees shall be calculated in the same manner as the employer calculates wages for other forms of paid leave time.
(m) If the need for paid sick leave is foreseeable, the employee shall provide reasonable advance notification. If the need for paid sick leave is unforeseeable, the employee shall provide notice of the need for the leave as soon as practicable.
(n) An employer shall provide payment for sick leave taken by an employee no later than the payday for the next regular payroll period after the sick leave was taken.
(o) The State Department of Social Services, in consultation with stakeholders, shall convene a workgroup to implement paid sick leave for in-home supportive services providers as specified in this section. This workgroup shall finish its implementation work by November 1, 2017, and the State Department of Social Services shall issue guidance such as an all-county letter or similar instructions by December 1, 2017.
(p) No later than February 1, 2019, the State Department of Social Services, in consultation with the Department of Finance and stakeholders, shall reconvene the paid sick leave workgroup for in-home supportive services providers. The workgroup shall discuss how paid sick leave affects the provision of in-home supportive services. The workgroup shall consider the potential need for a process to cover an in-home supportive services recipient’s authorized hours when a provider needs to utilize their sick time. This workgroup shall finish its work by November 1, 2019.
(q) Notwithstanding the rulemaking provisions of the Administrative Procedure Act (Chapter 3.5 (commencing with Section 11340) of Part 1 of Division 3 of Title 2 of the Government Code), the State Department of Social Services may implement, interpret, or make specific this section by means of an all-county letter, or similar instructions, without taking any regulatory action.

SEC. 14.

 Section 1001.20 of the Penal Code is amended to read:

1001.20.
 As used in this chapter:
(a) “Cognitive Developmental Disability” means any of the following:
(1) “Intellectual disability” means a condition of significantly subaverage general intellectual functioning existing concurrently with deficits in adaptive behavior and manifested during the developmental period.
(2) “Autism” means a diagnosed condition of markedly abnormal or impaired development in social interaction, in communication, or in both, with a markedly restricted repertoire of activity and interests.
(3) Disabling conditions found to be closely related to intellectual disability or autism, or that require treatment similar to that required for individuals with intellectual disability or autism, and that would qualify an individual for services provided under the Lanterman Developmental Disabilities Services Act.
(b) “Diversion-related treatment and habilitation” means, but is not limited to, specialized services or special adaptations of generic services, directed toward the alleviation of cognitive developmental disability or toward social, personal, physical, or economic habilitation or rehabilitation of an individual with a cognitive developmental disability, and includes, but is not limited to, diagnosis, evaluation, treatment, personal care, day care, domiciliary care, special living arrangements, physical, occupational, and speech therapy, training, education, sheltered employment, mental health services, recreation, counseling of the individual with this disability and of the individual’s family, protective and other social and sociolegal services, information and referral services, follow-along services, and transportation services necessary to ensure delivery of services to persons with cognitive developmental disabilities.
(c) “Regional center” means a regional center for the developmentally disabled established under the Lanterman Developmental Disabilities Services Act that is organized as a private nonprofit community agency to plan, purchase, and coordinate the delivery of services that cannot be provided by state agencies to developmentally disabled persons residing in a particular geographic catchment area, and that is licensed and funded by the State Department of Developmental Services.
(d) “Director of a regional center” means the executive director of a regional center for the developmentally disabled individual or their designee.
(e) “Agency” means the prosecutor, the probation department, and the regional center involved in a particular defendant’s case.
(f) “Dual agency diversion” means a treatment and habilitation program developed with court approval by the regional center, administered jointly by the regional center and by the probation department, that is individually tailored to the needs of the defendant as derived from the defendant’s individual program plan pursuant to Section 4646 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, and that includes, but is not limited to, treatment specifically addressed to the criminal offense charged, for a specified period of time as prescribed in Section 1001.28.
(g) “Single agency diversion” means a treatment and habilitation program developed with court approval by the regional center, administered solely by the regional center without involvement by the probation department, that is individually tailored to the needs of the defendant as derived from the defendant’s individual program plan pursuant to Section 4646 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, and that includes, but is not limited to, treatment specifically addressed to the criminal offense charged, for a specified period of time as prescribed in Section 1001.28.
(h) This section shall remain in effect only until January 1, 2021, and as of that date is repealed.

SEC. 15.

 Section 1001.20 is added to the Penal Code, to read:

1001.20.
 (a) “Developmental disability” means a disability as defined in subdivision (a) of Section 4512 of the Welfare and Institutions Code and for which a regional center finds eligibility for services under the Lanterman Developmental Disabilities Services Act.
(b) “Diversion-related treatment and habilitation” means, but is not limited to, specialized services or special adaptations of generic services, directed toward the alleviation of developmental disability or toward social, personal, physical, or economic habilitation or rehabilitation of an individual with a developmental disability, and includes, but is not limited to, diagnosis, evaluation, treatment, personal care, day care, domiciliary care, special living arrangements, physical, occupational, and speech therapy, training, education, sheltered employment, mental health services, recreation, counseling of the individual with this disability and of the individual’s family, protective and other social and sociolegal services, information and referral services, follow-along services, and transportation services necessary to ensure delivery of services to persons with developmental disabilities.
(c) “Regional center” means a regional center for the developmentally disabled established under the Lanterman Developmental Disabilities Services Act that is organized as a private nonprofit community agency to plan, purchase, and coordinate the delivery of services that cannot be provided by state agencies to developmentally disabled persons residing in a particular geographic catchment area, and that is licensed and funded by the State Department of Developmental Services.
(d) “Director of a regional center” means the executive director of a regional center for the developmentally disabled individual or their designee.
(e) “Agency” means the prosecutor, the probation department, and the regional center involved in a particular defendant’s case.
(f) “Dual agency diversion” means a treatment and habilitation program developed with court approval by the regional center, administered jointly by the regional center and by the probation department, that is individually tailored to the needs of the defendant as derived from the defendant’s individual program plan pursuant to Section 4646 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, and that includes, but is not limited to, treatment specifically addressed to the criminal offense charged, for a specified period of time as prescribed in Section 1001.28.
(g) “Single agency diversion” means a treatment and habilitation program developed with court approval by the regional center, administered solely by the regional center without involvement by the probation department, that is individually tailored to the needs of the defendant as derived from the defendant’s individual program plan pursuant to Section 4646 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, and that includes, but is not limited to, treatment specifically addressed to the criminal offense charged, for a specified period of time as prescribed in Section 1001.28.
(h) This section is operative January 1, 2021.

SEC. 16.

 Section 1001.21 of the Penal Code is amended to read:

1001.21.
 (a) This chapter shall apply whenever a case is before any court upon an accusatory pleading at any stage of the criminal proceedings, for any person who has been evaluated by a regional center for the developmentally disabled and who is determined to be a person with a cognitive developmental disability by the regional center, and who therefore is eligible for its services.
(b) This chapter applies to any offense which is charged as or reduced to a misdemeanor, except that diversion shall not be ordered when the defendant previously has been diverted under this chapter within two years prior to the present criminal proceedings.
(c) This chapter shall apply to persons who have a condition described in paragraph (2) or (3) of subdivision (a) of Section 1001.20 only if that person was a client of a regional center at the time of the offense for which the person is charged.
(d) This section shall remain in effect only until January 1, 2021, and as of that date is repealed.

SEC. 17.

 Section 1001.21 is added to the Penal Code, to read:

1001.21.
 (a) This chapter shall apply whenever a case is before any court upon an accusatory pleading at any stage of the criminal proceedings, for any person who has been evaluated by a regional center and who is determined to be a person with a developmental disability by the regional center, and who therefore is eligible for its services.
(b) This chapter applies to any offense that is charged as a misdemeanor or felony offense, except that a defendant may not be placed into a diversion program, pursuant to this section, for any of the following current charged offenses:
(1) Murder or voluntary manslaughter.
(2) An offense for which a person, if convicted, would be required to register pursuant to Section 290, except for a violation of Section 314.
(3) Rape.
(4) Lewd or lascivious act on a child under 14 years of age.
(5) Assault with intent to commit rape, sodomy, or oral copulation, in violation of Section 220.
(6) Commission of rape or sexual penetration in concert with another person, in violation of Section 264.1.
(7) Continuous sexual abuse of a child, in violation of Section 288.5.
(8) A violation of subdivision (b) or (c) of Section 11418.
(c) Diversion shall not be ordered when the defendant previously has been diverted under this chapter within two years prior to the present criminal proceedings.
(d) This section is operative January 1, 2021.

SEC. 18.

 Section 1001.22 of the Penal Code is amended to read:

1001.22.
 The court shall consult with the prosecutor, the defense counsel, the probation department, and the appropriate regional center in order to determine whether a defendant may be diverted pursuant to this chapter. If the defendant is not represented by counsel, the court shall appoint counsel to represent the defendant. When the court suspects that a defendant may have a cognitive developmental disability, as defined in subdivision (a) of Section 1001.20, and the defendant consents to the diversion process and to the case being evaluated for eligibility for regional center services, and waives their right to a speedy trial, the court shall order the prosecutor, the probation department, and the regional center to prepare reports on specified aspects of the defendant’s case. Each report shall be prepared concurrently.
(a) The regional center shall submit a report to the probation department within 25 judicial days of the court’s order. The regional center’s report shall include a determination as to whether the defendant has a cognitive developmental disability and is eligible for regional center diversion-related treatment and habilitation services, and the regional center shall also submit to the court a proposed diversion program, individually tailored to the needs of the defendant as derived from the defendant’s individual program plan pursuant to Section 4646 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, which shall include, but not be limited to, treatment addressed to the criminal offense charged for a period of time as prescribed in Section 1001.28. The regional center’s report shall also contain a statement whether the proposed program is available for the defendant through the treatment and habilitation services of the regional centers pursuant to Section 4648 of the Welfare and Institutions Code.
(b) The prosecutor shall submit a report on specified aspects of the defendant’s case, within 30 judicial days of the court’s order, to the court, to each of the other agencies involved in the case, and to the defendant. The prosecutor’s report shall include all of the following:
(1) A statement of whether the defendant’s record indicates the defendant’s diversion pursuant to this chapter within two years prior to the alleged commission of the charged divertible offense.
(2) If the prosecutor recommends that this chapter may be applicable to the defendant, the prosecutor shall recommend either a dual or single agency diversion program and shall advise the court, the probation department, the regional center, and the defendant, in writing, of that determination within 20 judicial days of the court’s order to prepare the report.
(3) If the prosecutor recommends against diversion, the prosecutor’s report shall include a declaration in writing to state for the record the grounds upon which the recommendation was made, and the court shall determine, pursuant to Section 1001.23, whether the defendant shall be diverted.
(4) If dual agency diversion is recommended by the prosecutor, a copy of the prosecutor’s report shall also be provided by the prosecutor to the probation department, the regional center, and the defendant within the above prescribed time period. This notification shall include all of the following:
(A) A full description of the proceedings for diversion and the prosecutor’s investigation procedures.
(B) A general explanation of the role and authority of the probation department, the prosecutor, the regional center, and the court in the diversion program process.
(C) A clear statement that the court may decide in a hearing not to divert the defendant and that the defendant may have to stand trial for the alleged offense.
(D) A clear statement that should the defendant fail in meeting the terms of the diversion, or if, during the period of diversion, the defendant is subsequently charged with a felony, the defendant may be required, after a hearing, to stand trial for the original diverted offense.
(c) The probation department shall submit a report on specified aspects of the defendant’s case within 30 judicial days of the court’s order, to the court, to each of the other agencies involved in the case, and to the defendant. The probation department’s report to the court shall be based upon an investigation by the probation department and consideration of the defendant’s age, cognitive developmental disability, employment record, educational background, ties to community agencies and family, treatment history, criminal record if any, and demonstrable motivation and other mitigating factors in determining whether the defendant is a person who would benefit from a diversion-related treatment and habilitation program. The regional center’s report in full shall be appended to the probation department’s report to the court.
(d) This section shall remain in effect only until January 1, 2021, and as of that date is repealed.

SEC. 19.

 Section 1001.22 is added to the Penal Code, to read:

1001.22.
 The court shall consult with the prosecutor, the defense counsel, the probation department, and the appropriate regional center in order to determine whether a defendant may be diverted pursuant to this chapter. If the defendant is not represented by counsel, the court shall appoint counsel to represent the defendant. When the court suspects that a defendant may have a developmental disability, as defined in subdivision (a) of Section 1001.20, and the defendant consents to the diversion process and to the case being evaluated for eligibility for regional center services, and waives their right to a speedy trial, the court shall order the prosecutor, the probation department, and the regional center to prepare reports on specified aspects of the defendant’s case. Each report shall be prepared concurrently.
(a) The regional center shall submit a report to the probation department within 25 judicial days of the court’s order. The regional center’s report shall include a determination as to whether the defendant has a developmental disability and is eligible for regional center diversion-related treatment and habilitation services, and the regional center shall also submit to the court a proposed diversion program, individually tailored to the needs of the defendant as derived from the defendant’s individual program plan pursuant to Section 4646 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, which shall include, but not be limited to, treatment addressed to the criminal offense charged for a period of time as prescribed in Section 1001.28. The regional center’s report shall also contain a statement whether the proposed program is available for the defendant through the treatment and habilitation services of the regional centers pursuant to Section 4648 of the Welfare and Institutions Code.
(b) The prosecutor shall submit a report on specified aspects of the defendant’s case, within 30 judicial days of the court’s order, to the court, to each of the other agencies involved in the case, and to the defendant. The prosecutor’s report shall include all of the following:
(1) A statement of whether the defendant’s record indicates the defendant’s diversion pursuant to this chapter within two years prior to the alleged commission of the charged divertible offense.
(2) If the prosecutor recommends that this chapter may be applicable to the defendant, the prosecutor shall recommend either a dual or single agency diversion program and shall advise the court, the probation department, the regional center, and the defendant, in writing, of that determination within 20 judicial days of the court’s order to prepare the report.
(3) If the prosecutor recommends against diversion, the prosecutor’s report shall include a declaration in writing to state for the record the grounds upon which the recommendation was made, and the court shall determine, pursuant to Section 1001.23, whether the defendant shall be diverted.
(4) If dual agency diversion is recommended by the prosecutor, a copy of the prosecutor’s report shall also be provided by the prosecutor to the probation department, the regional center, and the defendant within the above prescribed time period. This notification shall include all of the following:
(A) A full description of the proceedings for diversion and the prosecutor’s investigation procedures.
(B) A general explanation of the role and authority of the probation department, the prosecutor, the regional center, and the court in the diversion program process.
(C) A clear statement that the court may decide in a hearing not to divert the defendant and that the defendant may have to stand trial for the alleged offense.
(D) A clear statement that should the defendant fail in meeting the terms of the diversion, or if, during the period of diversion, the defendant is subsequently charged with a felony, the defendant may be required, after a hearing, to stand trial for the original diverted offense.
(c) The probation department shall submit a report on specified aspects of the defendant’s case within 30 judicial days of the court’s order, to the court, to each of the other agencies involved in the case, and to the defendant. The probation department’s report to the court shall be based upon an investigation by the probation department and consideration of the defendant’s age, developmental disability, employment record, educational background, ties to community agencies and family, treatment history, criminal record if any, and demonstrable motivation and other mitigating factors in determining whether the defendant is a person who would benefit from a diversion-related treatment and habilitation program. The regional center’s report in full shall be appended to the probation department’s report to the court.
(d) This section is operative January 1, 2021.

SEC. 20.

 Section 1001.23 of the Penal Code is amended to read:

1001.23.
 (a) Upon the court’s receipt of the reports from the prosecutor, the probation department, and the regional center, and a determination by the regional center that the defendant does not have a cognitive developmental disability, the criminal proceedings for the offense charged shall proceed. If the defendant is found to have a cognitive developmental disability and to be eligible for regional center services, and the court determines from the various reports submitted to it that the proposed diversion program is acceptable to the court, the prosecutor, the probation department, and the regional center, and if the defendant consents to diversion and waives their right to a speedy trial, the court may order, without a hearing, that the diversion program be implemented for a period of time as prescribed in Section 1001.28.
(b) After consideration of the probation department’s report, the report of the regional center, and the report of the prosecutor relating to the prosecutor’s recommendation for or against diversion, and any other relevant information, the court shall determine if the defendant shall be diverted under either dual or single agency supervision, and referred for habilitation or rehabilitation diversion pursuant to this chapter. If the court does not deem the defendant a person who would benefit by diversion at the time of the hearing, the suspended criminal proceedings may be reinstituted, or any other disposition as authorized by law may be made, and diversion may be ordered at a later date.
(c) If a dual agency diversion program is ordered by the court, the regional center shall submit a report to the probation department on the defendant’s progress in the diversion program not less than every six months. Within five judicial days after receiving the regional center’s report, the probation department shall submit its report on the defendant’s progress in the diversion program, with the full report of the regional center appended, to the court and to the prosecutor. If single agency diversion is ordered by the court, the regional center alone shall report the defendant’s progress to the court and to the prosecutor not less than every six months.
(d) This section shall remain in effect only until January 1, 2021, and as of that date is repealed.

SEC. 21.

 Section 1001.23 is added to the Penal Code, to read:

1001.23.
 (a) Upon the court’s receipt of the reports from the prosecutor, the probation department, and the regional center, and a determination by the regional center that the defendant does not have a developmental disability, the criminal proceedings for the offense charged shall proceed. If the defendant is found to have a developmental disability and to be eligible for regional center services, and the court determines from the various reports submitted to it that the proposed diversion program is acceptable to the court, the prosecutor, the probation department, and the regional center, and if the defendant consents to diversion and waives their right to a speedy trial, the court may order, without a hearing, that the diversion program be implemented for a period of time as prescribed in Section 1001.28.
(b) After consideration of the probation department’s report, the report of the regional center, the report of the prosecutor relating to the prosecutor’s recommendation for or against diversion, the defendant’s violence and criminal history, the relationship of the developmental disability to the charged offense, and the current charged offense, and any other relevant information, and the court is satisfied that the defendant will not pose an unreasonable risk of danger to public safety, as defined in Section 1170.18, if treated in the community, the court shall determine if the defendant shall be diverted under either dual or single agency supervision, and referred for habilitation or rehabilitation diversion pursuant to this chapter. If the court does not deem the defendant a person who would benefit by diversion at the time of the hearing, the suspended criminal proceedings may be reinstituted, or any other disposition as authorized by law may be made, and diversion may be ordered at a later date.
(c)  If a dual agency diversion program is ordered by the court, the regional center shall submit a report to the probation department on the defendant’s progress in the diversion program not less than every six months. Within five judicial days after receiving the regional center’s report, the probation department shall submit its report on the defendant’s progress in the diversion program, with the full report of the regional center appended, to the court and to the prosecutor. If single agency diversion is ordered by the court, the regional center alone shall report the defendant’s progress to the court and to the prosecutor not less than every six months.
(d) This section is operative January 1, 2021.

SEC. 22.

 Section 1001.29 of the Penal Code is amended to read:

1001.29.
 If it appears that the divertee is not meeting the terms and conditions of the diversion program, the court may hold a hearing and amend the program to provide for greater supervision by the responsible regional center alone, by the probation department alone, or by both the regional center and the probation department. However, notwithstanding the modification of a diversion order, the court may hold a hearing to determine whether the diverted criminal proceedings should be reinstituted if it appears that the divertee’s performance in the diversion program is unsatisfactory, or if the divertee is subsequently charged with a felony during the period of diversion.
(a) In cases of dual agency diversion, a hearing to reinstitute the diverted criminal proceedings may be initiated by either the court, the prosecutor, the regional center, or the probation department.
(b) In cases of single agency diversion, a hearing to reinstitute the diverted criminal proceedings may be initiated only by the court, the prosecutor, or the regional center.
(c) No hearing for either of these purposes shall be held unless the moving agency or the court has given the divertee prior notice of the hearing.
(d) Where the cause of the hearing is a subsequent charge of a felony against the divertee subsequent to the diversion order, any hearing to reinstitute the diverted criminal proceedings shall be delayed until such time as probable cause has been established in court to bind the defendant over for trial on the subsequently charged felony.
(e) This section shall remain in effect only until January 1, 2021, and as of that date is repealed.

SEC. 23.

 Section 1001.29 is added to the Penal Code, to read:

1001.29.
 (a) If it appears that the divertee is not meeting the terms and conditions of the diversion program, the court may hold a hearing and amend the program to provide for greater supervision by the responsible regional center alone, by the probation department alone, or by both the regional center and the probation department. However, notwithstanding the modification of a diversion order, the court may hold a hearing to determine whether the diverted criminal proceedings should be reinstituted if any of the following circumstances exists:
(1) The defendant is charged with an additional misdemeanor allegedly committed during the pretrial diversion and that reflects the defendant’s propensity for violence.
(2) The defendant is charged with an additional felony allegedly committed during the pretrial diversion.
(3) The defendant is engaged in criminal conduct rendering the defendant unsuitable for diversion.
(4) The defendant’s performance in the diversion program is unsatisfactory.
(b) In cases of dual agency diversion, a hearing to reinstitute the diverted criminal proceedings may be initiated by either the court, the prosecutor, the regional center, or the probation department.
(c) In cases of single agency diversion, a hearing to reinstitute the diverted criminal proceedings may be initiated only by the court, the prosecutor, or the regional center.
(d) No hearing for either of these purposes shall be held unless the moving agency or the court has given the divertee prior notice of the hearing.
(e) Where the cause of the hearing is a subsequent charge of a felony against the divertee subsequent to the diversion order, any hearing to reinstitute the diverted criminal proceedings shall be delayed until such time as probable cause has been established in court to bind the defendant over for trial on the subsequently charged felony.
(f) This section is operative January 1, 2021.

SEC. 24.

 Section 4418.7 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

4418.7.
 (a) (1) If the regional center determines, or is informed by the consumer’s parents, legal guardian, conservator, or authorized representative that the community placement of a consumer is at risk of failing, and that admittance to an acute crisis home operated by the department is a likelihood, or the regional center is notified by a court of a potential admission to an acute crisis home operated by the department, the regional center shall immediately notify the appropriate regional resource development project, the consumer, the consumer’s parents, legal guardian, or conservator, and the regional center clients’ rights advocate. For purposes of this section, “acute crisis home operated by the department” includes the acute crisis centers at Fairview Developmental Center and Sonoma Developmental Center.
(2) For purposes of this section, notification to the clients’ rights advocate for the consumer’s regional center shall include a copy of the most recent comprehensive assessment or updated assessment, and the time, date, and location of an individual program plan meeting held pursuant to subdivision (b). The regional center shall provide this notice as soon as practicable, but not less than seven calendar days prior to the meeting.
(b) In these cases, the regional resource development project shall immediately arrange for an assessment of the situation, including, visiting the consumer, if appropriate, determining barriers to successful integration, and recommending the most appropriate means necessary to assist the consumer to remain in the community. The regional center shall request assistance from the statewide specialized resource service pursuant to Section 4418.25, as necessary, in order to determine the most appropriate means necessary to assist the consumer to remain in the community and shall provide the information obtained from the statewide specialized resource service to the regional resource development project. If, based on the assessment, the regional resource development project determines that additional or different services and supports are necessary, the department shall ensure that the regional center provides those services and supports on an emergency basis. An individual program plan meeting, including the regional resource development project’s representative, shall be convened as soon as possible to review the emergency services and supports and determine the consumer’s ongoing needs for services and supports. The regional resource development project shall follow up with the regional center as to the success of the recommended interventions until the consumer’s living arrangement is stable.
(c) (1) If the regional resource development project determines, based on the assessment conducted pursuant to subdivision (b), that the consumer referred to the regional resource development project by the court cannot be safely served in an acute crisis home operated by the department, the department shall notify the court in writing.
(2) (A) If the regional resource development project, in consultation with the regional center, the consumer, and the consumer’s parents, legal guardian, or conservator, when appropriate, determines that admittance to an acute crisis home operated by the department is necessary due to an acute crisis, as defined in paragraph (1) of subdivision (d), the regional center shall immediately pursue the obtainment of a court order for short-term admission and crisis stabilization.
(B) (i) The regional resource development project, in consultation with the regional center, the consumer, and, when appropriate, the consumer’s parents, legal guardian, conservator, or authorized representative, shall not make a determination that admittance to an acute crisis home operated by the department is necessary due to an acute crisis, as defined in paragraph (1) of subdivision (d), unless the determination includes a regional center report detailing all considered community-based services and supports, including a community crisis home certified pursuant to Article 8 (commencing with Section 4698) of Chapter 6 of Division 4.5, and an explanation of why those options could not meet the consumer’s needs at the time of the determination.
(ii) For purposes of complying with clause (i), the regional center shall not be required to consider out-of-state placements or mental health facilities, including institutions for mental disease, as described in Part 5 (commencing with Section 5900) of Division 5, that are ineligible for federal Medicaid funding.
(d) (1) For purposes of this section, an “acute crisis” means a situation in which the consumer meets the criteria of Section 6500 and, as a result of the consumer’s behavior, all of the following are met:
(A) There is imminent risk for substantial harm to the consumer or others.
(B) The service and support needs of the consumer cannot be met in the community, including with supplemental services, as set forth in subparagraph (F) of paragraph (9) of subdivision (a) of Section 4648, and emergency and crisis intervention services, as set forth in paragraph (10) of subdivision (a) of Section 4648.
(C) Due to serious and potentially life-threatening conditions, the consumer requires a specialized environment for crisis stabilization.
(2) For purposes of paragraph (1), out-of-state placements or mental health facilities and other facilities, including institutions for mental disease, as described in Part 5 (commencing with Section 5900) of Division 5, for which federal Medicaid funding is not available, shall not be deemed to be supplemental services or emergency and crisis intervention services.
(e) When an admission occurs due to an acute crisis, all of the following shall apply:
(1) As soon as possible following admission to an acute crisis home operated by the department, a comprehensive assessment shall be completed by the regional center in coordination with the regional resource development project and the acute crisis service staff. The comprehensive assessment shall include the identification of the services and supports needed for crisis stabilization and the timeline for identifying or developing the services and supports needed to transition the consumer back to a noncrisis community setting. The regional center shall immediately submit a copy of the comprehensive assessment to the committing court. Immediately following the assessment, and not later than 30 days following admission, the regional center and the acute crisis home operated by the department shall jointly convene an individual program plan meeting to determine the services and supports needed for crisis stabilization and to develop a plan to transition the consumer into community living pursuant to Section 4418.3. The clients’ rights advocate for the regional center shall be notified of the admission and the individual program plan meeting and may participate in the individual program plan meeting unless the consumer objects on their own behalf.
(2) If transition is not expected within 90 days of admission, an individual program plan meeting shall be held to discuss the status of transition and to determine if the consumer is still in need of crisis stabilization. If crisis services continue to be necessary, the regional center shall submit to the department an updated transition plan and a request for an extension of stay at the acute crisis home operated by the department of up to 90 days.
(3) (A) A consumer shall reside in an acute crisis home operated by the department no longer than six months before being placed into a community living arrangement pursuant to Section 4418.3, unless, prior to the end of the six months, all of the following have occurred:
(i) The regional center has conducted an additional comprehensive assessment based on information provided by the regional center, and the department determines that the consumer continues to be in an acute crisis.
(ii) The individual program planning team has developed a plan that identifies the specific services and supports necessary to transition the consumer into the community, and the plan includes a timeline to obtain or develop those services and supports.
(iii) The committing court has reviewed and, if appropriate, extended the commitment.
(B) The clients’ rights advocate for the regional center shall be notified of the proposed extension pursuant to clause (iii) of subparagraph (A) and the individual program plan meeting to consider the extension, and may participate in the individual program plan meeting unless the consumer objects on their own behalf.
(C) (i) A consumer’s placement at an acute crisis home operated by the department shall not exceed one year unless both of the following occur:
(I) The regional center demonstrates significant progress toward implementing the plan specified in clause (ii) of subparagraph (A) identifying the specific services and supports necessary to transition the consumer into the community.
(II) Extraordinary circumstances exist beyond the regional center’s control that have prevented the regional center from obtaining those services and supports within the timeline based on the plan.
(ii) If both of the circumstances described in subclauses (I) and (II) of clause (i) exist, the regional center may request, and the committing court may grant, an additional extension of the commitment, not to exceed 30 days.
(D) Consumers placed in the community after admission to an acute crisis home operated by the department pursuant to this section shall be considered to have moved from a developmental center for purposes of Section 4640.6.
(f) The department shall collect data on the outcomes of efforts to assist at-risk consumers to remain in the community. The department shall make aggregate data on the implementation of the requirements of this section available, upon request.
(g) Commencing January 1, 2015, admissions to an acute crisis home operated by the department pursuant to a court order for an acute crisis, as described in this section, shall be limited to the acute crisis center at the Fairview Developmental Center, the acute crisis center at the Sonoma Developmental Center, or another acute crisis home operated by the department.
(h) The acute crisis center at the Fairview Developmental Center and the acute crisis center at the Sonoma Developmental Center shall each consist of one unit that is distinct from other residential units at the developmental center and shall each serve no more than five consumers. Crisis center residents may participate in day, work, and recreation programs, and other developmental center facility activities, outside of the acute crisis unit, when the individual program plan identifies it is appropriate and consistent with the individual’s treatment plan. The acute crisis centers shall assist the consumer with transitioning back to their prior residence, or an alternative community-based residential setting, within the timeframe described in this section.
(i) The department may execute leases, lease-purchases, or leases with the option to purchase for real property necessary for the establishment or maintenance of Stabilization, Training, Assistance and Reintegration (STAR) homes to serve as acute crisis homes operated by the department.

SEC. 25.

 Section 4646.5 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

4646.5.
 (a) The planning process for the individual program plan described in Section 4646 shall include all of the following:
(1) Gathering information and conducting assessments to determine the life goals, capabilities and strengths, preferences, barriers, and concerns or problems of the person with developmental disabilities. For children with developmental disabilities, this process should include a review of the strengths, preferences, and needs of the child and the family unit as a whole. Assessments shall be conducted by qualified individuals and performed in natural environments whenever possible. Information shall be taken from the consumer, the consumer’s parents and other family members, the consumer’s friends, advocates, authorized representative, if applicable, providers of services and supports, and other agencies. The assessment process shall reflect awareness of, and sensitivity to, the lifestyle and cultural background of the consumer and the family.
(2) A statement of goals, based on the needs, preferences, and life choices of the individual with developmental disabilities, and a statement of specific, time-limited objectives for implementing the person’s goals and addressing the person’s needs. These objectives shall be stated in terms that allow measurement of progress or monitoring of service delivery. These goals and objectives should maximize opportunities for the consumer to develop relationships, be part of community life in the areas of community participation, housing, work, school, and leisure, increase control over the consumer’s life, acquire increasingly positive roles in community life, and develop competencies to help accomplish these goals.
(3) In developing individual program plans for children, regional centers shall be guided by the principles, process, and services and support parameters set forth in Section 4685.
(4) In developing an individual program plan for a transition age youth or working age adult, the planning team shall consider the Employment First Policy described in Chapter 14 (commencing with Section 4868).
(5) A schedule of the type and amount of services and supports to be purchased by the regional center or obtained from generic agencies or other resources in order to achieve the individual program plan goals and objectives, and identification of the provider or providers of service responsible for attaining each objective, including, but not limited to, vendors, contracted providers, generic service agencies, and natural supports. The individual program plan shall specify the approximate scheduled start date for services and supports and shall contain timelines for actions necessary to begin services and supports, including generic services. In addition to the requirements of subdivision (h) of Section 4646, each regional center shall offer, and upon request provide, a written copy of the individual program plan to the consumer, and, if appropriate, the consumer’s parents, legal guardian or conservator, or authorized representative within 45 days of their request in a threshold language, as defined by paragraph (3) of subdivision (a) of Section 1810.410 of Title 9 of the California Code of Regulations.
(6) If agreed to by the consumer, the parents, legally appointed guardian, or authorized representative of a minor consumer, or the legally appointed conservator of an adult consumer or the authorized representative, including those appointed pursuant to subdivision (a) of Section 4541, subdivision (b) of Section 4701.6, and subdivision (e) of Section 4705, a review of the general health status of the adult or child, including medical, dental, and mental health needs, shall be conducted. This review shall include a discussion of current medications, any observed side effects, and the date of the last review of the medication. Service providers shall cooperate with the planning team to provide any information necessary to complete the health status review. If any concerns are noted during the review, referrals shall be made to regional center clinicians or to the consumer’s physician, as appropriate. Documentation of health status and referrals shall be made in the consumer’s record by the service coordinator.
(7) (A) The development of a transportation access plan for a consumer when all of the following conditions are met:
(i) The regional center is purchasing private, specialized transportation services or services from a residential, day, or other provider, excluding vouchered service providers, to transport the consumer to and from day or work services.
(ii) The planning team has determined that a consumer’s community integration and participation could be safe and enhanced through the use of public transportation services.
(iii) The planning team has determined that generic transportation services are available and accessible.
(B) To maximize independence and community integration and participation, the transportation access plan shall identify the services and supports necessary to assist the consumer in accessing public transportation and shall comply with Section 4648.35. These services and supports may include, but are not limited to, mobility training services and the use of transportation aides. Regional centers are encouraged to coordinate with local public transportation agencies.
(8) A schedule of regular periodic review and reevaluation to ascertain that planned services have been provided, that objectives have been fulfilled within the times specified, and that consumers and families are satisfied with the individual program plan and its implementation.
(b) For all active cases, individual program plans shall be reviewed and modified by the planning team, through the process described in Section 4646, as necessary, in response to the person’s achievement or changing needs, and no less often than once every three years. If the consumer or, if appropriate, the consumer’s parents, legal guardian, authorized representative, or conservator requests an individual program plan review, the individual program plan shall be reviewed within 30 days after the request is submitted, or no later than 7 days after the request is submitted if necessary for the consumer’s health and safety or to maintain the consumer in their home.
(c) (1) The department, with the participation of representatives of a statewide consumer organization, the Association of Regional Center Agencies, an organized labor organization representing service coordination staff, and the state council shall prepare training material and a standard format and instructions for the preparation of individual program plans, which embody an approach centered on the person and family.
(2) Each regional center shall use the training materials and format prepared by the department pursuant to paragraph (1).
(3) The department shall biennially review a random sample of individual program plans at each regional center to ensure that these plans are being developed and modified in compliance with Section 4646 and this section.

SEC. 26.

 Section 4684.81 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

4684.81.
 (a) The department shall use community placement plan funds, as appropriated in the State Department of Developmental Services’ annual budget, to develop enhanced behavioral supports in homelike community settings. The enhanced behavioral supports homes shall be for purposes of providing intensive behavioral services and supports to adults and children with developmental disabilities who need intensive services and supports due to challenging behaviors that cannot be managed in a community setting without the availability of enhanced behavioral services and supports, and who are at risk of institutionalization or out-of-state placement, or are transitioning to the community from a developmental center, other state-operated residential facility, institution for mental disease, or out-of-state placement.
(b) An enhanced behavioral supports home may only be established in an adult residential facility or a group home approved through a regional center community placement plan pursuant to Section 4418.25.
(c) Enhanced behavioral supports homes may be approved by the State Department of Developmental Services each fiscal year to the extent funding is available for this purpose, each for no more than four individuals with developmental disabilities. The homes shall be located throughout the state, as determined by the State Department of Developmental Services, based on regional center requests.
(d) Each enhanced behavioral supports home shall be licensed as an adult residential facility or a group home pursuant to the California Community Care Facilities Act (Chapter 3 (commencing with Section 1500) of Division 2 of the Health and Safety Code) and certified by the State Department of Developmental Services, shall exceed the minimum requirements for a Residential Facility Service Level 4-i pursuant to Sections 56004 and 56013 of Subchapter 4 of Chapter 3 of Division 2 of Title 17 of the California Code of Regulations, and shall meet all applicable statutory and regulatory requirements applicable to a facility licensed as an adult residential facility or a group home for facility licensing, seclusion, and restraint, including Division 1.5 (commencing with Section 1180) of the Health and Safety Code, and the use of behavior modification interventions, subject to any additional requirements applicable to enhanced behavioral supports homes established by statute or by regulation promulgated pursuant to this article and Article 9.5 (commencing with Section 1567.61) of Chapter 3 of Division 2 of the Health and Safety Code.
(e) A regional center shall not place a consumer in an enhanced behavioral supports home unless the program is certified by the State Department of Developmental Services and the facility is licensed by the State Department of Social Services.
(f) The State Department of Developmental Services shall be responsible for granting the certificate of program approval for an enhanced behavioral supports home.
(g) The State Department of Developmental Services may, pursuant to Section 4684.85, decertify any enhanced behavioral supports home that does not comply with program requirements. Upon decertification of an enhanced behavioral supports home, the State Department of Developmental Services shall report the decertification to the State Department of Social Services. The State Department of Social Services shall revoke the license of the enhanced behavioral supports home that has been decertified pursuant to Section 1550 of the Health and Safety Code.
(h) If the State Department of Developmental Services determines that urgent action is necessary to protect a consumer residing in an enhanced behavioral supports home from physical or mental abuse, abandonment, or any other substantial threat to the consumer’s health and safety, the State Department of Developmental Services may request that the regional center or centers remove the consumer from the enhanced behavioral supports home or direct the regional center or centers to obtain alternative or additional services for the consumers within 24 hours of that determination. When possible, an individual program plan (IPP) meeting shall be convened to determine the appropriate action pursuant to this section. In any case, an IPP meeting shall be convened within 30 days following an action pursuant to this section.
(i) Enhanced behavioral supports homes shall have a facility program plan approved by the State Department of Developmental Services.
(1) No later than December 1, 2017, the department shall develop guidelines regarding the use of restraint or containment in enhanced behavioral supports homes, which shall be maintained in the facility program plan and plan of operation. In the development of these guidelines, the department shall consult with both of following:
(A) The appropriate professionals regarding the use of restraint or containment in enhanced behavioral supports homes.
(B) The protection and advocacy agency described in subdivision (i) of Section 4900 regarding appropriate safeguards for the protection of clients’ rights.
(2) The requirements of paragraph (1) shall not apply to enhanced behavioral supports homes that are certified and licensed prior to January 1, 2018, or prior to the adoption of the guidelines required in paragraph (1), whichever is sooner. However, these homes shall meet the requirements of paragraph (1) no later than 30 days following adoption of the guidelines.
(3) An enhanced behavioral supports home shall include in its facility program plan a description of how it will ensure physical restraint or containment will not be used as an extended procedure in accordance with this section, subdivision (h) of Section 1180.4 of the Health and Safety Code, and any other applicable law or regulation.
(4) The facility program plan approved by the State Department of Developmental Services shall be submitted to the State Department of Social Services for inclusion in the facility plan of operation.
(5) The vendoring regional center and each consumer’s regional center shall have joint responsibility for monitoring and evaluating the services provided in the enhanced behavioral supports home. Monitoring shall include at least quarterly, or more frequently if specified in the consumer’s individual program plan, face-to-face, onsite case management visits with each consumer by the consumer’s regional center and at least quarterly quality assurance visits by the vendoring regional center. The State Department of Developmental Services shall monitor and ensure the regional centers’ compliance with their monitoring responsibilities.
(j) The State Department of Developmental Services shall establish by regulation a rate methodology for enhanced behavioral supports homes that includes a fixed facility component for residential services and an individualized services and supports component based on each consumer’s needs as determined through the individual program plan process, which may include assistance with transitioning to a less restrictive community residential setting.
(k) (1) The established facility rate for a full month of service, as defined in regulations adopted pursuant to this article, shall be paid based on the licensed capacity of the facility once the facility reaches maximum capacity, despite the temporary absence of one or more consumers from the facility or subsequent temporary vacancies created by consumers moving from the facility. Prior to the facility reaching licensed capacity, the facility rate shall be prorated based on the number of consumers residing in the facility.
When a consumer is temporarily absent from the facility, including when a consumer is in need for inpatient care in a health facility, as defined in subdivision (a), (b), or (c) of Section 1250 of the Health and Safety Code, the regional center may, based on consumer need, continue to fund individual services, in addition to paying the facility rate. Individual consumer services funded by the regional center during a consumer’s absence from the facility shall be approved by the regional center director and shall only be approved in 14-day increments. The regional center shall maintain documentation of the need for these services and the regional center director’s approval.
(2) An enhanced behavioral supports home using delayed egress devices, in compliance with Section 1531.1 of the Health and Safety Code, may utilize secured perimeters, in compliance with Section 1531.15 of the Health and Safety Code and applicable regulations. No more than 11 enhanced behavioral supports homes that use delayed egress devices in combination with a secured perimeter shall be certified. Enhanced behavioral supports homes shall be counted for purposes of the statewide limit established in regulations on the total number of beds permitted in homes with delayed egress devices in combination with secured perimeters pursuant to subdivision (k) of Section 1531.15 of the Health and Safety Code.

SEC. 27.

 Section 4684.82 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

4684.82.
 The vendoring regional center shall, before placing any consumer into an enhanced behavioral supports home, ensure that the home has a license issued by the State Department of Social Services for not more than four individuals with developmental disabilities, is certified by the State Department of Developmental Services, and has a contract with the regional center that meets the contracting requirements established by the State Department of Developmental Services through regulations promulgated pursuant to this article.

SEC. 28.

 Section 4684.87 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is repealed.

SEC. 29.

 Section 4685.8 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

4685.8.
 (a) The department shall implement a statewide Self-Determination Program. The Self-Determination Program shall be available in every regional center catchment area to provide participants and their families, within an individual budget, increased flexibility and choice, and greater control over decisions, resources, and needed and desired services and supports to implement their IPP. The statewide Self-Determination Program shall be phased in over three years, and during this phase-in period, shall serve up to 2,500 regional center consumers, inclusive of the remaining participants in the self-determination pilot projects authorized pursuant to Section 13 of Chapter 1043 of the Statutes of 1998, as amended, and Article 4 (commencing with Section 4669.2) of Chapter 5. Following the phase-in period, the program shall be available on a voluntary basis to all regional center consumers, including residents in developmental centers who are moving to the community, who are eligible for the Self-Determination Program. The program shall be available to individuals who reflect the disability, ethnic, and geographic diversity of the state. The Department of Finance may approve, upon a request from the department and no sooner than 30 days following notification to the Joint Legislative Budget Committee, an increase to the number of consumers served by the Self-Determination Program before the end of the three-year phase-in period.
(b) The department, in establishing the statewide program, shall do both of the following:
(1) For the first three years of the Self-Determination Program, determine, as part of the contracting process described in Sections 4620 and 4629, the number of participants each regional center shall serve in its Self-Determination Program. To ensure that the program is available on an equitable basis to participants in all regional center catchment areas, the number of Self-Determination Program participants in each regional center shall be based on the relative percentage of total consumers served by the regional centers minus any remaining participants in the self-determination pilot projects authorized pursuant to Section 13 of Chapter 1043 of the Statutes of 1998, as amended, and Article 4 (commencing with Section 4669.2) of Chapter 5 or another equitable basis.
(2) Ensure all of the following:
(A) Oversight of expenditure of self-determined funds and the achievement of participant outcomes over time.
(B) Increased participant control over which services and supports best meet the participant’s needs and the IPP objectives. A participant’s unique support system may include the purchase of existing service offerings from service providers or local businesses, hiring their own support workers, or negotiating unique service arrangements with local community resources.
(C) Comprehensive person-centered planning, including an individual budget and services that are outcome based.
(D) Consumer and family training to ensure understanding of the principles of self-determination, the planning process, and the management of budgets, services, and staff.
(E) Choice of independent facilitators who can assist with the person-centered planning process and choice of financial management services providers vendored by regional centers who can assist with payments and provide employee-related services.
(F) Innovation that will more effectively allow participants to achieve their goals.
(c) For purposes of this section, the following definitions apply:
(1) “Financial management services” means services or functions that assist the participant to manage and direct the distribution of funds contained in the individual budget, and ensure that the participant has the financial resources to implement their IPP throughout the year. These may include bill paying services and activities that facilitate the employment of service and support workers by the participant, including, but not limited to, fiscal accounting, tax withholding, compliance with relevant state and federal employment laws, assisting the participant in verifying provider qualifications, including criminal background checks, and expenditure reports. The financial management services provider shall meet the requirements of Sections 58884, 58886, and 58887 of Title 17 of the California Code of Regulations and other specific qualifications established by the department. The costs of financial management services shall be paid by the participant out of the participant’s individual budget, except for the cost of obtaining the criminal background check specified in subdivision (w).
(2) “Independent facilitator” means a person, selected and directed by the participant, who is not otherwise providing services to the participant pursuant to their IPP and is not employed by a person providing services to the participant. The independent facilitator may assist the participant in making informed decisions about the individual budget, and in locating, accessing, and coordinating services and supports consistent with the participant’s IPP. The independent facilitator is available to assist in identifying immediate and long-term needs, developing options to meet those needs, leading, participating, or advocating on behalf of the participant in the person-centered planning process and development of the IPP, and obtaining identified services and supports. The cost of the independent facilitator, if any, shall be paid by the participant out of the participant’s individual budget. An independent facilitator shall receive training in the principles of self-determination, the person-centered planning process, and the other responsibilities described in this paragraph at the independent facilitator’s own cost.
(3) “Individual budget” means the amount of regional center purchase of service funding available to the participant for the purchase of services and supports necessary to implement the IPP. The individual budget shall be determined using a fair, equitable, and transparent methodology.
(4) “IPP” means individual program plan, as described in Section 4646.
(5) “Participant” means an individual, and when appropriate, the participant’s parents, legal guardian or conservator, or authorized representative, who has been deemed eligible for, and has voluntarily agreed to participate in, the Self-Determination Program.
(6) “Self-determination” means a voluntary delivery system consisting of a defined and comprehensive mix of services and supports, selected and directed by a participant through person-centered planning, in order to meet the objectives in their IPP. Self-determination services and supports are designed to assist the participant to achieve personally defined outcomes in community settings that promote inclusion. The Self-Determination Program shall only fund services and supports provided pursuant to this division that the federal Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services determines are eligible for federal financial participation.
(d) Participation in the Self-Determination Program is fully voluntary. A participant may choose to participate in, and may choose to leave, the Self-Determination Program at any time. A regional center shall not require or prohibit participation in the Self-Determination Program as a condition of eligibility for, or the delivery of, services and supports otherwise available under this division. Participation in the Self-Determination Program shall be available to any regional center consumer who meets the following eligibility requirements:
(1) The participant has a developmental disability, as defined in Section 4512, and is receiving services pursuant to this division.
(2) The consumer does not live in a licensed long-term health care facility, as defined in paragraph (44) of subdivision (a) of Section 54302 of Title 17 of the California Code of Regulations. An individual, and when appropriate the individual’s parent, legal guardian or conservator, or authorized representative, who is not eligible to participate in the Self-Determination Program pursuant to this paragraph may request that the regional center provide person-centered planning services in order to make arrangements for transition to the Self-Determination Program, provided that the individual is reasonably expected to transition to the community within 90 days. In that case, the regional center shall initiate person-centered planning services within 60 days of that request.
(3) The participant agrees to all of the following terms and conditions:
(A) The participant shall receive an orientation to the Self-Determination Program prior to enrollment, which includes the principles of self-determination, the role of the independent facilitator and the financial management services provider, person-centered planning, and development of a budget.
(B) The participant shall utilize the services and supports available within the Self-Determination Program only when generic services and supports are not available.
(C) The participant shall only purchase services and supports necessary to implement their IPP and shall comply with any and all other terms and conditions for participation in the Self-Determination Program described in this section.
(D) The participant shall manage Self-Determination Program services and supports within the participant’s individual budget.
(E) The participant shall utilize the services of a financial management services provider of their own choosing and who is vendored by a regional center.
(F) The participant may utilize the services of an independent facilitator of their own choosing for the purpose of providing services and functions as described in paragraph (2) of subdivision (c). If the participant elects not to use an independent facilitator, the participant may use their regional center service coordinator to provide the services and functions described in paragraph (2) of subdivision (c).
(e) A participant who is not Medi-Cal eligible may participate in the Self-Determination Program and receive self-determination services and supports if all other program eligibility requirements are met and the services and supports are otherwise eligible for federal financial participation.
(f) An individual receiving services and supports under a self-determination pilot project authorized pursuant to Section 13 of Chapter 1043 of the Statutes of 1998, as amended, or pursuant to Article 4 (commencing with Section 4669.2) of Chapter 5, may elect to continue to receive self-determination services and supports pursuant to this section or the regional center shall provide for the participant’s transition from the self-determination pilot program to other services and supports. This transition shall include the development of a new IPP that reflects the services and supports necessary to meet the individual’s needs. The regional center shall ensure that there is no gap in services and supports during the transition period.
(g) The additional federal financial participation funds generated by the former participants of the self-determination pilot projects authorized pursuant to Section 13 of Chapter 1043 of the Statutes of 1998, as amended, or pursuant to Article 4 (commencing with Section 4669.2) of Chapter 5, shall be used to maximize the ability of Self-Determination Program participants to direct their own lives and to ensure the department and regional centers successfully implement the program as follows:
(1) First, to offset the cost to the department for the criminal background check conducted pursuant to subdivision (w) and other administrative costs incurred by the department in implementing the Self-Determination Program.
(2) With the remaining funds, the department, in consultation with stakeholders, including a statewide self-determination advisory workgroup, shall prioritize the use of the funds to meet the needs of participants and to implement the program, including costs associated with all of the following:
(A) Independent facilitators to assist with a participant’s initial person-centered planning meeting.
(B) Development of the participant’s initial individual budget.
(C) Joint training of consumers, family members, regional center staff, and members of the local volunteer advisory committee established pursuant to paragraph (1) of subdivision (x).
(D) Regional center operations for caseload ratio enhancement.
(E) To offset the costs to the regional centers in implementing the Self-Determination Program.
(h) If at any time during participation in the Self-Determination Program a regional center determines that a participant is no longer eligible to continue in, or a participant voluntarily chooses to exit, the Self-Determination Program, the regional center shall provide for the participant’s transition from the Self-Determination Program to other services and supports. This transition shall include the development of a new IPP that reflects the services and supports necessary to meet the individual’s needs. The regional center shall ensure that there is no gap in services and supports during the transition period.
(i) An individual determined to be ineligible for or who voluntarily exits the Self-Determination Program shall be permitted to return to the Self-Determination Program upon meeting all applicable eligibility criteria and upon approval of the participant’s planning team, as described in subdivision (j) of Section 4512. An individual who has voluntarily exited the Self-Determination Program shall not return to the program for at least 12 months. During the first three years of the program, the individual’s right to return to the program is conditioned on the regional center not having reached the participant cap imposed by paragraph (1) of subdivision (b).
(j) An individual who participates in the Self-Determination Program may elect to continue to receive self-determination services and supports if the individual transfers to another regional center catchment area, provided that the individual remains eligible for the Self-Determination Program pursuant to subdivision (d). The balance of the participant’s individual budget shall be reallocated to the regional center to which the participant transfers.
(k) The IPP team shall utilize the person-centered planning process to develop the IPP for a participant. The IPP shall detail the goals and objectives of the participant that are to be met through the purchase of participant-selected services and supports. The IPP team shall determine the individual budget to ensure the budget assists the participant to achieve the outcomes set forth in the participant’s IPP and ensures their health and safety. The completed individual budget shall be attached to the IPP.
(l) The participant shall implement their IPP, including choosing and purchasing the services and supports allowable under this section necessary to implement the plan. A participant is exempt from the cost control restrictions regarding the purchases of services and supports pursuant to Section 4648.5. A regional center shall not prohibit the purchase of any service or support that is otherwise allowable under this section.
(m) A participant shall have all the rights established in Sections 4646 to 4646.6, inclusive, and Chapter 7 (commencing with Section 4700).
(n) (1) Except as provided in paragraph (4), the IPP team shall determine the initial and any revised individual budget for the participant using the following methodology:
(A) (i) Except as specified in clause (ii), for a participant who is a current consumer of the regional center, their individual budget shall be the total amount of the most recently available 12 months of purchase of service expenditures for the participant.
(ii) An adjustment may be made to the amount specified in clause (i) if both of the following occur:
(I) The IPP team determines that an adjustment to this amount is necessary due to a change in the participant’s circumstances, needs, or resources that would result in an increase or decrease in purchase of service expenditures, or the IPP team identifies prior needs or resources that were unaddressed in the IPP, which would have resulted in an increase or decrease in purchase of service expenditures.
(II) The regional center certifies on the individual budget document that regional center expenditures for the individual budget, including any adjustment, would have occurred regardless of the individual’s participation in the Self-Determination Program.
(iii) For purposes of clauses (i) and (ii), the amount of the individual budget shall not be increased to cover the cost of the independent facilitator or the financial management services.
(B) For a participant who is either newly eligible for regional center services or who does not have 12 months of purchase service expenditures, the participant’s individual budget shall be calculated as follows:
(i) The IPP team shall identify the services and supports needed by the participant and available resources, as required by Section 4646.
(ii) The regional center shall calculate the cost of providing the services and supports to be purchased by the regional center by using the average cost paid by the regional center for each service or support unless the regional center determines that the consumer has a unique need that requires a higher or lower cost. The regional center shall certify on the individual budget document that this amount would have been expended using regional center purchase of service funds regardless of the individual’s participation in the Self-Determination Program.
(iii) For purposes of clauses (i) and (ii), the amount of the individual budget shall not be increased to cover the cost of the independent facilitator or the financial management services.
(2) The amount of the individual budget shall be available to the participant each year for the purchase of program services and supports. An individual budget shall be calculated no more than once in a 12-month period, unless revised to reflect a change in circumstances, needs, or resources of the participant using the process specified in clause (ii) of subparagraph (A) of paragraph (1).
(3) The individual budget shall be assigned to uniform budget categories developed by the department in consultation with stakeholders and distributed according to the timing of the anticipated expenditures in the IPP and in a manner that ensures that the participant has the financial resources to implement the IPP throughout the year.
(4) The department, in consultation with stakeholders, may develop alternative methodologies for individual budgets that are computed in a fair, transparent, and equitable manner and are based on consumer characteristics and needs, and that include a method for adjusting individual budgets to address a participant’s change in circumstances or needs.
(o) Annually, participants may transfer up to 10 percent of the funds originally distributed to any budget category set forth in paragraph (3) of subdivision (n) to another budget category or categories. Transfers in excess of 10 percent of the original amount allocated to any budget category may be made upon the approval of the regional center or the participant’s IPP team.
(p) Consistent with the implementation date of the IPP, the IPP team shall annually ascertain from the participant whether there are any circumstances or needs that require a change to the annual individual budget. Based on that review, the IPP team shall calculate a new individual budget consistent with the methodology identified in subdivision (n).
(q) (1) On or before December 31, 2014, the department shall apply for federal Medicaid funding for the Self-Determination Program by doing one or more of the following:
(A) Applying for a state plan amendment.
(B) Applying for an amendment to a current home- and community-based waiver for individuals with developmental disabilities.
(C) Applying for a new waiver.
(D) Seeking to maximize federal financial participation through other means.
(2) To the extent feasible, the state plan amendment, waiver, or other federal request described in paragraph (1) shall incorporate the eligibility requirements, benefits, and operational requirements set forth in this section. Except for the provisions of subdivisions (k), (m), (p), and this subdivision, the department may modify eligibility requirements, benefits, and operational requirements as needed to secure approval of federal funding.
(3) Contingent upon approval of federal funding, the Self-Determination Program shall be established.
(r) (1) The department, as it determines necessary, may adopt regulations to implement the procedures set forth in this section. Any regulations shall be adopted in accordance with the requirements of Chapter 3.5 (commencing with Section 11340) of Part 1 of Division 3 of Title 2 of the Government Code.
(2) Notwithstanding paragraph (1) and Chapter 3.5 (commencing with Section 11340) of Part 1 of Division 3 of Title 2 of the Government Code, and only to the extent that all necessary federal approvals are obtained, the department, without taking any further regulatory action, shall implement, interpret, or make specific this section by means of program directives or similar instructions until the time regulations are adopted. It is the intent of the Legislature that the department be allowed this temporary authority as necessary to implement program changes only until completion of the regulatory process.
(s) The department, in consultation with stakeholders, shall develop informational materials about the Self-Determination Program. The department shall ensure that regional centers are trained in the principles of self-determination, the mechanics of the Self-Determination Program, and the rights of consumers and families as candidates for, and participants in, the Self-Determination Program.
(t) Each regional center shall be responsible for implementing the Self-Determination Program as a term of its contract under Section 4629. As part of implementing the program, the regional center shall do both of the following:
(1) Contract with local consumer or family-run organizations and consult with the local volunteer advisory committee established pursuant to paragraph (1) of subdivision (x) to conduct outreach through local meetings or forums to consumers and their families to provide information about the Self-Determination Program and to help ensure that the program is available to a diverse group of participants, with special outreach to underserved communities.
(2) Collaborate with the local consumer or family-run organizations identified in paragraph (1) to jointly conduct training about the Self-Determination Program. The regional center shall consult with the local volunteer advisory committee established pursuant to paragraph (1) of subdivision (x) in planning for the training, and the local volunteer advisory committee may designate members to represent the advisory committee at the training.
(u) The financial management services provider shall provide the participant and the regional center service coordinator with a monthly individual budget statement that describes the amount of funds allocated by budget category, the amount spent in the previous 30-day period, and the amount of funding that remains available under the participant’s individual budget.
(v) Only the financial management services provider is required to apply for vendorization in accordance with Subchapter 2 (commencing with Section 54300) of Chapter 3 of Division 2 of Title 17 of the California Code of Regulations for the Self-Determination Program. All other service and support providers shall not be on the federal debarment list and shall have applicable state licenses, certifications, or other state required documentation, including documentation of any other qualifications required by the department, but are exempt from the vendorization requirements set forth in Title 17 of the California Code of Regulations when serving participants in the Self-Determination Program.
(w) To protect the health and safety of participants in the Self-Determination Program, the department shall require a criminal background check in accordance with all of the following:
(1) The department shall issue a program directive that identifies nonvendored providers of services and supports who shall obtain a criminal background check pursuant to this subdivision. At a minimum, these staff shall include both of the following:
(A) Individuals who provide direct personal care services to a participant.
(B) Other nonvendored providers of services and supports for whom a criminal background check is requested by a participant or the participant’s financial management service.
(2) Subject to the procedures and requirements of this subdivision, the department shall administer criminal background checks consistent with the department’s authority and the process described in Sections 4689.2 to 4689.6, inclusive.
(3) The department shall electronically submit to the Department of Justice fingerprint images and related information required by the Department of Justice of nonvendored providers of services and supports, as specified in paragraph (1), for purposes of obtaining information as to the existence and content of a record of state or federal convictions and state or federal arrests and also information as to the existence and content of a record of state or federal arrests for which the Department of Justice establishes that the person is free on bail or on their own recognizance pending trial or appeal.
(4) When received, the Department of Justice shall forward to the Federal Bureau of Investigation requests for federal summary criminal history information received pursuant to this section. The Department of Justice shall review the information returned from the Federal Bureau of Investigation and compile and disseminate a response to the department.
(5) The Department of Justice shall provide a state or federal response to the department pursuant to paragraph (1) of subdivision (p) of Section 11105 of the Penal Code.
(6) The department shall request from the Department of Justice subsequent notification service, as provided pursuant to Section 11105.2 of the Penal Code, for persons described in paragraph (1).
(7) The Department of Justice shall charge a fee sufficient to cover the cost of processing the request described in this subdivision.
(8) The fingerprints of any provider of services and supports who is required to obtain a criminal background check shall be submitted to the Department of Justice prior to employment. The costs of the fingerprints and the financial management service’s administrative cost authorized by the department shall be paid by the services and supports provider or the provider’s employing agency. Any administrative costs incurred by the department pursuant to this subdivision shall be offset by the funds specified in subdivision (g).
(9) If the criminal record information report shows a criminal history, the department shall take the steps specified in Section 4689.2. The department may prohibit a provider of services and supports from becoming employed, or continuing to be employed, based on the criminal background check, as authorized in Section 4689.6. The provider of services and supports who has been denied employment shall have the rights set forth in Section 4689.6.
(10) The department may utilize a current department-issued criminal record clearance to enable a provider to serve more than one participant, as long as the criminal record clearance has been processed through the department and no subsequent arrest notifications have been received relative to the cleared applicant.
(11) Consistent with subdivision (h) of Section 4689.2, the participant or financial management service that denies or terminates employment based on written notification from the department shall not incur civil liability or unemployment insurance liability.
(x) To ensure the effective implementation of the Self-Determination Program and facilitate the sharing of best practices and training materials commencing with the implementation of the Self-Determination Program, local and statewide advisory committees shall be established as follows:
(1) Each regional center shall establish a local volunteer advisory committee to provide oversight of the Self-Determination Program. The regional center and the State Council on Developmental Disabilities shall each appoint one-half of the membership of the committee. The committee shall consist of the regional center clients’ rights advocate, consumers, family members, and other advocates, and community leaders. A majority of the committee shall be consumers and their family members. The committee shall reflect the multicultural diversity and geographic profile of the catchment area. The committee shall review the development and ongoing progress of the Self-Determination Program, including whether the program advances the principles of self-determination and is operating consistent with the requirements of this section, and may make ongoing recommendations for improvement to the regional center and the department.
(2) The State Council on Developmental Disabilities shall form a volunteer committee, to be known as the Statewide Self-Determination Advisory Committee, comprised of the chairs of the 21 local advisory committees or their designees. The council shall convene the Statewide Self-Determination Advisory Committee twice annually, or more frequently in the sole discretion of the council. The Statewide Self-Determination Advisory Committee shall meet by teleconference or other means established by the council to identify self-determination best practices, effective consumer and family training materials, implementation concerns, systemic issues, ways to enhance the program, and recommendations regarding the most effective method for participants to learn of individuals who are available to provide services and supports. The council shall synthesize information received from the Statewide Self-Determination Advisory Committee, local advisory committees, and other sources, share the information with consumers, families, regional centers, and the department, and make recommendations, as appropriate, to increase the program’s effectiveness in furthering the principles of self-determination.
(y) The department shall annually provide the following information to the appropriate policy and fiscal committees of the Legislature:
(1) Number and characteristics of participants, by regional center, including the number of participants who entered the program upon movement from a developmental center.
(2) Types and amount of services and supports purchased under the Self-Determination Program, by regional center.
(3) Range and average of individual budgets, by regional center, including adjustments to the budget to address the adjustments permitted in clause (ii) of subparagraph (A) of paragraph (1) of subdivision (n).
(4) The number and outcome of appeals concerning individual budgets, by regional center.
(5) The number and outcome of fair hearing appeals, by regional center.
(6) The number of participants who voluntarily withdraw from the Self-Determination Program and a summary of the reasons why, by regional center.
(7) The number of participants who are subsequently determined to no longer be eligible for the Self-Determination Program and a summary of the reasons why, by regional center.
(z) (1) The State Council on Developmental Disabilities shall issue an interim report to the Legislature, in compliance with Section 9795 of the Government Code, no later than June 30, 2021, on the status of the Self-Determination Program authorized by this section, barriers to its implementation, and recommendations to enhance the effectiveness of the program. The interim report shall provide an update to the program’s status, each regional center’s cap on participation and progress toward that cap, the most recent statewide and per-regional-center participant count, and the historical trend in the statewide participation count since the start of the program. The department shall assist in providing available information to the council in order to facilitate the timely issuance of the report.
(2) The council, in collaboration with the protection and advocacy agency identified in Section 4900 and the federally funded University Centers for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities Education, Research, and Service, may work with regional centers to survey participants regarding participant satisfaction under the Self-Determination Program and, when data is available, the traditional service delivery system, including the proportion of participants who report that their choices and decisions are respected and supported and who report that they are able to recruit and hire qualified service providers, and to identify barriers to participation and recommendations for improvement.
(3) The council, in collaboration with the protection and advocacy agency identified in Section 4900 and the federally funded University Centers for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities Education, Research, and Service, shall issue a report to the Legislature, in compliance with Section 9795 of the Government Code, by December 31, 2022, on the status of the Self-Determination Program authorized by this section, and provide recommendations to enhance the effectiveness of the program. This review shall include the program’s effectiveness in furthering the principles of self-determination, including all of the following:
(A) Freedom, which includes the ability of adults with developmental disabilities to exercise the same rights as all citizens to establish, with freely chosen supporters, family and friends, where they want to live, with whom they want to live, how their time will be occupied, and who supports them; and for families to have the freedom to receive unbiased assistance of their own choosing when developing a plan and to select all personnel and supports to further the life goals of a minor child.
(B) Authority, which includes the ability of a person with a disability, or family, to control a certain sum of dollars in order to purchase services and supports of their choosing.
(C) Support, which includes the ability to arrange resources and personnel, both formal and informal, that will assist a person with a disability to live a life in the community that is rich in community participation and contributions.
(D) Responsibility, which includes the ability of participants to take responsibility for decisions in their own lives and to be accountable for the use of public dollars, and to accept a valued role in their community through, for example, competitive employment, organizational affiliations, spiritual development, and general caring of others in their community.
(E) Confirmation, which includes confirmation of the critical role of participants and their families in making decisions in their own lives and designing and operating the system that they rely on.

SEC. 30.

 Section 4691.12 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

4691.12.
 (a) (1) Notwithstanding any other law or regulation, to the extent funds are appropriated in the annual Budget Act for this purpose, and contingent upon the approval of federal funding, the department shall provide a rate increase effective January 1, 2020, for all of the following services:
(A) Specified services for which rates are set by the department or through negotiations between the regional centers and service providers.
(B) Rates paid for supported employment services, as specified in subdivisions (a) and (b) of Section 4860.
(C) Vouchered community-based services, as specified in paragraph (7) of subdivision (c) of Section 4688.21.
(2) The rate increase shall be applied to rates in effect on December 31, 2019, less the amount of any one-time rate increases for developmental services, as authorized in the Budget Act of 2018 (Chapter 29 of the Statutes of 2018). The rate increase shall be applied as a percentage, and this percentage shall be the same for all providers within each service category, as established by the department and set forth in the supplemental rate increase schedule posted on the department’s internet website.
(3) The rate increase provided in this subdivision shall not apply to those services for which rates are determined by other entities, including, but not limited to, the State Department of Health Care Services or the State Department of Social Services, or are usual and customary.
(b) (1) Notwithstanding any other law or regulation, to the extent funds are appropriated in the annual Budget Act for this purpose, and contingent upon the approval of federal funding, the department shall provide a rate increase effective January 1, 2021, for all of the following services:
(A) Independent living programs that use the service code identified in paragraph (35) of subdivision (a) of Section 54342 of Title 17 of the California Code of Regulations.
(B) Infant development programs that use the service code identified in paragraph (37) of subdivision (a) of Section 54342 of Title 17 of the California Code of Regulations.
(C) Early start specialized therapeutic services provided by vendors classified by a regional center as early start specialized therapeutic services providers pursuant to Section 54356 of Title 17 of the California Code of Regulations.
(2) The rate increase shall be applied to rates in effect on December 31, 2020. The rate increase shall be applied as a percentage, and this percentage shall be the same for all providers within each service category, as established by the department and set forth in the rate increase schedule posted on the department’s internet website.
(c) (1) The implementation of the increases authorized in subdivisions (a) and (b) shall be suspended on December 31, 2021, unless paragraph (2) applies.
(2) If, in the determination of the Department of Finance, the estimates of General Fund revenues and expenditures determined pursuant to Section 12.5 of Article IV of the California Constitution that accompany the May Revision, which is required to be released by May 14, 2021, pursuant to Section 13308 of the Government Code, contain projected annual General Fund revenues that exceed projected annual General Fund expenditures in the 2021–22 and 2022–23 fiscal years by the sum total of General Fund moneys appropriated for all programs subject to suspension on December 31, 2021, pursuant to the Budget Act of 2019 and the bills providing for appropriations related to the Budget Act of 2019 within the meaning of subdivision (e) of Section 12 of Article IV of the California Constitution, then the implementation of this section shall not be suspended pursuant to paragraph (1).
(3) If paragraph (1) applies, it is the intent of the Legislature to consider alternative solutions to restore the rate increases described in subdivisions (a) and (b).

SEC. 31.

 Section 7502.5 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

7502.5.
 (a) An individual may be admitted to the secure treatment facility at Porterville Developmental Center, as provided in paragraphs (1) and (3) of subdivision (a) of Section 7505, only when all of the following conditions are satisfied:
(1) The unit to which the individual will be admitted is approved for occupancy and licensed.
(2) Until June 30, 2023, the population of the secure treatment facility is no more than 231 persons. On and after July 1, 2023, the population of the secure treatment facility is no more than 211 persons.
(3) The individual is at least 18 years of age.
(4) The regional center notifies the regional resource development project identified in Section 4418.7, the regional center clients’ rights advocate, the individual, or the individual’s legal guardian or conservator, as appropriate, of a potential admission pursuant to paragraphs (1) and (3) of subdivision (a) of Section 7505.
(5) The regional resource development project completes an assessment of the individual’s services and supports needs, including by visiting the consumer, if appropriate. The assessment shall include consideration of placement options and other necessary services and supports, if any, that could meet the individual’s needs in the community.
(b) An individual may be admitted to the transitional treatment program at Porterville Developmental Center when all of the following conditions are satisfied:
(1) The individual was admitted to Porterville Developmental Center pursuant to paragraphs (1) and (3) of subdivision (a) of Section 7505.
(2) The individual remains eligible for commitment pursuant to paragraph (3) of subdivision (a) of Section 7505.
(3) The unit to which the individual will be admitted is approved for occupancy and licensed.
(4) The population of the transitional treatment program is no more than 60 persons.
(c) As soon as possible, but no later than 30 days following admission to the transitional treatment program, the regional center, in coordination with the developmental center, shall do both of the following:
(1) Complete a comprehensive assessment that shall include the identification of services and supports needed to transition the individual to the community.
(2) Jointly convene an individual program plan meeting to discuss the comprehensive assessment and develop a plan to transition the individual to the community pursuant to Section 4418.3. The transition plan shall be based upon the individual’s needs, developed through the individual program plan process, and shall ensure that needed services and supports will be in place at the time the individual moves. Individual supports and services shall include, when appropriate for the individual, wrap-around services through intensive individualized support services. The transition shall be to a community living arrangement that is in the least restrictive environment appropriate to the needs of the individual and most protective of the individual’s rights to dignity, freedom, and choice, as described in subdivision (a) of Section 4648. The clients’ rights advocate for the regional center shall be notified of the individual program plan meeting and may participate in the meeting unless the consumer objects on their own behalf.
(d) An individual described in this section shall not be placed in the transitional treatment program for longer than necessary to procure a less restrictive placement. Each year, pursuant to Section 4418.25, an individual in the transitional treatment program at Porterville Developmental Center shall receive an updated comprehensive assessment that shall include all of the following:
(1) The reason or reasons for placement in the program for longer than one year.
(2) A description of the issue or issues preventing community placement.
(3) The estimated timeframe for placement in the community and the plan for that placement.
(e)  Before March 1 of each year, the department shall provide the following information to the appropriate policy and fiscal committees of the Legislature:
(1) For each regional center, the number of transitional program residents who are placed in the program for more than one year.
(2) A description of reasons for placement in the program beyond one year.
(3) The steps undertaken to resolve the issue or issues prohibiting community placement.
(4) The additional steps necessary before community placement can be made.
(f) (1) Prior to issuing a request for proposal for a contract to provide the intensive transitional services for individuals residing in the secure treatment program at Porterville Developmental Center, the department shall consult with the appropriate professionals to develop the parameters for the services to be provided in the contract. The department shall also consult with the protection and advocacy agency described in subdivision (i) of Section 4900 regarding appropriate safeguards for the protection of clients’ rights. The department shall ensure that the services are not punitive, are protective of the individual’s rights to dignity, freedom, and choice, and are tailored to the needs of the individual and developed through a person-centered planning process and whether the transition and placement are adequate for the protection and safety of others from the dangers posed by the individual’s known behaviors and for the welfare of the individual. The department shall further ensure that the regional center clients’ rights advocate receives notice of each individual program plan meeting in which the intensive transitional supports are discussed and a copy of any assessment regarding the individual’s intensive support needs, and shall ensure that if the individual disagrees with the proposed intensive transitional supports, the individual may request a fair hearing pursuant to Section 4710.5.
(2) By December 31, 2018, the department shall promulgate emergency regulations in accordance with the Administrative Procedure Act (Chapter 3.5 (commencing with Section 11340) of Part 1 of Division 3 of Title 2 of the Government Code) regarding the intensive transitional services for individuals residing in the secure treatment program at Porterville Developmental Center. The adoption of these regulations shall be deemed to be an emergency and necessary for the immediate preservation of the public peace, health and safety, or general welfare.

SEC. 32.

 Section 10004 is added to the Welfare and Institutions Code, to read:

10004.
 (a) For all In-Home Supportive Services recipients who were due for a reassessment pursuant to Section 12301.1 between the issuance of Executive Order No. N-29-20 and June 30, 2020, and for whom one was not completed due to the waiver authority set forth in Executive Order No. N-29-20, counties shall have until December 31, 2020, to complete the required reassessments.
(b) Reassessments for In-Home Supportive Services recipients required pursuant to Section 12301.1 on or before December 31, 2020, may be conducted remotely using telehealth, including by video conference or telephone, subject to continuing federal approval.
(c) (1) For applicants and recipients of the Cash Assistance Program for Aged, Blind and Disabled Legal Immigrants (Chapter 10.3 (commencing with Section 18937) of Part 6), all eligibility interviews may be conducted electronically, including by telephone or videoconference, and all application and redetermination forms may be submitted by telephone, email, or facsimile, through December 31, 2020.
(2) Any applicant or recipient applying for the Cash Assistance Program for Aged, Blind and Disabled Legal Immigrants (Chapter 10.3 (commencing with Section 18937) of Part 6) through December 31, 2020, satisfies the eligibility verification requirement specified in subdivision (a) of Section 18939, that the applicant or recipient is ineligible for Supplemental Security Income/State Supplemental Program (SSI/SSP) solely due to their immigration status, by providing a verbal attestation that they have applied for SSI/SSP and their application is pending a final determination by the Social Security Administration, or that they have received a final determination and denial by the Social Security Administration.
(d) This section shall remain in effect only until January 1, 2024, and as of that date is repealed.

SEC. 33.

 Section 10831 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

10831.
 (a) The department shall implement and maintain a nonbiometric identity verification method in the CalWORKs program. It is the intent of the Legislature to codify additional details regarding this method so that recipients of aid, other than dependent children, will be required, as a condition of eligibility, to cooperate with this method.
(b) This section shall become inoperative on July 1, 2020, and as of January 1, 2021, is repealed.

SEC. 34.

 Section 10831 is added to the Welfare and Institutions Code, to read:

10831.
 (a) The department shall implement and maintain nonbiometric identity verification methods in the CalWORKs program. The methods approved by the department as of July 1, 2018, satisfy this requirement.
(b) This section shall become operative on July 1, 2020.

SEC. 35.

 Section 10832 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is repealed.

SEC. 36.

 Section 11265 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

11265.
 (a) The county shall redetermine eligibility annually. The county shall at the time of the redetermination, and may at other intervals as may be deemed necessary, require the family to complete a certificate of eligibility containing a written declaration of the information that may be required to establish the continuing eligibility and amount of grant pursuant to Section 11004.
(b) (1) The certificate shall include blanks wherein shall be stated the names of all children receiving aid, their present place of residence, the names and status of any other adults living in the home, the name and, if known, the social security number and present whereabouts of a parent who is not living in the home, and any outside income that may have been received through employment, gifts, or the sale of real or personal property.
(2) Each adult member of the family shall provide, under penalty of perjury, the information necessary to complete the certificate.
(3) When completing the annual certificate of eligibility, a recipient shall provide information on the certificate about income received during the 30 days prior to submission.
(c) (1) If the certificate is mailed to the family, it shall be mailed no later than the end of the month prior to the month it is due and shall be accompanied by a postage-paid envelope for its return. If a complete certificate is not received by the 15th day of the month in which the certificate is due, the county shall provide the recipient with a notice that the county will terminate benefits at the end of the month. Prior to terminating benefits, the county shall attempt to make personal contact by a county worker via telephone or, if consent has been provided, text message or electronically, to remind the recipient that a completed certificate is due and attempt to collect the necessary information to complete the certificate. The certificate shall be completed with the assistance of the eligibility worker, if needed. For recipients also receiving CalFresh benefits, the certificate shall be completed pursuant to the timeframes required by federal and state law for the CalFresh program.
(2) The department may adopt regulations providing for waiver of the deadline for returning the completed certificate when the recipient is considered to be mentally or physically unable to meet the deadline.

SEC. 37.

 Section 11265.1 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

11265.1.
 (a) Counties shall redetermine recipient eligibility and grant amounts on a semiannual basis in a prospective manner, using reasonably anticipated income consistent with Section 5 of the federal Food and Nutrition Act of 2008 (7 U.S.C. Sec. 2014(f)(3)(A)) and any subsequent amendments thereto, implementing regulations, and any waivers obtained by the department pursuant to Section 18910. Counties shall use the information reported on a recipient’s semiannual report form or annual certificate of eligibility required pursuant to Section 11265 to prospectively determine eligibility and the grant amount for each semiannual reporting period.
(b) A semiannual reporting period shall be six consecutive calendar months. In addition to the annual certificate of eligibility required pursuant to Section 11265, a semiannual report form shall be required during the first semiannual reporting period following the application or annual redetermination.
(c) (1) The recipient shall submit a semiannual report form during the first semiannual reporting period following the application or annual redetermination of eligibility.
(2) Counties shall provide a semiannual report form to recipients at the end of the fifth month of the semiannual reporting period, and recipients shall return the completed semiannual report form with required verification to the county by the 11th day of the sixth month of the semiannual reporting period.
(3) The semiannual report form shall be signed under penalty of perjury, and shall include only the information necessary to determine CalWORKs and CalFresh eligibility and calculate the CalWORKs grant amount and CalFresh allotment, as specified by the department. The form shall be written in language that is as understandable as possible for recipients and shall require recipients to provide the following:
(A) Information about income received during the fifth month of the semiannual reporting period.
(B) (i) Information about any changes in income from the amount last used to calculate the household’s allotment.
(ii) This subparagraph shall be implemented upon notification by the department to the Legislature that automation necessary to carry out this provision has been completed. The automation necessary to carry out this provision shall be included in the development of the pre-populated semiannual report form pursuant to Section 11265.15. Notwithstanding the rulemaking provisions of the Administrative Procedure Act, the department shall issue an all-county letter or similar instruction no later than April 1, 2022, to facilitate automation changes necessary to implement this paragraph.
(C) Any other changes to facts required to be reported. The recipient shall provide verification as specified by the department with the semiannual report form.
(4) The semiannual report form shall be considered complete if the following requirements, as specified by the department, are met:
(A) The form is signed by the persons specified by the department.
(B) All questions and items pertaining to CalWORKs and CalFresh eligibility and grant amounts are answered.
(C) Verification required by the department is provided.
(5) If a recipient fails to submit a complete semiannual report form, as described in paragraph (4), by the 11th day of the sixth month of the semiannual reporting period, the county shall provide the recipient with a notice that the county will terminate benefits at the end of the month. Prior to terminating benefits, the county shall attempt to make personal contact by a county worker via telephone or, if consent has been provided, text message or electronically, to remind the recipient that a completed report is due and attempt to collect the necessary information to complete the report. If contact is not made or the semiannual form is not complete, the county shall send a reminder notice to the recipient no later than five days prior to the end of the month. Any discontinuance notice shall be rescinded if a complete report is received, or the necessary information is obtained via an acceptable alternative method and documented in the case file, by the end of the first working day of the first month of the following semiannual reporting period.
(6) The county may determine, at any time prior to the last day of the calendar month following discontinuance for nonsubmission of a semiannual report form, that a recipient had good cause for failing to submit a complete semiannual report form, as described in paragraph (4), by the end of the first working day of the month following discontinuance. If the county finds a recipient had good cause, as defined by the department, it shall rescind the discontinuance notice. Good cause exists only when the recipient cannot reasonably be expected to fulfill the recipient’s reporting responsibilities due to factors outside of the recipient’s control.
(d) Administrative savings that may be reflected in the annual Budget Act due to the implementation of semiannual reporting pursuant to the act that added this section shall not exceed the amount necessary to fund the net General Fund and TANF costs of the semiannual reporting provisions of that act. Possible additional savings in excess of this amount may only be reflected in the annual Budget Act to the extent that they are based on actual savings related to the change to semiannual reporting calculated based on data developed in consultation with the County Welfare Directors Association (CWDA).
(e) The department, in consultation with the CWDA, shall update the relevant policy and fiscal committees of the Legislature as information becomes available regarding the effects upon the program efficiency of implementation of semiannual reporting requirements set forth in Section 11004.1. The update shall be based on data collected by CWDA and select counties. The department, in consultation with CWDA, shall determine the data collection needs required to assess the effects of the semiannual reporting.
(f) Counties may establish staggered semiannual reporting cycles for individual recipients, based on factors established or approved by the department, provided the semiannual reporting cycle is aligned with the annual redetermination of eligibility; however, all recipients within a county must be transitioned to a semiannual reporting system simultaneously. Up to and until the establishment of a countywide semiannual system, counties shall operate a quarterly system, as established by law and regulation applicable immediately prior to the establishment of the semiannual reporting system.

SEC. 38.

 Section 11265.15 is added to the Welfare and Institutions Code, to read:

11265.15.
 (a) The department shall work with the County Welfare Directors Association of California, representatives of county eligibility workers, the Statewide Automated Welfare System, and client advocates to develop and implement the necessary system changes to prepopulate the semiannual report form described in Section 11265.1.
(b) Upon certification that the Statewide Automated Welfare System can perform the necessary automation to implement this section, counties shall provide recipients with a prepopulated semiannual report form instead of a blank form to comply with the requirement described in paragraph (2) of subdivision (c) of Section 11265.1.

SEC. 39.

 Section 11265.2 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

11265.2.
 (a) The grant amount a recipient shall be entitled to receive for each month of the semiannual reporting period shall be prospectively determined as provided by this section. If a recipient reports that they do not anticipate any changes in income during the upcoming semiannual period, compared to the income the recipient reported actually receiving on the semiannual report form or the annual certificate of eligibility required pursuant to Section 11265, the grant shall be calculated using the actual income received. If a recipient reports that the recipient anticipates a change in income in one or more months of the upcoming semiannual period, the county shall determine whether the recipient’s income is reasonably anticipated. The grant shall be calculated using the income that the county determines is reasonably anticipated for the upcoming semiannual period.
(b) For the purposes of the semiannual reporting, prospective budgeting system, income shall be considered to be “reasonably anticipated” if the county is reasonably certain of the amount of income and that the income will be received during the semiannual reporting period. The county shall determine what income is “reasonably anticipated” based on information provided by the recipient and any other available information.
(c) If a recipient reports that their income in the upcoming semiannual period will be different each month and the county needs additional information to determine a recipient’s reasonably anticipated income for the following semiannual period, the county may require the recipient to provide information about income for each month of the prior semiannual period.
(d) Grant calculations pursuant to subdivision (a) may not be revised to adjust the grant amount during the semiannual reporting period, except as provided in Section 11265.3 and subdivisions (e), (f), (g), and (h), and as otherwise established by the department.
(e) Notwithstanding subdivision (d), statutes and regulations relating to (1) the 48-month time limit, (2) age limitations for children under Section 11253, and (3) sanctions and financial penalties affecting eligibility or grant amount shall be applicable as provided in those statutes and regulations. Eligibility and grant amount shall be adjusted during the semiannual reporting period pursuant to those statutes and regulations effective with the first monthly grant after timely and adequate notice is provided.
(f) Notwithstanding Section 11056, if an applicant applies for assistance for a child who is currently aided in another assistance unit, and the county determines that the applicant has care and control of the child, as specified by the department, and is otherwise eligible, the county shall discontinue aid to the child in the existing assistance unit and shall aid the child in the applicant’s assistance unit effective as of the first of the month following the discontinuance of the child from the existing assistance unit.
(g) If the county is notified that a child for whom CalWORKs assistance is currently being paid has been placed in a foster care home, the county shall discontinue aid to the child at the end of the month of placement. The county shall discontinue the case if the remaining assistance unit members are not otherwise eligible.
(h) If the county determines that a recipient is no longer a California resident, pursuant to Section 11100, the recipient shall be discontinued with timely and adequate notice. The county shall discontinue the case if the remaining assistance unit members are not otherwise eligible.
(i) This section shall become inoperative on May 1, 2022, or when the department notifies the Legislature that the Statewide Automated Welfare System can perform the necessary automation to implement Section 11265.2, as added by the act that added this subdivision, whichever date is later, and, as of January 1 of the following year, is repealed.

SEC. 40.

 Section 11265.2 is added to the Welfare and Institutions Code, to read:

11265.2.
 (a) The grant amount a recipient shall be entitled to receive for each month of the semiannual reporting period shall be prospectively determined as provided by this section. If a recipient reports that they do not anticipate any changes in income during the upcoming semiannual period, compared to the income the recipient reported actually receiving on the semiannual report form or the annual certificate of eligibility required pursuant to Section 11265, the grant shall be calculated using the actual income received. If a recipient reports that the recipient anticipates a change in income in one or more months of the upcoming semiannual period, the county shall determine whether the recipient’s income is reasonably anticipated. The grant shall be calculated using the income that the county determines is reasonably anticipated for the upcoming semiannual period.
(b) For the purposes of the semiannual reporting, prospective budgeting system, income shall be considered to be “reasonably anticipated” if the county is reasonably certain of the amount of income and that the income will be received during the semiannual reporting period. The county shall determine what income is “reasonably anticipated” based on information provided by the recipient and any other available information.
(c) If a recipient reports that their income in the upcoming semiannual period will be different each month and the county needs additional information to determine a recipient’s reasonably anticipated income for the following semiannual period, the county may require the recipient to provide information about income for each month of the prior semiannual period.
(d) Grant calculations pursuant to subdivision (a) may not be revised to adjust the grant amount during the semiannual reporting period, except as provided in Section 11265.3 and subdivisions (e), (f), (g), and (h), and as otherwise established by the department.
(e) Notwithstanding subdivision (d), statutes and regulations relating to (1) the 60-month time limit, (2) age limitations for children under Section 11253, and (3) sanctions and financial penalties affecting eligibility or grant amount shall be applicable as provided in those statutes and regulations. Eligibility and grant amount shall be adjusted during the semiannual reporting period pursuant to those statutes and regulations effective with the first monthly grant after timely and adequate notice is provided.
(f) Notwithstanding Section 11056, if an applicant applies for assistance for a child who is currently aided in another assistance unit, and the county determines that the applicant has care and control of the child, as specified by the department, and is otherwise eligible, the county shall discontinue aid to the child in the existing assistance unit and shall aid the child in the applicant’s assistance unit effective as of the first of the month following the discontinuance of the child from the existing assistance unit.
(g) If the county is notified that a child for whom CalWORKs assistance is currently being paid has been placed in a foster care home, the county shall discontinue aid to the child at the end of the month of placement. The county shall discontinue the case if the remaining assistance unit members are not otherwise eligible.
(h) If the county determines that a recipient is no longer a California resident, pursuant to Section 11100, the recipient shall be discontinued with timely and adequate notice. The county shall discontinue the case if the remaining assistance unit members are not otherwise eligible.
(i) This section shall become operative on May 1, 2022, or when the department notifies the Legislature that the Statewide Automated Welfare System can perform the necessary automation to implement this section, whichever date is later.

SEC. 41.

 Section 11265.45 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

11265.45.
 (a) Notwithstanding Sections 11265.1, 11265.2, and 11265.3, a CalWORKs assistance unit that does not include an eligible adult shall not be subject to periodic reporting requirements other than the annual redetermination required in Section 11265. This subdivision shall not apply to a CalWORKs assistance unit in which the only eligible adult is under sanction in accordance with Section 11327.5.
(b) For an assistance unit described in subdivision (a), grant calculations may not be revised to adjust the grant amount during the year, except as provided in subdivisions (c), (d), (e), and (f), Section 11265.47, and as otherwise established by the department by regulation.
(c) Notwithstanding subdivision (b), statutes and regulations relating to the 48-month time limit, age limitations for children under Section 11253, and sanctions and financial penalties affecting eligibility or grant amount shall be applicable as provided in those statutes and regulations.
(d) If the county is notified that a child for whom assistance is currently being paid has been placed in a foster care home, the county shall discontinue aid to the child at the end of the month of placement. The county shall discontinue the case if the remaining assistance unit members are not otherwise eligible.
(e) If the county determines that a recipient is no longer a California resident, pursuant to Section 11100, the recipient shall be discontinued with timely and adequate notice. The county shall discontinue the case if the remaining assistance unit members are not otherwise eligible.
(f) If an overpayment has occurred, the county shall commence any applicable grant adjustment in accordance with Section 11004 as of the first monthly grant after timely and adequate notice is provided.
(g) This section shall become inoperative on May 1, 2022, or when the department notifies the Legislature that the Statewide Automated Welfare System can perform the necessary automation to implement Section 11265.45, as added by the act that added this subdivision, whichever date is later, and, as of January 1 of the following year, is repealed.

SEC. 42.

 Section 11265.45 is added to the Welfare and Institutions Code, to read:

11265.45.
 (a) Notwithstanding Sections 11265.1, 11265.2, and 11265.3, a CalWORKs assistance unit that does not include an eligible adult shall not be subject to periodic reporting requirements other than the annual redetermination required in Section 11265. This subdivision shall not apply to a CalWORKs assistance unit in which the only eligible adult is under sanction in accordance with Section 11327.5.
(b) For an assistance unit described in subdivision (a), grant calculations may not be revised to adjust the grant amount during the year, except as provided in subdivisions (c), (d), (e), and (f), Section 11265.47, and as otherwise established by the department by regulation.
(c) Notwithstanding subdivision (b), statutes and regulations relating to the 60-month time limit, age limitations for children under Section 11253, and sanctions and financial penalties affecting eligibility or grant amount shall be applicable as provided in those statutes and regulations.
(d) If the county is notified that a child for whom assistance is currently being paid has been placed in a foster care home, the county shall discontinue aid to the child at the end of the month of placement. The county shall discontinue the case if the remaining assistance unit members are not otherwise eligible.
(e) If the county determines that a recipient is no longer a California resident, pursuant to Section 11100, the recipient shall be discontinued with timely and adequate notice. The county shall discontinue the case if the remaining assistance unit members are not otherwise eligible.
(f) If an overpayment has occurred, the county shall commence any applicable grant adjustment in accordance with Section 11004 as of the first monthly grant after timely and adequate notice is provided.
(g) This section shall become operative on May 1, 2022, or when the department notifies the Legislature that the Statewide Automated Welfare System can perform the necessary automation to implement this section, whichever date is later.

SEC. 43.

 Section 11320.15 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

11320.15.
 (a) After a participant has been removed from the assistance unit pursuant to subdivision (a) of Section 11454, additional welfare-to-work services may be provided to the recipient, at the option of the county. If the county provides services to the recipient after the 48-month limit has been reached, the recipient shall participate in community service or subsidized employment, as described in Section 11322.64.
(b) This section shall become inoperative on May 1, 2022, or when the department notifies the Legislature that the Statewide Automated Welfare System can perform the necessary automation to implement Section 11320.15, as added by the act that added this subdivision, whichever date is later, and, as of January 1 of the following year, is repealed.

SEC. 44.

 Section 11320.15 is added to the Welfare and Institutions Code, to read:

11320.15.
 (a) After a participant has been removed from the assistance unit pursuant to subdivision (a) of Section 11454, additional welfare-to-work services may be provided to the recipient, at the option of the county. If the county provides services to the recipient after the 60-month limit has been reached, the recipient shall participate in community service or subsidized employment, as described in Section 11322.64.
(b) This section shall become operative on May 1, 2022, or when the department notifies the Legislature that the Statewide Automated Welfare System can perform the necessary automation to implement this section, whichever date is later.

SEC. 45.

 Section 11320.3 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

11320.3.
 (a) (1) Except as provided in subdivision (b) or if otherwise exempt, every individual, as a condition of eligibility for aid under this chapter, shall participate in welfare-to-work activities under this article.
(2) Individuals eligible under Section 11331.5 shall be required to participate in the Cal-Learn Program under Article 3.5 (commencing with Section 11331) during the time that article is operative, in lieu of the welfare-to-work requirements, and subdivision (b) shall not apply to that individual.
(b) The following individuals shall not be required to participate for so long as the condition continues to exist:
(1) An individual under 16 years of age.
(2) (A) A child attending an elementary, secondary, vocational, or technical school on a full-time basis.
(B) A person who is 16 or 17 years of age, or a person described in subdivision (d) who loses this exemption, shall not requalify for the exemption by attending school as a required activity under this article.
(C) Notwithstanding subparagraph (B), a person who is 16 or 17 years of age who has obtained a high school diploma or its equivalent and is enrolled or is planning to enroll in a postsecondary education, vocational, or technical school training program shall also not be required to participate for so long as the condition continues to exist.
(D) For purposes of subparagraph (C), a person shall be deemed to be planning to enroll in a postsecondary education, vocational, or technical school training program if the person or the person’s parent, acting on the person’s behalf, submits a written statement expressing the person’s intent to enroll in such a program for the following term. The exemption from participation shall not continue beyond the beginning of the term, unless verification of enrollment is provided or obtained by the county.
(3) An individual who meets either of the following conditions:
(A) The individual is disabled as determined by a doctor’s verification that the disability is expected to last at least 30 days and that it significantly impairs the recipient’s ability to be regularly employed or participate in welfare-to-work activities, provided that the individual is actively seeking appropriate medical treatment.
(B) The individual is of advanced age.
(4) A nonparent caretaker relative who has primary responsibility for providing care for a child and is either caring for a child who is a dependent or ward of the court or caring for a child in a case in which a county determines the child is at risk of placement in foster care, and the county determines that the caretaking responsibilities are beyond those considered normal day-to-day parenting responsibilities such that they impair the caretaker relative’s ability to be regularly employed or to participate in welfare-to-work activities.
(5) An individual whose presence in the home is required because of illness or incapacity of another member of the household and whose caretaking responsibilities impair the recipient’s ability to be regularly employed or to participate in welfare-to-work activities.
(6) A parent or other relative who meets the criteria in subparagraph (A) or (B).
(A) (i) The parent or other relative has primary responsibility for personally providing care to a child six months of age or under, except that, on a case-by-case basis, and based on criteria developed by the county, this period may be reduced to the first 12 weeks after the birth or adoption of the child, or increased to the first 12 months after the birth or adoption of the child. An individual may be exempt only once under this clause.
(ii) An individual who received an exemption pursuant to clause (i) shall be exempt for a period of 12 weeks, upon the birth or adoption of any subsequent children, except that this period may be extended on a case-by-case basis to six months, based on criteria developed by the county.
(iii) In making the determination to extend the period of exception under clause (i) or (ii), the following may be considered:
(I) The availability of child care.
(II) Local labor market conditions.
(III) Other factors determined by the county.
(iv) Effective January 1, 2013, the parent or other relative has primary responsibility for personally providing care to one child from birth to 23 months, inclusive. The exemption provided for under this clause shall be available in addition to any other exemption provided for under this subparagraph. An individual may be exempt only once under this clause.
(B) In a family eligible for aid under this chapter due to the unemployment of the principal wage earner, the exemption criteria contained in subparagraph (A) shall be applied to only one parent.
(7) A pregnant person and for whom it has been medically verified that the pregnancy impairs the pregnant person’s ability to be regularly employed or participate in welfare-to-work activities or the county has determined that, at that time, participation will not readily lead to employment or that a training activity is not appropriate. If a pregnant person is unable to secure this medical verification, but is otherwise eligible for an exemption from welfare-to-work requirements under this section, including good cause for temporary illness related to the pregnancy, the pregnant person shall be exempt from participation.
(c) Any individual not required to participate may choose to participate voluntarily under this article, and end that participation at any time without loss of eligibility for aid under this chapter, if the individual’s status has not changed in a way that would require participation.
(d) (1) Notwithstanding subdivision (a), a custodial parent who is under 20 years of age and who has not earned a high school diploma or its equivalent, and who is not exempt or whose only basis for exemption is paragraph (1), (2), (5), (6), (7), or (8) of subdivision (b), shall be required to participate solely for the purpose of earning a high school diploma or its equivalent. During the time that Article 3.5 (commencing with Section 11331) is operative, this subdivision shall only apply to a custodial parent who is 19 years of age.
(2) Section 11325.25 shall apply to a custodial parent who is 18 or 19 years of age and who is required to participate under this article.
(e) Notwithstanding paragraph (1) of subdivision (d), the county may determine that participation in education activities for the purpose of earning a high school diploma or equivalent is inappropriate for a custodial parent who is 18 or 19 years of age only if that parent is reassigned pursuant to an evaluation under Section 11325.25, or, at appraisal is already in an educational or vocational training program that is approvable as a self-initiated program as specified in Section 11325.23. If that determination is made, the parent shall be allowed to continue participation in the self-initiated program subject to Section 11325.23. During the time that Article 3.5 (commencing with Section 11331) is operative, this subdivision shall only apply to a custodial parent who is 19 years of age.
(f) A recipient shall be excused from participation for good cause when the county has determined there is a condition or other circumstance that temporarily prevents or significantly impairs the recipient’s ability to be regularly employed or to participate in welfare-to-work activities. The county welfare department shall review the good cause determination for its continuing appropriateness in accordance with the projected length of the condition, or circumstance, but not less than every three months. The recipient shall cooperate with the county welfare department and provide information, including written documentation, as required to complete the review. Conditions that may be considered good cause include, but are not limited to, the following:
(1) Lack of necessary supportive services.
(2) In accordance with Article 7.5 (commencing with Section 11495), the applicant or recipient is a victim of domestic violence, but only if participation under this article is detrimental to or unfairly penalizes that individual or their family.
(3) Licensed or license-exempt childcare for a child 10 years of age or younger is not reasonably available during the individual’s hours of training or employment including commuting time, or arrangements for childcare have broken down or have been interrupted, or childcare is needed for a child who meets the criteria of subparagraph (C) of paragraph (1) of subdivision (a) of Section 11323.2, but who is not included in the assistance unit. For purposes of this paragraph, “reasonable availability” means childcare that is commonly available in the recipient’s community to a person who is not receiving aid and that is in conformity with the requirements of Public Law 104-193. The choices of childcare shall meet either licensing requirements or the requirements of Section 11324. This good cause criterion shall include the unavailability of suitable special needs childcare for children with identified special needs, including, but not limited to, disabilities or chronic illnesses.

SEC. 46.

 Section 11322.8 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

11322.8.
 (a) An adult recipient required to participate in accordance with paragraph (1) of subdivision (a) of Section 11322.85, unless otherwise exempt, shall participate in welfare-to-work activities for the following number of hours per week during the month:
(1) An average of at least 30 hours per week, if the assistance unit includes either of the following, but does not include a child under six years of age:
(A) One adult.
(B) Two adults, one of whom is disabled, as defined in subparagraph (A) of paragraph (3) of subdivision (b) of Section 11320.3.
(2) An average of at least 20 hours per week, if the assistance unit includes a child under six years of age and either of the following:
(A) One adult.
(B) Two adults, one of whom is disabled, as defined in subparagraph (A) of paragraph (3) of subdivision (b) of Section 11320.3.
(3) An average of at least 20 hours per week, if the assistance unit consists only of a pregnant person.
(4) An average of at least 35 hours per week, if the adult recipient is an unemployed parent, as defined in Section 11201, except as provided in paragraphs (1) and (2). However, both parents in a two-parent assistance unit may contribute to the 35 hours.
(b) An adult recipient required to participate in accordance with paragraph (3) of subdivision (a) of Section 11322.85, unless otherwise exempt, shall participate in welfare-to-work activities for the following number of hours per week during the month:
(1) An average of at least 30 hours per week, subject to the special rules and limitations described in Section 607(c)(1)(A) of Title 42 of the United States Code as of January 1, 2013, if the assistance unit consists of only a pregnant person, or includes one of the following but does not include a child under six years of age:
(A) One adult.
(B) Two adults, one of whom is disabled, as defined in subparagraph (A) of paragraph (3) of subdivision (b) of Section 11320.3.
(2) An average of at least 20 hours per week, as described in Section 607(c)(2)(B) of Title 42 of the United States Code as of January 1, 2013, if the assistance unit includes only one adult and a child under six years of age.
(3) An average of at least 35 hours per week, if the adult recipient is an unemployed parent, as defined in Section 11201, except as provided in paragraph (1) and subject to the special rules and limitations described in Section 607(c)(1)(B) of Title 42 of the United States Code as of January 1, 2013.
(c) This section shall become inoperative on May 1, 2022, or when the department notifies the Legislature that the Statewide Automated Welfare System can perform the necessary automation to implement Section 11322.8, as added by the act that added this subdivision, whichever date is later, and, as of January 1 of the following year, is repealed.

SEC. 47.

 Section 11322.8 is added to the Welfare and Institutions Code, to read:

11322.8.
 (a) An adult recipient required to participate in welfare-to-work activities, unless otherwise exempt, shall participate in welfare-to-work activities for the following number of hours per week during the month:
(1) An average of at least 30 hours per week, if the assistance unit includes either of the following, but does not include a child under six years of age:
(A) One adult.
(B) Two adults, one of whom is disabled, as defined in subparagraph (A) of paragraph (3) of subdivision (b) of Section 11320.3.
(2) An average of at least 20 hours per week, if the assistance unit includes a child under six years of age and either of the following:
(A) One adult.
(B) Two adults, one of whom is disabled, as defined in subparagraph (A) of paragraph (3) of subdivision (b) of Section 11320.3.
(3) An average of at least 20 hours per week, if the assistance unit consists only of a pregnant person.
(4) An average of at least 35 hours per week, if the adult recipient is an unemployed parent, as defined in Section 11201, except as provided in paragraphs (1) and (2). However, both parents in a two-parent assistance unit may contribute to the 35 hours.
(b) This section shall become operative on May 1, 2022, or when the department notifies the Legislature that the Statewide Automated Welfare System can perform the necessary automation to implement this section, whichever date is later.

SEC. 48.

 Section 11322.85 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

11322.85.
 (a) Unless otherwise exempt, an applicant or recipient shall participate in welfare-to-work activities.
(1) For 24 cumulative months during a recipient’s lifetime, these activities may include the activities listed in Section 11322.6 that are consistent with the assessment performed in accordance with Section 11325.4 and that are included in the individual’s welfare-to-work plan, as described in Section 11325.21, to meet the hours required in Section 11322.8. These 24 months need not be consecutive.
(2) Any month in which the recipient meets the requirements of Section 11322.8, through participation in an activity or activities described in paragraph (3), shall not count as a month of activities for purposes of the 24-month time limit described in paragraph (1).
(3) After a total of 24 months of participation in welfare-to-work activities pursuant to paragraph (1), an aided adult shall participate in one or more of the following welfare-to-work activities, in accordance with Section 607(c) and (d) of Title 42 of the United States Code as of the operative date of this section, that are consistent with the assessment performed in accordance with Section 11325.4, and included in the individual’s welfare-to-work plan, described in Section 11325.21:
(A) Unsubsidized employment.
(B) Subsidized private sector employment.
(C) Subsidized public sector employment.
(D) Work experience, including work associated with the refurbishing of publicly assisted housing, if sufficient private sector employment is not available.
(E) On-the-job training.
(F) Job search and job readiness assistance.
(G) Community service programs.
(H) Vocational educational training (not to exceed 12 months with respect to any individual).
(I) Job skills training directly related to employment.
(J) Education directly related to employment, in the case of a recipient who has not received a high school diploma or a certificate of high school equivalency.
(K) Satisfactory attendance at a secondary school or in a course of study leading to a certificate of general equivalence, in the case of a recipient who has not completed secondary school or received such a certificate.
(L) The provision of childcare services to an individual who is participating in a community service program.
(b) Any month in which any of the following conditions exists shall not be counted as one of the 24 months of participation allowed under paragraph (1) of subdivision (a):
(1) The recipient is participating in job search in accordance with Section 11325.22, assessment pursuant to Section 11325.4, is in the process of appraisal as described in Section 11325.2, or is participating in the development of a welfare-to-work plan as described in Section 11325.21.
(2) The recipient is no longer receiving aid, pursuant to Sections 11327.4 and 11327.5.
(3) The recipient has been excused from participation for good cause, pursuant to Section 11320.3.
(4) The recipient is exempt from participation pursuant to subdivision (b) of Section 11320.3.
(5) The recipient is only required to participate in accordance with subdivision (d) of Section 11320.3.
(6) The recipient is participating in family stabilization pursuant to Section 11325.24, and the recipient would meet the criteria for good cause pursuant to Section 11320.3. This paragraph may apply to a recipient for no more than six cumulative months.
(c) County welfare departments shall provide each recipient who is subject to the requirements of paragraph (3) of subdivision (a) written notice describing the 24-month time limitation described in that paragraph and the process by which recipients may claim exemptions from, and extensions to, those requirements.
(d) The notice described in subdivision (c) shall be provided at the time the individual applies for aid, during the recipient’s annual redetermination, and at least once after the individual has participated for a total of 18 months, and prior to the end of the 21st month, that count toward the 24-month time limit.
(e) The notice described in this section shall include, but shall not be limited to, all of the following:
(1) The number of remaining months the adult recipient may be eligible to receive aid.
(2) The requirements that the recipient must meet in accordance with paragraph (3) of subdivision (a) and the action that the county will take if the adult recipient does not meet those requirements.
(3) The manner in which the recipient may dispute the number of months counted toward the 24-month time limit.
(4) The opportunity for the recipient to modify their welfare-to-work plan to meet the requirements of paragraph (3) of subdivision (a).
(5) The opportunity for an exemption to, or extension of, the 24-month time limitation.
(f) For an individual subject to the requirements of paragraph (3) of subdivision (a), who is not exempt or granted an extension, and who does not meet those requirements, the provisions of Sections 11327.4, 11327.5, 11327.9, and 11328.2 shall apply to the extent consistent with the requirements of this section. For purposes of this section, the procedures referenced in this subdivision shall not be described as sanctions.
(g) (1) The department, in consultation with stakeholders, shall convene a workgroup to determine further details of the noticing and engagement requirements for the 24-month time limit, and shall instruct counties via an all-county letter, followed by regulations, no later than 18 months after the effective date of the act that added this section.
(2) The workgroup described in paragraph (1) may also make recommendations to refine or differentiate the procedures and due process requirements applicable to individuals as described in subdivision (f).
(h) (1) Notwithstanding paragraph (3) of subdivision (a) or any other law, an assistance unit that contains an eligible adult who has received assistance under this chapter, or from any state pursuant to the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families program (Part A (commencing with Section 401) of Title IV of the federal Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. Sec. 601 et seq.)) prior to January 1, 2013, may continue in a welfare-to-work plan that meets the requirements of Section 11322.6 for a cumulative period of 24 months commencing January 1, 2013, unless or until the eligible adult exceeds the 48-month time limitation described in Section 11454.
(2) All months of assistance described in paragraph (1) prior to January 1, 2013, shall not be applied to the 24-month limitation described in paragraph (1) of subdivision (a).
(i) This section shall become inoperative on May 1, 2022, or when the department notifies the Legislature that the Statewide Automated Welfare System can perform the necessary automation to implement the changes associated with the repeal of this section, whichever date is later, and, as of January 1 of the following year, is repealed.

SEC. 49.

 Section 11322.86 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

11322.86.
 (a) (1) Each county may provide an extension of time during which a recipient may participate in activities described in paragraph (1) of subdivision (a) of Section 11322.85 for recipients who are unlikely to meet the requirements of paragraph (3) of subdivision (a) of Section 11322.85 upon the expiration of the 24-month time limitation described in Section 11322.85.
(2) A county may grant extensions pursuant to paragraph (1) for a number of assistance units equal to no more than 20 percent of the assistance units in the county in which all adult members have been provided aid under this chapter for at least 24 months, in accordance with paragraph (1) of subdivision (a) of Section 11322.85, but not more than 48 months, in accordance with Section 11454.
(b) Counties are required to report information regarding the number and percentage of these extensions they have granted to the state.
(c) After consultation with stakeholders, the department shall issue an all-county letter by November 1, 2013, to define the process for implementing the extensions described in this section and the methodology for calculating the 20 percent limitation in paragraph (2) of subdivision (a).
(d) It is the intent of the Legislature that the state shall work with counties and other stakeholders to ensure that the extension process pursuant to subdivision (a) is implemented with minimal disruption to the impending completion of the welfare-to-work plans for recipients.
(e) This section shall become inoperative on May 1, 2022, or when the department notifies the Legislature that the Statewide Automated Welfare System can perform the necessary automation to implement the changes associated with the repeal of this section, whichever date is later, and, as of January 1 of the following year, is repealed.

SEC. 50.

 Section 11322.87 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

11322.87.
 (a) A recipient subject to the 24-month time limitation described in Section 11322.85 may request an extension in accordance with Section 11322.86 and may present evidence to the county that they meet any of the following circumstances:
(1) The recipient is likely to obtain employment within six months.
(2) The recipient has encountered unique labor market barriers temporarily preventing employment, and therefore needs additional time to obtain employment.
(3) The recipient has achieved satisfactory progress in an educational or treatment program, including adult basic education, vocational education, or a self-initiated program that has a known graduation, transfer, or completion date that would meaningfully increase the likelihood of the recipient’s employment. For purposes of this paragraph, a high school education or its equivalent is presumed to meaningfully increase the likelihood of employment.
(4) The recipient needs an additional period of time to complete a welfare-to-work activity specified in the recipient’s welfare-to-work case plan due to a diagnosed learning or other disability, so as to meaningfully increase the likelihood of the recipient’s employment.
(5) The recipient has submitted an application to receive SSI disability benefits, and a hearing date has been established.
(6) The recipient obtained the recipient’s high school diploma or its equivalent while participating in activities described in paragraph (1) of subdivision (a) of Section 11322.85, and an additional period of time to complete an educational program or other activity described in paragraph (1) of subdivision (a) of Section 11322.85 in which the recipient is currently participating would meaningfully increase the likelihood of the recipient’s employment.
(7) Other circumstances as determined by the department.
(b) (1) Except for an extension requested in accordance with paragraph (5) of subdivision (a), and subject to the limitation described in paragraph (2) of subdivision (a) of Section 11322.86, a county shall grant an extension to a recipient who presents evidence in accordance with subdivision (a) unless the county determines that the evidence presented does not support the existence of the circumstances described in subdivision (a).
(2) An extension requested in accordance with paragraph (5) of subdivision (a) shall be granted if evidence that a hearing date has been established is provided to the county.
(3) At any hearing disputing a county’s denial of an extension in accordance with paragraph (1), the county shall have the burden of proof to establish that an extension was not justified unless the county demonstrates that the denial was due to the unavailability of an extension in accordance with the 20-percent limitation described in paragraph (2) of subdivision (a) of Section 11322.86.
(c) If, as a result of information already available to a county, including the recipient’s welfare-to-work plan and verifications of participation, the county identifies that a recipient meets a circumstance described in subdivision (a), and subject to the limitation described in paragraph (2) of subdivision (a) of Section 11322.86, a county may grant an extension of the 24-month time limitation described in paragraph (1) of subdivision (a) of Section 11322.85 to the recipient.
(d) An extension granted in accordance with subdivision (b) or (c) shall be granted for an initial period of up to six months and shall be reevaluated by the county at least every six months.
(e) This section shall become inoperative on May 1, 2022, or when the department notifies the Legislature that the Statewide Automated Welfare System can perform the necessary automation to implement the changes associated with the repeal of this section, whichever date is later, and, as of January 1 of the following year, is repealed.

SEC. 51.

 Section 11323.2 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

11323.2.
 (a) Necessary supportive services shall be offered and available to every participant to enable them to participate in a program activity or to accept or maintain employment. Necessary supportive services shall also be offered and available to every individual who is not required to participate, but chooses to participate voluntarily, to allow them to participate in a program activity or to accept or maintain employment. A participant who is required to participate and who does not receive necessary supportive services shall have good cause for not participating under subdivision (f) of Section 11320.3. Supportive services shall be listed in the welfare-to-work plan or other agreement entered into between the county and participant pursuant to this article, supportive services shall include all of the following:
(1) Childcare.
(A) Paid childcare shall be available to every participant with a dependent child in the household who needs paid childcare if the child is 12 years of age or under, or requires childcare or supervision due to a physical, mental, or developmental disability or other similar condition as verified by the county welfare department, or who is under court supervision. A county welfare department may verify the need for childcare or supervision for a child over 12 years of age from an individualized education plan or a statement from a qualified professional that the child is a child with exceptional needs, as defined in subdivision (l) of Section 8208 of the Education Code. A sanctioned participant shall have access to childcare pursuant to this section if the participant has indicated an intent to engage in a program activity or employment, but has not yet participated.
(B) First-stage childcare, as described in Article 15.5 (commencing with Section 8350) of Chapter 2 of Part 6 of Division 1 of Title 1 of the Education Code, shall be full time, unless the participant determines that part-time care better meets the family’s needs. Upon establishing initial or ongoing eligibility for first-stage childcare services under this chapter, a family shall be considered to meet all eligibility and need requirements and be authorized for not less than 12 months, or until the participant is transferred to the second stage of childcare. This shall apply to every participant who indicates a need for childcare in order to engage in a program activity or employment. A participant may, at any time, indicate a new or increased need for childcare and the information shall be used, as applicable, to authorize childcare in accordance with this subparagraph or increase the family’s services.
(C) Necessary childcare services shall be available to every former recipient for up to two years, pursuant to Article 15.5 (commencing with Section 8350) of Chapter 2 of Part 6 of Division 1 of Title 1 of the Education Code. Beginning January 1, 2021, or the date that automation changes occur, as required for implementation, in the Statewide Automated Welfare System, whichever date is later, in the 18th month following the date of last receipt of aid, the county shall send a notice, via mail to the last known address, text message, or email, to a former recipient who is not currently receiving second or third stage childcare informing them that their eligibility for stage-two childcare will expire by the end of the 24th month following their last receipt of aid, and how to obtain stage-two childcare services. The department shall issue an all-county letter or similar directive by November 1, 2019, to implement this subparagraph, until regulations are adopted.
(D) A child in foster care receiving benefits under Title IV-E of the federal Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. Sec. 670 et seq.), or a child who would become a dependent child except for the receipt of federal Supplemental Security Income benefits pursuant to Title XVI of the federal Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. Sec. 1381 et seq.), or a child who is not a member of the assistance unit but for whom the recipient is responsible for providing support, shall be deemed to be a dependent child for the purposes of this paragraph.
(E) The provision of care and payment rates under this paragraph shall be governed by Article 15.5 (commencing with Section 8350) of Chapter 2 of Part 6 of Division 1 of Title 1 of the Education Code. Parent fees shall be governed by Sections 8263 and 8273.1 of the Education Code.
(F) For purposes of subparagraphs (A) and (B), a participant includes an individual who is not required to participate, and expresses an intent to participate voluntarily, or a sanctioned participant who indicates an intent to engage in any program activity, as defined in subdivision (c), or employment. After securing childcare services, to document their commitment to participate, a participant shall sign a welfare-to-work plan or a curing plan, whichever is appropriate, or other agreement that may be developed and approved for use on a statewide basis by the department.
(2) Diaper costs.
(A) On and after April 1, 2018, a participant who is participating in a welfare-to-work plan shall be eligible for thirty dollars ($30) per month to assist with diaper costs for each child who is under 36 months of age.
(B) The department shall adopt regulations by January 1, 2020, to implement this paragraph. Notwithstanding the rulemaking provisions of the Administrative Procedure Act (Chapter 3.5 (commencing with Section 11340) of Part 1 of Division 3 of Title 2 of the Government Code), the department shall implement this paragraph through all-county letters until regulations are adopted.
(3) Transportation costs, which shall be governed by regional market rates as determined in accordance with regulations established by the department.
(4) Ancillary expenses, which shall include the cost of books, tools, clothing specifically required for the job, fees, and other necessary costs.
(5) Personal counseling. A participant who has personal or family problems that would affect the outcome of the welfare-to-work plan entered into pursuant to this article shall, to the extent available, receive necessary counseling and related supportive services, to help the participant and the participant’s family adjust to the participant’s job or training assignment.
(b) If provided in a county plan, the county may continue to provide case management and supportive services under this section to former participants who become employed. The county may provide these services for up to the first 12 months of employment to the extent they are not available from other sources and are needed for the individual to retain the employment.
(c) For the purposes of paragraph (1) of subdivision (a), “program activity” includes, but is not limited to, any welfare-to-work activity, orientation, appraisal, assessment, job search, job club, domestic violence services, court appearances, housing searches and classes, homeless support programs, shelter participation requirements, eviction proceedings, mental health services, including therapy or personal counseling, home visiting, drug and substance abuse services, parenting classes, and medical or education-related appointments for the participant or their dependents.

SEC. 52.

 Section 11325.21 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

11325.21.
 (a) Any individual who is required to participate in welfare-to-work activities pursuant to this article shall enter into a written welfare-to-work plan with the county welfare department after assessment, as required by subdivision (c) of Section 11320.1, but no more than 90 days after the date that a recipient’s eligibility for aid is determined or the date the recipient is required to participate in welfare-to-work activities pursuant to Section 11320.3. The recipient and the county may enter into a welfare-to-work plan as late as 90 days after the completion of the job search activity, as defined in subdivision (b) of Section 11320.1, if the job search activity is initiated within 30 days after the recipient’s eligibility for aid is determined. The plan shall include the activities and services that will move the individual into employment.
(b) The county shall allow the participant three working days after completion of the plan or subsequent amendments to the plan in which to evaluate and request changes to the terms of the plan.
(c) The plan shall be written in clear and understandable language, and have a simple and easy-to-read format.
(d) The plan shall contain at least all of the following general information:
(1) A general description of the program provided for in this article, including available program components and supportive services.
(2) A general description of the rights, duties, and responsibilities of program participants, including a list of the exemptions from the required participation under this article, the consequences of a refusal to participate in program components, and criteria for successful completion of the program.
(3) A description of the grace period required in paragraph (5) of subdivision (b) of Section 11325.22.
(e) (1) The plan shall specify, and shall be amended to reflect changes in, the participant’s welfare-to-work activity, a description of services to be provided in accordance with Sections 11322.6, 11322.8, and 11322.85, as needed, and specific requirements for successful completion of assigned activities, including required hours of participation.
(2) The plan shall also include a general description of supportive services pursuant to Section 11323.2 that are to be provided as necessary for the participant to complete assigned program activities.
(f) Any assignment to a program component shall be reflected in the plan or an amendment to the plan. The participant shall maintain satisfactory progress toward employment through the methods set forth in the plan, and the county shall provide the services pursuant to Section 11323.2.
(g) This section shall not apply to individuals subject to Article 3.5 (commencing with Section 11331) during the time that article is operative.
(h) This section shall become inoperative on May 1, 2022, or when the department notifies the Legislature that the Statewide Automated Welfare System can perform the necessary automation to implement Section 11325.21, as added by the act that added this subdivision, whichever date is later, and, as of January 1 of the following year, is repealed.

SEC. 53.

 Section 11325.21 is added to the Welfare and Institutions Code, to read:

11325.21.
 (a) Any individual who is required to participate in welfare-to-work activities pursuant to this article shall enter into a written welfare-to-work plan with the county welfare department after assessment, as required by subdivision (c) of Section 11320.1, but no more than 90 days after the date that a recipient’s eligibility for aid is determined or the date the recipient is required to participate in welfare-to-work activities pursuant to Section 11320.3. The recipient and the county may enter into a welfare-to-work plan as late as 90 days after the completion of the job search activity, as defined in subdivision (b) of Section 11320.1, if the job search activity is initiated within 30 days after the recipient’s eligibility for aid is determined. The plan shall include the activities and services that will move the individual into employment.
(b) The county shall allow the participant three working days after completion of the plan or subsequent amendments to the plan in which to evaluate and request changes to the terms of the plan.
(c) The plan shall be written in clear and understandable language, and have a simple and easy-to-read format.
(d) The plan shall contain at least all of the following general information:
(1) A general description of the program provided for in this article, including available program components and supportive services.
(2) A general description of the rights, duties, and responsibilities of program participants, including a list of the exemptions from the required participation under this article, the consequences of a refusal to participate in program components, and criteria for successful completion of the program.
(3) A description of the grace period required in paragraph (5) of subdivision (b) of Section 11325.22.
(e) (1) The plan shall specify, and shall be amended to reflect changes in, the participant’s welfare-to-work activity, a description of services to be provided in accordance with Sections 11322.6 and 11322.8, as needed, and specific requirements for successful completion of assigned activities, including required hours of participation.
(2) The plan shall also include a general description of supportive services pursuant to Section 11323.2 that are to be provided as necessary for the participant to complete assigned program activities.
(f) Any assignment to a program component shall be reflected in the plan or an amendment to the plan. The participant shall maintain satisfactory progress toward employment through the methods set forth in the plan, and the county shall provide the services pursuant to Section 11323.2.
(g) This section shall not apply to individuals subject to Article 3.5 (commencing with Section 11331) during the time that article is operative.
(h) This section shall become operative on May 1, 2022, or when the department notifies the Legislature that the Statewide Automated Welfare System can perform the necessary automation to implement this section, whichever date is later.

SEC. 54.

 Section 11325.24 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

11325.24.
 (a) If, in the course of appraisal pursuant to Section 11325.2 or at any point during an individual’s participation in welfare-to-work activities in accordance with paragraph (1) of subdivision (a) of Section 11322.85, it is determined that a recipient meets the criteria described in subdivision (b), the recipient is eligible to participate in family stabilization.
(b) (1) A recipient is eligible to participate in family stabilization if the county determines that the recipient’s family is experiencing an identified situation or crisis that is destabilizing the family and would interfere with participation in welfare-to-work activities and services.
(2) A situation or a crisis that is destabilizing the family in accordance with paragraph (1) may include, but shall not be limited to:
(A) Homelessness or imminent risk of homelessness.
(B) A lack of safety due to domestic violence.
(C) Untreated or undertreated behavioral needs, including mental health or substance abuse-related needs.
(c) Family stabilization shall include intensive case management and services designed to support the family in overcoming the situation or crisis, which may include, but are not limited to, welfare-to-work activities.
(d) Funds allocated for family stabilization in accordance with this section shall be in addition to, and independent of, the county allocations made pursuant to Section 15204.2.
(e) Funds allocated for family stabilization in accordance with this section, or the county allocations made pursuant to Section 15204.2, may be used to provide housing and other needed services to a family during any month that a family is participating in family stabilization.
(f) Each county shall submit to the department a plan, as defined by the department, regarding how it intends to implement the provisions of this section and shall report information to the department, including, but not limited to, the number of recipients served pursuant to this section, information regarding the services provided, outcomes for the families served, and any lack of availability of services. The department shall provide an update regarding this information to the Legislature during the 2014–15 budget process.
(g) It is the intent of the Legislature that family stabilization be a voluntary component intended to provide needed services and constructive interventions for parents and to assist in barrier removal for families facing very difficult needs. Participants in family stabilization are encouraged to participate, but the Legislature does not intend that parents be sanctioned as part of their experience in this program component. The Legislature further intends that recipients refusing or unable to follow their family stabilization plans without good cause be returned to the traditional welfare-to-work program.
(h) This section shall become inoperative on May 1, 2022, or when the department notifies the Legislature that the Statewide Automated Welfare System can perform the necessary automation to implement Section 11325.24, as added by the act that added this subdivision, whichever date is later, and, as of January 1 of the following year, is repealed.

SEC. 55.

 Section 11325.24 is added to the Welfare and Institutions Code, to read:

11325.24.
 (a) If, in the course of appraisal pursuant to Section 11325.2 or at any point during an individual’s participation in welfare-to-work activities, it is determined that a recipient meets the criteria described in subdivision (b), the recipient is eligible to participate in family stabilization.
(b) (1) A recipient is eligible to participate in family stabilization if the county determines that the recipient’s family is experiencing an identified situation or crisis that is destabilizing the family and would interfere with participation in welfare-to-work activities and services.
(2) A situation or a crisis that is destabilizing the family in accordance with paragraph (1) may include, but shall not be limited to:
(A) Homelessness or imminent risk of homelessness.
(B) A lack of safety due to domestic violence.
(C) Untreated or undertreated behavioral needs, including mental health or substance abuse-related needs.
(c) Family stabilization shall include intensive case management and services designed to support the family in overcoming the situation or crisis, which may include, but are not limited to, welfare-to-work activities.
(d) Funds allocated for family stabilization in accordance with this section shall be in addition to, and independent of, the county allocations made pursuant to Section 15204.2.
(e) Funds allocated for family stabilization in accordance with this section, or the county allocations made pursuant to Section 15204.2, may be used to provide housing and other needed services to a family during any month that a family is participating in family stabilization.
(f) Each county shall submit to the department a plan, as defined by the department, regarding how it intends to implement the provisions of this section and shall report information to the department, including, but not limited to, the number of recipients served pursuant to this section, information regarding the services provided, outcomes for the families served, and any lack of availability of services. The department shall provide an update regarding this information to the Legislature during the 2014–15 budget process.
(g) It is the intent of the Legislature that family stabilization be a voluntary component intended to provide needed services and constructive interventions for parents and to assist in barrier removal for families facing very difficult needs. Participants in family stabilization are encouraged to participate, but the Legislature does not intend that parents be sanctioned as part of their experience in this program component. The Legislature further intends that recipients refusing or unable to follow their family stabilization plans without good cause be returned to the traditional welfare-to-work program.
(h) This section shall become operative on May 1, 2022, or when the department notifies the Legislature that the Statewide Automated Welfare System can perform the necessary automation to implement this section, whichever date is later.

SEC. 56.

 Section 11333 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

11333.
 (a) Except as provided in subdivision (b), counties shall contract for the provision of intensive case management services, as described in subdivision (b) of Section 11331.7 and in Section 11332.5, with public or nonprofit agencies or school districts that administer services pursuant to one or more of the following intensive case management models:
(1) The Adolescent Family Life Program (Article 1 (commencing with Section 124175) of Chapter 4 of Part 2 of Division 106 of the Health and Safety Code).
(2) A home visiting model approved by the department for the CalWORKs Home Visiting Program established pursuant to Article 3.4 (commencing with Section 11330.6), with priority on models that have demonstrated relevance serving the Cal-Learn population.
(3) Evidence-based home visiting models as identified by the United States Department of Health and Human Services that serve the specific demographic of Cal-Learn.
(b) In cases where services from contractors administering one or more of the models specified in subdivision (a) are not available or cost effective, counties may contract with other public or nonprofit agencies or school districts for intensive case management services or provide intensive case management services directly if all the following conditions are met:
(1) The department has determined that the proposed intensive case management model conforms with the standards and scope of services of an evidence-based model of the Adolescent Family Life Program, meets the same criteria as an evidence-based model identified by the United States Department of Health and Human Services, HomVEE review, or conforms to an intensive case management model specified or required by the department.
(2) The submitted county plan is determined by the department to sufficiently document that a model specified in subdivision (a) is not available or cost effective.
(3) The county has consulted with applicable local health agencies to assist in the implementation of the provision of services provided in the intensive case management model.
(c) Counties shall include approved contractors pursuant to subdivision (a) or (b) in their planning of the Cal-Learn Program to ensure participation in the county’s planning and implementation of the Cal-Learn program.
(d) The department shall consult with the State Department of Public Health to implement the purposes of this program.
(e) It is the intent of the Legislature to review the implementation of the changes to this section enacted by the act that added this subdivision during the course of the 2020–21 fiscal year to determine how these changes impact service delivery and counties’ ability to maintain service levels as they existed in 2019–20 and prior to these changes.

SEC. 57.

 Section 11402.2 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

11402.2.
 (a) Recognizing that transitions to independence involve self-initiated changes in placements, it is the intent of the Legislature that regulations developed regarding the approval of the supervised independent living setting, as defined in subdivision (w) of Section 11400, shall ensure continuity of placement and payment while the nonminor dependent is awaiting approval of their new supervised independent living setting, in accordance with paragraph (2) of subdivision (c) of Section 1524 of the Health and Safety Code.
(b) A county may elect to complete an inspection of a supervised independent living placement to ensure that it meets health and safety standards through methods other than an in-person visit, including, but not limited to, videoconferencing and telephone calls that include pictures of the living space, and may, for the 2020–21 fiscal year, temporarily approve the supervised independent living placement pending the submission of required forms by the nonminor dependent, based on the nonminor dependent’s agreement that the forms will be submitted.

SEC. 58.

 Section 11403.2 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

11403.2.
 (a) The following persons are eligible for transitional housing provided pursuant to Article 4 (commencing with Section 16522) of Chapter 5 of Part 4:
(1) A foster child at least 16 years of age and not more than 18 years of age, and, on or after January 1, 2012, any nonminor dependent, as defined in subdivision (v) of Section 11400, who is eligible for AFDC-FC benefits as described in Section 11401. A foster child under 18 years of age shall be eligible for placement in the program certified as a “Transitional Housing Placement program for minor foster children” pursuant to paragraph (1) of subdivision (a) of Section 16522.1. A nonminor dependent shall be eligible for placement in the program certified as a “Transitional Housing Placement program for nonminor dependents” pursuant to paragraph (2) of subdivision (a) of Section 16522.1.
(2) (A) A former foster youth at least 18 years of age and, except as provided in subparagraph (B), not more than 24 years of age who has exited from the foster care system on or after their 18th birthday and elects to participate in Transitional Housing Program-Plus, as defined in subdivision (s) of Section 11400, if the former foster youth has not received services under this paragraph for more than a total of 24 months, whether or not consecutive. If the person participating in a Transitional Housing Program-Plus is not receiving aid under Section 11403.1, they, as a condition of participation, shall enter into, and execute the provisions of, a transitional independent living plan that shall be mutually agreed upon, and annually reviewed, by the former foster youth and the applicable county welfare or probation department or independent living program coordinator. The person participating under this paragraph shall inform the county of any changes to conditions specified in the agreed-upon plan that affect eligibility, including changes in address, living circumstances, and the educational or training program.
(B) A county may, at its option, extend the services provided under subparagraph (A) to former foster youth not more than 25 years of age, and for a total of 36 months, whether or not consecutive, if the former foster youth, in addition to the requirements specified in subparagraph (A), meets either of the following criteria:
(i) The former foster youth is completing secondary education or a program leading to an equivalent credential.
(ii) The former foster youth is enrolled in an institution that provides postsecondary education.
(C) A county may, at its option, extend the services provided under subparagraph (A) to former foster youth participating in the Transitional Housing Program-Plus as of July 1 2020, without regard to their age or length of time they have received services, until June 30, 2021.
(b) Payment on behalf of an eligible person receiving transitional housing services pursuant to paragraph (1) of subdivision (a) shall be made to the transitional housing placement provider pursuant to the conditions and limitations set forth in Section 11403.3. Notwithstanding Section 11403.3, the department, in consultation with concerned stakeholders, including, but not limited to, representatives of the Legislature, the County Welfare Directors Association of California, the Chief Probation Officers of California, the Judicial Council, representatives of Indian tribes, the California Youth Connection, former foster youth, child advocacy organizations, labor organizations, juvenile justice advocacy organizations, foster caregiver organizations, researchers, and transitional housing placement providers, shall convene a workgroup to establish a new rate structure for the Title IV-E funded Transitional Housing Placement program for nonminor dependents placement option for nonminor dependents. The workgroup shall also consider application of this new rate structure to the Transitional Housing Program-Plus, as described in paragraph (2) of subdivision (a) of Section 11403.3. In developing the new rate structure pursuant to this subdivision, the department shall consider the average rates in effect and being paid by counties to current transitional housing placement providers.
(c) The Legislature finds and declares that this subdivision was added in 2015 to clearly codify the requirement of existing law regarding the payment made on behalf of an eligible person receiving transitional housing services. The workgroup described in subdivision (b) recommended, and the department subsequently implemented, an annual adjustment to the payment made on behalf of an eligible person receiving transitional housing services. This annual adjustment has been, and shall continue to be, equal to the California Necessities Index applicable to each fiscal year. The Legislature hereby declares that its intent remains in making this annual adjustment to support the care and supervision, including needed services and supports, for nonminor dependents who are receiving transitional housing services through the Transitional Housing Placement program for nonminor dependents.

SEC. 59.

 Section 11403.3 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

11403.3.
 (a) (1) Subject to subdivision (b), a transitional housing placement provider, as defined in subdivision (r) of Section 11400, that provides transitional housing services to an eligible foster youth in a facility licensed pursuant to Section 1559.110 of the Health and Safety Code, shall be paid as follows:
(A)  For a program serving foster children who are at least 16 years of age and not more than 18 years of age, a monthly rate that is 75 percent of the average foster care expenditures for foster youth 16 to 18 years of age, inclusive, in group home care in the county in which the program operates.
(B) For a program serving nonminor dependents, the rate structure established pursuant to subdivision (b) of Section 11403.2.
(2) Subject to subdivision (c), a Transitional Housing Program-Plus, as defined in subdivision (s) of Section 11400, that provides transitional housing services to eligible former foster youth who have exited from the foster care system on or after their 18th birthday, shall be paid a monthly rate that is 70 percent of the average foster care expenditures for foster youth 16 to 18 years of age, inclusive, in group home care in the county in which the program operates.
(b) Payment to a transitional housing placement provider for transitional housing services provided to a person described in paragraph (1) of subdivision (a) of Section 11403.2 shall be subject to the following conditions:
(1) An amount equal to the base rate, as defined in subdivision (d), shall be paid for transitional housing services provided.
(2) Any additional amount payable pursuant to subdivision (a) shall be contingent on the election by the county placing the youth in the transitional housing placement program to participate in the costs of the additional amount, pursuant to subdivision (g).
(c) Payment to a Transitional Housing Program-Plus provider for transitional housing services provided pursuant to paragraph (2) of subdivision (a) of Section 11403.2 shall be subject to the following conditions:
(1) Any Supportive Transitional Emancipation Program (STEP) payment payable pursuant to Section 11403.1 shall be paid for transitional housing services provided.
(2) Prior to fiscal year 2011–12, any amount payable pursuant to subdivision (a) to a Transitional Housing Program-Plus provider for services provided to a person described in paragraph (2) of subdivision (a) of Section 11403.2 shall be paid contingent on the availability of moneys appropriated for this purpose in the annual Budget Act for the cost of the program.
(d) (1) As used in this section, “base rate” means the rate a transitional housing placement provider or Transitional Housing Program-Plus provider was approved to receive on June 30, 2001. If a program commences operation after this date, the base rate shall be the rate the program would have received if it had been operational on June 30, 2001.
(2) Notwithstanding subdivision (a), no transitional housing placement provider or Transitional Housing Program-Plus provider with an approved rate on July 1, 2001, shall receive a lower rate than its base rate.
(e) Any reductions in payments to a transitional housing placement provider pursuant to the implementation of paragraph (2) of subdivision (b) or to a Transitional Housing Program-Plus provider pursuant to paragraph (2) of subdivision (c) shall not preclude the program from acquiring from other sources, additional funding necessary to provide program services.
(f) The department shall develop, implement, and maintain a ratesetting system schedule for transitional housing placement providers, and Transitional Housing Program-Plus providers pursuant to subdivisions (a) to (d), inclusive.
(g) (1) Funding for the rates payable under this section for persons described in paragraph (1) of subdivision (a) of Section 11403.2, prior to the 2011–12 fiscal year, shall be subject to a sharing ratio of 40 percent state and 60 percent county share of nonfederal funds.
(2) Funding for the rates payable under this section for persons described in paragraph (2) of subdivision (a) of Section 11403.2, prior to the 2011–12 fiscal year, shall be subject to a sharing ratio of 100 percent state and 0 percent county funds.
(3) Notwithstanding paragraph (2) of subdivision (c) and paragraphs (1) and (2) of this subdivision, beginning in the 2011–12 fiscal year, and for each fiscal year thereafter, funding and expenditures for programs and activities under this section shall be in accordance with the requirements provided in Sections 30025 and 30026.5 of the Government Code.
(h) The department shall develop, implement, and maintain a ratesetting methodology and rate schedule for providers identified in subparagraph (A) of paragraph (1) of, and paragraph (2) of, subdivision (a) by December 31, 2019. Until a new rate schedule is implemented, the rates shall be based on the rates in existence on December 31, 2017, plus the annual adjustment described in subdivision (c) of Section 11403.2.
(i) (1) Subject to an appropriation in the annual Budget Act for this purpose, the rate paid to a transitional housing placement provider serving nonminor dependents shall be supplemented with a housing supplement, which shall be calculated by the department as follows:
(A) For nonminor dependents who are custodial parents, the difference between the fair market rent for a one-bedroom apartment in the county in which the nonminor dependent resides and 21.45 percent of the rate established pursuant to subdivision (b) of Section 11403.2.
(B) For nonminor dependents who are not custodial parents, the difference between one-half of the fair market rent for a two-bedroom apartment in the county in which the nonminor resides and 21.45 percent of the rate established pursuant to subdivision (b) of Section 11403.2.
(2) Notwithstanding the rulemaking provisions of the Administrative Procedure Act (Chapter 3.5 (commencing with Section 11340) of Part 1 of Division 3 of Title 2 of the Government Code), the State Department of Social Services shall annually calculate the housing supplement described in this subdivision and shall inform county welfare agencies by November 1 of each year of the amount of the supplement by means of all-county letters or similar written instructions. These all-county letters or similar instructions shall have the same force and effect as regulations.
(3) A county shall not receive less than the rate established pursuant to subdivision (h).
(4) For purposes of this subdivision, “fair market rent” means the rent calculated for the fair market rent system developed by the United States Department of Housing and Urban Development for use in determining the allowable rent level for individuals who participate in the Housing Choice Voucher program, and that includes the cost of housing and utilities, except for telephone, cable, and internet, and is calculated annually for each county and released at the start of each fiscal year by the United States Department of Housing and Urban Development.
(5) (A) The department shall work with the County Welfare Directors Association of California and the Statewide Automated Welfare System (CalSAWS) to develop and implement the necessary system changes to implement the housing supplement provided pursuant to paragraph (1).
(B) (i) This supplement shall begin on July 1, 2021, for the counties utilizing the CalWIN system, or when the department notifies the Legislature that CalWIN can perform the necessary automation to implement it, whichever is later.
(ii) This supplement shall begin on September 1, 2022, for the counties utilizing the CalSAWS system, or when the department notifies the Legislature that CalSAWS can perform the necessary automation to implement it, whichever is later.

SEC. 60.

 Section 11454 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

11454.
 (a) A parent or caretaker relative shall not be eligible for aid under this chapter when the parent or caretaker relative has received aid under this chapter or from any state under the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families program (Part A (commencing with Section 401) of Title IV of the federal Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. Sec. 601 et seq.)) for a cumulative total of 48 months.
(b) (1) Except as otherwise specified in subdivision (c), Section 11454.5, or other law, all months of aid received under this chapter from January 1, 1998, to the operative date of this section, inclusive, shall be applied to the 48-month time limit described in subdivision (a).
(2) All months of aid received from January 1, 1998, to the operative date of this section, inclusive, in any state pursuant to the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families program (Part A (commencing with Section 401) of Title IV of the federal Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. Sec. 601 et seq.)), shall be applied to the 48-month time limit described in subdivision (a).
(c) Subdivision (a) and paragraph (1) of subdivision (b) shall not be applicable when all parents or caretaker relatives of the aided child who are living in the home of the child meet any of the following requirements:
(1) They are 60 years of age or older.
(2) They meet one of the conditions specified in paragraph (4) or (5) of subdivision (b) of Section 11320.3.
(3) They are not included in the assistance unit.
(4) They are receiving benefits under Section 12200 or 12300, State Disability Insurance benefits or Workers’ Compensation Temporary Disability Insurance, if the disability significantly impairs the recipient’s ability to be regularly employed or participate in welfare-to-work activities.
(5) They are incapable of maintaining employment or participating in welfare-to-work activities, as determined by the county, based on the assessment of the individual and the individual has a history of participation and full cooperation in welfare-to-work activities.
(d) This section shall become inoperative on May 1, 2022, or when the department notifies the Legislature that the Statewide Automated Welfare System can perform the necessary automation to implement Section 11454, as added by the act that added this subdivision, whichever date is later, and, as of January 1 of the following year, is repealed.

SEC. 61.

 Section 11454 is added to the Welfare and Institutions Code, to read:

11454.
 (a) A parent or caretaker relative shall not be eligible for aid under this chapter when the parent or caretaker relative has received aid under this chapter or from any state under the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families program (Part A (commencing with Section 401) of Title IV of the federal Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. Sec. 601 et seq.)) for a cumulative total of 60 months.
(b) (1) Except as otherwise specified in subdivision (c), Section 11454.5, or other law, all months of aid received under this chapter from January 1, 1998, to the operative date of this section, inclusive, shall be applied to the 60-month time limit described in subdivision (a).
(2) All months of aid received from January 1, 1998, to the operative date of this section, inclusive, in any state pursuant to the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families program (Part A (commencing with Section 401) of Title IV of the federal Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. Sec. 601 et seq.)), shall be applied to the 60-month time limit described in subdivision (a).
(c) Subdivision (a) and paragraph (1) of subdivision (b) shall not be applicable when all parents or caretaker relatives of the aided child who are living in the home of the child meet any of the following requirements:
(1) They are 60 years of age or older.
(2) They meet one of the conditions specified in paragraph (4) or (5) of subdivision (b) of Section 11320.3.
(3) They are not included in the assistance unit.
(4) They are receiving benefits under Section 12200 or 12300, State Disability Insurance benefits or Workers’ Compensation Temporary Disability Insurance, if the disability significantly impairs the recipient’s ability to be regularly employed or participate in welfare-to-work activities.
(5) They are incapable of maintaining employment or participating in welfare-to-work activities, as determined by the county, based on the assessment of the individual and the individual has a history of participation and full cooperation in welfare-to-work activities.
(d) This section shall become operative on May 1, 2022, or when the department notifies the Legislature that the Statewide Automated Welfare System can perform the necessary automation to implement this section, whichever date is later.

SEC. 62.

 Section 11454.1 is added to the Welfare and Institutions Code, to read:

11454.1.
 (a) County welfare departments shall provide each recipient who is subject to the 60-month time limitation described in subdivision (a) of Section 11454 with written notice describing the 60-month time limitation described in that subdivision and the process by which recipients may claim exemptions from, and extensions to, the time limit.
(b) The notice described in subdivision (a) shall be provided at the time the individual applies for aid, during the recipient’s annual redetermination, and at least once after the individual has participated for a total of 54 months, and prior to the end of the 57th month, that count toward the 60-month time limit.
(c) The notice described in this section shall include, but shall not be limited to, the following:
(1) The number of remaining months the adult recipient may be eligible to receive aid.
(2) The manner in which the recipient may dispute the number of months counted toward the 60-month time limit.
(d) This section shall become operative on May 1, 2022, or when the department notifies the Legislature that the Statewide Automated Welfare System can perform the necessary automation to implement this section, whichever is later.

SEC. 63.

 Section 11454.2 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is repealed.

SEC. 64.

 Section 11454.5 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

11454.5.
 (a) Any month in which the following conditions exist shall not be counted as a month of receipt of aid for the purposes of subdivision (a) of, and paragraph (1) of subdivision (b) of, Section 11454:
(1) The recipient is exempt from participation under Article 3.2 (commencing with Section 11320) due to disability, or advanced age in accordance with paragraph (3) of subdivision (b) of Section 11320.3, or due to caretaking responsibilities that impair the recipient’s ability to be regularly employed, in accordance with paragraph (5) of subdivision (b) of Section 11320.3.
(2) The recipient is eligible for, participating in, or exempt from, the Cal-Learn Program provided for pursuant to Article 3.5 (commencing with Section 11331), for any period during which the Cal-Learn Program is operative, is participating in another teen parent program approved by the department, or is a nonminor dependent under the supervision of the county welfare or probation department who is placed in an approved relative’s home and is eligible for aid under this section because the recipient satisfies the conditions described in Section 11403.
(3) The cost of the cash aid provided to the recipient for the month is fully reimbursed by child support, whether collected in that month or any subsequent month.
(4) The family is a former recipient of cash aid under this chapter and currently receives only child care, case management, or supportive services pursuant to Section 11323.2 or Article 15.5 (commencing with Section 8350) of Chapter 2 of Part 6 of Title 1 of the Education Code.
(5) To the extent provided by federal law, the recipient lived in Indian country, as defined by federal law, or an Alaskan native village in which at least 50 percent of the adults living in the Indian country or in the village are not employed.
(6) The recipient received CalWORKs for any month between August 1, 2009, and January 1, 2015, and was either exempt from participation under paragraph (7) of subdivision (b) of Section 11320.3, or was exempt from participation and was not reengaged in accordance with subdivision (h) of Section 11320.3, as that section read on June 30, 2020.
(7) The recipient is exempt from participating in welfare-to-work activities because the recipient has primary responsibility for personally providing care to a child 24 months of age or younger, pursuant to clause (iv) of subparagraph (A) of paragraph (6) of subdivision (b) of Section 11320.3.
(b) In cases where a lump-sum diversion payment is provided in lieu of cash aid under Section 11266.5, the month in which the payment is made or the months calculated pursuant to subdivision (f) of Section 11266.5 shall count against the limits specified in Section 11454.

SEC. 65.

 Section 11461.36 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

11461.36.
 (a) It is the intent of the Legislature to provide support to emergency caregivers, as defined in subdivision (c), who care for children and nonminor dependents before approval of an application under the Resource Family Approval Program.
(b) For placements made on and after July 1, 2018, each county shall provide a payment equivalent to the resource family basic level rate of the home-based family care rate structure, pursuant to Section 11463, to an emergency caregiver on behalf of a child or nonminor dependent placed in the home of the caregiver pursuant to subdivision (d) of Section 309 or Section 361.45, or based on a compelling reason pursuant to subdivision (e) of Section 16519.5, subject to the availability of state and federal funds pursuant to subdivision (e), if all of the following criteria are met:
(1) The child or nonminor dependent is not otherwise eligible for AFDC-FC or the Approved Relative Caregiver Funding Program, pursuant to Section 11461.3, while placed in the home of the emergency caregiver.
(2) The child or nonminor dependent resides in California.
(3) The emergency caregiver has signed and submitted to the county an application for resource family approval.
(4) An application for the Emergency Assistance Program has been completed.
(c) For purposes of this section, an “emergency caregiver” means an individual who has a pending resource family application filed with an appropriate agency on or after July 1, 2018, and who meets one of the following requirements:
(1) The individual has been assessed pursuant to Section 361.4.
(2) The individual has successfully completed the home environment assessment portion of the resource family approval pursuant to paragraph (2) of subdivision (d) of Section 16519.5.
(d) The beginning date of aid for payments made pursuant to subdivision (b) shall be the date of placement.
(e) Funding for payments made pursuant to subdivision (b) shall be as follows:
(1) For emergency or compelling reason placements made during the 2018–19 fiscal year:
(A) Payments shall be made to an emergency caregiver through the Emergency Assistance Program included in the state’s Temporary Assistance for Needy Families block grant.
(B) The county shall be solely responsible for the nonfederal share of cost.
(C) Notwithstanding subparagraphs (A) and (B), if the child or nonminor dependent is determined to be ineligible for the Emergency Assistance Program included in the state’s Temporary Assistance for Needy Families block grant, 70 percent of the cost of emergency payments made to the emergency caregiver shall be funded by the department and 30 percent shall be funded by the county.
(D) Notwithstanding subparagraphs (A), (B), and (C), payments required to be provided pursuant to subdivision (b) shall not be eligible for the federal or state share of cost upon approval or denial of the resource family application, consistent with subdivision (g), beyond 180 days, or, if the conditions of subparagraph (E) are met, beyond 365 days, whichever occurs first.
(E) The federal and state share of payment made pursuant to this paragraph shall be available beyond 180 days of payments, and up to 365 days of payments, if all of the following conditions are met:
(i) On a monthly basis, the county has documented good cause for the delay in approving the resource family application that is outside the direct control of the county, which may include delays in processing background check clearances or exemptions, medical examinations, or delays that are based on the needs of the family.
(ii) On a monthly basis, the deputy director or director of the county child welfare department, or their designee, has been notified of the delay in approving the resource family application and that notification is documented in the resource family approval file.
(iii) On a monthly basis, the county provides to the department a list of the resource family applications that have been pending for more than 90 days and the reason for the delays.
(2) For emergency or compelling reason placements made during the 2019–20 fiscal year:
(A)  Payments shall be made to an emergency caregiver through the Emergency Assistance Program included in the state’s Temporary Assistance for Needy Families block grant.
(B)  The county shall be solely responsible for the nonfederal share of cost.
(C)  Notwithstanding subparagraphs (A) and (B), if the child or nonminor dependent is determined to be ineligible for the Emergency Assistance Program included in the state’s Temporary Assistance for Needy Families block grant, 70 percent of the cost of emergency payments made to the emergency caregiver shall be funded by the department and 30 percent shall be funded by the county.
(D) Notwithstanding subparagraphs (A), (B), and (C), payments required to be provided pursuant to subdivision (b) shall not be eligible for the federal or state share of cost upon approval or denial of the resource family application, consistent with subdivision (g), or beyond 120 days, whichever occurs first.
(E) The federal and state share of payment made pursuant to this paragraph shall be available beyond 120 days of payments, and up to 365 days of payments, if all of the following conditions are met:
(i) On a monthly basis, the county has documented good cause for the delay in approving the resource family application that is outside the direct control of the county, which may include delays in processing background check clearances or exemptions, medical examinations, or delays that are based on the needs of the family.
(ii) On a monthly basis, the deputy director or director of the county child welfare department, or their designee, or the chief probation officer, or their designee, as applicable, has been notified of the delay in approving the resource family application and that notification is documented in the resource family approval file.
(iii) On a monthly basis, the county provides to the department a list of the resource family applications that have been pending for more than 120 days and the reason for the delays.
(3) For emergency or compelling reason placements made during the 2020–21 fiscal year:
(A) Payments shall be made to an emergency caregiver through the Emergency Assistance Program included in the state’s Temporary Assistance for Needy Families block grant.
(B) The county shall be solely responsible for the nonfederal share of cost.
(C) Notwithstanding subparagraphs (A) and (B), if the child or nonminor dependent is determined to be ineligible for the Emergency Assistance Program included in the state’s Temporary Assistance for Needy Families block grant, 70 percent of the cost of emergency payments made to the emergency caregiver shall be funded by the department and 30 percent shall be funded by the county.
(D) Notwithstanding subparagraphs (A), (B), and (C), payments required to be provided pursuant to subdivision (b) shall not be eligible for the federal or state share of cost upon approval or denial of the resource family application, consistent with subdivision (g), or beyond 120 days, whichever occurs first.
(E) The federal and state share of payment made pursuant to this paragraph shall be available beyond 120 days of payments, and up to 365 days of payments, if all of the following conditions are met:
(i) On a monthly basis, the county has documented good cause for delay in approving the resource family application that is outside the direct control of the county, which may include delays in processing background check clearances or exemptions, medical examinations, or delays that are based on the needs of the family.
(ii) On a monthly basis, the deputy director or director of the county child welfare department, or their designees, or the chief probation officer, or their designee, as applicable, has been notified of the delay in approving the resource family application and that notification is documented in the resource family approval file.
(iii) On a monthly basis, the county provides to the department a list of the resource family applications that have been pending for more than 120 days and the reasons for the delays.
(4) For emergency or compelling reason placements made during the 2021–22 fiscal year, and each fiscal year thereafter:
(A) Payments shall be made to an emergency caregiver through the Emergency Assistance Program included in the state’s Temporary Assistance for Needy Families block grant.
(B) The county shall be solely responsible for the nonfederal share of cost.
(C) Notwithstanding subparagraphs (A) and (B), if the child or nonminor dependent is determined to be ineligible for the Emergency Assistance Program included in the state’s Temporary Assistance for Needy Families block grant, 70 percent of the cost of the emergency payments made to the emergency caregiver shall be funded by the department and 30 percent shall be funded by the county.
(D) Notwithstanding subparagraphs (A), (B), and (C), payments required to be provided pursuant to subdivision (b) shall not be eligible for the federal or state share of cost upon approval or denial of the resource family application, consistent with subdivision (g), or beyond 90 days, whichever occurs first.
(E) The department shall consider extending the payments required pursuant to subdivision (b) beyond the 90-day limit identified in subparagraph (D) if it makes a determination that the resource family approval process cannot be completed within 90 days due to circumstances outside of a county’s control.
(f) (1) An emergency caregiver eligible for payments pursuant to subdivision (b) of Section 11461.35, as that section read on June 30, 2018, shall continue to be eligible for those payments on and after July 1, 2018, until the emergency caregiver’s resource family application is approved or denied.
(2) Funding for a payment described in paragraph (1) shall be as follows:
(A) If the emergency caregiver was eligible to receive payments funded through the Approved Relative Caregiver Funding Program, payments shall be made through that program until the application for resource family approval is approved or denied.
(B) If the emergency caregiver was eligible to receive payments funded through the Emergency Assistance Program, payments shall be made through that program, subject to the following conditions:
(i) Up to 180 total days or, if the conditions of subparagraph (D) are met, up to 365 total days of payments shall be made to the emergency caregiver through the Emergency Assistance Program. For the purpose of this subdivision, “total days of payments” includes all payments made to the emergency caregiver through the Emergency Assistance Program pursuant to this section and Section 11461.35, as that section read on June 30, 2018.
(ii) The county shall be solely responsible for the nonfederal share of cost.
(C) Notwithstanding subparagraphs (A) and (B), payments required to be provided pursuant to subdivision (b) shall not be eligible for the federal or state share of cost upon approval or denial of the resource family application, consistent with subdivision (g), beyond 180 days, or, if the conditions of subparagraph (D) are met, beyond 365 days, whichever occurs first.
(D) The federal and state share of payment made pursuant to this subdivision shall be available beyond 180 total days of payments, and up to 365 total days of payments, when the following conditions are met:
(i) On a monthly basis, the county has documented good cause for the delay in approving the resource family application that is outside the direct control of the county, which may include delays in processing background check clearances or exemptions, medical examinations, or delays that are based on the needs of the family.
(ii) On a monthly basis, the deputy director or director of the county child welfare department, or their designee, has been notified of the delay in approving the resource family application and that notification is documented in the resource family approval file.
(iii) On a monthly basis, the county provides to the department a list of the resource family applications that have been pending for more than 90 days, the number of cases that have received more than 90 total days of payments pursuant to this section and Section 11461.35, and the reason for the delays in approval or denial of the resource family applications.
(g) (1) If the application for resource family approval is approved, the funding source for the placement shall be changed to AFDC-FC or the Approved Relative Caregiver Funding Program, as appropriate and consistent with existing eligibility requirements.
(2) If the application for resource family approval is denied, eligibility for funding pursuant to this section shall be terminated.
(h) A county shall not be liable for any federal disallowance or penalty imposed on the state as a result of a county’s action in reliance on the state’s instruction related to implementation of this section.
(i) (1) For the 2018–19 and 2019–20 fiscal years, the department shall determine, on a county-by-county basis, whether the timeframe for the resource family approval process resulted in net assistance costs or net assistance savings for assistance payments, pursuant to this section.
(2) For the 2018–19 and 2019–20 fiscal years, the department shall also consider, on a county-by-county basis, the impact to the receipt of federal Title IV-E funding that may result from implementation of this section.
(3) The department shall work with the California State Association of Counties to jointly determine the timeframe for subsequent reviews of county costs and savings beyond the 2019–20 fiscal year.
(j) (1) The department shall monitor the implementation of this section, including, but not limited to, tracking the usage and duration of Emergency Assistance Program payments made pursuant to this section and evaluating the duration of time a child or nonminor dependent is in a home pending resource family approval. The department may conduct county reviews or case reviews, or both, to monitor the implementation of this section and to ensure successful implementation of the county plan, submitted pursuant to subparagraph (B) of paragraph (2) of subdivision (e) of Section 11461.35, to eliminate any resource family approval backlog by September 1, 2018.
(2) The department may request information or data necessary to oversee the implementation of this section until data collection is available through automation. Pending the completion of automation, information or data collected manually shall be determined in consultation with the County Welfare Directors Association of California.
(k) An appropriation shall not be made pursuant to Section 15200 for purposes of implementing this section.
(l) (1) On and after July 1, 2019, each county shall provide a payment equivalent to the resource family basic level rate of the home-based family care rate structure, pursuant to Section 11463, on behalf of an Indian child, as defined in subdivision (a) of Section 224.1, placed in the home of the caregiver who is pending approval as a tribally approved home, as defined in subdivision (r) of Section 224.1, if all of the following criteria are met:
(A) The placement is made pursuant to subdivision (d) of Section 309 or Section 361.45.
(B) The caregiver has been assessed pursuant to Section 361.4.
(C) The child is not otherwise eligible for AFDC-FC or the Approved Relative Caregiver Funding Program, pursuant to Section 11461.3, while placed in the home of the caregiver.
(D) The child resides in California.
(E) The tribe or tribal agency has initiated the process for the home to become tribally approved.
(F) An application for the Emergency Assistance Program has been completed by the placing agency.
(2) The beginning date of aid for payments made pursuant to this subdivision shall be the date of placement.
(3) The funding source for the placement shall be changed to AFDC-FC or the Approved Relative Caregiver Funding Program, as appropriate and consistent with existing eligibility requirements, when the caregiver is approved as a tribally approved home. If the approval is denied, payments made pursuant to this subdivision shall cease.
(4) Subdivision (e) and subdivisions (h) to (k), inclusive, shall apply to payments made pursuant to this subdivision.
(m) Notwithstanding the rulemaking provisions of the Administrative Procedure Act (Chapter 3.5 (commencing with Section 11340) of Part 1 of Division 3 of Title 2 of the Government Code), the department may implement and administer this section through an all-county letter or similar instructions, which shall include instructions regarding the eligibility standards for emergency assistance until regulations are adopted.

SEC. 66.

 Section 11463 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

11463.
 (a) The department shall commence development of a new payment structure for the Title IV-E funded foster family agency placement option that maximizes federal funding, in consultation with county placing agencies.
(b) The department shall develop a payment system for foster family agencies that provide treatment, intensive treatment, and therapeutic foster care programs, and shall consider all of the following factors:
(1) Administrative activities that are eligible for federal financial participation provided, at the request of the county, for and to county-licensed or approved family homes and resource families, intensive case management and supervision, and services to achieve legal permanency or successful transition to adulthood.
(2) Social work activities that are eligible for federal financial participation under Title IV-E (42 U.S.C. Sec. 670 et seq.) of the federal Social Security Act.
(3) Social work and mental health services eligible for federal financial participation under Title XIX (42 U.S.C. Sec. 1396 et seq.) of the federal Social Security Act.
(4) Intensive treatment or therapeutic services in the foster family agency.
(5) Core services that are made available to children and nonminor dependents either directly or secured through agreements with other agencies, and which are trauma informed, culturally relevant, and include any of the following:
(A) Specialty mental health services for children who meet medical necessity criteria for specialty mental health services, as provided for in Section 1830.205 or 1830.210 of Title 9 of the California Code of Regulations.
(B) Transition support services for children, youth, and families upon initial entry and placement changes and for families who assume permanency through reunification, adoption, or guardianship.
(C) Educational, physical, behavioral, and mental health supports, including extracurricular activities and social supports.
(D) Activities designed to support transition-age youth and nonminor dependents in achieving a successful adulthood.
(E) Services to achieve permanency, including supporting efforts to reunify or achieve adoption or guardianship and efforts to maintain or establish relationships with parents, siblings, extended family members, tribes, or others important to the child or youth, as appropriate.
(F) When serving Indian children, as defined in subdivisions (a) and (b) of Section 224.1, the core services specified in subparagraphs (A) to (E), inclusive, shall be provided to eligible Indian children consistent with active efforts pursuant to Section 361.7.
(G) The core services specified in subparagraphs (A) to (F), inclusive, are not intended to duplicate services already available to foster children in the community, but to support access to those services and supports to the extent already available. Those services and supports may include, but are not limited to, foster youth services available through county offices of education, Indian Health Services, and school-based extracurricular activities.
(6) Staff training.
(7) Health and Safety Code requirements.
(8) A process for accreditation that includes all of the following:
(A) Provision for all licensed foster family agencies to maintain in good standing accreditation from a nationally recognized accreditation agency with expertise in programs for youth group care facilities, as determined by the department.
(B) Promulgation by the department of information identifying the agency or agencies from which accreditation shall be required.
(C) Provision for timely reporting to the department of any change in accreditation status.
(9) Mental health certification, including a requirement to timely report to the department any change in mental health certificate status.
(10) Populations served, including, but not limited to, any of the following:
(A) (i) Children and youth assessed as seriously emotionally disturbed, as described in subdivision (a) of Section 5600.3, including those children and youth placed out-of-home pursuant to an individualized education program developed under Article 2 (commencing with Section 56320) of Chapter 4 of Part 30 of Division 4 of Title 2 of the Education Code.
(ii) Children assessed as meeting the medical necessity criteria for specialty mental health services, as provided for in Section 1830.205 or 1830.210 of Title 9 of the California Code of Regulations.
(B) AFDC-FC children and youth receiving intensive and therapeutic treatment services in a foster family agency.
(C) AFDC-FC children and youth receiving mental health treatment services from a foster family agency.
(11) Maximization of federal financial participation for Title IV-E (42 U.S.C. Sec. 670 et seq.) and Title XIX (42 U.S.C. Sec. 1396 et. seq.) of the federal Social Security Act.
(c) Commencing January 1, 2017, the department shall establish rates pursuant to subdivisions (a) and (b). The rate structure shall include an interim rate, a provisional rate for new foster family agency programs, and a probationary rate. The department may issue a one-time reimbursement for accreditation fees incurred after August 1, 2016, in an amount and manner determined by the department in written directives.
(1) (A) Initial interim rates developed pursuant to this section shall be effective January 1, 2017, through December 31, 2020.
(B) The initial interim rates developed pursuant to this paragraph shall not be lower than the rates proposed as part of the Governor’s 2016 May Revision.
(C) The initial interim rates set forth in written directives or regulations pursuant to paragraph (4) shall become inoperative on January 1, 2021, unless a later enacted statute, that becomes operative on or before January 1, 2021, deletes or extends the dates on which they become inoperative.
(D) It is the intent of the Legislature to establish an ongoing payment structure no later than January 1, 2021.
(2) Consistent with Section 11466.01, for provisional and probationary rates, all of the following shall be established:
(A) Terms and conditions, including the duration of the rate.
(B) An administrative review process for the rate determinations, including denials, reductions, and terminations.
(C) An administrative review process that includes a departmental review, corrective action, and an appeal with the department. Notwithstanding the rulemaking provisions of the Administrative Procedure Act (Chapter 3.5 (commencing with Section 11340) of Part 1 of Division 3 of Title 2 of the Government Code), this process shall be disseminated by written directive pending the promulgation of regulations.
(3) (A) (i) The foster family agency rate shall include a basic rate pursuant to paragraph (4) of subdivision (g) of Section 11461. A child or youth placed in a certified family home or with a resource family of a foster family agency is eligible for the basic rate, which shall be passed on to the certified parent or resource family along with annual increases in accordance with paragraph (2) of subdivision (g) of Section 11461.
(ii) A certified family home of a foster family agency shall be paid the basic rate as set forth in this paragraph only through December 31, 2020.
(B) The basic rate paid to either a certified family home or a resource family of a foster family agency shall be paid by the agency to the home from the rate that is paid to the agency pursuant to this section.
(C) In addition to the basic rate described in this paragraph, the department shall develop foster family agency rates that consider specialized programs to serve children with specific needs, including, but not limited to, all of the following:
(i) Intensive treatment and behavioral needs, including those currently being served under intensive treatment foster care.
(ii) Specialized health care needs.
(4) Notwithstanding the rulemaking provisions of the Administrative Procedure Act (Chapter 3.5 (commencing with Section 11340) of Part 1 of Division 3 of Title 2 of the Government Code), the foster family agency rates, and the manner in which they are determined, shall be set forth in written directives until regulations are adopted.
(d) The department shall develop a system of governmental monitoring and oversight that shall be carried out in coordination with the State Department of Health Care Services. Oversight responsibilities shall include, but not be limited to, ensuring conformity with federal and state law, including program, fiscal, and health and safety reviews. The state agencies shall attempt to minimize duplicative audits and reviews to reduce the administrative burden on providers.
(e) The department shall consider the impact on children and youth being transitioned to alternate programs as a result of the new ratesetting system.
(f) (1) Commencing July 1, 2019, the rates paid to foster family agencies shall, except for the rate paid to a certified family home or resource family agency pursuant to clause (i) of subparagraph (A) of paragraph (3) of subdivision (c), be 4.15 percent higher than the rates paid to foster family agencies in the 2018–19 fiscal year.
(2) (A) The rate increase described in paragraph (1) shall be suspended on December 31, 2021, unless subparagraph (B) applies.
(B) If, in the determination of the Department of Finance, the estimates of General Fund revenues and expenditures determined pursuant to Section 12.5 of Article IV of the California Constitution that accompany the May Revision required to be released by May 14, 2021, pursuant to Section 13308 of the Government Code, contain projected annual General Fund revenues that exceed projected annual General Fund expenditures in the 2021–22 and 2022–23 fiscal years by the sum total of General Fund moneys appropriated for all programs subject to suspension on December 31, 2021, pursuant to the Budget Act of 2019 and the bills providing for appropriations related to the Budget Act of 2019 within the meaning of subdivision (e) of Section 12 of Article IV of the California Constitution, then the implementation of the rate increase described in this subdivision shall not be suspended pursuant to subparagraph (A).
(C) If subparagraph (A) applies, it is the intent of the Legislature to consider alternative solutions to facilitate the continued implementation of the rate increase described in paragraph (1).
(D) If, at any point in 2020–21 fiscal year, the State Department of Social Services and the Department of Finance identify additional federal funds due to the ability of the State Department of Social Services to implement a foster family agency Social Worker Time Study, it is the intent of the Legislature that these funds be utilized for the cost of the 4.15 percent rate increase pursuant to paragraph (1). An update on the results of the Social Worker Time Study shall be provided to the appropriate policy and fiscal committees of the Legislature.

SEC. 67.

 Section 11523 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

11523.
 (a) This section shall be known and may be cited as the CalWORKs Outcomes and Accountability Review Act of 2017.
(b) The State Department of Social Services shall establish, by July 1, 2019, the California CalWORKs Outcomes and Accountability Review (Cal-OAR) to facilitate a local accountability system that fosters continuous quality improvement in county CalWORKs programs and in the collection and dissemination by the department of best practices in service delivery. The Cal-OAR shall cover CalWORKs services provided to current and former recipients, including those who are in sanction or exempt status or who are unengaged, and shall include the programmatic elements that each county offers as part of its CalWORKs service array as well as any local program components, and shall consist of performance indicators, a county CalWORKs self-assessment process, and a county CalWORKs system improvement plan. For purposes of this section, “CalWORKs services” shall include welfare-to-work, family stabilization, housing support, and post-employment job retention services.
(c) (1) (A) By October 1, 2017, the department shall convene a workgroup comprised of representatives from county human services agencies, legislative staff, interested welfare advocacy and research organizations, current and former CalWORKs recipients, organizations that represent county human services agencies and county boards of supervisors, representatives of community colleges, tribal organizations, and the workforce investment system, and any other state entities that the department deems necessary. The workgroup members shall also include individuals with expertise related to domestic violence, substance abuse, and mental health. The workgroup shall establish a workplan by which the Cal-OAR shall be conducted, pursuant to the provisions described in this section, including a process for qualitative peer reviews of counties’ CalWORKs services. The workgroup shall discuss potential costs for state and county participation.
(B) The department shall report annually to the Subcommittee on Health and Human Services of the Senate Committee on Budget and Fiscal Review and the Subcommittee on Health and Human Services of the Assembly Committee on Budget during the budget process with an update on the schedule for development of and future changes to the Cal-OAR.
(2) At a minimum, in establishing the work plan, the workgroup shall consider existing CalWORKs performance indicators being measured, additional, alternative, or additional and alternative process and outcome indicators to be measured, development of uniform elements of the county CalWORKs self-assessment and the county CalWORKs system improvement plans, timelines for implementation, recommendations for reducing the existing CalWORKS services data reporting burden in light of new requirements established by the act that added this section and the resulting Cal-OAR, recommendations for financial incentives to counties for achievement on performance measures, and an analysis of the county and state workload associated with implementation of the requirements of this section.
(d) The Cal-OAR shall consist of the following three components: performance indicators, a county CalWORKs self-assessment, and a county CalWORKs system improvement plan.
(1) (A) The Cal-OAR performance indicators shall be consistent with programmatic goals for the CalWORKs program, and shall include both process and outcome measures. These measures shall be established in order to provide baseline and ongoing information about how the state and counties are performing over time and to inform and guide each county human services agency’s CalWORKs self-assessment and CalWORKs system improvement plan.
(i) Process measures shall include measures of participant engagement, CalWORKs service delivery, and participation. Specific process measures shall be established by the department, in consultation with the workgroup, and may include measures of engagement as shown by improvement in program participation, timeliness of service provision, rates of utilization of program components, such as vocational education, and referrals and utilization of services based upon recommendations from the Online CalWORKs Appraisal Tool.
(ii) Outcome measures shall include measures of employment, educational attainment, program exits, and program reentries, and may include other indicators of family and child well-being as determined by the department, in consultation with the workgroup.
(B) Performance indicator data available in existing county data systems shall be collected by counties and provided to the department, and performance indicator data available in existing state department data systems shall be collected by the department and provided to the counties. These data shall be reported in a manner and on a schedule to be determined by the department, in consultation with the workgroup, but no less frequently than semiannually.
(C) (i) During the first five-year Cal-OAR cycle, performance indicator data, as reported by each county, shall be used to establish both county and statewide baselines for each of the process measures. After the first review cycle, the department shall, in consultation with the workgroup, establish standard target thresholds for each of the process measures established by the workgroup.
(ii) The department, in consultation with the workgroup, shall develop a process for resolving any disputes regarding the establishment of standard process thresholds pursuant to clause (i).
(D) For subsequent reviews, and based upon availability of additional data from enhancements to the Statewide Automated Welfare System or through interagency data-sharing agreements, the workgroup shall convene, as necessary, to consider whether to establish additional performance indicators that support the programmatic goals for the CalWORKs program. Any additional performance indicators established shall also be subject to the process described in subparagraph (C) and include consideration of when data on the additional performance indicators would be available for reporting, if not already available.
(E) If, during subsequent reviews, there is sufficient reason to establish statewide performance standards for one or more outcome measures, the department may, in consultation with the workgroup, establish those standards for each of the agreed-upon outcome measures. In making a determination as to whether there is sufficient reason to establish performance standards for any outcome measure, the department shall consider whether all counties could reasonably be expected to meet those standards given local variability in employment opportunities, availability of services, demographics, educational opportunities, and funding, among other things.
(2) (A) The county CalWORKs self-assessment component of the Cal-OAR, as established by the workgroup, shall require the county human services agencies to assess their performance on the established process and outcome measures that comprise the performance indicators, identify the strengths and weaknesses in their current practice and resource deployment, identify and describe how local operational decisions and systemic factors affect program outcomes, and consider areas of focus that may be included in the county CalWORKs system improvement plan, as described in paragraph (3). The county CalWORKs self-assessment process shall be designed to identify areas of best practices for replication and for system improvement at the county level, and shall guide the development of the county CalWORKs system improvement plan, as described in paragraph (3). To the extent a county identifies eligibility procedures and practices that it determines, through its self-assessment, contribute to its achievement on process and outcome measures related to CalWORKs services, the county may, at its option, incorporate eligibility-related elements into its system improvement plan.
(B) (i) The county CalWORKs self-assessment process shall be completed every five years by the county in consultation and collaboration with local stakeholders and submitted to the department.
(ii) Local stakeholders shall include county CalWORKs administrators, supervisors, and caseworkers; current and former CalWORKs recipients; and county human services agency partners. To the extent possible and relevant, local stakeholders shall also include representatives of community colleges, tribal organizations, and the local workforce board. Additional specific county human services agency partners shall be determined by the county and may include, but are not limited to, adult education providers, providers of services for survivors of domestic violence, the local housing continuum of care, county behavioral health departments, county drug and alcohol programs, community-based service providers, organizations that represent CalWORKs recipients, child care resource and referral programs, and alternative payment programs, as appropriate.
(3) (A) (i) The county CalWORKs system improvement plan shall consist of uniform elements to be developed by the workgroup. It shall, at a minimum, describe how the county will improve its CalWORKs program performance in strategic focus areas based upon information learned through the county CalWORKs self-assessment process. The county CalWORKs system improvement plan shall be approved in public session by the county’s board of supervisors or, as applicable, chief elected official, and submitted to the department.
(ii) The county CalWORKs system improvement plan shall be completed every five years by the county, approved in public session by the county’s board of supervisors or, as applicable, chief elected official, and be submitted to the department.
(B) The county CalWORKs system improvement plan shall include a peer CalWORKs services review element, the purpose of which shall be to provide additional insight and technical assistance by peer counties for each county.
(C) Strategic focus areas for the county CalWORKs system improvement plan shall be determined by the county, informed by the county CalWORKs self-assessment process, as described in paragraph (2), with targets for improvement based upon what is learned in the county CalWORKs self-assessment process.
(D) The county human services agency shall complete an annual progress report on the status of its submitted system improvement plan and shall submit these reports to the department. The department, in consultation with the workgroup, shall develop uniform elements of the progress report.
(e) (1) The department shall receive, review, and, based on its determination of the county CalWORKs system improvement plan meeting the required elements identified in subparagraph (A) of paragraph (3) of subdivision (d), certify as complete all county-submitted performance indicator data, county CalWORKs self-assessments, county CalWORKS system improvement plans, and annual progress reports, and shall identify and promote the replication of best practices in CalWORKs service delivery to achieve the established process and outcome measures.
(2) The department shall monitor, on an ongoing basis, county performance on the measures developed pursuant to subdivision (d).
(3) The department shall make data collected pursuant to this section publicly available on its internet website.
(4) The department shall, on an annual basis, submit a report to the Legislature that summarizes county performance on the established process and outcome measures during the reporting period, analyzes county performance trends over time, and makes findings and recommendations for common CalWORKs services improvements identified in the county CalWORKs self-assessments and county CalWORKs system improvement plans, including information on common statutory, regulatory, or fiscal barriers identified as inhibiting system improvements and any recommendations to overcome those barriers.
(5) (A) The department shall facilitate the provision of, and provide as appropriate, technical assistance to county human services agencies as part of the peer review that supports the county’s selected areas for improvement as described in its system improvement plan.
(B) If, in the course of its review of county CalWORKs system improvement plans and annual updates, or, in the course of its review of regularly submitted performance indicator data, the department determines that a county is consistently failing to make progress toward its strategic focus areas for improvement or is consistently failing to meet the process measure standard target thresholds established pursuant to subparagraph (C) of paragraph (1) of subdivision (d), the department shall engage the county in a process of targeted technical assistance and support to address and resolve the identified shortcomings. If, after the assistance is provided, the county continues in its failure to meet its goals or performance thresholds, the department may engage in corrective action with the county.
(f) A county shall execute and fulfill components of its CalWORKs system improvement plan that can be accomplished with existing resources.
(g) A county shall not be required to execute and fulfill any components of its CalWORKs system improvement plan that creates new county costs, unless funding for those costs are appropriated in the annual Budget Act.
(h) The implementation of the Cal-OAR continuous quality improvement components, including county self-assessments, system improvement plans, peer reviews, progress reports, and data validation shall be optional to counties during the 2020–21 fiscal year.
(i) Beginning in the 2019–20 fiscal year, and for each fiscal year thereafter, no more than two million dollars ($2,000,000) from the General Fund shall be appropriated in the annual Budget Act to counties to complete the requirements described in subdivision (c).

SEC. 68.

 Section 11523.05 is added to the Welfare and Institutions Code, immediately following Section 11523, to read:

11523.05.
 (a) Notwithstanding any other law, any contract or grant necessary for the State Department of Social Services to implement or evaluate the Cal-OAR initiative pursuant to this article is exempt from all of the following:
(1) The personal services contracting requirements of Article 4 (commencing with Section 19130) of Chapter 5 of Part 2 of Division 5 of Title 2 of the Government Code.
(2) The Public Contract Code, the State Contracting Manual, and Section 11546 of the Government Code.
(3) Review and approval by the Department of General Services or the Department of Technology.
(b) Subdivision (a) applies to any contract or grant that does any of the following:
(1) Provides workforce training and certification to state or county staff on development and completion of a CalWORKs self-assessment.
(2) Develops or provides training and technical assistance to state and county staff related to either of the following:
(A) Continuous Quality Improvement.
(B) Evaluation of system-improvement strategies.
(c) The department shall provide a summary of the executed and pending contracts and grants made pursuant to this section, with detail on the amounts involved, to the Cal-OAR portion of the department’s internet website. Commencing January 10, 2021, this posting shall be refreshed at least annually, on January 10 of each year, for as long as this section is operative.
(d)  This section shall become inoperative on July 1, 2023, and, as of January 1, 2024, is repealed.

SEC. 69.

 Section 11523.1 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

11523.1.
 The Legislature finds and declares all of the following:
(a) It is the intent of the Legislature to make the CalWORKs program the most effective family antipoverty program in the country. California continues to be a national leader in total caseload, provision of cash assistance, welfare-to-work services, and assistance for children. California is a national leader in improving the quality of life for CalWORKs families, including the elimination of the “maximum family grant rule,” as described in subparagraph (A) of paragraph (4) of subdivision (a) of Section 11450.025, and the commitment to ending deep poverty among all CalWORKs families.
(b) Beginning in the 2019–20 fiscal year and continuing through the 2023–24 fiscal year, California embarks on the first cycle of a new CalWORKs innovation, the CalWORKs Outcome and Accountability Review (Cal-OAR) system. Cal-OAR establishes a local, data-driven program management system that facilitates continuous improvement of county CalWORKs programs by collecting, analyzing, and disseminating outcomes and best practices. This system will help achieve the state’s goals of ensuring that CalWORKs families receive the best possible services and supports to improve their lives and will also help the state meet federal work participation rates by emphasizing quality and engagement.
(c) At the same time, county human services agencies are transforming the welfare-to-work process away from a compliance-oriented and work-first model into a modern, science-based, and goal-oriented welfare-to-work model known locally as CalWORKs 2.0. The success of this approach depends on a culture shift away from compliance-oriented, directive case management and toward supportive and responsive interactions between the case manager and the customer. Case management emphasizes coaching that allows clients to naturally develop accountability by setting and achieving their goals. Case managers in CalWORKs 2.0 have a framework to provide customers a trajectory from stability, to upskilling, to employment.
(d) Cal-OAR and the county CalWORKs 2.0 initiative are bold steps toward a better CalWORKs program, yet state law has not been updated to be consistent with the new approaches.

SEC. 70.

 Section 12301.24 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, as amended by Section 1 of Chapter 87 of the Statutes of 2018, is amended to read:

12301.24.
 (a) Effective November 1, 2009, all prospective providers shall complete a provider orientation at the time of enrollment, as developed by the department, in consultation with counties, which shall include, but is not limited to, all of the following:
(1) The requirements to be an eligible IHSS provider.
(2) A description of the IHSS program.
(3) The rules, regulations, and provider-related processes and procedures, including timesheets.
(4) The consequences of committing fraud in the IHSS program.
(5) The Medi-Cal toll-free telephone fraud hotline and internet website for reporting suspected fraud or abuse in the provision or receipt of supportive services.
(6) The applicable federal and state requirements regarding minimum wage and overtime pay, including paid travel time and wait time, and the requirements of Section 12300.4.
(b) In order to complete provider enrollment, at the conclusion of the provider orientation, all applicants shall sign a statement specifying that the provider agrees to all of the following:
(1) The prospective provider will provide to a recipient the authorized services.
(2) The prospective provider has received a demonstration of, and understands, timesheet requirements, including content, signature, and fingerprinting, when implemented.
(3) The prospective provider shall cooperate with state or county staff to provide any information necessary for assessment or evaluation of a case.
(4) The prospective provider understands and agrees to program expectations and is aware of the measures that the state or county may take to enforce program integrity.
(5) The prospective provider has attended the provider orientation and understands that failure to comply with program rules and requirements may result in the provider being terminated from providing services through the IHSS program.
(c) Between November 1, 2009, and June 30, 2010, all current providers shall receive the information described in this section. Following receipt of this information, a provider shall submit a signed agreement, consistent with the requirements of this section, to the appropriate county office.
(d) The county shall indefinitely retain this statement in the provider’s file. Refusal of the provider to sign the statement described in subdivision (b) shall result in the provider being ineligible to receive payment for the provision of services and participate as a provider in the IHSS program.
(e) Beginning no later than April 1, 2015, all of the following shall apply:
(1) The orientation described in subdivision (a) shall be an onsite orientation that all prospective providers shall attend in person.
(2) Prospective providers may attend the onsite orientation only after completing the application for the IHSS provider enrollment process described in subdivision (a) of Section 12305.81.
(3) Any oral presentation and written materials presented at the orientation shall be translated into all IHSS threshold languages in the county.
(4) (A) Representatives of the recognized employee organization in the county shall be permitted to make a presentation of up to 30 minutes at the beginning of the orientation. Prior to implementing the orientation requirements set forth in this subdivision, counties shall provide at least the level of access to, and the ability to make presentations at, provider orientations that they allowed the recognized employee organization in the county as of September 1, 2014. Counties shall not discourage prospective providers from attending, participating, or listening to the orientation presentation of the recognized employee organization. Prospective providers may, by their own accord, choose not to participate in the recognized employee organization presentation.
(B) Prior to scheduling a provider orientation, the county shall provide the recognized employee organization in the county with not less than 10 days advance notice of the planned date, time, and location of the orientation. If, within 3 business days of receiving that notice, the recognized employee organization notifies the county of its unavailability for the planned orientation, the county shall make reasonable efforts to schedule the orientation so the recognized employee organization can attend, so long as rescheduling the orientation does not delay provider enrollment by more than 10 business days. The requirement to make reasonable efforts to reschedule may be waived, as necessary, due to a natural disaster or other declared state of emergency, or by mutual agreement between the county and the recognized employee organization.
(C) Prior to the orientation, the recognized employee organization shall be provided with the information described in subdivision (b) of Section 6253.2 of the Government Code for prospective providers.
(f) To the extent that the orientation is modified from an onsite and in-person orientation, as required by paragraph (1) of subdivision (e), the recognized employee organization in the county shall be provided with the same right to make a presentation, the same advance notice of scheduling, and the same information regarding the applicants, providers, or prospective providers who will attend the orientation, as the organization would receive for an onsite orientation.

SEC. 71.

 Section 12301.24 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, as added by Section 2 of Chapter 87 of the Statutes of 2018, is repealed.

SEC. 72.

 Section 12305.7 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

12305.7.
 The department shall perform all of the following activities:
(a) Beginning in the 2004–05 fiscal year, and in each subsequent fiscal year, the department in consultation with the State Department of Health Care Services and the county welfare departments shall design and conduct an error rate study to estimate the extent of payment and service authorization errors and fraud in the provision of supportive services. The error rate study findings shall be used to prioritize and direct state and county fraud detection and quality improvement efforts. The State Department of Health Care Services shall provide technical assistance and guidance for the error rate studies as requested by the department.
(b) (1) The department and the State Department of Health Care Services shall conduct automated data matches to compare Medi-Cal paid claims and third-party liability data with supportive services paid service hours data to identify potential overpayments, duplicate payments, alternative payment sources for supportive services, and other potential supportive services delivery discrepancies, including but not limited to, receipt of supportive services by a recipient on the same day that other potentially duplicative Medi-Cal services are received. Relevant data match findings shall be transmitted to the counties, or to the appropriate state entity, for action.
(2) The department, in consultation with the county welfare departments and the State Department of Health Care Services, shall determine, define, and issue instructions to the counties describing the roles and responsibilities of the department, the State Department of Health Care Services, and counties for resolving data match discrepancies requiring followup, defining the necessary actions that will be taken to resolve them, and the process for exchange of information pertaining to the findings and disposition of data match discrepancies.
(c) The department shall develop methods for verifying the receipt of supportive services by program recipients. In developing the specified methods the department shall obtain input from program stakeholders as provided in Section 12305.72. The department shall, in consultation with the county welfare departments, also determine, define, and issue instructions describing the roles and responsibilities of the department and the county welfare departments for evaluating and responding to identified problems and discrepancies.
(d) The department shall make available on its internet website the regulations, all-county letters, approved forms, and training curricula developed and officially issued by the department to implement the items described in Section 12305.72. The department shall inform supportive services providers, recipients, and the general public about the availability of these items and of the Medi-Cal toll-free fraud hotline and internet website for reporting suspected fraud or abuse in the provision or receipt of supportive services.
(e) (1) (A) The department, in consultation with counties and in accordance with Section 12305.72, shall develop a standardized curriculum, training materials, and work aids, and operate an ongoing, statewide training program on the supportive services uniformity system. The training shall address, at a minimum, statutes, regulations, and policies related to in-home supportive services and service assessment and authorization, including the functional index ranks and statewide hourly task guidelines.
(B) The department shall develop a one-day refresher training program on service assessment and authorization, including the functional index ranks and statewide hourly task guidelines.
(2) (A) In-Home Supportive Services program case workers, case worker supervisors, program managers, quality assurance staff, and program integrity staff hired after the effective date of the act that added this paragraph shall complete the training developed pursuant to subparagraph (A) of paragraph (1) within six months of being hired.
(B) In-Home Supportive Services program case workers, case worker supervisors, program managers, quality assurance staff, and program integrity staff hired prior to the effective date of the act that added this paragraph who have not taken the training developed pursuant to subparagraph (A) of paragraph (1), or who took the training prior to July 1, 2019, shall take the refresher training program developed pursuant to subparagraph (B) of paragraph (1) by December 31, 2021.
(C) State hearing officers and public authority or nonprofit consortium staff may, but are not required to, attend the training or refresher training developed pursuant to paragraph (1).
(3) Training shall be scheduled and provided at sites throughout the state. The department may obtain a qualified vendor to assist in the development of the training and to conduct the training program. The design of the training program shall provide reasonable flexibility to allow counties to use their preferred training modalities to educate their supportive services staff in this subject matter.
(f) The department shall, in conjunction with the counties, develop protocols and procedures for monitoring county quality assurance programs. The monitoring may include onsite reviews of county quality assurance activities. The focus of the established monitoring protocols and procedures shall include determining the extent to which counties are fulfilling their quality assurance responsibilities and county quality assurance staff are correctly applying the uniformity system in reviewing supportive services cases for consistent, appropriate, and accurate service need assessments. The department and the county welfare departments shall also develop the protocols and procedures under which the department will report its monitoring findings to a county, disagreements over the findings are resolved, to the extent possible, and the county, the State Department of Health Care Services, and the department will follow up on the findings.
(g) The department shall conduct a review of program regulations in effect on the date of enactment of this section and shall revise the regulations as necessary to conform to the statutory changes that have occurred since the regulations were initially promulgated and to conform to federally authorized program changes.
(h) The department, in consultation with the county welfare departments and other stakeholders, as appropriate, shall develop protocols for the implementation of targeted mailings to providers, to convey program integrity concerns.

SEC. 73.

 Section 12305.71 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

12305.71.
 (a) Counties shall perform the following quality assurance activities:
(1) Establish a dedicated, specialized unit or function to ensure quality assurance and program integrity, including fraud detection and prevention, in the provision of supportive services.
(2) Perform routine, scheduled reviews of supportive services cases, to ensure that caseworkers appropriately apply the supportive services uniformity system and other supportive services rules and policies for assessing recipients’ need for services to the end that there are accurate assessments of needs and hours. Counties may consult with state quality assurance staff for technical assistance and shall cooperate with state monitoring of the county’s quality assurance activities and findings.
(3) The department and the county welfare departments shall develop policies, procedures, implementation timelines, and instructions under which county quality assurance programs will perform the following activities:
(A) Receiving, resolving, and responding appropriately to claims data match discrepancies or other state level quality assurance and program integrity information that indicates potential overpayments to providers or recipients or third-party liability for supportive services.
(B) Implementing procedures to identify potential sources of third-party liability for supportive services.
(C) Monitoring the delivery of supportive services in the county to detect and prevent potential fraud by providers, recipients, and others and maximize the recovery of overpayments from providers or recipients.
(i) As appropriate, in targeted cases, to protect program integrity, this monitoring may include a visit to the recipient’s home to verify the receipt of services.
(ii) The exact date and time of a home visit shall not be announced to the supportive services recipient or provider.
(iii) The department, in consultation with the county welfare departments, shall develop protocols for followup home visits and other actions, if the provider and recipient are not at the recipient’s home at the time of the initial home visit. The protocols shall include, at a minimum, all of the following:
(I) Information sent to the recipient’s home regarding the goals of the home visit, including the county’s objective to maintain program integrity by verifying the receipt of services, the quality of services and consumer well-being, and the potential loss of services if fraud is substantiated.
(II) Additional attempted visits to the recipient’s home, pursuant to clause (i).
(III) Followup phone calls to both the recipient and the provider, if necessary.
(D) Informing supportive services providers and recipients, and the public that suspected fraud in the provision or receipt of supportive services can be reported by using the toll-free Medi-Cal fraud telephone hotline and internet website.
(E) In accordance with protocols developed pursuant to subdivision (h) of Section 12305.7, distribute targeted program integrity mailings to providers. The purpose of the targeted program integrity mailings is to inform providers of appropriate program rules and requirements and consequences for failure to adhere to them.
(4) Develop a schedule, beginning July 1, 2005, under which county quality assurance staff shall periodically perform targeted quality assurance studies.
(5) In accordance with protocols developed by the department and county welfare departments, conduct joint case review activities with state quality assurance staff, including random postpayment paid claim reviews to ensure that payments to providers were valid and were associated with existing program recipients; identify, refer to, and work with appropriate agencies in investigation, administrative action, or prosecution of instances of fraud in the provision of supportive services. The protocols shall consider the relative priorities of the activities required pursuant to this section and available resources.
(b) (1) Until December 31, 2020, a county may request, and the department may approve, a reduction of quality assurance and program integrity activities pursuant to this section and Section 12305.7 to address staffing shortages and enable the county to repurpose staff to support critical In-Home Supportive Services administrative functions, including intakes and reassessments. Any reduction pursuant to this subdivision shall be in effect for a period of no more than 12 months, to be determined by the department on a case-by-case basis.
(2) Until December 31, 2020, a county may perform required quality assurance and program integrity activities pursuant to this section and Section 12305.7 remotely using telehealth, including by video conference or telephone, subject to continuing federal approval.

SEC. 74.

 Section 15204.2 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

15204.2.
 (a) It is the intent of the Legislature that the annual Budget Act appropriate state and federal funds in a single allocation to counties for the support of administrative activities undertaken by the counties to provide benefit payments to recipients of aid under Chapter 2 (commencing with Section 11200) of Part 3 and to provide required work activities and supportive services in order to efficiently and effectively carry out the purposes of that chapter.
(b) (1) No later than 30 days after the enactment of the Budget Act of 2004, the State Department of Social Services, in consultation with the County Welfare Directors Association of California, shall estimate the amount of unspent funds appropriated in the 2003–04 fiscal year single allocation described in this section.
(2) Unspent funds appropriated in the 2003–04 fiscal year single allocation, not to exceed forty million dollars ($40,000,000), shall be reappropriated to, and in augmentation of, Item 5180-101-0890 of Section 2.00 of the Budget Act of 2004. The State Department of Social Services, in consultation with the County Welfare Directors Association of California, shall develop an allocation methodology for these funds. A planning allocation, based on the estimated amount of unspent funds and the agreed upon allocation methodology, shall be provided to the counties no later than 30 days after the enactment of the Budget Act of 2004.
(c) (1) No later than 30 days after the enactment of the Budget Act of 2005, the State Department of Social Services, in consultation with the County Welfare Directors Association of California, shall estimate the amount of unspent funds appropriated in the 2004-05 fiscal year single allocation described in this section.
(2) Unspent funds appropriated in the 2004–05 fiscal year single allocation, not to exceed fifty million dollars ($50,000,000), shall be reappropriated to, and in augmentation of, Item 5180-101-0890 of Section 2.00 of the Budget Act of 2005. The State Department of Social Services, in consultation with the County Welfare Directors Association of California, shall develop an allocation methodology for these funds in order to partially offset the estimated savings due to the implementation of the quarterly reporting/prospective budgeting. A planning allocation, based on the estimated amount of unspent funds and the agreed upon allocation methodology, shall be provided to the counties no later than 30 days after the enactment of the Budget Act of 2005.
(d) The State Department of Social Services shall work with the County Welfare Directors Association of California, to determine the effect of implementation of the quarterly reporting/prospective budgeting system on eligibility activities and evaluate the impact on administrative costs.
(e) Notwithstanding subdivision (a), commencing with the 2021–22 fiscal year, and for each fiscal year thereafter, the funding provided for stage one childcare, as described in Article 15.5 (commencing with Section 8350) of Chapter 2 of Part 6 of Division 1 of Title 1 of the Education Code, shall be allocated to counties separately from the single allocation described in subdivision (a) for purposes of providing direct stage one childcare services and stage one childcare-related administration pursuant to Article 15.5 of the Education Code.

SEC. 75.

 Section 16519.5 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, as amended by Section 1 of Chapter 810 of the Statutes of 2019, is amended to read:

16519.5.
 (a) The State Department of Social Services, in consultation with county child welfare agencies, foster parent associations, and other interested community parties, shall implement a unified, family friendly, and child-centered resource family approval process to replace the existing multiple processes for licensing foster family homes, certifying foster homes by licensed foster family agencies, approving relatives and nonrelative extended family members as foster care providers, and approving guardians and adoptive families.
(b) (1) Counties shall be selected to participate on a voluntary basis as early implementation counties for the purpose of participating in the initial development of the approval process. Early implementation counties shall be selected according to criteria developed by the department in consultation with the County Welfare Directors Association of California. In selecting the five early implementation counties, the department shall promote diversity among the participating counties in terms of size and geographic location.
(2) Additional counties may participate in the early implementation of the program upon authorization by the department.
(3) The State Department of Social Services shall be responsible for all of the following:
(A) Selecting early implementation counties, based on criteria established by the department in consultation with the County Welfare Directors Association of California.
(B) Establishing timeframes for participating counties to submit an implementation plan, enter into terms and conditions for early implementation participation in the program, train appropriate staff, and accept applications from resource families.
(C) Entering into terms and conditions for early implementation participation in the program by counties.
(4) Counties participating in the early implementation of the program shall be responsible for all of the following:
(A) Submitting an implementation plan.
(B) Entering into terms and conditions for early implementation participation in the program.
(C) Consulting with the county probation department in the development of the implementation plan.
(D) Training appropriate staff.
(E) Accepting applications from resource families within the timeframes established by the department.
(5) (A) Approved relatives and nonrelative extended family members, licensed foster family homes, or approved adoptive homes that have completed the license or approval process prior to statewide implementation of the program shall not be considered part of the program. The otherwise applicable assessment and oversight processes shall continue to be administered for families and facilities not included in the program.
(B) Upon implementation of the program in a county, that county shall not accept new applications for the licensure of foster family homes, the approval of relative and nonrelative extended family members, or the approval of prospective guardians and adoptive homes.
(6) The department may waive regulations that pose a barrier to the early implementation and operation of this program. The waiver of any regulations by the department pursuant to this section shall apply to only those counties or foster family agencies participating in the early implementation of the program and only for the duration of the program.
(7) This subdivision shall become inoperative on January 1, 2017.
(c) (1) For purposes of this article, “resource family” means an individual or family that has successfully met both the home environment assessment standards and the permanency assessment criteria adopted pursuant to subdivision (d) necessary for providing care for a child placed by a public or private child placement agency by court order, or voluntarily placed by a parent or legal guardian. A resource family shall demonstrate all of the following:
(A) An understanding of the safety, permanence, and well-being needs of children who have been victims of child abuse and neglect, and the capacity and willingness to meet those needs, including the need for protection, and the willingness to make use of support resources offered by the agency, or a support structure in place, or both.
(B) An understanding of children’s needs and development, effective parenting skills or knowledge about parenting, and the capacity to act as a reasonable, prudent parent in day-to-day decisionmaking.
(C) An understanding of the role of the individual or family as a resource family and the capacity to work cooperatively with the agency and other service providers in implementing the child’s case plan.
(D) The financial ability within the household to ensure the stability and financial security of the family. An applicant who will rely on the funding described in subdivision (l) to meet additional household expenses incurred due to the placement of a child shall not, for this reason, be denied approval as a resource family.
(E) An ability and willingness to provide a family setting that promotes normal childhood experiences that serves the needs of the child.
(2) For purposes of this article, and unless otherwise specified, references to a “child” shall include a “nonminor dependent” and “nonminor former dependent or ward,” as defined in subdivision (v) and paragraph (1) of subdivision (aa) of Section 11400.
(3) There is no fundamental right to approval as a resource family. Emergency placement of a child pursuant to Section 309, 361.45, or 727.05, or placement with a resource family applicant pursuant to subdivision (e), does not entitle an applicant approval as a resource family.
(4) (A) A resource family shall be considered eligible to provide foster care for children in out-of-home placement and approved for adoption and guardianship.
(B) (i) Notwithstanding subparagraph (A), a county may approve a resource family to care for a specific child, as specified in the written directives or regulations adopted pursuant to this section.
(ii) In the case of an Indian child for whom the child’s tribe is not exercising its right to approve a home, the county shall apply the prevailing social and cultural standards of the Indian community to resource family approval for that child, as required by subdivision (f) of Section 361.31 and the federal Indian Child Welfare Act of 1978 (25 U.S.C. Sec. 1901 et seq.). The department shall engage in the tribal consultation process and develop regulations to implement this clause. Notwithstanding the rulemaking provisions of the Administrative Procedure Act (Chapter 3.5 (commencing with Section 11340) of Part 1 of Division 3 of Title 2 of the Government Code), the department may implement this clause through all-county letters or other similar instruction, and provide guidance to counties regarding consistent implementation of this clause.
(5) For purposes of this article, “resource family approval” means that the applicant or resource family successfully meets the home environment assessment and permanency assessment standards. This approval is in lieu of a foster family home license issued pursuant to Chapter 3 (commencing with Section 1500) of Division 2 of the Health and Safety Code, a certificate of approval issued by a licensed foster family agency, as described in subdivision (b) of Section 1506 of the Health and Safety Code, relative or nonrelative extended family member approval, guardianship approval, and the adoption home study approval.
(6) Approval of a resource family does not guarantee an initial, continued, or adoptive placement of a child with a resource family or with a relative or nonrelative extended family member. Approval of a resource family does not guarantee the establishment of a legal guardianship of a child with a resource family.
(7) (A) Notwithstanding paragraphs (1) to (6), inclusive, the county shall, consistent with Sections 1520.3 and 1558.1 of the Health and Safety Code, cease any further review of an application if the applicant has had a previous application denial by the department or a county within the preceding year, or if the applicant has had a previous rescission, revocation, or exemption denial or exemption rescission by the department or a county within the preceding two years.
(B) Notwithstanding subparagraph (A), the county may continue to review an application if it has determined that the reasons for the previous denial, rescission, or revocation were due to circumstances and conditions that either have been corrected or are no longer in existence. If an individual was excluded from a resource family home or facility licensed by the department, the county shall cease review of the individual’s application unless the excluded individual has been reinstated pursuant to subdivision (g) of Section 16519.6 of this code or pursuant to Section 1569.53, subdivision (h) of Section 1558, subdivision (h) of Section 1569.58, or subdivision (h) of Section 1596.8897, of the Health and Safety Code.
(C) (i) The county may cease any further review of an application if, after written notice to the applicant, the applicant fails to complete an application without good faith effort and within 30 days of the date of the notice, as specified in the written directives or regulations adopted pursuant to this section.
(ii) Clause (i) does not apply if a child is placed with the applicant pursuant to Section 309, 361.45, 727.05, or paragraph (1) of subdivision (e) of Section 16519.5.
(D) The cessation of an application review pursuant to this paragraph shall not constitute a denial of the application for purposes of this section or any other law.
(E) For purposes of this section, the date of a previous denial, rescission, revocation, exemption denial or exemption rescission, or exclusion shall be either of the following:
(i) The effective date of a final decision or order upholding a notice of action or exclusion order.
(ii) The date on the notice of the decision to deny, rescind, revoke, or exclude if the notice was not appealed or otherwise constitutes a final decision.
(8) A resource family shall meet the approval standards set forth in this section, and, as applicable, Chapter 6.3 (commencing with Section 18360) of Part 6, to maintain approval. A resource family shall comply with the written directives or regulations adopted pursuant to this section and applicable laws in order to maintain approval.
(9) A resource family may be approved by a county child welfare department or a probation department pursuant to this section or by a foster family agency pursuant to Section 1517 of the Health and Safety Code.
(10) A resource family shall not be licensed to operate a residential facility, as defined in Section 1502 of the Health and Safety Code, a residential care facility for the elderly, as defined in Section 1569.2 of the Health and Safety Code, or a residential care facility for persons with chronic life-threatening illnesses, as defined in Section 1568.01 of the Health and Safety Code, on the same premises used as the residence of the resource family.
(11) (A) An applicant who withdraws an application prior to its approval or denial may resubmit the application within 12 months of the withdrawal.
(B) This paragraph does not preclude a county from requiring an applicant to complete an application activity, even if that activity was previously completed.
(d) (1) The department shall adopt standards pertaining to the home environment and permanency assessments of a resource family.
(2) Resource family home environment assessment standards shall include, but not be limited to, all of the following:
(A) (i) (I) A criminal record clearance of each applicant and all adults residing in, or regularly present in, the home, and not exempted from fingerprinting, as set forth in subdivision (b) of Section 1522 of the Health and Safety Code, pursuant to Section 8712 of the Family Code, utilizing a check of the Child Abuse Central Index pursuant to Section 1522.1 of the Health and Safety Code, and receipt of a fingerprint-based state and federal criminal offender record information search response. The criminal history information shall include subsequent notifications pursuant to Section 11105.2 of the Penal Code.
(II) Consideration of any substantiated allegations of child abuse or neglect against the applicant and any other adult residing in, or regularly present in, the home pursuant to Section 1522.1 of the Health and Safety Code.
(III) If the criminal records check indicates that the person has been convicted of an offense described in subparagraph (A) of paragraph (2) of subdivision (g) of Section 1522 of the Health and Safety Code, home approval shall be denied. If the criminal records check indicates that the person has been convicted of an offense described in subparagraph (B) or (C) of paragraph (2) of subdivision (g) of Section 1522 of the Health and Safety Code, the home shall not be approved unless a criminal records exemption has been granted pursuant to subclause (IV).
(IV) If the resource family parent, applicant, or any other person specified in subclause (I) has been convicted of a crime other than a minor traffic violation or arrested for an offense specified in subdivision (e) of Section 1522 of the Health and Safety Code, except for the civil penalty language, the criminal background check provisions specified in subdivisions (d) through (f) of Section 1522 of the Health and Safety Code shall apply. Exemptions from the criminal records clearance requirements set forth in this section may be granted by the department or the county, if that county has been granted permission by the department to issue criminal records exemptions pursuant to Section 361.4, using the exemption criteria currently used for foster care licensing, as specified in subdivision (g) of Section 1522 of the Health and Safety Code.
(V) If it is determined, on the basis of the fingerprint images and related information submitted to the Department of Justice, that subsequent to obtaining a criminal record clearance or exemption from disqualification, the person has been convicted of, or is awaiting trial for, a sex offense against a minor, or has been convicted for an offense specified in Section 243.4, 273a, 273ab, 273d, 273g, or 368 of the Penal Code, or a felony, the department or county shall notify the resource family to act immediately to remove or bar the person from entering the resource family’s home. The department or county, as applicable, may subsequently grant an exemption from disqualification pursuant to subdivision (g) of Section 1522 of the Health and Safety Code. If the conviction or arrest was for another crime, the resource family shall, upon notification by the department or county, act immediately to either remove or bar the person from entering the resource family’s home, or require the person to seek an exemption from disqualification pursuant to subdivision (g) of Section 1522 of the Health and Safety Code. The department or county, as applicable, shall determine if the person shall be allowed to remain in the home until a decision on the exemption from disqualification is rendered.
(ii) For public foster family agencies approving resource families, the criminal records clearance process set forth in clause (i) shall be utilized.
(iii) For private foster family agencies approving resource families, the criminal records clearance process set forth in clause (i) shall be utilized, but the Department of Justice shall disseminate a fitness determination resulting from the federal criminal offender record information search.
(B) A home and grounds evaluation to ensure the health and safety of children.
(C) In addition to the foregoing requirements, the resource family home environment assessment standards shall require the following:
(i) That the applicant demonstrates an understanding of the rights of children in care and the applicant’s responsibility to safeguard those rights.
(ii) That the total number of children residing in the home of a resource family shall be no more than the total number of children the resource family can properly care for, regardless of status, and shall not exceed six children, unless exceptional circumstances that are documented in the foster child’s case file exist to permit a resource family to care for more children, including, but not limited to, the need to place siblings together.
(iii) That the applicant understands the applicant’s responsibilities with respect to acting as a reasonable and prudent parent, and maintaining the least restrictive environment that serves the needs of the child.
(3) The resource family permanency assessment standards shall include, but not be limited to, all of the following:
(A) Caregiver training, as described in subdivisions (g) and (h).
(B) A family evaluation, which shall include, but not be limited to, interviews of an applicant to assess the applicant’s personal history, family dynamic, and need for support or resources, and a risk assessment.
(i) When the applicant is a relative or nonrelative extended family member to an identified child, the family evaluation shall consider the nature of the relationship between the relative or nonrelative extended family member and the child. The relative or nonrelative extended family member’s expressed desire to only care for a specific child or children shall not be a reason to deny the approval.
(ii) A caregiver risk assessment shall include, but not be limited to, physical and mental health, alcohol and other substance use and abuse, family and domestic violence, and the factors listed in paragraph (1) of subdivision (c).
(iii) A county may review and discuss data contained in the statewide child welfare database with an applicant for purposes of conducting a family evaluation, as specified in the written directives or regulations adopted pursuant to this section.
(C) Completion of any other activities that relate to the ability of an applicant or a resource family to achieve permanency with a child.
(4) (A) For a child placed on an emergency basis pursuant to Section 309, 361.45, or 727.05, the home environment assessment, the permanency assessment, and the written report shall be completed within 90 days of the placement, unless good cause exists based upon the needs of the child.
(B) If additional time is needed to complete the home environment assessment or the permanency assessment, the county shall document the extenuating circumstances for the delay and generate a timeframe for the completion of those assessments.
(C) The county shall report to the department, on a quarterly basis, the number of families with emergency placements whose home environment assessment or permanency assessment goes beyond 90 days and summarize the reasons for these delays.
(e) (1) A county may place a child with a resource family applicant who has successfully completed the home environment assessment prior to completion of a permanency assessment only if a compelling reason for the placement exists based on the needs of the child.
(A) The permanency assessment and the written report described in paragraph (5) of subdivision (g) shall be completed within 90 days of the child’s placement in the home, unless good cause exists.
(B) If additional time is needed to comply with subparagraph (A), the county shall document the extenuating circumstances for the delay and generate a timeframe for the completion of the permanency assessment.
(C) The county shall report to the department, on a quarterly basis, the number of applicants for whom the requirements of subparagraph (A) exceed 90 days and summarize the reasons for these delays.
(2) The home environment and permanency assessments, and the written report described in paragraph (5) of subdivision (g), shall be completed within 90 days of a child’s placement with a relative or nonrelative extended family member pursuant to Section 309, 361.45, or 727.05, unless good cause exists.
(3) For any placement made pursuant to this subdivision, AFDC-FC funding shall not be available until approval of the resource family has been completed.
(4) Any child placed pursuant to this subdivision shall be afforded all the rights set forth in Section 16001.9.
(5) This section shall not limit the county’s authority to inspect the home of a resource family applicant as often as necessary to ensure the quality of care provided.
(6) This subdivision does not limit the county’s obligation under law to assess and give placement consideration to relatives and nonrelative extended family members and to place a child pursuant to Section 309, 361.3, 361.45, 706.6, or 727.1.
(f) The State Department of Social Services shall be responsible for all of the following:
(1) (A) Until regulations are adopted, administering the program through the issuance of written directives that shall have the same force and effect as regulations. Any directive affecting Article 1 (commencing with Section 700) of Chapter 7 of Division 1 of Title 11 of the California Code of Regulations shall be approved by the Department of Justice. The directives shall be exempt from the rulemaking provisions of the Administrative Procedure Act (Chapter 3.5 (commencing with Section 11340)) of Part 1 of Division 3 of Title 2 of the Government Code.
(B) Adopting, amending, or repealing, in accordance with Chapter 4.5 (commencing with Section 11400) of Part 1 of Division 3 of Title 2 of the Government Code, any reasonable rules, regulations, and standards that may be necessary or proper to carry out the purposes and intent of this article and to enable the department to exercise the powers and perform the duties conferred upon it by this section, consistent with the laws of this state.
(2) Approving and requiring the use of a single standard for resource family approval.
(3) Adopting and requiring the use of standardized documentation for the home environment and permanency assessments of resource families. The department shall permit counties to maintain documentation relating to the resource family approval process in an electronic format.
(4) Adopting core competencies for county staff to participate in the assessment and evaluation of an applicant or resource family.
(5) Requiring counties to monitor county-approved resource families, including, but not limited to, both of the following:
(A) Investigating complaints regarding resource families.
(B) Developing and monitoring resource family corrective action plans to correct identified deficiencies and to rescind resource family approval if compliance with corrective action plans is not achieved.
(6) Ongoing oversight and monitoring of county systems and operations including all of the following:
(A) Reviewing the county’s implementation plan and implementation of the program.
(B) Reviewing an adequate number of county-approved resource families in each county to ensure that approval standards are being properly applied. The review shall include case file documentation and may include onsite inspection of individual resource families. The review shall occur on a biennial basis and more frequently if the department becomes aware that a county is experiencing a disproportionate number of complaints against individual resource family homes.
(C) Reviewing county reports of serious complaints and incidents involving resource families, as determined necessary by the department. The department may conduct an independent review of the complaint or incident and change the findings depending on the results of its investigation.
(D) Investigating unresolved complaints against counties.
(E) Requiring corrective action of counties that are not in full compliance with this section.
(7) Excluding a resource family parent, applicant, or other individual from presence in any resource family home, consistent with the established standard for any of the reasons specified in Section 16519.61.
(8) Implementing due process procedures, including, but not limited to, all of the following:
(A) Providing a statewide fair hearing process for application denials, rescissions of approval, exclusion actions, or criminal record exemption denials or rescissions by a county or the department.
(B) Providing an excluded individual with due process pursuant to Section 16519.6.
(C) Amending the department’s applicable state hearing procedures and regulations or using the Administrative Procedure Act, when applicable, as necessary for the administration of the program.
(g) Counties shall be responsible for all of the following:
(1) Submitting an implementation plan and consulting with the county probation department in the development of the implementation plan.
(2) Complying with the written directives or regulations adopted pursuant to this section.
(3) Implementing the requirements for resource family approval and utilizing standardized documentation established by the department. A county may maintain documentation relating to the resource family approval process in an electronic format.
(4) Training appropriate staff, including ensuring staff have the education and experience or core competencies necessary to participate in the assessment and evaluation of an applicant or resource family.
(5) (A) Taking the following actions, as applicable, for any of the reasons specified in Section 16519.61:
(i) (I) Approving or denying resource family applications, including preparing a written report that evaluates an applicant’s capacity to foster, adopt, and provide legal guardianship of a child based on all of the information gathered through the resource family application and assessment processes.
(II) The applicant’s preference to provide a specific level of permanency, including adoption, guardianship, or, in the case of a relative, placement with a fit and willing relative, shall not be a basis to deny an application.
(ii) Rescinding approvals of resource families.
(iii) When applicable, referring a case to the department for an action to exclude a resource family parent, applicant, or other individual from presence in any resource family home, consistent with the established standard.
(iv) Issuing a temporary suspension order that suspends the resource family approval prior to a hearing when, in the opinion of the county, urgent action is needed to protect a child from physical or mental abuse, abandonment, or any other substantial threat to health or safety. The county shall serve the resource family with the temporary suspension order and a copy of available discovery in the possession of the county, including, but not limited to, affidavits, declarations, names of witnesses, and other evidence upon which the county relied in issuing the temporary suspension order. The temporary suspension order shall be served upon the resource family with a notice of action, and if the matter is to be heard before the Office of Administrative Hearings, an accusation. The temporary suspension order shall list the effective date on the order.
(v) Granting, denying, or rescinding criminal record exemptions.
(B) Providing a resource family parent, applicant, or individual who is the subject of a criminal record exemption denial or rescission with due process pursuant to Section 16519.6.
(C) Notifying the department of any decisions denying an application for resource family approval, rescinding the approval of a resource family, or denying or rescinding a criminal record exemption and, if applicable, notifying the department of the results of an administrative action.
(6) (A) Updating resource family approval biennially and as necessary to address any changes that have occurred in the resource family’s circumstances, including, but not limited to, moving to a new home location or commencing operation of a family daycare home, as defined in Section 1596.78 of the Health and Safety Code.
(B) A county shall conduct an announced inspection of a resource family home during the biennial update, and as necessary to address any changes specified in subparagraph (A), in order to ensure that the resource family is conforming to all applicable laws and the written directives or regulations adopted pursuant to this section.
(7) Monitoring resource families through all of the following:
(A) Ensuring that social workers who identify a condition in the home that may not meet the approval standards set forth in subdivision (d) while in the course of a routine visit to children placed with a resource family take appropriate action as needed.
(B) Requiring resource families to meet the approval standards set forth in this section and to comply with the written directives or regulations adopted pursuant to this section, other applicable laws, and corrective action plans as necessary to correct identified deficiencies. If corrective action is not completed, as specified in the plan, the county may rescind the resource family approval.
(C) Requiring resource families to report to the county child welfare agency any incidents consistent with the reporting requirements for licensed foster family homes.
(D) Inspecting resource family homes as often as necessary to ensure the quality of care provided.
(8) (A) Investigating all complaints against a resource family and taking action as necessary, including, but not limited to, investigating any incidents reported about a resource family indicating that the approval standard is not being maintained and inspecting the resource family home.
(B) The child’s social worker shall not conduct the investigation into the complaint received concerning a family providing services pursuant to the standards required by subdivision (d). To the extent that adequate resources are available, complaints shall be investigated by a worker who did not conduct the home environment assessment or family evaluation or prepare the written report determining approval of the resource family.
(C) Upon conclusion of the complaint investigation, the final disposition shall be reviewed and approved by a supervising staff member.
(D) The department shall be notified of any serious incidents or serious complaints or any incident that falls within the definition of Section 11165.5 of the Penal Code. If those incidents or complaints result in an investigation, the department shall also be notified as to the status and disposition of that investigation.
(9) Performing corrective action as required by the department.
(10) Assessing county performance in related areas of the California Child and Family Services Review System, and remedying problems identified.
(11) Submitting information and data that the department determines is necessary to study, monitor, and prepare the update specified in paragraph (7) of subdivision (f).
(12) Ensuring resource family applicants and resource families have the necessary knowledge, skills, and abilities to support children in foster care by completing caregiver training. The training should include a curriculum that supports the role of a resource family in parenting vulnerable children and should be ongoing in order to provide resource families with information on trauma-informed practices and requirements and other topics within the foster care system.
(13) Ensuring that a resource family applicant completes a minimum of 12 hours of preapproval caregiver training. The training shall include, but not be limited to, all of the following courses:
(A) An overview of the child protective and probation systems.
(B) The effects of trauma, including grief and loss, and child abuse and neglect, on child development and behavior, and methods to behaviorally support children impacted by that trauma or child abuse and neglect.
(C) Positive discipline and the importance of self-esteem.
(D) Health issues in foster care.
(E) Accessing services and supports to address education needs, physical, mental, and behavioral health, and substance use disorders, including culturally relevant services.
(F) The rights of a child in foster care and the resource family’s responsibility to safeguard those rights, including the right to have fair and equal access to all available services, placement, care, treatment, and benefits, and to not be subjected to discrimination or harassment on the basis of actual or perceived race, ethnic group identification, ancestry, national origin, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, mental or physical disability, or HIV status.
(G) Cultural needs of children, including instruction on cultural competency and sensitivity, and related best practices for providing adequate care for children or youth across diverse ethnic and racial backgrounds, as well as children or youth identifying as lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender.
(H) Basic instruction on existing laws and procedures regarding the safety of foster youth at school.
(I) Permanence, well-being, and education needs of children.
(J) Child and adolescent development, including sexual orientation, gender identity, and expression.
(K) The role of resource families, including working cooperatively with the child welfare or probation agency, the child’s family, and other service providers implementing the case plan.
(L) The role of a resource family on the child and family team as defined in paragraph (4) of subdivision (a) of Section 16501.
(M) A resource family’s responsibility to act as a reasonable and prudent parent, as described in subdivision (c) of Section 1522.44 of the Health and Safety Code, and to provide a family setting that promotes normal childhood experiences and that serves the needs of the child.
(N) An overview of the specialized training identified in subdivision (h).
(O) The information described in subdivision (i) of Section 16521.5. The program may use the curriculum created pursuant to subdivision (h), and described in subdivision (i), of Section 16521.5.
(14) Ensuring resource families complete a minimum of eight hours of caregiver training annually, a portion of which shall be from subparagraph (M) of paragraph (13) and from one or more of the other topics listed in paragraph (13).
(h) In addition to any training required by this section, a county may require a resource family or applicant to receive relevant specialized training for the purpose of preparing the resource family to meet the needs of a particular child in care. This training may include, but is not limited to, the following:
(1) Understanding how to use best practices for providing care and supervision to commercially sexually exploited children.
(2) Understanding how to use best practices for providing care and supervision to lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender children.
(3) Understanding the requirements and best practices regarding psychotropic medications, including, but not limited to, court authorization, benefits, uses, side effects, interactions, assistance with self-administration, misuse, documentation, storage, and metabolic monitoring of children prescribed psychotropic medications.
(4) Understanding the federal Indian Child Welfare Act (25 U.S.C. Sec. 1901 et seq.), its historical significance, the rights of children covered by the act, and the best interests of Indian children, including the role of the caregiver in supporting culturally appropriate, child-centered practices that respect Native American history, culture, retention of tribal membership, and connection to the tribal community and traditions.
(5) Understanding how to use best practices for providing care and supervision to nonminor dependents.
(6) Understanding how to use best practices for providing care and supervision to children with special health care needs.
(7) Understanding the different permanency options and the services and benefits associated with the options.
(i) This section shall not preclude a county from requiring training in excess of the requirements in this section.
(j) (1) Resource families who move home locations shall retain their resource family status pending the outcome of the update conducted pursuant to paragraph (6) of subdivision (g).
(2) (A) If a resource family moves from one county to another county, the department, or the county to which a resource family has moved, shall submit a written request to the Department of Justice to transfer the individual’s subsequent arrest notification, as specified in subdivision (h) of Section 1522 of the Health and Safety Code.
(B) A request to transfer a subsequent arrest notification shall contain all prescribed data elements and format protocols pursuant to a written agreement between the department and the Department of Justice.
(3) Subject to the requirements in paragraph (1), the resource family shall continue to be approved for guardianship and adoption. This subdivision shall not limit a county, foster family agency, or adoption agency from determining that the family is not approved for guardianship or adoption based on changes in the family’s circumstances or family evaluation.
(k) Implementation of the program shall be contingent upon the continued availability of federal Social Security Act Title IV-E (42 U.S.C. Sec. 670) funds for costs associated with placement of children with resource families assessed and approved pursuant to the program.
(l) A child placed with a resource family is eligible for the resource family basic rate, pursuant to Sections 11460, 11461, 11461.3, and 11463, at the child’s assessed level of care.
(m) Sharing ratios for nonfederal expenditures for all costs associated with activities related to the approval of relatives and nonrelative extended family members shall be in accordance with Section 10101.
(n) The Department of Justice shall charge fees sufficient to cover the cost of initial or subsequent criminal offender record information and Child Abuse Central Index searches, processing, or responses, as specified in this section.
(o) Except as provided, resource families shall be exempt from both of the following:
(1) Licensure requirements established pursuant to the California Community Care Facilities Act (Chapter 3 (commencing with Section 1500) of Division 2 of the Health and Safety Code) and all regulations promulgated to implement the act.
(2) Relative and nonrelative extended family member approval requirements as those approval requirements existed prior to January 1, 2017.
(p) (1) Early implementation counties shall be authorized to continue through December 31, 2016. The program shall be implemented by each county on or before January 1, 2017.
 (2) (A) (i) On and after January 1, 2017, a county to which the department has delegated its licensing authority pursuant to Section 1511 of the Health and Safety Code shall approve resource families in lieu of licensing foster family homes.
(ii) Notwithstanding clause (i), the existing licensure and oversight processes shall continue to be administered for foster family homes licensed prior to January 1, 2017, or as specified in subparagraph (C), until the license is revoked or forfeited by operation of law pursuant to Section 1517.1 of the Health and Safety Code.
(B) (i) On and after January 1, 2017, a county shall approve resource families in lieu of approving relative and nonrelative extended family members.
(ii) Notwithstanding clause (i), the existing approval and oversight processes shall continue to be administered for relatives and nonrelative extended family members approved prior to January 1, 2017, or as specified in subparagraph (C), until the approval is revoked or forfeited by operation of law pursuant to this section.
(C) Notwithstanding subparagraph (D), a county shall approve or deny all applications for foster family home licenses and requests for relative or nonrelative extended family member approvals received on or before December 31, 2016, in accordance with Chapter 3 (commencing with Section 1500) of Division 2 of the Health and Safety Code or provisions providing for the approval of relatives or nonrelative extended family members, as applicable.
(D) On and after January 1, 2017, a county shall not accept applications for foster family home licenses or requests to approve relatives or nonrelative extended family members.
(3) No later than July 1, 2019, each county shall provide the following information to all licensed foster family homes and approved relatives and nonrelative extended family members licensed or approved by the county:
(A) A detailed description of the resource family approval program.
(B) Notification that, in order to care for a foster child, resource family approval is required by December 31, 2020.
(C) Notification that a foster family home license and an approval of a relative or nonrelative extended family member shall be forfeited by operation of law, as specified in paragraph (8).
(4) The following shall apply to all licensed foster family homes and approved relative and nonrelative extended family members:
(A) A licensed foster family home or an approved relative or nonrelative extended family member with an approved adoptive home study completed prior to January 1, 2018, shall be deemed to be a resource family.
(B) A licensed foster family home or an approved relative or nonrelative extended family member who had a child in placement at any time between January 1, 2017, and December 31, 2017, inclusive, may be approved as a resource family on the date of successful completion of a family evaluation.
(C) A licensed foster family home that provided county-authorized respite services at any time between January 1, 2017, and December 31, 2017, inclusive, may be approved as a resource family on the date of successful completion of a family evaluation.
(5) A county may provide supportive services to all licensed foster family homes, relatives, and nonrelative extended family members with a child in placement to assist with the resource family transition and to minimize placement disruptions.
(6) (A) In order to approve a licensed foster family home or approved relative or nonrelative extended family member as a resource family pursuant to paragraph (4), a county shall submit a written request to the Department of Justice to transfer any subsequent arrest and Child Abuse Central Index notifications, as specified in subdivision (h) of Section 1522 of the Health and Safety Code.
(B) A request to transfer a subsequent arrest notification shall contain all prescribed data elements and format protocols pursuant to a written agreement between the department and the Department of Justice.
(7) An individual who is a member of a resource family approved pursuant to subparagraph (B) or (C) of paragraph (4) shall be fingerprinted pursuant to Section 8712 of the Family Code upon filing an application for adoption.
(8) All foster family licenses and approvals of relatives and nonrelative extended family members shall be forfeited by operation of law on December 31, 2020, except as provided in this paragraph or Section 1524 of the Health and Safety Code:
(A) All licensed foster family homes that did not have a child in placement or did not provide county-authorized respite services at any time between January 1, 2017, and December 31, 2017, inclusive, shall forfeit the license by operation of law on January 1, 2018.
(B) For foster family home licensees and approved relatives or nonrelative extended family members who have a pending resource family application on December 31, 2020, the foster family home license or relative and nonrelative extended family member approval shall be forfeited by operation of law upon approval as a resource family. If approval is denied, forfeiture by operation of law shall occur on the date of completion of any proceedings required by law to ensure due process.
(C) A foster family home license shall be forfeited by operation of law, pursuant to Section 1517.1 of the Health and Safety Code, upon approval as a resource family.
(D) Approval as a relative or nonrelative extended family member shall be forfeited by operation of law upon approval as a resource family.
(q) On and after January 1, 2017, all licensed foster family agencies shall approve resource families in lieu of certifying foster homes, as set forth in Section 1517 of the Health and Safety Code.
(r) The department may establish participation conditions, and select and authorize foster family agencies that voluntarily submit implementation plans and revised plans of operation in accordance with requirements established by the department, to approve resource families in lieu of certifying foster homes.
(1) Notwithstanding any other law, a participating foster family agency shall require resource families to meet and maintain the resource family approval standards and requirements set forth in this chapter and in the written directives adopted consistent with the chapter prior to approval and in order to maintain approval.
(2) A participating foster family agency shall implement the resource family approval program pursuant to Section 1517 of the Health and Safety Code.
(3) This section does not limit the authority of the department to inspect, evaluate, or investigate a complaint or incident, or initiate a disciplinary action against a foster family agency pursuant to Article 5 (commencing with Section 1550) of Chapter 3 of Division 2 of the Health and Safety Code, or to take any action it may deem necessary for the health and safety of children placed with the foster family agency.
(4) The department may adjust the foster family agency AFDC-FC rate pursuant to Section 11463 for implementation of this subdivision.
(5) This subdivision is inoperative on January 1, 2017.
(s) The department or a county is authorized to obtain any arrest or conviction records or reports from any court or law enforcement agency as necessary to the performance of its duties, as provided in this section or subdivision (e) of Section 1522 of the Health and Safety Code.
(t) A resource family approved pursuant to this section shall forfeit its approval concurrent with resource family approval by a foster family agency.
(u) This section shall remain in effect only until January 1, 2021, and as of that date is repealed.

SEC. 76.

 Section 16519.5 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, as added by Section 2 of Chapter 810 of the Statutes of 2019, is amended to read:

16519.5.
 (a) The State Department of Social Services, in consultation with county child welfare agencies, foster parent associations, and other interested community parties, shall implement a unified, family friendly, and child-centered resource family approval process to replace the existing multiple processes for licensing foster family homes, certifying foster homes by licensed foster family agencies, approving relatives and nonrelative extended family members as foster care providers, and approving guardians and adoptive families.
(b) (1) Counties shall be selected to participate on a voluntary basis as early implementation counties for the purpose of participating in the initial development of the approval process. Early implementation counties shall be selected according to criteria developed by the department in consultation with the County Welfare Directors Association of California. In selecting the five early implementation counties, the department shall promote diversity among the participating counties in terms of size and geographic location.
(2) Additional counties may participate in the early implementation of the program upon authorization by the department.
(3) The State Department of Social Services shall be responsible for all of the following:
(A) Selecting early implementation counties, based on criteria established by the department in consultation with the County Welfare Directors Association of California.
(B) Establishing timeframes for participating counties to submit an implementation plan, enter into terms and conditions for early implementation participation in the program, train appropriate staff, and accept applications from resource families.
(C) Entering into terms and conditions for early implementation participation in the program by counties.
(4) Counties participating in the early implementation of the program shall be responsible for all of the following:
(A) Submitting an implementation plan.
(B) Entering into terms and conditions for early implementation participation in the program.
(C) Consulting with the county probation department in the development of the implementation plan.
(D) Training appropriate staff.
(E) Accepting applications from resource families within the timeframes established by the department.
(5) (A) Approved relatives and nonrelative extended family members, licensed foster family homes, or approved adoptive homes that have completed the license or approval process prior to statewide implementation of the program shall not be considered part of the program. The otherwise applicable assessment and oversight processes shall continue to be administered for families and facilities not included in the program.
(B) Upon implementation of the program in a county, that county shall not accept new applications for the licensure of foster family homes, the approval of relative and nonrelative extended family members, or the approval of prospective guardians and adoptive homes.
(6) The department may waive regulations that pose a barrier to the early implementation and operation of this program. The waiver of any regulations by the department pursuant to this section shall apply to only those counties or foster family agencies participating in the early implementation of the program and only for the duration of the program.
(7) This subdivision shall become inoperative on January 1, 2017.
(c) (1) For purposes of this article, “resource family” means an individual or family that has successfully met both the home environment assessment standards and the permanency assessment criteria adopted pursuant to subdivision (d) necessary for providing care for a child placed by a public or private child placement agency by court order, or voluntarily placed by a parent or legal guardian. A resource family shall demonstrate all of the following:
(A) An understanding of the safety, permanence, and well-being needs of children who have been victims of child abuse and neglect, and the capacity and willingness to meet those needs, including the need for protection, and the willingness to make use of support resources offered by the agency, or a support structure in place, or both.
(B) An understanding of children’s needs and development, effective parenting skills or knowledge about parenting, and the capacity to act as a reasonable, prudent parent in day-to-day decisionmaking.
(C) An understanding of the role of the individual or family as a resource family and the capacity to work cooperatively with the agency and other service providers in implementing the child’s case plan.
(D) The financial ability within the household to ensure the stability and financial security of the family. An applicant who will rely on the funding described in subdivision (l) to meet additional household expenses incurred due to the placement of a child shall not, for this reason, be denied approval as a resource family.
(E) An ability and willingness to provide a family setting that promotes normal childhood experiences that serves the needs of the child.
(2) For purposes of this article, and unless otherwise specified, references to a “child” shall include a “nonminor dependent” and “nonminor former dependent or ward,” as defined in subdivision (v) and paragraph (1) of subdivision (aa) of Section 11400.
(3) There is no fundamental right to approval as a resource family. Emergency placement of a child pursuant to Section 309, 361.45, or 727.05, or placement with a resource family applicant pursuant to subdivision (e), does not entitle an applicant approval as a resource family.
(4) (A) A resource family shall be considered eligible to provide foster care for children in out-of-home placement and approved for adoption and guardianship.
(B) (i) Notwithstanding subparagraph (A), a county may approve a resource family to care for a specific child, as specified in the written directives or regulations adopted pursuant to this section.
(ii) In the case of an Indian child for whom the child’s tribe is not exercising its right to approve a home, the county shall apply the prevailing social and cultural standards of the Indian community to resource family approval for that child, as required by subdivision (f) of Section 361.31 and the federal Indian Child Welfare Act of 1978 (25 U.S.C. Sec. 1901 et seq.). The department shall engage in the tribal consultation process and develop regulations to implement this clause. Notwithstanding the rulemaking provisions of the Administrative Procedure Act (Chapter 3.5 (commencing with Section 11340) of Part 1 of Division 3 of Title 2 of the Government Code), the department may implement this clause through all-county letters or other similar instruction, and provide guidance to counties regarding consistent implementation of this clause.
(5) For purposes of this article, “resource family approval” means that the applicant or resource family successfully meets the home environment assessment and permanency assessment standards. This approval is in lieu of a foster family home license issued pursuant to Chapter 3 (commencing with Section 1500) of Division 2 of the Health and Safety Code, a certificate of approval issued by a licensed foster family agency, as described in subdivision (b) of Section 1506 of the Health and Safety Code, relative or nonrelative extended family member approval, guardianship approval, and the adoption home study approval.
(6) Approval of a resource family does not guarantee an initial, continued, or adoptive placement of a child with a resource family or with a relative or nonrelative extended family member. Approval of a resource family does not guarantee the establishment of a legal guardianship of a child with a resource family.
(7) (A) Notwithstanding paragraphs (1) to (6), inclusive, the county shall, consistent with Sections 1520.3 and 1558.1 of the Health and Safety Code, cease any further review of an application if the applicant has had a previous application denial by the department or a county within the preceding year, or if the applicant has had a previous rescission, revocation, or exemption denial or exemption rescission by the department or a county within the preceding two years.
(B) Notwithstanding subparagraph (A), the county may continue to review an application if it has determined that the reasons for the previous denial, rescission, or revocation were due to circumstances and conditions that either have been corrected or are no longer in existence. If an individual was excluded from a resource family home or facility licensed by the department, the county shall cease review of the individual’s application unless the excluded individual has been reinstated pursuant to subdivision (g) of Section 16519.6 of this code or pursuant to Section 1569.53, subdivision (h) of Section 1558, subdivision (h) of Section 1569.58, or subdivision (h) of Section 1596.8897, of the Health and Safety Code.
(C) (i) The county may cease any further review of an application if, after written notice to the applicant, the applicant fails to complete an application without good faith effort and within 30 days of the date of the notice, as specified in the written directives or regulations adopted pursuant to this section.
(ii) Clause (i) does not apply if a child is placed with the applicant pursuant to Section 309, 361.45, 727.05, or paragraph (1) of subdivision (e) of Section 16519.5.
(D) The cessation of an application review pursuant to this paragraph shall not constitute a denial of the application for purposes of this section or any other law.
(E) For purposes of this section, the date of a previous denial, rescission, revocation, exemption denial or exemption rescission, or exclusion shall be either of the following:
(i) The effective date of a final decision or order upholding a notice of action or exclusion order.
(ii) The date on the notice of the decision to deny, rescind, revoke, or exclude if the notice was not appealed or otherwise constitutes a final decision.
(8) A resource family shall meet the approval standards set forth in this section, and, as applicable, Chapter 6.3 (commencing with Section 18360) of Part 6, to maintain approval. A resource family shall comply with the written directives or regulations adopted pursuant to this section and applicable laws in order to maintain approval.
(9) A resource family may be approved by a county child welfare department or a probation department pursuant to this section or by a foster family agency pursuant to Section 1517 of the Health and Safety Code.
(10) A resource family shall not be licensed to operate a residential facility, as defined in Section 1502 of the Health and Safety Code, a residential care facility for the elderly, as defined in Section 1569.2 of the Health and Safety Code, or a residential care facility for persons with chronic life-threatening illnesses, as defined in Section 1568.01 of the Health and Safety Code, on the same premises used as the residence of the resource family.
(11) (A) An applicant who withdraws an application prior to its approval or denial may resubmit the application within 12 months of the withdrawal.
(B) This paragraph does not preclude a county from requiring an applicant to complete an application activity, even if that activity was previously completed.
(d) (1) The department shall adopt standards pertaining to the home environment and permanency assessments of a resource family.
(2) Resource family home environment assessment standards shall include, but not be limited to, all of the following:
(A) (i) (I) A criminal record clearance of each applicant and all adults residing in, or regularly present in, the home, and not exempted from fingerprinting, as set forth in subdivision (b) of Section 1522 of the Health and Safety Code, pursuant to Section 8712 of the Family Code, utilizing a check of the Child Abuse Central Index pursuant to Section 1522.1 of the Health and Safety Code, and receipt of a fingerprint-based state and federal criminal offender record information search response. The criminal history information shall include subsequent notifications pursuant to Section 11105.2 of the Penal Code.
(II) Consideration of any substantiated allegations of child abuse or neglect against the applicant and any other adult residing in, or regularly present in, the home pursuant to Section 1522.1 of the Health and Safety Code.
(III) If the criminal records check indicates that the person has been convicted of an offense described in subparagraph (A) of paragraph (2) of subdivision (g) of Section 1522 of the Health and Safety Code, home approval shall be denied. If the criminal records check indicates that the person has been convicted of an offense described in subparagraph (B) or (C) of paragraph (2) of subdivision (g) of Section 1522 of the Health and Safety Code, the home shall not be approved unless a criminal records exemption has been granted pursuant to subclause (IV).
(IV) If the resource family parent, applicant, or any other person specified in subclause (I) has been convicted of a crime other than a minor traffic violation or arrested for an offense specified in subdivision (e) of Section 1522 of the Health and Safety Code, except for the civil penalty language, the criminal background check provisions specified in subdivisions (d) through (f) of Section 1522 of the Health and Safety Code shall apply. Exemptions from the criminal records clearance requirements set forth in this section may be granted by the department or the county, if that county has been granted permission by the department to issue criminal records exemptions pursuant to Section 361.4, using the exemption criteria currently used for foster care licensing, as specified in subdivision (g) of Section 1522 of the Health and Safety Code.
(V) If it is determined, on the basis of the fingerprint images and related information submitted to the Department of Justice, that subsequent to obtaining a criminal record clearance or exemption from disqualification, the person has been convicted of, or is awaiting trial for, a sex offense against a minor, or has been convicted for an offense specified in Section 243.4, 273a, 273ab, 273d, 273g, or 368 of the Penal Code, or a felony, the department or county shall notify the resource family to act immediately to remove or bar the person from entering the resource family’s home. The department or county, as applicable, may subsequently grant an exemption from disqualification pursuant to subdivision (g) of Section 1522 of the Health and Safety Code. If the conviction or arrest was for another crime, the resource family shall, upon notification by the department or county, act immediately to either remove or bar the person from entering the resource family’s home, or require the person to seek an exemption from disqualification pursuant to subdivision (g) of Section 1522 of the Health and Safety Code. The department or county, as applicable, shall determine if the person shall be allowed to remain in the home until a decision on the exemption from disqualification is rendered.
(ii) For public foster family agencies approving resource families, the criminal records clearance process set forth in clause (i) shall be utilized.
(iii) For private foster family agencies approving resource families, the criminal records clearance process set forth in clause (i) shall be utilized, but the Department of Justice shall disseminate a fitness determination resulting from the federal criminal offender record information search.
(B) A home and grounds evaluation to ensure the health and safety of children.
(C) In addition to the foregoing requirements, the resource family home environment assessment standards shall require the following:
(i) That the applicant demonstrates an understanding of the rights of children in care and the applicant’s responsibility to safeguard those rights.
(ii) That the total number of children residing in the home of a resource family shall be no more than the total number of children the resource family can properly care for, regardless of status, and shall not exceed six children, unless exceptional circumstances that are documented in the foster child’s case file exist to permit a resource family to care for more children, including, but not limited to, the need to place siblings together.
(iii) That the applicant understands the applicant’s responsibilities with respect to acting as a reasonable and prudent parent, and maintaining the least restrictive environment that serves the needs of the child.
(3) The resource family permanency assessment standards shall include, but not be limited to, all of the following:
(A) Caregiver training, as described in subdivisions (g) and (h).
(B) A family evaluation, which shall include, but not be limited to, interviews of an applicant to assess the applicant’s personal history, family dynamic, and need for support or resources, and a risk assessment.
(i) When the applicant is a relative or nonrelative extended family member to an identified child, the family evaluation shall consider the nature of the relationship between the relative or nonrelative extended family member and the child. The relative or nonrelative extended family member’s expressed desire to only care for a specific child or children shall not be a reason to deny the approval.
(ii) A caregiver risk assessment shall include, but not be limited to, physical and mental health, alcohol and other substance use and abuse, family and domestic violence, and the factors listed in paragraph (1) of subdivision (c).
(iii) A county may review and discuss data contained in the statewide child welfare database with an applicant for purposes of conducting a family evaluation, as specified in the written directives or regulations adopted pursuant to this section.
(C) Completion of any other activities that relate to the ability of an applicant or a resource family to achieve permanency with a child.
(4) (A) For a child placed on an emergency basis pursuant to Section 309, 361.45, or 727.05, the home environment assessment, the permanency assessment, and the written report shall be completed within 90 days of the placement, unless good cause exists based upon the needs of the child.
(B) If additional time is needed to complete the home environment assessment or the permanency assessment, the county shall document the extenuating circumstances for the delay and generate a timeframe for the completion of those assessments.
(C) The county shall report to the department, on a quarterly basis, the number of families with emergency placements whose home environment assessment or permanency assessment goes beyond 90 days and summarize the reasons for these delays.
(e) (1) A county may place a child with a resource family applicant who has successfully completed the home environment assessment prior to completion of a permanency assessment only if a compelling reason for the placement exists based on the needs of the child.
(A) The permanency assessment and the written report described in paragraph (5) of subdivision (g) shall be completed within 90 days of the child’s placement in the home, unless good cause exists.
(B) If additional time is needed to comply with subparagraph (A), the county shall document the extenuating circumstances for the delay and generate a timeframe for the completion of the permanency assessment.
(C) The county shall report to the department, on a quarterly basis, the number of applicants for whom the requirements of subparagraph (A) exceed 90 days and summarize the reasons for these delays.
(2) The home environment and permanency assessments, and the written report described in paragraph (5) of subdivision (g), shall be completed within 90 days of a child’s placement with a relative or nonrelative extended family member pursuant to Section 309, 361.45, or 727.05, unless good cause exists.
(3) For any placement made pursuant to this subdivision, AFDC-FC funding shall not be available until approval of the resource family has been completed.
(4) Any child placed pursuant to this subdivision shall be afforded all the rights set forth in Section 16001.9.
(5) This section shall not limit the county’s authority to inspect the home of a resource family applicant as often as necessary to ensure the quality of care provided.
(6) This subdivision does not limit the county’s obligation under law to assess and give placement consideration to relatives and nonrelative extended family members and to place a child pursuant to Section 309, 361.3, 361.45, 706.6, or 727.1.
(f) The State Department of Social Services shall be responsible for all of the following:
(1) (A) Until regulations are adopted, administering the program through the issuance of written directives that shall have the same force and effect as regulations. Any directive affecting Article 1 (commencing with Section 700) of Chapter 7 of Division 1 of Title 11 of the California Code of Regulations shall be approved by the Department of Justice. The directives shall be exempt from the rulemaking provisions of the Administrative Procedure Act (Chapter 3.5 (commencing with Section 11340)) of Part 1 of Division 3 of Title 2 of the Government Code.
(B) Adopting, amending, or repealing, in accordance with Chapter 4.5 (commencing with Section 11400) of Part 1 of Division 3 of Title 2 of the Government Code, any reasonable rules, regulations, and standards that may be necessary or proper to carry out the purposes and intent of this article and to enable the department to exercise the powers and perform the duties conferred upon it by this section, consistent with the laws of this state.
(2) Approving and requiring the use of a single standard for resource family approval.
(3) Adopting and requiring the use of standardized documentation for the home environment and permanency assessments of resource families. The department shall permit counties to maintain documentation relating to the resource family approval process in an electronic format.
(4) Adopting core competencies for county staff to participate in the assessment and evaluation of an applicant or resource family.
(5) Requiring counties to monitor county-approved resource families, including, but not limited to, both of the following:
(A) Investigating complaints regarding resource families.
(B) Developing and monitoring resource family corrective action plans to correct identified deficiencies and to rescind resource family approval if compliance with corrective action plans is not achieved.
(6) Ongoing oversight and monitoring of county systems and operations including all of the following:
(A) Reviewing the county’s implementation plan and implementation of the program.
(B) Reviewing an adequate number of county-approved resource families in each county to ensure that approval standards are being properly applied. The review shall include case file documentation and may include onsite inspection of individual resource families. The review shall occur on a biennial basis and more frequently if the department becomes aware that a county is experiencing a disproportionate number of complaints against individual resource family homes.
(C) Reviewing county reports of serious complaints and incidents involving resource families, as determined necessary by the department. The department may conduct an independent review of the complaint or incident and change the findings depending on the results of its investigation.
(D) Investigating unresolved complaints against counties.
(E) Requiring corrective action of counties that are not in full compliance with this section.
(7) Excluding a resource family parent, applicant, or other individual from presence in any resource family home, consistent with the established standard for any of the reasons specified in Section 16519.61.
(8) Implementing due process procedures, including, but not limited to, all of the following:
(A) Providing a statewide fair hearing process for application denials, rescissions of approval, exclusion actions, or criminal record exemption denials or rescissions by a county or the department.
(B) Providing an excluded individual with due process pursuant to Section 16519.6.
(C) Amending the department’s applicable state hearing procedures and regulations or using the Administrative Procedure Act, when applicable, as necessary for the administration of the program.
(g) Counties shall be responsible for all of the following:
(1) Submitting an implementation plan and consulting with the county probation department in the development of the implementation plan.
(2) Complying with the written directives or regulations adopted pursuant to this section.
(3) Implementing the requirements for resource family approval and utilizing standardized documentation established by the department. A county may maintain documentation relating to the resource family approval process in an electronic format.
(4) Training appropriate staff, including ensuring staff have the education and experience or core competencies necessary to participate in the assessment and evaluation of an applicant or resource family.
(5) (A) Taking the following actions, as applicable, for any of the reasons specified in Section 16519.61:
(i) (I) Approving or denying resource family applications, including preparing a written report that evaluates an applicant’s capacity to foster, adopt, and provide legal guardianship of a child based on all of the information gathered through the resource family application and assessment processes.
(II) The applicant’s preference to provide a specific level of permanency, including adoption, guardianship, or, in the case of a relative, placement with a fit and willing relative, shall not be a basis to deny an application.
(ii) Rescinding approvals of resource families.
(iii) When applicable, referring a case to the department for an action to exclude a resource family parent, applicant, or other individual from presence in any resource family home, consistent with the established standard.
(iv) Issuing a temporary suspension order that suspends the resource family approval prior to a hearing when, in the opinion of the county, urgent action is needed to protect a child from physical or mental abuse, abandonment, or any other substantial threat to health or safety. The county shall serve the resource family with the temporary suspension order and a copy of available discovery in the possession of the county, including, but not limited to, affidavits, declarations, names of witnesses, and other evidence upon which the county relied in issuing the temporary suspension order. The temporary suspension order shall be served upon the resource family with a notice of action, and if the matter is to be heard before the Office of Administrative Hearings, an accusation. The temporary suspension order shall list the effective date on the order.
(v) Granting, denying, or rescinding criminal record exemptions.
(B) Providing a resource family parent, applicant, or individual who is the subject of a criminal record exemption denial or rescission with due process pursuant to Section 16519.6.
(C) Notifying the department of any decisions denying an application for resource family approval, rescinding the approval of a resource family, or denying or rescinding a criminal record exemption and, if applicable, notifying the department of the results of an administrative action.
(6) (A) Updating resource family approval biennially and as necessary to address any changes that have occurred in the resource family’s circumstances, including, but not limited to, moving to a new home location or commencing operation of a family daycare home, as defined in Section 1596.78 of the Health and Safety Code.
(B) A county shall conduct an announced inspection of a resource family home during the biennial update, and as necessary to address any changes specified in subparagraph (A), in order to ensure that the resource family is conforming to all applicable laws and the written directives or regulations adopted pursuant to this section.
(7) Monitoring resource families through all of the following:
(A) Ensuring that social workers who identify a condition in the home that may not meet the approval standards set forth in subdivision (d) while in the course of a routine visit to children placed with a resource family take appropriate action as needed.
(B) Requiring resource families to meet the approval standards set forth in this section and to comply with the written directives or regulations adopted pursuant to this section, other applicable laws, and corrective action plans as necessary to correct identified deficiencies. If corrective action is not completed, as specified in the plan, the county may rescind the resource family approval.
(C) Requiring resource families to report to the county child welfare agency any incidents consistent with the reporting requirements for licensed foster family homes.
(D) Inspecting resource family homes as often as necessary to ensure the quality of care provided.
(8) (A) Investigating all complaints against a resource family and taking action as necessary, including, but not limited to, investigating any incidents reported about a resource family indicating that the approval standard is not being maintained and inspecting the resource family home.
(B) The child’s social worker shall not conduct the investigation into the complaint received concerning a family providing services pursuant to the standards required by subdivision (d). To the extent that adequate resources are available, complaints shall be investigated by a worker who did not conduct the home environment assessment or family evaluation or prepare the written report determining approval of the resource family.
(C) Upon conclusion of the complaint investigation, the final disposition shall be reviewed and approved by a supervising staff member.
(D) The department shall be notified of any serious incidents or serious complaints or any incident that falls within the definition of Section 11165.5 of the Penal Code. If those incidents or complaints result in an investigation, the department shall also be notified as to the status and disposition of that investigation.
(9) Performing corrective action as required by the department.
(10) Assessing county performance in related areas of the California Child and Family Services Review System, and remedying problems identified.
(11) Submitting information and data that the department determines is necessary to study, monitor, and prepare the update specified in paragraph (7) of subdivision (f).
(12) Ensuring resource family applicants and resource families have the necessary knowledge, skills, and abilities to support children in foster care by completing caregiver training. The training should include a curriculum that supports the role of a resource family in parenting vulnerable children and should be ongoing in order to provide resource families with information on trauma-informed practices and requirements and other topics within the foster care system.
(13) Ensuring that a resource family applicant completes a minimum of 12 hours of preapproval caregiver training. The training shall include, but not be limited to, all of the following courses:
(A) An overview of the child protective and probation systems.
(B) The effects of trauma, including grief and loss, and child abuse and neglect, on child development and behavior, and methods to behaviorally support children impacted by that trauma or child abuse and neglect.
(C) Positive discipline and the importance of self-esteem.
(D) Health issues in foster care.
(E) Accessing services and supports to address education needs, physical, mental, and behavioral health, and substance use disorders, including culturally relevant services.
(F) The rights of a child in foster care and the resource family’s responsibility to safeguard those rights, including the right to have fair and equal access to all available services, placement, care, treatment, and benefits, and to not be subjected to discrimination or harassment on the basis of actual or perceived race, ethnic group identification, ancestry, national origin, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, mental or physical disability, or HIV status.
(G) Cultural needs of children, including instruction on cultural competency and sensitivity, and related best practices for providing adequate care for children or youth across diverse ethnic and racial backgrounds, as well as children or youth identifying as lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender.
(H) Basic instruction on existing laws and procedures regarding the safety of foster youth at school.
(I) Permanence, well-being, and education needs of children.
(J) Child and adolescent development, including sexual orientation, gender identity, and expression.
(K) The role of resource families, including working cooperatively with the child welfare or probation agency, the child’s family, and other service providers implementing the case plan.
(L) The role of a resource family on the child and family team as defined in paragraph (4) of subdivision (a) of Section 16501.
(M) A resource family’s responsibility to act as a reasonable and prudent parent, as described in subdivision (c) of Section 1522.44 of the Health and Safety Code, and to provide a family setting that promotes normal childhood experiences and that serves the needs of the child.
(N) An overview of the specialized training identified in subdivision (h).
(O) The information described in subdivision (i) of Section 16521.5. The program may use the curriculum created pursuant to subdivision (h), and described in subdivision (i), of Section 16521.5.
(P) Information on providing care and supervision to children who have been commercially sexually exploited. For purposes of this subparagraph, “information” may include, but not be limited to, informational pamphlets addressing the identification of victims of commercial sexual exploitation and the provision of existing resources, such as crisis hotline numbers, survivor and caregiver supports, and contact information for law enforcement entities.
(14) Ensuring resource families complete a minimum of eight hours of caregiver training annually, a portion of which shall be from subparagraph (M) of paragraph (13) and from one or more of the other topics listed in paragraph (13).
(15) (A) Ensuring that resource families that care for children who are 10 years of age or older attend, within 12 months of approval as a resource family, a training on understanding how to use best practices for providing care and supervision to children who have been commercially sexually exploited. This training shall be survivor informed, culturally relevant and appropriate, and address issues relating to stigma. The training required by this subparagraph shall address all of the following topics:
(i) Recognizing indicators of commercial sexual exploitation.
(ii) Harm reduction.
(iii) Trauma-informed care.
(iv) Available county and state resources.
(v) Perspectives of individuals or families who have experiences with commercial sexual exploitation.
(B) The information provided in subparagraph (P) of paragraph (13) shall also be provided during the training described in this paragraph.
(C) After completing the training required by subparagraph (A), a resource family shall not be required to attend training relating to children who have been commercially sexually exploited, except as required pursuant to subdivision (h).
(D) Nothing in this section prevents an entity from providing the training specified in this paragraph in person, virtually, by recorded means, or by any other available means.
(h) In addition to any training required by this section, a county may require a resource family or applicant to receive relevant specialized training for the purpose of preparing the resource family to meet the needs of a particular child in care. This training may include, but is not limited to, the following:
(1) Understanding how to use best practices for providing care and supervision to commercially sexually exploited children.
(2) Understanding how to use best practices for providing care and supervision to lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender children.
(3) Understanding the requirements and best practices regarding psychotropic medications, including, but not limited to, court authorization, benefits, uses, side effects, interactions, assistance with self-administration, misuse, documentation, storage, and metabolic monitoring of children prescribed psychotropic medications.
(4) Understanding the federal Indian Child Welfare Act (25 U.S.C. Sec. 1901 et seq.), its historical significance, the rights of children covered by the act, and the best interests of Indian children, including the role of the caregiver in supporting culturally appropriate, child-centered practices that respect Native American history, culture, retention of tribal membership, and connection to the tribal community and traditions.
(5) Understanding how to use best practices for providing care and supervision to nonminor dependents.
(6) Understanding how to use best practices for providing care and supervision to children with special health care needs.
(7) Understanding the different permanency options and the services and benefits associated with the options.
(i) This section shall not preclude a county from requiring training in excess of the requirements in this section.
(j) (1) Resource families who move home locations shall retain their resource family status pending the outcome of the update conducted pursuant to paragraph (6) of subdivision (g).
(2) (A) If a resource family moves from one county to another county, the department, or the county to which a resource family has moved, shall submit a written request to the Department of Justice to transfer the individual’s subsequent arrest notification, as specified in subdivision (h) of Section 1522 of the Health and Safety Code.
(B) A request to transfer a subsequent arrest notification shall contain all prescribed data elements and format protocols pursuant to a written agreement between the department and the Department of Justice.
(3) Subject to the requirements in paragraph (1), the resource family shall continue to be approved for guardianship and adoption. This subdivision shall not limit a county, foster family agency, or adoption agency from determining that the family is not approved for guardianship or adoption based on changes in the family’s circumstances or family evaluation.
(k) Implementation of the program shall be contingent upon the continued availability of federal Social Security Act Title IV-E (42 U.S.C. Sec. 670) funds for costs associated with placement of children with resource families assessed and approved pursuant to the program.
(l) A child placed with a resource family is eligible for the resource family basic rate, pursuant to Sections 11460, 11461, 11461.3, and 11463, at the child’s assessed level of care.
(m) Sharing ratios for nonfederal expenditures for all costs associated with activities related to the approval of relatives and nonrelative extended family members shall be in accordance with Section 10101.
(n) The Department of Justice shall charge fees sufficient to cover the cost of initial or subsequent criminal offender record information and Child Abuse Central Index searches, processing, or responses, as specified in this section.
(o) Except as provided, resource families shall be exempt from both of the following:
(1) Licensure requirements established pursuant to the California Community Care Facilities Act (Chapter 3 (commencing with Section 1500) of Division 2 of the Health and Safety Code) and all regulations promulgated to implement the act.
(2) Relative and nonrelative extended family member approval requirements as those approval requirements existed prior to January 1, 2017.
(p) (1) Early implementation counties shall be authorized to continue through December 31, 2016. The program shall be implemented by each county on or before January 1, 2017.
 (2) (A) (i) On and after January 1, 2017, a county to which the department has delegated its licensing authority pursuant to Section 1511 of the Health and Safety Code shall approve resource families in lieu of licensing foster family homes.
(ii) Notwithstanding clause (i), the existing licensure and oversight processes shall continue to be administered for foster family homes licensed prior to January 1, 2017, or as specified in subparagraph (C), until the license is revoked or forfeited by operation of law pursuant to Section 1517.1 of the Health and Safety Code.
(B) (i) On and after January 1, 2017, a county shall approve resource families in lieu of approving relative and nonrelative extended family members.
(ii) Notwithstanding clause (i), the existing approval and oversight processes shall continue to be administered for relatives and nonrelative extended family members approved prior to January 1, 2017, or as specified in subparagraph (C), until the approval is revoked or forfeited by operation of law pursuant to this section.
(C) Notwithstanding subparagraph (D), a county shall approve or deny all applications for foster family home licenses and requests for relative or nonrelative extended family member approvals received on or before December 31, 2016, in accordance with Chapter 3 (commencing with Section 1500) of Division 2 of the Health and Safety Code or provisions providing for the approval of relatives or nonrelative extended family members, as applicable.
(D) On and after January 1, 2017, a county shall not accept applications for foster family home licenses or requests to approve relatives or nonrelative extended family members.
(3) No later than July 1, 2019, each county shall provide the following information to all licensed foster family homes and approved relatives and nonrelative extended family members licensed or approved by the county:
(A) A detailed description of the resource family approval program.
(B) Notification that, in order to care for a foster child, resource family approval is required by December 31, 2020.
(C) Notification that a foster family home license and an approval of a relative or nonrelative extended family member shall be forfeited by operation of law, as specified in paragraph (8).
(4) The following shall apply to all licensed foster family homes and approved relative and nonrelative extended family members:
(A) A licensed foster family home or an approved relative or nonrelative extended family member with an approved adoptive home study completed prior to January 1, 2018, shall be deemed to be a resource family.
(B) A licensed foster family home or an approved relative or nonrelative extended family member who had a child in placement at any time between January 1, 2017, and December 31, 2017, inclusive, may be approved as a resource family on the date of successful completion of a family evaluation.
(C) A licensed foster family home that provided county-authorized respite services at any time between January 1, 2017, and December 31, 2017, inclusive, may be approved as a resource family on the date of successful completion of a family evaluation.
(5) A county may provide supportive services to all licensed foster family homes, relatives, and nonrelative extended family members with a child in placement to assist with the resource family transition and to minimize placement disruptions.
(6) (A) In order to approve a licensed foster family home or approved relative or nonrelative extended family member as a resource family pursuant to paragraph (4), a county shall submit a written request to the Department of Justice to transfer any subsequent arrest and Child Abuse Central Index notifications, as specified in subdivision (h) of Section 1522 of the Health and Safety Code.
(B) A request to transfer a subsequent arrest notification shall contain all prescribed data elements and format protocols pursuant to a written agreement between the department and the Department of Justice.
(7) An individual who is a member of a resource family approved pursuant to subparagraph (B) or (C) of paragraph (4) shall be fingerprinted pursuant to Section 8712 of the Family Code upon filing an application for adoption.
(8) All foster family licenses and approvals of relatives and nonrelative extended family members shall be forfeited by operation of law on December 31, 2020, except as provided in this paragraph or Section 1524 of the Health and Safety Code:
(A) All licensed foster family homes that did not have a child in placement or did not provide county-authorized respite services at any time between January 1, 2017, and December 31, 2017, inclusive, shall forfeit the license by operation of law on January 1, 2018.
(B) For foster family home licensees and approved relatives or nonrelative extended family members who have a pending resource family application on December 31, 2020, the foster family home license or relative and nonrelative extended family member approval shall be forfeited by operation of law upon approval as a resource family. If approval is denied, forfeiture by operation of law shall occur on the date of completion of any proceedings required by law to ensure due process.
(C) A foster family home license shall be forfeited by operation of law, pursuant to Section 1517.1 of the Health and Safety Code, upon approval as a resource family.
(D) Approval as a relative or nonrelative extended family member shall be forfeited by operation of law upon approval as a resource family.
(q) On and after January 1, 2017, all licensed foster family agencies shall approve resource families in lieu of certifying foster homes, as set forth in Section 1517 of the Health and Safety Code.
(r) The department may establish participation conditions, and select and authorize foster family agencies that voluntarily submit implementation plans and revised plans of operation in accordance with requirements established by the department, to approve resource families in lieu of certifying foster homes.
(1) Notwithstanding any other law, a participating foster family agency shall require resource families to meet and maintain the resource family approval standards and requirements set forth in this chapter and in the written directives adopted consistent with the chapter prior to approval and in order to maintain approval.
(2) A participating foster family agency shall implement the resource family approval program pursuant to Section 1517 of the Health and Safety Code.
(3) This section does not limit the authority of the department to inspect, evaluate, or investigate a complaint or incident, or initiate a disciplinary action against a foster family agency pursuant to Article 5 (commencing with Section 1550) of Chapter 3 of Division 2 of the Health and Safety Code, or to take any action it may deem necessary for the health and safety of children placed with the foster family agency.
(4) The department may adjust the foster family agency AFDC-FC rate pursuant to Section 11463 for implementation of this subdivision.
(5) This subdivision is inoperative on January 1, 2017.
(s) The department or a county is authorized to obtain any arrest or conviction records or reports from any court or law enforcement agency as necessary to the performance of its duties, as provided in this section or subdivision (e) of Section 1522 of the Health and Safety Code.
(t) A resource family approved pursuant to this section shall forfeit its approval concurrent with resource family approval by a foster family agency.
(u) This section shall become operative on January 1, 2021.

SEC. 77.

 Section 16521.8 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

16521.8.
 (a) (1) A child welfare public health nursing early intervention program shall be conducted in the County of Los Angeles, as provided in this section, and with the county’s consent. The purpose of the program is to improve outcomes for the expanded population of youth at risk of entering the foster care system by maximizing access to health care and health education, and connecting youth and families to safety net services. It is the intent of the Legislature for the program to maximize the use of county public health nurses in the field in order to provide families with children who are at risk of being placed in the child welfare system with preventative services to meet their medical, mental, and behavioral health needs.
(2) The program shall be administered by the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health (DPH), in cooperation with the county’s Department of Children and Family Services (DCFS).
(3) Funding appropriated for purposes of the program shall be used for, but not limited to, the following:
(A) Hiring a sufficient number of new public health nurses, with the goal of achieving an average caseload ratio of 200:1.
(B) Hiring additional public health nursing supervisors to provide necessary guidance and support.
(C) Hiring senior and intermediate typist clerks to assist with data entry.
(D) Establishing an accountability mechanism and a shared information and data exchange system.
(b) A county public health nurse providing services under the program may do all of the following:
(1) Respond to emergency response referrals with social workers.
(2) Conduct emergency and routine home visits with social workers.
(3) Educate social workers on behavioral, mental and physical health conditions.
(4) Identify behavioral and health conditions that social workers are not trained to identify.
(5) Provide followup with families of youth who remain in the home to monitor compliance with the medical, dental, and mental health care plans to promote wellbeing and minimize repeat referrals.
(6) Conduct routine followups and monitoring of medically fragile and medically at-risk children and youth in the Family Maintenance and Reunification programs.
(7) Provide parents and guardians with educational tools and resources to ensure the child’s physical, mental, and behavioral health needs are being met.
(8) Interpret medical records and reports for social workers.
(c) (1) The DPH, in cooperation with the DCFS, shall develop appropriate outcome measures to determine the effectiveness of the program, including established triaging tools and visitation protocols, in achieving the objectives described in paragraph (1) of subdivision (a). Commencing on January 1 during the fiscal year when funding has been provided to the DPH by the State Department of Social Services, and each January 1 thereafter, the DPH shall report to the Legislature on the effectiveness of the program using those outcome measures, including any recommendations for continuation or expansion of the program.
(2) A report submitted under this subdivision shall be submitted in compliance with Section 9795 of the Government Code.
(d) (1) Before January 1, 2021, and to the extent enabled by existing resources or appropriated funds, the State Department of Health Care Services, in consultation with the County of Los Angeles, shall determine the steps required to seek any federal approvals necessary to claim federal financial participation for those allowable Medicaid activities of the program described in subdivision (a) and shall seek any federal approvals necessary to claim federal financial participation available for those identified Medicaid activities.
(2) The County of Los Angeles shall submit to the State Department of Health Care Services any information deemed relevant to the determination described in paragraph (1) at the time and in the form and manner specified by that department.
(3) With respect to any Medicaid activities identified pursuant to paragraph (1) for which federal approval is sought, those activities shall be implemented only to the extent that the State Department of Health Care Services obtains any necessary federal Medicaid approvals.
(4) Notwithstanding Chapter 3.5 (commencing with Section 11340) of Part 1 of Division 3 of Title 2 of the Government Code, the department may implement, interpret, or make specific this subdivision, in whole or in part, by means of provider bulletins, plan letters, or other similar instructions, without taking any further regulatory action.
(e) Contingent upon an appropriation in the annual Budget Act, the State Department of Social Services shall provide funds to the DPH for the purposes described in this section.
(f) Notwithstanding any other law, including the personal services contracting requirements of Article 4 (commencing with Section 19130) of Chapter 5 of Part 2 of Division 5 of Title 2 of the Government Code, Part 2 (commencing with Section 10100) of Division 2 of the Public Contract Code, and the State Contracting Manual, any state funds annually appropriated to the State Department of Social Services for the purposes described this section that are not used as the nonfederal share for Medicaid expenditures approved pursuant to subdivision (d) shall be passed through in a single lump-sum to the DPH.
(g) (1) The implementation of this section shall be suspended on December 31, 2021, unless paragraph (2) applies.
(2) If, in the determination of the Department of Finance, the estimates of General Fund revenues and expenditures determined pursuant to Section 12.5 of Article IV of the California Constitution that accompany the May Revision required to be released by May 14, 2021, pursuant to Section 13308 of the Government Code contain projected annual General Fund revenues that exceed projected annual General Fund expenditures in the 2021–22 and 2022–23 fiscal years by the sum total of General Fund moneys appropriated for all programs subject to suspension on December 31, 2021, pursuant to the Budget Act of and the bills providing for appropriations related to the Budget Act of 2019 within the meaning of subdivision (e) of Section 12 of Article IV of the California Constitution, then the implementation of this section shall not be suspended pursuant to paragraph (1).
(3) If paragraph (1) applies, it is the intent of the Legislature to consider alternative solutions to facilitate the continued implementation of the program created pursuant to this section.

SEC. 78.

 Section 16527 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

16527.
 (a) The department shall establish a statewide hotline as the entry point for the Family Urgent Response System, which shall be available 24 hours a day, seven days a week, to respond to calls from a caregiver or current or former foster child or youth during moments of instability. Both of the following shall be available through this hotline:
(1) Hotline workers who are trained in techniques for deescalation and conflict resolution telephone response specifically for children or youth impacted by trauma.
(2) Referrals to a county-based mobile response system, established pursuant to Section 16529, for further support and in-person response. Referrals shall occur as follows:
(A) A warm handoff whereby the hotline worker establishes direct and live connection through a three-way call that includes the caregiver, child or youth, and county contact. The caregiver, child, or youth may decline the three-way contact with the county contact if they feel their situation has been resolved at the time of the call.
(B) If a direct communication cannot be established pursuant to subparagraph (A), a referral directly to the community- or county-based service and a followup call to ensure that a connection to the caregiver, child, or youth occurs.
(C) The hotline worker shall contact the caregiver and the child or youth within 24 hours after the initial call required under subparagraph (A) or (B) to offer additional support, if needed.
(b) The statewide hotline shall maintain contact information for all county-based mobile response systems, based on information provided by counties, for referrals to local services, including, but not limited to, county-based mobile response and stabilization teams.
(c) The department shall ensure that deidentified, aggregated data are collected regarding individuals served through the statewide hotline and county-based mobile response systems and shall publish a report on the department’s internet website by January 1, 2022, and annually by January 1 thereafter, in consultation with stakeholders, including, but not limited to, the County Welfare Directors Association of California, the Chief Probation Officers of California, and the County Behavioral Health Directors Association of California. The data shall be collected using automated procedures or other matching methods mutually agreed upon by the state and county agencies, including, but not limited to, the statewide child welfare automation management system, and shall include all of the following information:
(1) The number of caregivers served through the hotline, separated by placement type and status as a current or former foster caregiver.
(2) The number of current and former foster children or youth served through the hotline, separated by county agency type, current or former foster care status, age, gender, race, and whether the call was made by the caregiver or the child or youth.
(3) The disposition of each call, including, but not limited to, whether mobile response and stabilization services were provided or a referral was made to other services.
(4) County-based outcome data, including, but not limited to, placement stability, return into foster care, movement from child welfare to juvenile justice, and timeliness to permanency.
(d) The department may meet the requirements of this section through contract with an entity with demonstrated experience in working with populations of children or youth who have suffered trauma and with capacity to provide a 24-hour-a-day, seven-day-a-week response that includes mediation, relationship preservation for the caregiver and the child or youth, and a family-centered and developmentally appropriate approach with the caregiver and the child or youth.
(e) The department, in consultation with stakeholders, including current and former foster youth and caregivers, shall do all of the following:
(1) Develop methods and materials for informing all caregivers and current or former foster children or youth about the statewide hotline, including a dissemination plan for those materials, which shall include, at a minimum, making those materials publicly available through the department’s internet website.
(2) Establish protocols for triage and response.
(3) Establish minimum education and training requirements for hotline workers.
(4) Consider expanding the statewide hotline to include communication through electronic means, including, but not limited to, text messaging or email.
(f) (1) The statewide hotline shall be operational no sooner than January 1, 2021, and on the same date as the county mobile response system created pursuant to this chapter.
(2) Notwithstanding paragraph (1), the statewide hotline may operate sooner than January 1, 2021, or prior to the date that each county has created a county mobile response system, upon notification from each county to the department that the county satisfies one of the following requirements:
(A) Has established a county mobile response system created pursuant to this chapter.
(B) Has an alternative method to accept and respond to referrals from the statewide hotline pending the establishment of the county mobile response system.
(g) The department shall assist, as needed, the State Department of Health Care Services in exercising its authority pursuant to subdivision (b) of Section 16528.

SEC. 79.

 Section 16529 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

16529.
 (a) County child welfare, probation, and behavioral health agencies, in each county or region of counties as specified in subdivision (e), shall establish a joint county-based mobile response system that includes a mobile response and stabilization team for the purpose of providing supportive services to address situations of instability, preserve the relationship of the caregiver and the child or youth, develop healthy conflict resolution and relationship skills, promote healing as a family, and stabilize the situation.
(b) In each county or region of counties, the county child welfare, probation, and behavioral health agencies, in consultation with other relevant county agencies, tribal representatives, caregivers, and current or former foster children or youth, shall submit a single, coordinated plan to the department that describes how the county-based mobile response system shall meet the requirements described in subdivision (c). The plan shall also describe all of the following:
(1) How the county, or region of counties, will track and monitor calls.
(2) Data collection efforts, consistent with guidance provided by the department, including, at a minimum, collection of data necessary for the report required pursuant to subdivision (c) of Section 16527.
(3) Transitions from mobile response and stabilization services to ongoing services.
(4) A process for identifying if the child or youth has an existing child and family team for coordinating with the child and family team to address the instability, and a plan for ongoing care to support that relationship in a trusting and healing environment.
(5) A process and criteria for determining response.
(6) The composition of the responders, including efforts to include peer partners and those with lived experience in the response team, whenever possible.
(7) Both existing and new services that will be used to support the mobile response and stabilization services. County behavioral health departments that operate mobile crisis units may share resources between mobile crisis units and the mobile response system required pursuant to this chapter, at their discretion.
(8) Response protocols for the child or youth in family-based and congregate care settings based on guidelines developed by the department, in consultation with stakeholders, pursuant to Section 16528. The response protocols shall ensure protections for children and youth to prevent placements into congregate care settings, psychiatric institutions, and hospital settings.
(9) A process for identifying whether the child or youth has an existing behavioral health treatment plan and a placement preservation strategy, as described in Section 16010.7, and for coordinating response and services consistent with the plan and strategy.
(10) A plan for the mobile response and stabilization team to provide supportive services in the least intrusive and most child, youth, and family friendly manner, such that mobile response and stabilization teams do not trigger further trauma to the child or youth.
(c) A county-based mobile response system shall include all of the following:
(1) Phone response at the county level that facilitates entry of the caregivers and current or former foster children or youth into mobile response services.
(2) A process for determining when a mobile response and stabilization team will be sent, or when other services will be used, based on the urgent and critical needs of the caregiver, child, or youth.
(3) A mobile response and stabilization team available 24 hours a day, seven days a week.
(4) Ability to provide immediate, in-person, face-to-face response preferably within one hour, but not to exceed 3 hours in extenuating circumstances for urgent needs, or same-day response within 24 hours for nonurgent situations.
(5) Utilization of individuals with specialized training in trauma of children or youth and the foster care system on the mobile response and stabilization team. Efforts should be made to include peer partners and those with lived experience in the response team, whenever possible.
(6) Provision of in-home deescalation, stabilization, and support services and supports, including all of the following:
(A) Establishing in-person, face-to-face contact with the child or youth and caregiver.
(B) Identifying the underlying causes of, and precursors to, the situation that led to the instability.
(C) Identifying the caregiver interventions attempted.
(D) Observing the child and caregiver interaction.
(E) Diffusing the immediate situation.
(F) Coaching and working with the caregiver and the child or youth in order to preserve the family unit and maintain the current living situation or create a healthy transition plan, if necessary.
(G) Establishing connections to other county- or community-based supports and services to ensure continuity of care, including, but not limited to, linkage to additional trauma-informed and culturally and linguistically responsive family supportive services and youth and family wellness resources.
(H) Following up after the initial face-to-face response, for up to 72 hours, to determine if additional supports or services are needed.
(I) Identifying any additional support or ongoing stabilization needs for the family and making a plan for, or referral to, appropriate youth and family supportive services within the county.
(7) A process for communicating with the county of jurisdiction and the county behavioral health agency regarding the service needs of the child or youth and caregiver provided that the child or youth is currently under the jurisdiction of either the county child welfare or the probation system.
(d) County-based mobile response systems may be temporarily adapted to address circumstances associated with COVID-19, consistent with the Governor’s Proclamation of a State of Emergency, issued on March 4, 2020.
(e) (1) Each county shall establish a mobile response system no sooner than January 1, 2021, and on the same date as the statewide hotline created under this chapter.
(2) Notwithstanding paragraph (1), a county may establish a mobile response system, or an alternative method to accept and respond to referrals from the statewide hotline, pending the establishment of the county mobile response system, prior to January 1, 2021, in order to facilitate the early operation of the statewide hotline.
(3) The county agencies described in subdivisions (a) and (b) may implement this section on a per-county basis or by collaborating with other counties to establish regional, cross-county mobile response systems. For counties implementing this section pursuant to a regional approach, a single plan, as described in subdivision (b), signed by all agency representatives, shall be submitted to the department and a lead county shall be identified.
(4) Funds expended pursuant to this act shall be used to supplement, and not supplant, other existing funding for mobile response services described in this chapter.
(5) A county or region of counties may receive an extension, not to exceed six months, to implement a mobile response system after January 1, 2021, upon submission of a written request, in a manner to be prescribed by the department, that includes a demonstration of actions to implement, progress towards implementation, and the county’s alternative method to accept and respond to referrals from the statewide hotline pending the establishment of the county mobile response system.
(f) The creation and implementation of the Family Urgent Response System shall not infringe on entitlements or services provided pursuant to Title IV-E of the federal Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. Sec. 670 et seq.) or the federal Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnosis and Treatment services (42 U.S.C. Sec. 1396d(r)).
(g) The department, in collaboration with the County Welfare Directors Association of California, the County Behavioral Health Directors Association of California, and the Chief Probation Officers of California, on an annual basis beginning on January 1, 2022, shall assess utilization and workload associated with implementation of the statewide hotline and mobile response and provide an update to the Legislature during budget hearings.

SEC. 80.

 Section 16530 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

16530.
 (a) This chapter shall be inoperative in any fiscal year for which funding is not appropriated in the annual Budget Act for the purpose of complying with the requirements of Sections 16527 and 16529.
(b) (1) The implementation of the program required by this chapter shall be suspended on December 31, 2021, unless paragraph (2) applies.
(2) If, in the determination of the Department of Finance, the estimates of General Fund revenues and expenditures determined pursuant to Section 12.5 of Article IV of the California Constitution that accompany the May Revision required to be released by May 14, 2021, pursuant to Section 13308 of the Government Code, contain projected annual General Fund revenues that exceed projected annual General Fund expenditures in the 2021–22 and 2022–23 fiscal years by the sum total of General Fund moneys appropriated for all programs subject to suspension on December 31, 2021, pursuant to the Budget Act of 2019 and the bills providing for appropriations related to the Budget Act of 2019 within the meaning of subdivision (e) of Section 12 of Article IV of the California Constitution, then the implementation of this chapter shall not be suspended pursuant to paragraph (1).
(3) If paragraph (1) applies, it is the intent of the Legislature to consider alternative solutions to facilitate the continued implementation of the program created pursuant to this chapter.

SEC. 81.

 Section 17021 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

17021.
 (a) Any individual who is not eligible for aid under Chapter 2 (commencing with Section 11200) of Part 3 as a result of the 48-month limitation specified in subdivision (a) of Section 11454 shall not be eligible for aid or assistance under this part until all of the children of the individual on whose behalf aid was received, whether or not currently living in the home with the individual, are 18 years of age or older.
(b) Any individual who is receiving aid under Chapter 2 (commencing with Section 11200) of Part 3 on behalf of an eligible child, but who is either ineligible for aid or whose needs are not otherwise taken into account in determining the amount of aid to the family pursuant to Section 11450 due to the imposition of a sanction or penalty, shall not be eligible for aid or assistance under this part.
(c) This section shall not apply to health care benefits provided under this part.
(d) This section shall become inoperative on May 1, 2022, or when the department notifies the Legislature that the Statewide Automated Welfare System can perform the necessary automation to implement Section 17021, as added by the act that added this subdivision, whichever date is later, and, as of January 1 of the following year, is repealed.

SEC. 82.

 Section 17021 is added to the Welfare and Institutions Code, to read:

17021.
 (a) Any individual who is not eligible for aid under Chapter 2 (commencing with Section 11200) of Part 3 as a result of the 60-month limitation specified in subdivision (a) of Section 11454 shall not be eligible for aid or assistance under this part until all of the children of the individual on whose behalf aid was received, whether or not currently living in the home with the individual, are 18 years of age or older.
(b) Any individual who is receiving aid under Chapter 2 (commencing with Section 11200) of Part 3 on behalf of an eligible child, but who is either ineligible for aid or whose needs are not otherwise taken into account in determining the amount of aid to the family pursuant to Section 11450 due to the imposition of a sanction or penalty, shall not be eligible for aid or assistance under this part.
(c) This section shall not apply to health care benefits provided under this part.
(d) This section shall become operative on May 1, 2022, or when the department notifies the Legislature that the Statewide Automated Welfare System can perform the necessary automation to implement this section, whichever date is later.

SEC. 83.

 Section 18900.8 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

18900.8.
 The State Department of Social Services shall work with representatives of county human services agencies and the County Welfare Directors Association of California to update the budgeting methodology used to determine the annual funding for county administration of the CalFresh Program beginning with the 2021–22 fiscal year. As part of the process of updating the budgeting methodology, the ongoing workload and costs to counties of expanding CalFresh to recipients of Supplemental Security Income and State Supplementary Payment Program benefits shall be examined and legislative staff, advocates, and organizations that represent county workers shall be consulted.

SEC. 84.

 Section 18901 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

18901.
 (a) The eligibility of households shall be determined to the extent permitted by federal law.
(b) In determining eligibility for CalFresh, minimum age requirements other than those that exist under federal law shall not be imposed.
(c) The department shall establish verification policies and procedures for CalFresh applicants and beneficiaries in the event that necessary verification is not provided by the applicant or beneficiary to accompany the application, semiannual report, annual recertification, or any other form or submission that requests verification be provided at the time of submission. These policies and procedures, to the extent permitted by federal law, regulation, guidance, or a waiver thereof, shall require counties to first seek verification from available electronic sources or self-attestation before requesting documentary evidence from the applicant or beneficiary to complete required verification or pursuing secondary evidence to verify the necessary information. Notwithstanding the rulemaking provisions of the Administrative Procedure Act (Chapter 3.5 (commencing with Section 11340) of Part 1 of Division 3 of Title 2 of the Government Code), the department shall issue an all-county letter or similar instructions no later than January 1, 2021.

SEC. 85.

 Section 18901.1 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

18901.1.
 (a) The department shall issue guidance to counties that does all of the following:
(1) Simplifies the verification of dependent care expense deductions necessary to determine a household’s eligibility for, or the benefit level of, CalFresh.
(2) Establishes that dependent care expenses shall be considered verified upon receipt of a self-certified statement of monthly dependent care expenses, unless federal law or guidance requires additional documentation.
(3) Prohibits a county human services agency from requesting additional documents to verify dependent care expenses, except when the reported dependent care expenses are questionable as defined in state regulations.
(b) Notwithstanding the rulemaking provisions of the Administrative Procedure Act (Chapter 3.5 (commencing with Section 11340) of Part 1 of Division 3 of Title 2 of the Government Code), until regulations are adopted, the department may implement this section through all-county letters or similar instructions. The department shall adopt regulations implementing this section.

SEC. 86.

 Section 18901.10 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

18901.10.
 To the extent permitted by federal law, and subject to the limitation in subdivision (d), each county welfare department shall, if appropriate, exempt a household from complying with face-to-face interview requirements for purposes of determining eligibility at initial application and recertification, according to the following:
(a) The county welfare department shall screen each household’s need for exemption status at application and recertification.
(b) A person eligible for an exemption under this section may request a face-to-face interview to establish initial eligibility or to comply with recertification requirements.
(c) (1) No later than July 1, 2021, for purposes of interview scheduling and rescheduling at initial application and recertification, county welfare departments shall implement one or more of the following interview scheduling techniques in addition to providing written notice, to the extent they are not currently in use: time-block, telephonic contact in conjunction with, or prior to, the provision of written communication about the need to schedule an interview, and same-day interviews.
(2) The department, in consultation with the counties and client advocates, may authorize additional scheduling techniques to fulfill the requirement described in paragraph (1).
(d) This section does not limit a county’s ability to require an applicant or recipient to make a personal appearance at a county welfare department office if the applicant or recipient no longer qualifies for an exemption or for other good cause.

SEC. 87.

 Section 18901.25 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

18901.25.
 (a) There is hereby created the Safe Drinking Water Supplemental Benefit Pilot Program, a state-funded program to provide additional CalFresh nutrition benefits for interim assistance to purchase safe drinking water in areas where it is necessary.
(b) The State Department of Social Services shall use moneys allocated for this program to provide time-limited additional state-funded nutrition benefits to residents of prioritized disadvantaged communities that are served by public water systems that consistently fail to meet primary drinking water standards, as defined in Section 116275 of the Health and Safety Code. Benefits shall be in addition to benefits provided for pursuant to Article 6 (commencing with Section 11450) of Chapter 2 of Part 3, and shall not be considered as income for any program established in this code.
(c) The department may use its own existing databases and databases from the State Water Resources Control Board to determine which CalFresh households are eligible to receive benefits pursuant to this section. The following households shall receive priority:
(1) CalFresh recipients served by persistently noncompliant public water systems in disadvantaged communities, as defined in Section 79505.5 of the Water Code, as determined by the location of the recipient’s residence.
(2) CalFresh recipients in communities deemed eligible for interim emergency drinking water benefits by the State Water Resources Control Board, as determined by the recipient’s residence.
(d) Benefits granted pursuant to this section shall be delivered through the electronic benefits transfer (EBT) system created pursuant to Sections 10072 and 10072.2.
(e) The benefits authorized pursuant to this section are not entitlement benefits. A county shall comply with this section only to the extent funding for this purpose is appropriated in the annual Budget Act and available to the county. A county shall not be required to expend county funds for the provision of benefits authorized under this section.
(f)  This section shall become inoperative on July 1, 2024, and, as of January 1, 2025, is repealed.

SEC. 88.

 Section 18906.55 is added to the Welfare and Institutions Code, to read:

18906.55.
 (a) (1) Notwithstanding Section 18906.5 or any other law, in order to provide fiscal relief for the substantial fiscal pressures on counties created by the unprecedented and unanticipated CalFresh caseload growth and 1991 Realignment revenue declines resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic, for the 2020–21 and 2021–22 fiscal years, the amount of a county’s share of the nonfederal costs for administration of CalFresh is capped at the amount the county was required to contribute to receive its full allocation of state General Fund moneys under the Budget Act of 2019 (Chapter 23, Statutes of 2019).
(2) Once a county has reached the nonfederal share of costs specified in paragraph (1), the county shall receive the full General Fund allocation for administration of CalFresh for that fiscal year.
(b) The full General Fund allocation for administration of CalFresh for the 2020–21 and 2021–22 fiscal years, pursuant to subdivision (a), shall equal 35 percent of the total federal and nonfederal projected funding need for administration of CalFresh.
(c) Relief to the county share of administrative costs authorized by this section shall not result in any increased cost to the General Fund as determined in subdivision (b).
(d) Subdivision (a) does not prevent a county from expending funds in excess of the amount specified in subdivision (a).
(e) This section shall become inoperative on July 1, 2022, and, as of January 1, 2023, is repealed, unless a later enacted statute, that becomes operative on or before January 1, 2023, deletes or extends the dates on which it becomes inoperative and is repealed.

SEC. 89.

 Section 18910.2 is added to the Welfare and Institutions Code, to read:

18910.2.
 (a) The department shall convene a workgroup that includes, but is not limited to, the County Welfare Directors Association of California, representatives of county eligibility workers, the Statewide Automated Welfare System, and client advocates to consider changes to semiannual reporting with the goal of reducing the reporting burden on recipients and reducing the workload for county eligibility staff.
(b) The workgroup shall consider federally allowable reporting structures implemented in other states, consider recommendations in existing research reports, and receive and consider options put forth by workgroup members.
(c) (1) The consensus recommendations of the workgroup shall be submitted to the Legislature not later than October 1, 2021, and shall include details regarding potential implementation of these recommendations, including identification of those that the state may implement via state legislation or administrative guidance to counties, as well as those requiring changes in federal law or waivers of federal law. The report may also include ideas that were not consensus items with an opportunity for participating workgroup members to comment on those items.
(2) (A) The requirement for submitting a report imposed under paragraph (1) is inoperative on October 1, 2025, pursuant to Section 10231.5 of the Government Code.
(B) A report to be submitted pursuant to paragraph (1) shall be submitted in compliance with Section 9795 of the Government Code.

SEC. 90.

 Section 18918.1 is added to the Welfare and Institutions Code, to read:

18918.1.
 (a) In an effort to expand CalFresh program outreach and retention and improve dual enrollment between the CalFresh and Medi-Cal programs, county welfare departments shall, no later than January 1, 2022, do all of the following:
(1) Ensure that Medi-Cal applicants applying in-person, online, or by telephone, and who also may be eligible for CalFresh, are screened and given the opportunity to apply at the same time they are applying for Medi-Cal or submitting information for the renewal process.
(2) Ensure the same staff that receive Medi-Cal and CalFresh applications pursuant to paragraph (1) during the Medi-Cal application, renewal, or application and renewal processes conduct the eligibility determination functions needed to determine eligibility or ineligibility to CalFresh.
(3) Designate one or more county liaisons to establish CalFresh application referral and communication procedures on outreach activities between counties and community-based organizations facilitating Medi-Cal enrollment.
(b) Upon certification to the Legislature that the California Statewide Automated Welfare System (CalSAWS) can perform the necessary automation to implement this section, counties shall provide prepopulated CalFresh applications to Medi-Cal beneficiaries who are apparently CalFresh eligible and not dually enrolled during the Medi-Cal renewal process.

SEC. 91.

 Section 18927 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

18927.
 (a) Current and future CalFresh benefits shall be reduced in accordance with subdivisions (c) and (d) to recover an overissuance caused by intentional program violation, as defined in subdivision (c) of Section 273.16 of Title 7 of the Code of Federal Regulations, fraud, or inadvertent household error.
(b) Current and future CalFresh benefits shall be reduced in accordance with subdivisions (c) and (d) to recover an overissuance caused by administrative error if required by federal law or if the overissuance exceeds one hundred twenty-five dollars ($125), or a higher amount that is approved by the United States Department of Agriculture. Any higher amount shall be implemented when the department notifies the Legislature that the Statewide Automated Welfare System can perform the necessary automation to implement this provision.
(c) A household’s CalFresh benefits shall not be reduced to recover an overissuance as required or authorized by subdivision (a) or (b) unless the household receives adequate and timely notice of the overissuance, including, but not limited to, the budget worksheet that includes the amount and calculation of the overissuance and the reason for the overissuance.
(d) (1) In recovering an overissuance caused by administrative error, a recipient household’s monthly CalFresh benefits shall not be reduced by more than 5 percent of the household’s monthly CalFresh benefits or ten dollars ($10), whichever is greater, unless the recipient elects for the benefits to be reduced at a higher rate.
(2) In recovering an overissuance caused by inadvertent household error, a recipient household’s monthly CalFresh benefits shall not be reduced by more than 10 percent of the household’s monthly CalFresh benefits or ten dollars ($10), whichever is greater.
(3) In recovering an overissuance caused by intentional program violation, as defined in subdivision (c) of Section 273.16 of Title 7 of the Code of Federal Regulations, or fraud, a recipient household’s monthly CalFresh benefits shall be reduced by 20 percent of the household’s monthly CalFresh benefit or twenty dollars ($20), whichever is greater.
(e) If a household is no longer receiving CalFresh benefits, a CalFresh overissuance caused by administrative error or inadvertent household error shall not be established, and collection shall not be attempted, if the overissuance is less than four hundred dollars ($400), or a higher amount that is approved by the United States Department of Agriculture. Any higher amount shall be implemented when the department notifies the Legislature that the Statewide Automated Welfare System can perform the necessary automation to implement this provision.
(f) (1) No later than January 1, 2021, the department shall develop a policy for compromising administrative error claims, in whole or in part, for households that include at least one elderly or disabled member, including, but not limited to, recipients of Supplemental Security Income benefits.
(2) The department will implement the policy specified in paragraph (1) on December 31, 2023, or when implementation of the single Statewide Automated Welfare System automation is confirmed, whichever is later.
(g) If a household is no longer receiving CalFresh benefits, collection shall be attempted if the overissuance is caused by inadvertent household error and the overissuance is equal to or greater than the amount established for overissuances caused by administrative error, as specified in subdivision (e). All overissuances caused by intentional program violation, as defined in subdivision (c) of Section 273.16 of Title 7 of the Code of Federal Regulations, or fraud shall be collected as required by federal law.
(h) When an overissuance collection is attempted, reasonable cost-effective methods of collection shall be implemented. The department shall define reasonable cost-effective collection methods, which shall include adequate and timely notice of the overissuance, including, but not limited to, all of the following:
(1) The amount and calculation of, and reason for, the overissuance.
(2) A statement of the monetary threshold described in this subdivision.
(3) Information about how to appeal the overissuance.
(4) Instructions for timely commencement of repayment.
(5) Consequences of delinquent payment.
(i) Nothing in this section shall prevent a county from writing off or terminating an overissuance claim when it meets the provisions of paragraph (8) of subdivision (e) of Section 273.18 of Title 7 of the Code of Federal Regulations, or as otherwise authorized by the United States Department of Agriculture or federal law.
(j) Nothing in this section shall prevent a county or the state from collecting all overissuances that are identified during a quality control review, as required by Section 275.12 of Title 7 of the Code of Federal Regulations.
(k) Notwithstanding the rulemaking provisions of the Administrative Procedure Act (Chapter 3.5 (commencing with Section 11340) of Part 1 of Division 3 of Title 2 of the Government Code), the department may implement this section through all-county letters or similar instructions from the director no later than January 1, 2014, to allow for automation updates required by this section to be made in coordination with other scheduled updates.

SEC. 92.

 (a) (1) The sum of seventeen million five hundred thousand dollars ($17,500,000) of the funding appropriated from the General Fund to the California Department of Aging for the Senior Nutrition Program, as authorized in Schedule (1) of Item 4170-101-0001 of Section 2.00 of the Budget Act of 2020, shall be suspended on December 31, 2021, unless the conditions specified in paragraph (2) are met.
(2) If, in the determination of the Department of Finance, the estimates of General Fund revenues and expenditures determined pursuant to Section 12.5 of Article IV of the California Constitution that accompany the May Revision required to be released by May 14, 2021, pursuant to Section 13308 of the Government Code, contain projected annual General Fund revenues that exceed projected annual General Fund expenditures in the 2021–22 and 2022–23 fiscal years by the sum total of General Fund moneys appropriated for all programs subject to suspension on December 31, 2021, pursuant to the Budget Act of 2020 and the bills providing for appropriations related to the Budget Act of 2020 within the meaning of subdivision (e) of Section 12 of Article IV of the California Constitution, then the suspension of this section shall continue beyond December 31, 2021.
(b) It is the intent of the Legislature to consider alternative solutions to facilitate the continued implementation of this section if paragraph (2) of subdivision (a) does not apply.

SEC. 93.

 (a) (1) The funding appropriated from the General Fund to the State Department of Social Services for the Emergency Child Care Bridge Program, as authorized in paragraph (1) of subdivision (a) of Provision 11 of Schedule (1) of Item 5180-101-0001 of Section 2.00 of the Budget Act of 2020, shall be suspended on December 31, 2021, unless the conditions specified in paragraph (2) apply.
(2) The suspension shall not take effect if the estimated General Fund revenues and expenditures for the 2021–22 and 2022–23 fiscal years, as determined pursuant to Section 12.5 of Article IV of the California Constitution that accompany the May Revision required to be released by May 14, 2021, pursuant to Section 13308 of the Government Code, contain projected annual General Fund revenues that exceed projected annual General Fund expenditures in the 2021–22 and 2022–23 fiscal years by an amount equal to or greater than the sum of the total of General Fund appropriations for all programs subject to suspension on December 31, 2021, pursuant to the Budget Act of 2020 and the bills providing for appropriations related to the Budget Act of 2020.
(b) It is the intent of the Legislature to consider alternative solutions to restore this program if the suspension takes effect.

SEC. 94.

 Notwithstanding the rulemaking provisions of the Administrative Procedure Act (Chapter 3.5 (commencing with Section 11340) of Part 1 of Division 3 of Title 2 of the Government Code), the State Department of Social Services shall issue an all-county letter or similar instructions no later than October 31, 2020, to facilitate the automation changes necessary to implement the changes made to Sections 11265.2, 11265.45, 11320.15, 11322.8, 11322.85, 11322.86, 11322.87, 11325.21, 11325.24, 11454, 11454.1, 11454.2, and 17021 of the Welfare and Institutions Code.

SEC. 95.

 Notwithstanding the rulemaking provisions of the Administrative Procedure Act (Chapter 3.5 (commencing with Section 11340) of Part 1 of Division 3 of Title 2 of the Government Code), the State Department of Social Services may implement and administer Sections 10004, 18901.25, and 18906.55 of, and subdivision (h) of Section 11523 of, the Welfare and Institutions Code, which are added or amended by this act, through all-county letters or similar instruction that shall have the same force and effect as regulations.

SEC. 96.

 (a) Notwithstanding the rulemaking provisions of the Administrative Procedure Act (Chapter 3.5 (commencing with Section 11340) of Part 1 of Division 3 of Title 2 of the Government Code), the State Department of Social Services may implement and administer Sections 11265, 18901, 18901.1, and 18901.10 of, and subdivision (a) of Section 18918.1 of, the Welfare and Institutions Code, which are amended by this act, through all-county letters or similar instruction that shall have the same force and effect as regulations until regulations are adopted.
(b) The department shall adopt emergency regulations implementing the sections specified in subdivision (a) no later than January 1, 2022. The department may readopt any emergency regulation authorized by this section that is the same as, or substantially equivalent to, any emergency regulation previously adopted pursuant to this section. The initial adoption of regulations pursuant to this section and one readoption of emergency regulations shall be deemed to be an emergency and necessary for the immediate preservation of the public peace, health, safety, or general welfare. Initial emergency regulations and one readoption of emergency regulations authorized by this section shall be exempt from review by the Office of Administrative Law. The initial emergency regulations and the one readoption of emergency regulations authorized by this section shall be submitted to the Office of Administrative Law for filing with the Secretary of State, and each shall remain in effect for no more than 180 days, by which time final regulations shall be adopted.

SEC. 97.

 (a) Notwithstanding the rulemaking provisions of the Administrative Procedure Act (Chapter 3.5 (commencing with Section 11340) of Part 1 of Division 3 of Title 2 of the Government Code), the State Department of Social Services may implement and administer Sections 11265.1, 11265.15, 11265.2, 11265.45, 11320.15, 11322.8, 11322.85, 11322.86, 11322.87, 11325.21, 11325.24, 11454, and 11454.1, and 17021 of, and subdivision (b) of Section 18918.1 of, the Welfare and Institutions Code, which are added or amended by this act, through all-county letters or similar instruction that shall have the same force and effect as regulations until regulations are adopted.
(b) The department shall adopt regulations implementing the sections specified in subdivision (a) no later than 18 months following the completion of all necessary automation.

SEC. 98.

 No appropriation pursuant to Section 15200 of the Welfare and Institutions Code shall be made for purposes of implementing this act.

SEC. 99.

 The sum of two hundred thirty-four thousand dollars ($234,000) is hereby appropriated from the General Fund to the State Department of Developmental Services to implement the provisions of this act relating to information security. These funds shall be available for encumbrance or expenditure until June 30, 2021, and available for liquidation until June 30, 2023.

SEC. 100.

 The Legislature finds and declares that a special statute is necessary and that a general statute cannot be made applicable within the meaning of Section 16 of Article IV of the California Constitution because of the County of Los Angeles’ unique position to improve outcomes for the expanded population of youth at risk of entering the foster care system by maximizing access to health care and health education, and connecting the youth to safety net services.

SEC. 101.

 The Legislature finds and declares that Section 3 of this act, which amends Section 6253.2 of the Government Code, imposes a limitation on the public’s right of access to the meetings of public bodies or the writings of public officials and agencies within the meaning of Section 3 of Article I of the California Constitution. Pursuant to that constitutional provision, the Legislature makes the following findings to demonstrate the interest protected by this limitation and the need for protecting that interest:
In order to protect the privacy and well-being of persons who have completed a specified provider enrollment form to provide in-home supportive services, it is necessary to limit general access to information regarding those persons.

SEC. 102.

 No reimbursement is required by the section of this act that repeals Section 1567.70 of the Health and Safety Code, pursuant to Section 6 of Article XIII B of the California Constitution, because the only costs that may be incurred by a local agency or school district will be incurred because the repeal of that section creates a new crime or infraction, eliminates a crime or infraction, or changes the penalty for a crime or infraction, within the meaning of Section 17556 of the Government Code, or changes the definition of a crime within the meaning of Section 6 of Article XIII B of the California Constitution.

SEC. 103.

 To the extent that this act has an overall effect of increasing certain costs already borne by a local agency for programs or levels of service mandated by the 2011 Realignment Legislation within the meaning of Section 36 of Article XIII of the California Constitution, it shall apply to local agencies only to the extent that the state provides annual funding for the cost increase. Any new program or higher level of service provided by a local agency pursuant to this act above the level for which funding has been provided shall not require a subvention of funds by the state or otherwise be subject to Section 6 of Article XIII B of the California Constitution.
However, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that this act contains other costs mandated by the state, reimbursement to local agencies and school districts for those costs shall be made pursuant to Part 7 (commencing with Section 17500) of Division 4 of Title 2 of the Government Code.

SEC. 104.

 This act is a bill providing for appropriations related to the Budget Bill within the meaning of subdivision (e) of Section 12 of Article IV of the California Constitution, has been identified as related to the budget in the Budget Bill, and shall take effect immediately.