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ACR-11 Cervical Cancer Screening and Awareness Month.(2017-2018)

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Revised  January 30, 2017

CALIFORNIA LEGISLATURE— 2017–2018 REGULAR SESSION

Assembly Concurrent Resolution No. 11


Introduced by Assembly Members Baker and Cristina Garcia
(Coauthors: Assembly Members Aguiar-Curry, Burke, Caballero, Cervantes, Eggman, Friedman, Gonzalez Fletcher, Irwin, Limón, Melendez, Quirk-Silva, Reyes, Rubio, Waldron, and Weber Weber, Acosta, Travis Allen, Berman, Bigelow, Bloom, Bocanegra, Bonta, Brough, Calderon, Chau, Chávez, Chen, Chiu, Choi, Chu, Cooley, Cooper, Cunningham, Dababneh, Dahle, Daly, Flora, Fong, Frazier, Gallagher, Eduardo Garcia, Gipson, Gloria, Gray, Grayson, Harper, Jones-Sawyer, Kalra, Kiley, Lackey, Levine, Low, Maienschein, Mathis, Mayes, McCarty, Medina, Mullin, Muratsuchi, Nazarian, Obernolte, O’Donnell, Patterson, Quirk, Rendon, Ridley-Thomas, Rodriguez, Salas, Santiago, Steinorth, Mark  Stone, Thurmond, Ting, Voepel, and Wood)

January 17, 2017


Relative to Cervical Cancer Screening and Awareness Month.


LEGISLATIVE COUNSEL'S DIGEST


ACR 11, as introduced, Baker. Cervical Cancer Screening and Awareness Month.
This measure would designate the month of January every year as Cervical Cancer Screening and Awareness Month in the State of California. The measure would encourage all Californians, including the State Department of Public Health and the State Department of Health Care Services, to observe the month and observe appropriate activities, promote screening and educational outreach to women and the medical community, and develop programs to raise awareness about the causes of, symptoms of, and screening for, cervical cancer.
Fiscal Committee: NO  

WHEREAS, Cervical cancer is the third most common cancer in women and fifth most common cause of cancer deaths worldwide; and
WHEREAS, The State Department of Public Health and the American Cancer Society’s 2015 California Cancer Facts & Figures report shows a total of 1,461 new cases of cervical cancer diagnosed in 2012. A total of 422 deaths from cervical cancer occurred during that same year. If there had been adequate screening for these patients, 99 percent of these deaths could have been prevented; and
WHEREAS, Hispanic women have the highest risk of developing cervical cancer — about one and one-half times higher than non-Hispanic white and Asian/Pacific Islander women; and
WHEREAS, Infection with Human Papillomavirus (HPV), a form of sexually transmitted disease (STD), is the number one risk factor for cervical cancer. The American Cancer Society recommends starting routine HPV vaccinations for females at 11 or 12 years of age and finishing the series of vaccinations between 13 and 18, inclusive, years of age; and
WHEREAS, The American Cancer Society recommends that all people with cervixes begin cervical cancer screening at 21 years of age. Cervical cancer screening tests offer the best chance to detect precancerous changes; and
WHEREAS, If precancerous changes are detected, survival is virtually 100 percent. Current cervical cancer screening tests include the Papanicolaou (Pap) Test and the HPV test; and
WHEREAS, The United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends screening for cervical cancer in women from 21 to 65, inclusive, years of age with a Pap test every three years or, for women from 30 to 65, inclusive, years of age who want to lengthen the screening interval, cotesting with a combination of a Pap test plus the HPV test every five years; and
WHEREAS, Coverage of cervical cancer screening tests is mandated by the federal Affordable Care Act. California’s Medi-Cal program provides coverage for cervical cancer screening for eligible patients; and
WHEREAS, In addition, the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program, also known as the “Every Woman Counts” program within the State Department of Health Care Services, provides eligible women with free cervical cancer screening and has also adopted the screening recommendations of the USPSTF; and
WHEREAS, California’s cervical cancer screening rates remain below the United States average. The 2013 Medi-Cal Managed Care Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set (HEDIS) showed the cervical cancer weighted average screening rate was 65.1 percent, which is below the Healthy People 2020 objective of 93 percent; and
WHEREAS, Even with coverage available for most women, California still has low cervical cancer screening rates. It is imperative that the state continue to enhance its efforts to reach out to low-income, minority, and uninsured women to ensure they seek access to the cervical screening options available to them; now, therefore, be it
Resolved by the Assembly of the State of California, the Senate thereof concurring, That the Legislature designates the month of January of each year as Cervical Cancer Screening and Awareness Month in the State of California. The Legislature encourages all Californians, the State Department of Public Health, and the State Department of Health Care Services to observe the month and observe appropriate activities, promote screening and educational outreach to women and the medical community, and develop programs to raise awareness about the causes of, symptoms of, and screening for, cervical cancer; and be it further
Resolved, That the Chief Clerk of the Assembly transmit copies of this resolution to the author for appropriate distribution.
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CORRECTIONS:
Digest—Page 1.
REVISIONS:
Heading—Line 4.
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