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AB-2760 Prescription drugs: prescribers: naloxone hydrochloride and other FDA-approved drugs.(2017-2018)

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Date Published: 09/10/2018 09:00 PM
AB2760:v93#DOCUMENT

Assembly Bill No. 2760
CHAPTER 324

An act to add Article 10.7 (commencing with Section 740) to Chapter 1 of Division 2 of the Business and Professions Code, relating to healing arts.

[ Approved by Governor  September 10, 2018. Filed with Secretary of State  September 10, 2018. ]

LEGISLATIVE COUNSEL'S DIGEST


AB 2760, Wood. Prescription drugs: prescribers: naloxone hydrochloride and other FDA-approved drugs.
Existing law provides for the regulation of health care practitioners and requires prescription drugs to be ordered and dispensed in accordance with the Pharmacy Law. Existing law authorizes a pharmacist to furnish naloxone hydrochloride in accordance with standardized procedures or protocols developed by both the California State Board of Pharmacy and the Medical Board of California.
This bill would require a prescriber, as defined, to offer a prescription for naloxone hydrochloride or another drug approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration for the complete or partial reversal of opioid depression to a patient when certain conditions are present and to provide education on overdose prevention and the use of naloxone hydrochloride or another drug to the patient and specified others, except as specified. The bill would subject a prescriber to referral to the board charged with regulating his or her license for the imposition of administrative sanctions, as that board deems appropriate, for violating those provisions.
Vote: MAJORITY   Appropriation: NO   Fiscal Committee: YES   Local Program: NO  

The people of the State of California do enact as follows:


SECTION 1.

 The Legislature finds and declares all of the following:
(a) Abuse and misuse of opioids is a serious problem that affects the health, social, and economic welfare of the state.
(b) After alcohol, prescription drugs are the most commonly abused substances by Americans over 12 years of age.
(c) Almost 2,000,000 people in the United States suffer from substance use disorders related to prescription opioid pain relievers.
(d) Nonmedical use of prescription opioid pain relievers can be particularly dangerous when the products are manipulated for snorting or injection or are combined with other drugs.
(e) Deaths involving prescription opioid pain relievers represent the largest proportion of drug overdose deaths, greater than the number of overdose deaths involving heroin or cocaine.
(f) Driven by the continued surge in drug deaths, life expectancy in the United States dropped for the second year in a row in 2016, resulting in the first consecutive decline in national life expectancy since 1963.
(g) Should 2017 also result in a decline in life expectancy as a result of drug deaths, it would be the first three-year period of consecutive life expectancy declines since World War I and the Spanish flu pandemic in 1918.

SEC. 2.

 Article 10.7 (commencing with Section 740) is added to Chapter 1 of Division 2 of the Business and Professions Code, to read:
Article  10.7 Opioid Medication

740.
 For purposes of this article, “prescriber” means a person licensed, certified, registered, or otherwise subject to regulation pursuant to this division, or an initiative act referred to in this division, who is authorized to prescribe prescription drugs.

741.
 (a) Notwithstanding any other law, a prescriber shall do the following:
(1) Offer a prescription for naloxone hydrochloride or another drug approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration for the complete or partial reversal of opioid depression to a patient when one or more of the following conditions are present:
(A) The prescription dosage for the patient is 90 or more morphine milligram equivalents of an opioid medication per day.
(B) An opioid medication is prescribed concurrently with a prescription for benzodiazepine.
(C) The patient presents with an increased risk for overdose, including a patient with a history of overdose, a patient with a history of substance use disorder, or a patient at risk for returning to a high dose of opioid medication to which the patient is no longer tolerant.
(2) Consistent with the existing standard of care, provide education to patients receiving a prescription under paragraph (1) on overdose prevention and the use of naloxone hydrochloride or another drug approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration for the complete or partial reversal of opioid depression.
(3) Consistent with the existing standard of care, provide education on overdose prevention and the use of naloxone hydrochloride or another drug approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration for the complete or partial reversal of opioid depression to one or more persons designated by the patient, or, for a patient who is a minor, to the minor’s parent or guardian.
(b) This section does not apply to a prescriber when prescribing to an inmate or a youth under the jurisdiction of the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation or the Division of Juvenile Justice within the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation.

742.
 A prescriber who fails to offer a prescription, as required by paragraph (1) of subdivision (a) of Section 741, or fails to provide the education and use information required by paragraphs (2) and (3) of subdivision (a) of Section 741 shall be referred to the appropriate licensing board solely for the imposition of administrative sanctions deemed appropriate by that board. This section does not create a private right of action against a prescriber, and does not limit a prescriber’s liability for the negligent failure to diagnose or treat a patient.