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AB-1386 Genomic cancer testing pilot program.(2017-2018)

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Date Published: 04/19/2017 09:00 PM
AB1386:v97#DOCUMENT

Amended  IN  Assembly  April 19, 2017
Amended  IN  Assembly  March 30, 2017

CALIFORNIA LEGISLATURE— 2017–2018 REGULAR SESSION

Assembly Bill No. 1386


Introduced by Assembly Member Waldron

February 17, 2017


An act to add and repeal Article 1.2 (commencing with Section 104147) of Chapter 2 of Part 1 of Division 103 of the Health and Safety Code, relating to public health.


LEGISLATIVE COUNSEL'S DIGEST


AB 1386, as amended, Waldron. Genomic cancer testing pilot program.
Existing law requires the State Department of Public Health to place priority on providing information to consumers, patients, and health care providers regarding women’s gynecological cancers, including signs and symptoms, risk factors, the benefits of early detection through appropriate diagnostic testing, and treatment options.
This bill, until January 1, 2024, would require the department to establish a pilot program to promote and encourage screening for breast cancer susceptibility gene (BRCA) mutations that may lead to various forms of cancer, including breast and ovarian, through a public awareness campaign. The bill would require the department to apply for grants, and would authorize the department to accept donations from public or private entities or institutions, to fund the pilot program.
Vote: MAJORITY   Appropriation: NO   Fiscal Committee: YES   Local Program: NO  

The people of the State of California do enact as follows:


SECTION 1.

 The Legislature finds and declares all of the following:
(a) Genetic testing involves taking a sample of blood, cheek swab, or tissue in order to analyze a person’s genes. Genetic testing can be used to determine if someone has a change in his or her genes (mutation) that make makes him or her more likely to develop certain diseases such as cancer.
(b) Breast cancer susceptibility genes (BRCA), including BRCA1 and BRCA2, are the most common genes involved in hereditary breast and ovarian cancers. Testing does not detect whether a person has cancer or not; it indicates whether a person carries a change in one of these genes that can increase cancer risk.
(c) A study in the Journal of the American Medical Association found that women newly diagnosed with breast or ovarian cancer who are at high risk for having a BRCA mutation that raises cancer risk often do not get genetic testing, or even a chance to speak with a genetic counselor who would help them weigh the necessity of such a test.
(d) In December 2013, the United States Preventive Services Task Force recommended that women who have family members with breast, ovarian, fallopian tube, or peritoneal cancer be evaluated to see if they have a family history that is associated with increased risk of BRCA mutation. Family history factors include all of the following:
(1) Breast cancer diagnosed before 50 years of age.
(2) Cancer in both breasts of the same woman.
(3) A single woman with both breast and ovarian cancer.
(4) Multiple incidents of breast cancer.
(5) Two or more primary types of BRCA1- or BRCA2-related cancers in a single family member.
(6) Cases of male breast cancer.
(7) Ashkenazi Jewish Jewish, African American, or Hispanic ethnicity.
(e) Awareness of, and the ability to obtain, recommended breast cancer genetic testing will increase the quality of life for hundreds of people in the state by detecting and preventing death from late-stage breast or ovarian cancer and will lessen the physical, emotional, and financial burden that comes with a cancer diagnosis.

SEC. 2.

 Article 1.2 (commencing with Section 104147) is added to Chapter 2 of Part 1 of Division 103 of the Health and Safety Code, to read:
Article  1.2. Breast and Ovarian Cancer Genomic Testing

104147.
 (a) The State Department of Public Health shall establish a pilot program to promote and encourage screening for breast cancer susceptibility gene (BRCA) mutations that may lead to various forms of cancer, including breast and ovarian, through a public awareness campaign. The goal of the campaign is to help achieve increased genetic screening rates for individuals with recommended indications, including, but not limited to, multiple incidents of breast cancer, breast cancer diagnosed before 50 years of age, two or more primary types of BRCA-related cancers in a single family member, and Ashkenazi Jewish ethnicity.
(b) The pilot program shall have a systems approach to increase overall population-based screening to reach and screen populations at a high risk for breast and ovarian genetic mutation cancer, especially those who do not have medical insurance.

104147.1.
 The department shall apply for grants, and may accept donations from public or private institutions and entities, to be used for the pilot program created by this article.

104147.2.
 This article shall remain in effect only until January 1, 2024, and as of that date is repealed.