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AB-1361 Veterans’ homes: services: complex mental and behavioral health needs.(2017-2018)

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Date Published: 04/03/2017 09:00 PM
AB1361:v98#DOCUMENT

Amended  IN  Assembly  April 03, 2017

CALIFORNIA LEGISLATURE— 2017–2018 REGULAR SESSION

Assembly Bill No. 1361


Introduced by Assembly Member Eduardo Garcia

February 17, 2017


An act to amend Section 236.1 of the Penal Code, relating to human trafficking. add Section 1012.5 to the Military and Veterans Code, relating to veterans.


LEGISLATIVE COUNSEL'S DIGEST


AB 1361, as amended, Eduardo Garcia. Human trafficking. Veterans’ homes: services: complex mental and behavioral health needs.
Existing law provides for the establishment and operation of veterans’ homes at various sites, and provides for an administrator of each home, as specified. Existing law establishes the duties of the Department of Veterans Affairs with regard to the establishment and regulation of veterans’ homes.
This bill would require the Department of Veterans Affairs to conduct a survey to assess the ability of veterans' homes to assist veterans with complex mental and behavioral health needs, and develop a plan to accommodate that population, as prescribed. The bill would require the department to submit the plan and any recommendations for future legislation necessary to achieve its objectives to the Legislature by January 1, ____.

Existing law, as amended by Proposition 35, an initiative measure approved by the voters at the November 6, 2012, statewide general election, makes it a crime to deprive or violate another person’s personal liberty with the intent to obtain forced labor or services. Existing law also makes it a crime to deprive or violate another person’s personal liberty for the purpose of prostitution or sexual exploitation. Proposition 35 provides that it may be amended by a statute in furtherance of its objectives by a majority of the membership of each house of the Legislature concurring.

This bill would make technical, nonsubstantive changes to that provision.

Vote: MAJORITY   Appropriation: NO   Fiscal Committee: NOYES   Local Program: NO  

The people of the State of California do enact as follows:


SECTION 1.

 Section 1012.5 is added to the Military and Veterans Code, to read:

1012.5.
 (a) The department shall conduct a survey to assess the ability of veterans’ homes to assist veterans with complex mental and behavioral health needs, and develop a plan to accommodate that population. The plan shall address factors including, but not limited to, all of the following:
(1) The need for increased staff, including specialized staff, to provide appropriate care and services, and to ensure the safety of both the veterans with complex mental and behavioral health needs and other residents.
(2) An evaluation of the required staffing ratios at each level of care.
(3) The ability of each veterans’ home to accommodate veterans with complex mental and behavioral health needs, considering staffing and other budgeting resources, and the objective of minimizing disruption to the existing structure and operation of the veterans’ home system. The department may elect to dedicate specific beds or units in one or more veterans’ homes for the complex mental and behavioral health needs population.
(b) On or before January 1, ____, the department shall submit to the Legislature the plan developed pursuant to subdivision (a) and any recommendations for future legislation necessary to achieve the plan’s objectives. The plan shall be submitted in compliance with Section 9795 of the Government Code.

SECTION 1.Section 236.1 of the Penal Code is amended to read:
236.1.

(a)A person who deprives or violates the personal liberty of another with the intent to obtain forced labor or services, is guilty of human trafficking and shall be punished by imprisonment in the state prison for 5, 8, or 12 years and a fine of not more than five hundred thousand dollars ($500,000).

(b)A person who deprives or violates the personal liberty of another with the intent to effect or maintain a violation of Section 266, 266h, 266i, 266j, 267, 311.1, 311.2, 311.3, 311.4, 311.5, 311.6, or 518 is guilty of human trafficking and shall be punished by imprisonment in the state prison for 8, 14, or 20 years and a fine of not more than five hundred thousand dollars ($500,000).

(c)A person who causes, induces, or persuades, or attempts to cause, induce, or persuade, a person who is a minor at the time of commission of the offense to engage in a commercial sex act, with the intent to effect or maintain a violation of Section 266, 266h, 266i, 266j, 267, 311.1, 311.2, 311.3, 311.4, 311.5, 311.6, or 518 is guilty of human trafficking. A violation of this subdivision is punishable by imprisonment in the state prison as follows:

(1)Five, 8, or 12 years and a fine of not more than five hundred thousand dollars ($500,000).

(2)Fifteen years to life and a fine of not more than five hundred thousand dollars ($500,000) when the offense involves force, fear, fraud, deceit, coercion, violence, duress, menace, or threat of unlawful injury to the victim or to another person.

(d)In determining whether a minor was caused, induced, or persuaded to engage in a commercial sex act, the totality of the circumstances, including the age of the victim, his or her relationship to the trafficker or agents of the trafficker, and any handicap or disability of the victim, shall be considered.

(e)Consent by a victim of human trafficking who is a minor at the time of the commission of the offense is not a defense to a criminal prosecution under this section.

(f)Mistake of fact as to the age of a victim of human trafficking who is a minor at the time of the commission of the offense is not a defense to a criminal prosecution under this section.

(g)The Legislature finds that the definition of human trafficking in this section is equivalent to the federal definition of a severe form of trafficking found in Section 7102(9) of Title 22 of the United States Code.

(h)For purposes of this chapter, the following terms have the following meanings:

(1)“Coercion” includes a scheme, plan, or pattern intended to cause a person to believe that failure to perform an act would result in serious harm to or physical restraint against any person; the abuse or threatened abuse of the legal process; debt bondage; or providing and facilitating the possession of a controlled substance to a person with the intent to impair the person’s judgment.

(2)“Commercial sex act” means sexual conduct on account of which anything of value is given or received by a person.

(3)“Deprivation or violation of the personal liberty of another” includes substantial and sustained restriction of another’s liberty accomplished through force, fear, fraud, deceit, coercion, violence, duress, menace, or threat of unlawful injury to the victim or to another person, under circumstances where the person receiving or apprehending the threat reasonably believes that it is likely that the person making the threat would carry it out.

(4)“Duress” includes a direct or implied threat of force, violence, danger, hardship, or retribution sufficient to cause a reasonable person to acquiesce in or perform an act that he or she would otherwise not have submitted to or performed; a direct or implied threat to destroy, conceal, remove, confiscate, or possess an actual or purported passport or immigration document of the victim; or knowingly destroying, concealing, removing, confiscating, or possessing an actual or purported passport or immigration document of the victim.

(5)“Forced labor or services” means labor or services that are performed or provided by a person and are obtained or maintained through force, fraud, duress, or coercion, or equivalent conduct that would reasonably overbear the will of the person.

(6)“Great bodily injury” means a significant or substantial physical injury.

(7)“Minor” means a person less than 18 years of age.

(8)“Serious harm” includes any harm, whether physical or nonphysical, including psychological, financial, or reputational harm, that is sufficiently serious, under all the surrounding circumstances, to compel a reasonable person of the same background and in the same circumstances to perform or to continue performing labor, services, or commercial sexual acts in order to avoid incurring that harm.

(i)The total circumstances, including the age of the victim, the relationship between the victim and the trafficker or agents of the trafficker, and any handicap or disability of the victim, shall be factors to consider in determining the presence of “deprivation or violation of the personal liberty of another,” “duress,” and “coercion” as described in this section.