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AB-11 Child care: early childhood innovation partnerships and grants.(2017-2018)

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Date Published: 03/23/2017 09:00 PM
AB11:v98#DOCUMENT

Amended  IN  Assembly  March 23, 2017

CALIFORNIA LEGISLATURE— 2017–2018 REGULAR SESSION

Assembly Bill No. 11


Introduced by Assembly Member McCarty

December 05, 2016


An act to add and repeal Article 14.5 (commencing with Section 8290) of Chapter 2 of Part 6 of Division 1 of Title 1 of the Education Code, relating to child care.


LEGISLATIVE COUNSEL'S DIGEST


AB 11, as amended, McCarty. Child care: Early Head Start. early childhood innovation partnerships and grants.
The Child Care and Development Services Act has a purpose to provide a comprehensive, coordinated, and cost-effective system of child care and development services for children from infancy to 13 years of age and their parents, including a full range of supervision, health, and support services through full- and part-time programs. Existing law requires the Superintendent of Public Instruction to advise local educational agencies of the federal requirements relating to the Head Start Program. Existing law requires the Governor to appoint an advisory committee composed of representatives from various entities and requires the advisory committee to, among other things, assist the State Department of Education in developing a state plan for child development programs pursuant to the act. Existing law requires the advisory committee to continually evaluate the effectiveness of these programs and to provide reports to the Legislature.

This bill would make various findings and declarations regarding child care and would provide that it is the intent of the Legislature to enact legislation that would establish the Early Head Start-Child Care-Early Intervention Partnership and provide funding to establish classroom-based early intervention services to Early Head Start-Child Care programs.

This bill would, commencing July 1, 2018, until January 1, 2024, and upon an appropriation by the Legislature, establish a grant program for purposes of providing grants to local partnerships, that the bill would authorize local entities to establish, that use a systems approach to deliver health, child welfare, early care and education, and social services that meet the needs of the most vulnerable infants and toddlers, and their families, as provided. The bill would require the partnership to be comprised of various entities, including a representative from a county office of education. The bill would require the partnership to, among other things, build, expand, and test innovative early childhood system approaches that effectively identify and serve children from birth to 3 years of age, inclusive, and their families, who are experiencing adverse childhood experience, and provide them with individualized services and support.
The bill would establish in the California Health and Human Services Agency the Early Childhood Innovation Partnership Advisory Council, to be comprised of various entities, including a representative from the State Department of Education. The bill would require the advisory council to be responsible for various functions, including reviewing and approving partnership grant applications, hearing and responding to partnership requests for technical assistance, and providing reports to the Legislature, as provided.
Vote: MAJORITY   Appropriation: NO   Fiscal Committee: NOYES   Local Program: NO  

The people of the State of California do enact as follows:


SECTION 1.

 (a)The Legislature finds and declares all of the following:

(1)

(a) The future of any society depends on its ability to foster the healthy development of the next generation. Extensive research on the biology of stress now shows that healthy development can be derailed by excessive or prolonged activation of stress response systems in the body and brain. Such toxic stress can have damaging effects on learning, behavior, and health across the lifespan.
(b) By the age of three, a child’s brain has already established much of the architecture that will influence his or her lifelong learning, behavior, and health. Every baby deserves a strong start, but unmet basic needs and adverse experiences can create toxic stress with potential to weaken this architecture.

(2)

(c) When toxic stress response occurs continually, or is triggered by multiple sources, it can have a cumulative toll on an individual’s physical and mental health—for health, and last for a lifetime. The more adverse experiences in childhood, the greater the likelihood of developmental delays and later health problems, including heart disease, diabetes, substance abuse, and depression.
(d) For children and families experiencing conditions of risk and adversity that may jeopardize their long-term health and well-being, finding these children and families as soon as possible and introducing effective supports can stabilize a potentially negative trajectory, improve child and family outcomes, and prevent more costly and harder to resolve issues in the future.

(3)

(e) Research also indicates that supportive, responsive relationships with caring adults as early in life as possible can prevent or reverse the damaging effects of toxic stress response.

(b)Therefore, it is the intent of the Legislature to enact legislation that does both of the following:

(1)Establish the Early Head Start-Child Care-Early Intervention Partnership. There currently exists a federal program called the Early Head Start-Child Care Partnership, established by the Obama Administration. This partnership provides infants and toddlers living in poverty with full day child care and Early Head Start, which includes early learning, home visitation, and health and mental health services.

(2)Provide funding to establish classroom-based early intervention services to existing and new Early Head Start-Child Care programs for children suffering from toxic stress, who often need intensive early intervention services, such as speech, occupational, developmental, and physical therapy.

(f) In order to best match families with what they need, and utilize limited intervention resources most efficiently and effectively, there is a need for focus on better identifying these very young children and their families, optimizing their linkage to support and services, and whenever possible, ensuring the settings and programs they participate in are equipped to respond to their needs.
(g) In some places in California, there are already early care and education programs innovatively identifying, linking, and supporting children and families experiencing adversity. In different places, these efforts are developing, while in many other places they are not yet underway but needed.
(h) The state has a role and an opportunity to support communities in starting and scaling innovative approaches in this regard, and would benefit from establishing a foundation of local data, research, and evaluation to understand the practices, funding mechanisms, and coordination necessary to better identify, link, and serve these children and families across the state.
(i) In 2014, the Legislature passed Assembly Concurrent Resolution No. 155 by Assembly Member Raul Bocanegra, recognizing that research over the last two decades in the evolving fields of neuroscience, molecular biology, public health, genomics, and epigenetics reveals that experiences in the first few years of life build changes into the biology of the human body that, in turn, influence the person’s physical and mental health over his or her lifetime.
(j) On May 3, 2012, Governor Edmund G. Brown Jr. issued Executive Order B-19-12, establishing the Let’s Get Healthy California Task Force “to develop a 10-year plan for improving the health of Californians, controlling health care costs, promoting personal responsibility for individual health, and advancing health equity.” The task force identified several priorities, including a subset for “Healthy Beginnings,” which include improving birth outcomes, increasing vaccination rates, reducing childhood trauma, and reducing adolescent tobacco use. The final report of the task force states “the challenge going forward is to identify evidence-based interventions and quicken the pace of uptake across the state,” to meet the ambitious goals in the Governor’s directive.
(k) The 2014 First 5 California Strategic Plan articulates goals and activities as follows: “Goal 1.3. Family and Community Support and Partnership: Families and communities are engaged, supported, and strengthened through culturally effective resources and opportunities that assist them in nurturing, caring, and providing for their children’s success and well-being: Meet and collaborate with existing statewide child welfare workgroups and stakeholders to identify key issues for affecting systems change in child welfare practices that will reduce the number of children birth through age 5 who have contact with the child welfare system.”

SEC. 2.

 Article 14.5 (commencing with Section 8290) is added to Chapter 2 of Part 6 of Division 1 of Title 1 of the Education Code, to read:
Article  14.5. Early Childhood Innovation Partnerships and Grant Program

8290.
 For purposes of this article, the following terms have the following meanings:
(a) “Adverse childhood experiences” means traumatic experiences that occur during childhood, including physical, emotional, or sexual abuse, physical and emotional neglect, household dysfunction, including substance abuse, untreated mental illness or incarceration of a household member, domestic violence, or separation or divorce involving household members, that can have a profound effect on a child’s developing brain and body and can result in poor health during the person’s adulthood.
(b) “Advisory council” means the Early Childhood Innovation Partnership Advisory Council established pursuant to Section 8290.3.
(c) “Partnership” means the entity established pursuant to Sections 8290.1 and 8290.2.
(d) “Systems approach” means ____.

8290.1.
 (a) Local entities may form a partnership, in accordance with Section 8290.2, for purposes of using a systems approach to deliver health, child welfare, early care and education, and social services that meet the needs of the most vulnerable infants and toddlers, and their families.
(b) The partnership shall do all of the following:
(1) Build, expand, and test innovative early childhood system approaches that effectively identify and serve children from birth to age three, inclusive, and their families, who are experiencing adverse childhood experiences, and provide them with the seamless, individualized services and support they need to thrive.
(2) Focus on implementing proven system and program innovations where they are needed and testing and strengthening promising practices already in use.
(3) Evaluate and research the effectiveness of paragraphs (1) and (2), including an overarching report capturing diverse approaches and impacts of the partnership, and report the findings to the Early Childhood Innovation Partnership Advisory Council established pursuant to Section 8290.3.
(4) Designate a lead entity who is responsible for preparing and submitting grant applications.

8290.2.
 (a) A partnership shall be comprised of, at minimum, a representative from each of the following entities:
(1) First 5 California county commissions.
(2) The county offices of education.
(3) The county department of health or the county department of behavioral health.
(4) The county department of social services or the county department of child welfare.
(b) The partnership may include additional locally relevant and appropriate entities, including, but not limited to, the following entities:
(1) Early care and education programs.
(2) Early Head Start programs.
(3) Local child care and development planning councils.
(4) Regional centers.
(5) Hospitals.
(6) Health care plans and providers.
(7) The Women, Infants, and Children Program.
(8) Community-based organizations.
(9) Research institutions.
(10) Other family and child serving programs.

8290.3.
 (a) There is hereby established in the California Health and Human Services Agency the Early Childhood Innovation Partnership Advisory Council that has a purpose of providing leadership and technical guidance, as appropriate, regarding the administration of funding to the partnerships, progress toward specified objectives, and alignment to state goals across health, education, and social service departments.
(b) (1) The advisory council shall be comprised of the following entities:
(A) A representative from the California Health and Human Services Agency, appointed by the agency, who shall serve as chair of the advisory council.
(B) A representative from the State Department of Education, appointed by the department.
(C) A representative from First 5 California, appointed by First 5 California.
(D) A representative from the Department of Finance, appointed by the Department of Finance.
(E) A representative appointed by the Governor.
(F) A representative appointed by the Speaker of the Assembly.
(G) A representative appointed by the Senate Committee on Rules.
(2) Representatives appointed to the advisory council shall have expertise working with infants and toddlers.
(c) The advisory council shall be responsible for all of the following:
(1) Review and approve partnership grant applications on a form developed by the advisory council.
(2) Hear and respond to partnership requests for technical assistance.
(3) Review and analyze key data related to research-established risk factors and adverse experiences among pregnant women and very young children statewide.
(4) Identify opportunities to align existing resources, braid funding, engage relevant incentives, and maximize federal funds for purposes of this article.
(5) Articulate guidance relating to policy barriers and opportunities within existing state programs administered through departments within the California Health and Human Services Agency and the State Department of Education.
(6) Establish a state evaluation plan that shall include a common set of core measures, including child outcomes, which shall allow for data aggregation and data sharing across partnerships.
(7) On or before July 1, 2020, provide a report to the Legislature on the partnership objectives as found in the implementation plans created by the partnerships pursuant to Section 8290.6.
(8) On or before July 1, 2023, provide a comprehensive report to the Legislature that provides both of the following:
(A) Recommendations of effective policy and program approaches to meeting the needs of infants and toddlers, and their families, experiencing circumstances of adversity, trauma, or multidimensional risk factors that could jeopardize their long-term health and well-being.
(B) Statements about unmet need, scalability complexities, and recommendations to address these challenges.
(d) The advisory council may accept donations for purposes of funding the advisory council’s administrative responsibilities necessary to implement this article.
(e) Reports submitted to the Legislature pursuant to subdivision (c) shall be submitted in compliance with Section 9795 of the Government Code.

8290.4.
 A partnership may submit an application pursuant to Section 8290.5 to the California Health and Human Services Agency, who shall receive all applications from the partnerships and be responsible for communicating with applicants, on behalf of the advisory council.

8290.5.
 (a) Commencing July 1, 2018, and upon appropriation by the Legislature for these purposes, the advisory council shall provide grants to applicant partnerships that use a systems approach to delivering health, child welfare, early care and education, and social services that meet the needs of the most vulnerable infants and toddlers, and their families.
(b) (1) Successful applicant partnerships shall receive a grant over a five-year period as follows:
(A) (i) Year one funds shall be used for needs assessment and creating an implementation plan pursuant to Section 8290.6.
(ii) Funds shall not be used to supplant or expand existing services, but may be used to start or scale science-based innovations, risk assessment and referral systems, initiate program enhancements such as materials, training, coaching, or curriculum, evaluate impacts, pursue replication studies to validate existing promising programs, or activities to streamline local cross-agency partnerships, data, and systems.
(B) (i) Years two to five, inclusive, funds shall be used to implement the plan, data collection, formative evaluations to support continuous improvement during implementation, and promote learning among partnership members.
(ii) Years two to five, inclusive, funding shall be contingent on both of the of the following:
(I) Satisfactory completion of year one activities.
(II) Dedicated local match funding as follows:
(ia) Years two to three, inclusive, one dollar ($1) of matching funds for every four grant dollars ($4) awarded.
(ib) Year four, two dollars ($2) of matching funds for every four grant dollars ($4) awarded.
(ic) Year five, three dollars ($3) of matching funds for every four grant dollars ($4) awarded.
(2) Grant funds can also be used for the following purposes:
(A) Convene and facilitate active, ongoing collaboration among public agencies, early childhood practitioners, researchers, and key local partners.
(B) Use systems strategies to build, expand, and test innovative early childhood interventions that identify, link, and serve children from birth to three years of age, inclusive, and their families, who are at risk of adverse health and educational outcomes due to unmet basic needs, or adverse childhood experiences.
(c) When making grants, the advisory council shall make determinations as to grant amounts by taking into account county size, complexity, and need, among other criteria to be established by the advisory council, in alignment with the purposes of the partnership.
(d) (1) Grantee partnerships shall submit annual reports to the advisory council that shall include information about expenditures, progress toward identified objectives, as well as qualitative insights and expertise that will over time contribute to establishing a statewide cumulative report on best practices, unmet need, challenges, and opportunities with regard to this endeavor.
(2) Grantee applicants shall complete a summative five-year, full scope evaluation at the conclusion of the grant term.

8290.6.
 The implementation plan, created by the partnership, shall include all of the following:
(a) Analysis of key data related to research-established risk factors and adverse experiences among pregnant women and very young children locally.
(b) Assessment of assets and gaps across existing local programs and systems that serve women, children, and families during the prenatal, postpartum, and infant/toddler periods experiencing such factors or circumstances of adversity.
(c) Documentation of previous or existing relevant local efforts and initiatives and anticipated role in the implementation plan.
(d) Articulation of needs and opportunities related to strengthening or establishing a local, integrated system to identify, link, and provide support mechanisms to ensure target populations are identified early and matched with the level of services that meets their needs.
(e) Building and expanding effective local program models and using formative evaluation to guide program improvements, promote scalability, and maximize impact.
(f) An evaluation plan that includes the exact measures and processes that will be used to evaluate impact.

8290.7.
 This article shall remain in effect only until January 1, 2024, and as of that date is repealed, unless a later enacted statute that is enacted before January 1, 2024, deletes or extends that date.