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AB-427 Early primary programs: child care services: eligibility: military families.(2015-2016)

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Amended  IN  Assembly  May 06, 2015
Amended  IN  Assembly  March 26, 2015

CALIFORNIA LEGISLATURE— 2015–2016 REGULAR SESSION

Assembly Bill No. 427


Introduced by Assembly Member Weber

February 19, 2015


An act to add Section 8209.5 to the Education Code, relating to early childhood education.


LEGISLATIVE COUNSEL'S DIGEST


AB 427, as amended, Weber. Early primary programs: child care services: eligibility: military families.
The Child Care and Development Services Act has a purpose of providing a comprehensive, coordinated, and cost-effective system of child care and development services for children from infancy to 13 years of age and their parents, including a full range of supervision, health, and support services through full- and part-time programs.
This bill would exclude from income the amount of the basic allowance for housing provided to an individual who is on federal active duty, state active duty, active duty for special work, or Active Guard and Reserve duty in the military that is equal to the lowest rate of the allowance for the military housing area in which the individual resides for purposes of determining eligibility for child care and development services.
Vote: MAJORITY   Appropriation: NO   Fiscal Committee: YES   Local Program: NO  

The people of the State of California do enact as follows:


SECTION 1.

 (a) The Legislature finds and declares all of the following:
(1) California is home to a large number of military personnel, including 150,000 active duty personnel.
(2) Military families are a unique population with unique circumstances. The children of military families face constant transition, including family mobility and parental deployment.
(3) Military families move more than twice as often as civilian families. Forty percent of officers and 60 percent of enlisted personnel move during the school year. Thus, the lower the rank of the military family member, the more often the family moves.
(4) During a time of war, military families endure the strains of long-term separation as one or both parents may be deployed overseas.
(5) During parental deployment children are often anxious, stressed, and confused. Child care providers and preschools can be places where stability and routine can provide security. The routine helps to cushion the impact of parental deployment.
(6) Early education can be a determining factor in the early academic success of a pupil from a military family by providing educational enrichment, as well as a stable and nurturing learning environment.
(b) Given these special circumstances, it is the intent of the Legislature in enacting this act to ensure that military families have access to the child care development services that their children need.

SEC. 2.

 Section 8209.5 is added to the Education Code, to read:

8209.5.
 (a) For purposes of determining eligibility for services offered pursuant to this chapter, the income of an individual who is on federal active duty, state active duty, active duty for special work, or Active Guard and Reserve duty in the military shall not include the amount of the basic allowance for housing pursuant to Section 403 of Title 37 of the United States Code provided to the individual that is equal to the lowest rate of the allowance for the military housing area in which the individual resides.
(b) This section does not affect the priorities for federal and state subsidized child development services established pursuant to subdivision (b) of Section 8263.