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SB-783 The California Clean Water, Safe Urban Parks, and Environmental Health Investment Act of 2014.(2013-2014)

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CALIFORNIA LEGISLATURE— 2013–2014 REGULAR SESSION

Senate Bill No. 783


Introduced by Senator De León
(Coauthors: Senators DeSaulnier and Hancock)

February 22, 2013


An act to add Chapter 14 (commencing with Section 5880) to Division 5 of the Public Resources Code, relating to parks.


LEGISLATIVE COUNSEL'S DIGEST


SB 783, as introduced, De León. The California Clean Water, Safe Urban Parks, and Environmental Health Investment Act of 2014.
Existing law enacts various programs pertaining to clean water and the establishment of public parks.
This bill would make specific findings and declarations and would declare the intent of the Legislature to enact legislation that would improve the economy, the natural environment, and increase and improve access opportunities to physical fitness, by enacting the California Clean Water, Safe Urban Parks, and Environmental Health Investment Act of 2014.
Vote: MAJORITY   Appropriation: NO   Fiscal Committee: NO   Local Program: NO  

The people of the State of California do enact as follows:


SECTION 1.

 The Legislature finds and declares all of the following:
(a) California’s residents value state, local, and regional parks and recreation venues, as they provide access to the serenity and inspiration of nature, outdoor spaces, and places for play and exercise; facilities for directed and self-directed recreation; activities that facilitate social connections, human development, the arts, and lifelong learning; and positive alternatives for youth that help lower crime and delinquency.
(b) California’s parks and natural resources infrastructure have social, health, environmental, recreational, and intrinsic value to the citizens of the state; importantly, outdoor recreation can be a critical economic driver to the state.
(c) A study commissioned by the Outdoor Industry Association determined that the outdoor recreation economy contributes an estimated $46,000,000,000 annually to California. According to this study, recreational cycling alone and its estimated 7,500,000 participants contribute nearly $12,000,000,000 annually to California’s economy.
(d) California’s unemployment rate continues to hover above 10 percent, an infusion of funds into capital projects will stimulate job growth and provide for job skills to California’s youth.
(e) Competition for outdoor recreational services and the scarce ecotourism dollars throughout the west coast requires California to enhance its investment in improving the quality and access to recreational outlets.
(f) Continued investment in the state’s parks and resource infrastructure will mitigate the effects of global warming, thus reducing California’s carbon footprint.
(g) The well chronicled plight and backlog of over $1,000,000,000 in deferred maintenance and needed improvements within the state park system is a call to arms.
(h) Over the course of the last grant funding cycles administered by the state for local park improvements, the need for funds outpaced the availability of funds by a factor of eight to one.
(i) While continued investment in acquiring valuable lands for the conservation of open-space, habitat and future recreational opportunity is critical, California has already made a substantial investment in acquisition over the past decade and priority for resource spending should be in accessing, developing, and improving existing publically held lands.
(j) Investments in the state’s waterways will improve water quality and reliability and enhance fishery and wildlife habitats.
(k) A recent report issued by the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention concluded that nearly 50 percent of the nation’s population will be considered obese by 2030.
(l) The costs attributable to California alone for physical inactivity, obesity, and heightened risk factors associated with the overweight population in 2006 were estimated at $41,200,000,000. In contrast, a 5 percent improvement in each of these risk factors could result in annual savings of nearly $2,400,000,000.

SEC. 2.

 It is the intent of the Legislature to enact legislation that would improve the economy, the natural environment, and increase and improve access opportunities to physical fitness thus reducing the incidence of obesity and childhood diabetes, by enacting the California Clean Water, Safe Urban Parks, and Environmental Health Investment Act of 2014.

SEC. 3.

 Chapter 14 (commencing with Section 5880) is added to Division 5 of the Public Resources Code, to read:
CHAPTER  14. The California Clean Water, Safe Urban Parks, and Environmental Health Investment Act of 2014

5880.
 This chapter shall be known, and may be cited, as the California Clean Water, Safe Urban Parks, and Environmental Health Investment Act of 2014.