Bill Text

Bill Information


PDF |Add To My Favorites | print page

AB-346 Runaway and homeless youth shelters.(2013-2014)

SHARE THIS:share this bill in Facebookshare this bill in Twitter
AB346:v93#DOCUMENT

Assembly Bill No. 346
CHAPTER 485

An act to amend Section 1502 of, and to add Section 1502.35 to, the Health and Safety Code, and to amend Sections 319, 361.2, 450, 727, 11400, and 11402 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, relating to community care facilities.

[ Approved by Governor  October 02, 2013. Filed with Secretary of State  October 02, 2013. ]

LEGISLATIVE COUNSEL'S DIGEST


AB 346, Stone. Runaway and homeless youth shelters.
Existing law, the California Community Care Facilities Act, provides for the licensing and regulation of community care facilities, as defined, by the State Department of Social Services. A violation of the act is a misdemeanor.
This bill would include within the definition of a community care facility a runaway and homeless youth shelter, as defined. The bill would require the department to license as a group home a runaway and homeless youth shelter that meets specified requirements, including the requirement that shelter staff shall offer short-term, 24-hour nonmedical care and supervision and personal services to up to 25 youths who voluntarily enter the shelter. The bill would provide that a runaway and homeless youth shelter is not an eligible placement option under specified provisions. The bill would require the department to adopt regulations to implement these provisions and provide that, until those regulations become effective, the department may implement these provisions by publishing information releases or similar instructions from the director.
By expanding the definition of a community care facility, this bill would change the definition of an existing crime, thus creating a state-mandated local program.
Existing law provides for the Aid to Families with Dependent Children-Foster Care (AFDC-FC) program, under which counties provide payments to foster care providers on behalf of qualified children in foster care. Existing law requires a child or nonminor dependent to be placed in a specified placement in order to be eligible for AFDC-FC. Under existing law, foster care providers licensed as group homes have rates established by classifying each group home program and applying a standardized schedule of rates.
This bill would exclude a runaway and homeless youth shelter as a group home in which a child or nonminor dependent may be placed for AFDC-FC eligibility purposes. The bill would also prohibit a runaway and homeless youth shelter program from being eligible for a rate pursuant to the above-mentioned provisions.
This bill would incorporate additional changes in Sections 727 and 11400 of the Welfare and Institutions Code proposed by AB 787, to become operative if AB 787 and this bill become effective on or before January 1, 2014, and this bill is enacted last.
The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.
This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason.
Vote: MAJORITY   Appropriation: NO   Fiscal Committee: YES   Local Program: YES  

The people of the State of California do enact as follows:


SECTION 1.

 Section 1502 of the Health and Safety Code is amended to read:

1502.
 As used in this chapter:
(a) “Community care facility” means any facility, place, or building that is maintained and operated to provide nonmedical residential care, day treatment, adult day care, or foster family agency services for children, adults, or children and adults, including, but not limited to, the physically handicapped, mentally impaired, incompetent persons, and abused or neglected children, and includes the following:
(1) “Residential facility” means any family home, group care facility, or similar facility determined by the director, for 24-hour nonmedical care of persons in need of personal services, supervision, or assistance essential for sustaining the activities of daily living or for the protection of the individual.
(2) “Adult day program” means any community-based facility or program that provides care to persons 18 years of age or older in need of personal services, supervision, or assistance essential for sustaining the activities of daily living or for the protection of these individuals on less than a 24-hour basis.
(3) “Therapeutic day services facility” means any facility that provides nonmedical care, counseling, educational or vocational support, or social rehabilitation services on less than a 24-hour basis to persons under 18 years of age who would otherwise be placed in foster care or who are returning to families from foster care. Program standards for these facilities shall be developed by the department, pursuant to Section 1530, in consultation with therapeutic day services and foster care providers.
(4) “Foster family agency” means any organization engaged in the recruiting, certifying, and training of, and providing professional support to, foster parents, or in finding homes or other places for placement of children for temporary or permanent care who require that level of care as an alternative to a group home. Private foster family agencies shall be organized and operated on a nonprofit basis.
(5) “Foster family home” means any residential facility providing 24-hour care for six or fewer foster children that is owned, leased, or rented and is the residence of the foster parent or parents, including their family, in whose care the foster children have been placed. The placement may be by a public or private child placement agency or by a court order, or by voluntary placement by a parent, parents, or guardian. It also means a foster family home described in Section 1505.2.
(6) “Small family home” means any residential facility, in the licensee’s family residence, that provides 24-hour care for six or fewer foster children who have mental disorders or developmental or physical disabilities and who require special care and supervision as a result of their disabilities. A small family home may accept children with special health care needs, pursuant to subdivision (a) of Section 17710 of the Welfare and Institutions Code. In addition to placing children with special health care needs, the department may approve placement of children without special health care needs, up to the licensed capacity.
(7) “Social rehabilitation facility” means any residential facility that provides social rehabilitation services for no longer than 18 months in a group setting to adults recovering from mental illness who temporarily need assistance, guidance, or counseling. Program components shall be subject to program standards pursuant to Article 1 (commencing with Section 5670) of Chapter 2.5 of Part 2 of Division 5 of the Welfare and Institutions Code.
(8) “Community treatment facility” means any residential facility that provides mental health treatment services to children in a group setting and that has the capacity to provide secure containment. Program components shall be subject to program standards developed and enforced by the State Department of Health Care Services pursuant to Section 4094 of the Welfare and Institutions Code.
Nothing in this section shall be construed to prohibit or discourage placement of persons who have mental or physical disabilities into any category of community care facility that meets the needs of the individual placed, if the placement is consistent with the licensing regulations of the department.
(9) “Full-service adoption agency” means any licensed entity engaged in the business of providing adoption services, that does all of the following:
(A) Assumes care, custody, and control of a child through relinquishment of the child to the agency or involuntary termination of parental rights to the child.
(B) Assesses the birth parents, prospective adoptive parents, or child.
(C) Places children for adoption.
(D) Supervises adoptive placements.
Private full-service adoption agencies shall be organized and operated on a nonprofit basis. As a condition of licensure to provide intercountry adoption services, a full-service adoption agency shall be accredited and in good standing according to Part 96 of Title 22 of the Code of Federal Regulations, or supervised by an accredited primary provider, or acting as an exempted provider, in compliance with Subpart F (commencing with Section 96.29) of Part 96 of Title 22 of the Code of Federal Regulations.
(10) “Noncustodial adoption agency” means any licensed entity engaged in the business of providing adoption services, that does all of the following:
(A) Assesses the prospective adoptive parents.
(B) Cooperatively matches children freed for adoption, who are under the care, custody, and control of a licensed adoption agency, for adoption, with assessed and approved adoptive applicants.
(C) Cooperatively supervises adoptive placements with a full-service adoptive agency, but does not disrupt a placement or remove a child from a placement.
Private noncustodial adoption agencies shall be organized and operated on a nonprofit basis. As a condition of licensure to provide intercountry adoption services, a noncustodial adoption agency shall be accredited and in good standing according to Part 96 of Title 22 of the Code of Federal Regulations, or supervised by an accredited primary provider, or acting as an exempted provider, in compliance with Subpart F (commencing with Section 96.29) of Part 96 of Title 22 of the Code of Federal Regulations.
(11) “Transitional shelter care facility” means any group care facility that provides for 24-hour nonmedical care of persons in need of personal services, supervision, or assistance essential for sustaining the activities of daily living or for the protection of the individual. Program components shall be subject to program standards developed by the State Department of Social Services pursuant to Section 1502.3.
(12) “Transitional housing placement provider” means an organization licensed by the department pursuant to Section 1559.110 and Section 16522.1 of the Welfare and Institutions Code to provide transitional housing to foster children at least 16 years of age and not more than 18 years of age, and nonminor dependents, as defined in subdivision (v) of Section 11400 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, to promote their transition to adulthood. A transitional housing placement provider shall be privately operated and organized on a nonprofit basis.
(13) “Group home” means a residential facility that provides 24-hour care and supervision to children, delivered at least in part by staff employed by the licensee in a structured environment. The care and supervision provided by a group home shall be nonmedical, except as otherwise permitted by law.
(14) “Runaway and homeless youth shelter” means a group home licensed by the department to operate a program pursuant to Section 1502.35 to provide voluntary, short-term, shelter and personal services to runaway youth or homeless youth, as defined in paragraph (2) of subdivision (a) of Section 1502.35.
(b) “Department” or “state department” means the State Department of Social Services.
(c) “Director” means the Director of Social Services.

SEC. 2.

 Section 1502.35 is added to the Health and Safety Code, to read:

1502.35.
 (a) The department shall license a runaway and homeless youth shelter as a group home pursuant to this chapter. A runaway and homeless youth shelter shall meet all of the following requirements:
(1) The shelter shall offer short-term, 24-hour, nonmedical care and supervision and personal services to youth who voluntarily enter the shelter. As used in this paragraph, “short-term” means no more than 21 consecutive days from the date of admission.
(2) The shelter shall serve homeless youth and runaway youth.
(A) “Homeless youth” means a youth 12 to 17 years of age, inclusive, or 18 years of age if the youth is completing high school or its equivalent, who is in need of services and without a place of shelter.
(B) “Runaway youth”means a youth 12 to 17 years of age, inclusive, or 18 years of age if the youth is completing high school or its equivalent, who absents himself or herself from home or place of legal residence without the permission of his or her family, legal guardian, or foster parent.
(3) The shelter shall have a maximum capacity of 25 youths.
(4) The shelter shall have a ratio of one staff person to every eight youths. For purposes of this paragraph, a volunteer may be counted in the staff-to-youth ratio if the volunteer has satisfied the same training requirements as a paid shelter staff member and other requirements set forth in regulations, and a paid shelter staff member is present during the time the volunteer is on duty.
(5) Bunk beds may be permitted in the shelter, but shall not consist of more than two tiers.
(6) The shelter shall be owned and operated on a nonprofit basis by a private nonprofit corporation, a nonprofit organization, or a public agency.
(b) Shelter staff shall, prior to admission into the shelter, determine if a youth poses a threat to himself or herself or others in the shelter. A youth may not be admitted into the shelter if it is determined that the youth poses such a threat.
(c) An assessment shall not be required for admission, but shelter staff shall assess youth served within 72 hours of admission to the shelter.
(d) Shelter staff shall assist youth served in obtaining emergency health-related services.
(e) The shelter shall establish procedures to assist youth in securing long-term stability that includes all of the following:
(1) Reconnecting the youth with his or her family, legal guardian, or nonrelative extended family members when possible to do so.
(2) Coordinating with appropriate individuals, local government agencies, or organizations to help foster youth secure a suitable foster care placement.
(f) The shelter shall ensure all homeless youth and runaway youth have fair and equal access to services, care, and treatment provided by the shelter, and are not subjected to discrimination or harassment on the basis of actual or perceived race, ethnic group identification, ancestry, national origin, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, mental or physical disability, or HIV status.
(g) Prior to employment or interaction with youth at a runaway and homeless youth shelter, all persons specified in subdivision (b) of Section 1522 shall complete a criminal record review pursuant to Section 1522 and a Child Abuse Central Index check pursuant to Section 1522.1.
(h)  A runaway and homeless youth shelter shall collect and maintain all of the following information in a monthly report, in a format specified by the department, and make the report available to the department upon request:
(1) Total number of youth served per month.
(2) Age of each youth served.
(3) Length of stay of each youth served.
(4) Number of times a youth accesses the shelter and services at the shelter.
(i) Notwithstanding Section 1522.43, the department shall not require a runaway and homeless youth shelter to maintain a needs and services plan, as defined in Section 84001 of Title 22 of the California Code of Regulations, for a youth served. Nothing in this subdivision precludes the department from requiring a runaway and homeless youth shelter to maintain an assessment, as defined by the department, for youths served.
(j) The department may license a shelter pursuant to this section if the shelter is operating in two physical locations on or before January 1, 2013, with only one physical location providing overnight residential care, and the shelter meets the requirements of this section. If a shelter described in this subdivision is licensed pursuant to this section, the department shall permit the shelter to retain its two physical locations and issue a license for each physical location.
(k)  A runaway and homeless youth shelter is not an eligible placement option pursuant to Sections 319, 361.2, 450, and 727 of the Welfare and Institutions Code.
(l) A runaway and homeless youth shelter’s program shall not be eligible for a rate pursuant to Section 11462 of the Welfare and Institutions Code. This does not preclude a runaway and homeless youth shelter from receiving reimbursement for providing services to a foster youth as may be provided at the discretion of a county.
(m) On or before December 1, 2014, the department shall adopt regulations to implement this section, in consultation with interested parties, including representatives of provider organizations that serve homeless or runaway youth. The regulations developed pursuant to this subdivision shall be contained in the regulations for group homes found in Chapter 5 (commencing with Section 84000) of Division 6 of Title 22 of the California Code of Regulations.
(n) Notwithstanding the Administrative Procedure Act (Chapter 3.5 (commencing with Section 11340) of Part 1 of Division 3 of Title 2 of the Government Code), the department may implement the applicable provisions of this section by publishing information releases or similar instructions from the director until the regulations adopted by the department pursuant to subdivision (l) become effective.

SEC. 3.

 Section 319 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

319.
 (a) At the initial petition hearing, the court shall examine the child’s parents, guardians, or other persons having relevant knowledge and hear the relevant evidence as the child, the child’s parents or guardians, the petitioner, or their counsel desires to present. The court may examine the child, as provided in Section 350.
(b) The social worker shall report to the court on the reasons why the child has been removed from the parent’s physical custody, the need, if any, for continued detention, the available services and the referral methods to those services that could facilitate the return of the child to the custody of the child’s parents or guardians, and whether there are any relatives who are able and willing to take temporary physical custody of the child. The court shall order the release of the child from custody unless a prima facie showing has been made that the child comes within Section 300, the court finds that continuance in the parent’s or guardian’s home is contrary to the child’s welfare, and any of the following circumstances exist:
(1) There is a substantial danger to the physical health of the child or the child is suffering severe emotional damage, and there are no reasonable means by which the child’s physical or emotional health may be protected without removing the child from the parent’s or guardian’s physical custody.
(2) There is substantial evidence that a parent, guardian, or custodian of the child is likely to flee the jurisdiction of the court.
(3) The child has left a placement in which he or she was placed by the juvenile court.
(4) The child indicates an unwillingness to return home, if the child has been physically or sexually abused by a person residing in the home.
(c) If the matter is continued pursuant to Section 322 or for any other reason, the court shall find that the continuance of the child in the parent’s or guardian’s home is contrary to the child’s welfare at the initial petition hearing or order the release of the child from custody.
(d) (1) The court shall also make a determination on the record, referencing the social worker’s report or other evidence relied upon, as to whether reasonable efforts were made to prevent or eliminate the need for removal of the child from his or her home, pursuant to subdivision (b) of Section 306, and whether there are available services that would prevent the need for further detention. Services to be considered for purposes of making this determination are case management, counseling, emergency shelter care, emergency in-home caretakers, out-of-home respite care, teaching and demonstrating homemakers, parenting training, transportation, and any other child welfare services authorized by the State Department of Social Services pursuant to Chapter 5 (commencing with Section 16500) of Part 4 of Division 9. The court shall also review whether the social worker has considered whether a referral to public assistance services pursuant to Chapter 2 (commencing with Section 11200) and Chapter 7 (commencing with Section 14000) of Part 3, Chapter 1 (commencing with Section 17000) of Part 5, and Chapter 10 (commencing with Section 18900) of Part 6 of Division 9 would have eliminated the need to take temporary custody of the child or would prevent the need for further detention.
(2) If the child can be returned to the custody of his or her parent or guardian through the provision of those services, the court shall place the child with his or her parent or guardian and order that the services shall be provided. If the child cannot be returned to the physical custody of his or her parent or guardian, the court shall determine if there is a relative who is able and willing to care for the child, and has been assessed pursuant to paragraph (1) of subdivision (d) of Section 309.
(e) If a court orders a child detained, the court shall state the facts on which the decision is based, specify why the initial removal was necessary, reference the social worker’s report or other evidence relied upon to make its determination whether continuance in the home of the parent or legal guardian is contrary to the child’s welfare, order temporary placement and care of the child to be vested with the county child welfare department pending the hearing held pursuant to Section 355 or further order of the court, and order services to be provided as soon as possible to reunify the child and his or her family if appropriate.
(f) (1) If the child is not released from custody, the court may order that the child shall be placed in the assessed home of a relative, in an emergency shelter or other suitable licensed place, in a place exempt from licensure designated by the juvenile court, or in the assessed home of a nonrelative extended family member as defined in Section 362.7 for a period not to exceed 15 judicial days. A runaway and homeless youth shelter licensed by the State Department of Social Services pursuant to Section 1502.35 of the Health and Safety Code shall not be a placement option pursuant to this section.
(2) As used in this section, “relative” means an adult who is related to the child by blood, adoption, or affinity within the fifth degree of kinship, including stepparents, stepsiblings, and all relatives whose status is preceded by the words “great,” “great-great,” or “grand,” or the spouse of any of these persons, even if the marriage was terminated by death or dissolution. However, only the following relatives shall be given preferential consideration for placement of the child: an adult who is a grandparent, aunt, uncle, or sibling of the child.
(3) The court shall consider the recommendations of the social worker based on the assessment pursuant to paragraph (1) of subdivision (d) of Section 309 of the relative’s home, including the results of a criminal records check and prior child abuse allegations, if any, prior to ordering that the child be placed with a relative. The court shall order the parent to disclose to the social worker the names, residences, and any known identifying information of any maternal or paternal relatives of the child. The social worker shall initiate the assessment pursuant to Section 361.3 of any relative to be considered for continuing placement.
(g) (1) At the initial hearing upon the petition filed in accordance with subdivision (c) of Rule 5.520 of the California Rules of Court or anytime thereafter up until the time that the minor is adjudged a dependent child of the court or a finding is made dismissing the petition, the court may temporarily limit the right of the parent or guardian to make educational or developmental services decisions for the child and temporarily appoint a responsible adult to make educational or developmental services decisions for the child if all of the following conditions are found:
(A) The parent or guardian is unavailable, unable, or unwilling to exercise educational or developmental services rights for the child.
(B) The county placing agency has made diligent efforts to locate and secure the participation of the parent or guardian in educational or developmental services decisionmaking.
(C) The child’s educational and developmental services needs cannot be met without the temporary appointment of a responsible adult.
(2) If the court limits the parent’s educational rights under this subdivision, the court shall determine whether there is a responsible adult who is a relative, nonrelative extended family member, or other adult known to the child and who is available and willing to serve as the child’s educational representative before appointing an educational representative or surrogate who is not known to the child.
(3) If the court cannot identify a responsible adult to make educational decisions for the child and the appointment of a surrogate parent, as defined in subdivision (a) of Section 56050 of the Education Code, is not warranted, the court may, with the input of any interested person, make educational decisions for the child. If the child is receiving services from a regional center, the provision of any developmental services related to the court’s decision must be consistent with the child’s individual program plan and pursuant to the provisions of the Lanterman Developmental Disabilities Services Act (Division 4.5 (commencing with Section 4500)). If the court cannot identify a responsible adult to make developmental services decisions for the child, the court may, with the input of any interested person, make developmental services decisions for the child. If the court makes educational or developmental services decisions for the child, the court shall also issue appropriate orders to ensure that every effort is made to identify a responsible adult to make future educational or developmental services decisions for the child.
(4) Any temporary appointment of a responsible adult and temporary limitation on the right of the parent or guardian to make educational or developmental services decisions for the child shall be specifically addressed in the court order. Any order made under this section shall expire at the conclusion of the hearing held pursuant to Section 361 or upon dismissal of the petition. Upon the entering of disposition orders, any additional needed limitation on the parent’s or guardian’s educational or developmental services rights shall be addressed pursuant to Section 361.
(5) Nothing in this section in any way removes the obligation to appoint surrogate parents for students with disabilities who are without parental representation in special education procedures as required by state and federal law, including Section 1415(b)(2) of Title 20 of the United States Code, Section 56050 of the Education Code, Section 7579.5 of the Government Code, and Rule 5.650 of the California Rules of Court.
(6) If the court appoints a developmental services decisionmaker pursuant to this section, he or she shall have the authority to access the child’s information and records pursuant to subdivision (u) of Section 4514 and subdivision (y) of Section 5328, and to act on the child’s behalf for the purposes of the individual program plan process pursuant to Sections 4646, 4646.5, and 4648 and the fair hearing process pursuant to Chapter 7 (commencing with Section 4700), and as set forth in the court order.

SEC. 4.

 Section 361.2 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

361.2.
 (a) When a court orders removal of a child pursuant to Section 361, the court shall first determine whether there is a parent of the child, with whom the child was not residing at the time that the events or conditions arose that brought the child within the provisions of Section 300, who desires to assume custody of the child. If that parent requests custody, the court shall place the child with the parent unless it finds that placement with that parent would be detrimental to the safety, protection, or physical or emotional well-being of the child.
(b) If the court places the child with that parent it may do any of the following:
(1) Order that the parent become legal and physical custodian of the child. The court may also provide reasonable visitation by the noncustodial parent. The court shall then terminate its jurisdiction over the child. The custody order shall continue unless modified by a subsequent order of the superior court. The order of the juvenile court shall be filed in any domestic relation proceeding between the parents.
(2) Order that the parent assume custody subject to the jurisdiction of the juvenile court and require that a home visit be conducted within three months. In determining whether to take the action described in this paragraph, the court shall consider any concerns that have been raised by the child’s current caregiver regarding the parent. After the social worker conducts the home visit and files his or her report with the court, the court may then take the action described in paragraph (1), (3), or this paragraph. However, nothing in this paragraph shall be interpreted to imply that the court is required to take the action described in this paragraph as a prerequisite to the court taking the action described in either paragraph (1) or (3).
(3) Order that the parent assume custody subject to the supervision of the juvenile court. In that case the court may order that reunification services be provided to the parent or guardian from whom the child is being removed, or the court may order that services be provided solely to the parent who is assuming physical custody in order to allow that parent to retain later custody without court supervision, or that services be provided to both parents, in which case the court shall determine, at review hearings held pursuant to Section 366, which parent, if either, shall have custody of the child.
(c) The court shall make a finding either in writing or on the record of the basis for its determination under subdivisions (a) and (b).
(d) Part 6 (commencing with Section 7950) of Division 12 of the Family Code shall apply to the placement of a child pursuant to paragraphs (1) and (2) of subdivision (e).
(e) When the court orders removal pursuant to Section 361, the court shall order the care, custody, control, and conduct of the child to be under the supervision of the social worker who may place the child in any of the following:
(1) The home of a noncustodial parent as described in subdivision (a), regardless of the parent’s immigration status.
(2) The approved home of a relative, regardless of the relative’s immigration status.
(3) The approved home of a nonrelative extended family member as defined in Section 362.7.
(4) A foster home in which the child has been placed before an interruption in foster care, if that placement is in the best interest of the child and space is available.
(5) A suitable licensed community care facility, except a runaway and homeless youth shelter licensed by the State Department of Social Services pursuant to Section 1502.35 of the Health and Safety Code.
(6) With a foster family agency to be placed in a suitable licensed foster family home or certified family home which has been certified by the agency as meeting licensing standards.
(7) A home or facility in accordance with the federal Indian Child Welfare Act (25 U.S.C. Sec. 1901 et seq.).
(8) A child under the age of six years may be placed in a community care facility licensed as a group home for children, or a temporary shelter care facility as defined in Section 1530.8 of the Health and Safety Code, only under any of the following circumstances:
(A) (i) When a case plan indicates that placement is for purposes of providing short-term, specialized, and intensive treatment to the child, the case plan specifies the need for, nature of, and anticipated duration of this treatment, pursuant to paragraph (2) of subdivision (c) of Section 16501.1, the facility meets the applicable regulations adopted under Section 1530.8 of the Health and Safety Code and standards developed pursuant to Section 11467.1, and the deputy director or director of the county child welfare department or an assistant chief probation officer or chief probation officer of the county probation department has approved the case plan.
(ii) The short term, specialized, and intensive treatment period shall not exceed 120 days, unless the county has made progress toward or is actively working toward implementing the case plan that identifies the services or supports necessary to transition the child to a family setting, circumstances beyond the county’s control have prevented the county from obtaining those services or supports within the timeline documented in the case plan, and the need for additional time pursuant to the case plan is documented by the caseworker and approved by a deputy director or director of the county child welfare department or an assistant chief probation officer or chief probation officer of the county probation department.
(iii) To the extent that placements pursuant to this paragraph are extended beyond an initial 120 days, the requirements of clauses (i) and (ii) shall apply to each extension. In addition, the deputy director or director of the county child welfare department or an assistant chief probation officer or chief probation officer of the county probation department shall approve the continued placement no less frequently than every 60 days.
(B) When a case plan indicates that placement is for purposes of providing family reunification services. In addition, the facility offers family reunification services that meet the needs of the individual child and his or her family, permits parents to have reasonable access to their children 24 hours a day, encourages extensive parental involvement in meeting the daily needs of their children, and employs staff trained to provide family reunification services. In addition, one of the following conditions exists:
(i) The child’s parent is also a ward of the court and resides in the facility.
(ii) The child’s parent is participating in a treatment program affiliated with the facility and the child’s placement in the facility facilitates the coordination and provision of reunification services.
(iii) Placement in the facility is the only alternative that permits the parent to have daily 24-hour access to the child in accordance with the case plan, to participate fully in meeting all of the daily needs of the child, including feeding and personal hygiene, and to have access to necessary reunification services.
(9) (A) A child who is 6 to 12 years of age, inclusive, may be placed in a community care facility licensed as a group home for children only when a case plan indicates that placement is for purposes of providing short-term, specialized, and intensive treatment for the child, the case plan specifies the need for, nature of, and anticipated duration of this treatment, pursuant to paragraph (2) of subdivision (c) of Section 16501.1, and is approved by the deputy director or director of the county child welfare department or an assistant chief probation officer or chief probation officer of the county probation department.
(B) The short-term, specialized, and intensive treatment period shall not exceed six months, unless the county has made progress or is actively working toward implementing the case plan that identifies the services or supports necessary to transition the child to a family setting, circumstances beyond the county’s control have prevented the county from obtaining those services or supports within the timeline documented in the case plan, and the need for additional time pursuant to the case plan is documented by the caseworker and approved by a deputy director or director of the county child welfare department or an assistant chief probation officer or chief probation officer of the county probation department.
(C) To the extent that placements pursuant to this paragraph are extended beyond an initial six months, the requirements of subparagraph (A) and (B) shall apply to each extension. In addition, the deputy director or director of the county child welfare department or an assistant chief probation officer or chief probation officer of the county probation department shall approve the continued placement no less frequently than every 60 days.
(10) Nothing in this subdivision shall be construed to allow a social worker to place any dependent child outside the United States, except as specified in subdivision (f).
(f) (1) A child under the supervision of a social worker pursuant to subdivision (e) shall not be placed outside the United States prior to a judicial finding that the placement is in the best interest of the child, except as required by federal law or treaty.
(2) The party or agency requesting placement of the child outside the United States shall carry the burden of proof and must show, by clear and convincing evidence, that placement outside the United States is in the best interest of the child.
(3) In determining the best interest of the child, the court shall consider, but not be limited to, the following factors:
(A) Placement with a relative.
(B) Placement of siblings in the same home.
(C) Amount and nature of any contact between the child and the potential guardian or caretaker.
(D) Physical and medical needs of the dependent child.
(E) Psychological and emotional needs of the dependent child.
(F) Social, cultural, and educational needs of the dependent child.
(G) Specific desires of any dependent child who is 12 years of age or older.
(4) If the court finds that a placement outside the United States is, by clear and convincing evidence, in the best interest of the child, the court may issue an order authorizing the social worker to make a placement outside the United States. A child subject to this subdivision shall not leave the United States prior to the issuance of the order described in this paragraph.
(5) For purposes of this subdivision, “outside the United States” shall not include the lands of any federally recognized American Indian tribe or Alaskan Natives.
(6) This subdivision shall not apply to the placement of a dependent child with a parent pursuant to subdivision (a).
(g) (1) If the child is taken from the physical custody of the child’s parent or guardian and unless the child is placed with relatives, the child shall be placed in foster care in the county of residence of the child’s parent or guardian in order to facilitate reunification of the family.
(2) In the event that there are no appropriate placements available in the parent’s or guardian’s county of residence, a placement may be made in an appropriate place in another county, preferably a county located adjacent to the parent’s or guardian’s community of residence.
(3) Nothing in this section shall be interpreted as requiring multiple disruptions of the child’s placement corresponding to frequent changes of residence by the parent or guardian. In determining whether the child should be moved, the social worker shall take into consideration the potential harmful effects of disrupting the placement of the child and the parent’s or guardian’s reason for the move.
(4) When it has been determined that it is necessary for a child to be placed in a county other than the child’s parent’s or guardian’s county of residence, the specific reason the out-of-county placement is necessary shall be documented in the child’s case plan. If the reason the out-of-county placement is necessary is the lack of resources in the sending county to meet the specific needs of the child, those specific resource needs shall be documented in the case plan.
(5) When it has been determined that a child is to be placed out of county either in a group home or with a foster family agency for subsequent placement in a certified foster family home, and the sending county is to maintain responsibility for supervision and visitation of the child, the sending county shall develop a plan of supervision and visitation that specifies the supervision and visitation activities to be performed and specifies that the sending county is responsible for performing those activities. In addition to the plan of supervision and visitation, the sending county shall document information regarding any known or suspected dangerous behavior of the child that indicates the child may pose a safety concern in the receiving county. Upon implementation of the Child Welfare Services Case Management System, the plan of supervision and visitation, as well as information regarding any known or suspected dangerous behavior of the child, shall be made available to the receiving county upon placement of the child in the receiving county. If placement occurs on a weekend or holiday, the information shall be made available to the receiving county on or before the end of the next business day.
(6) When it has been determined that a child is to be placed out of county and the sending county plans that the receiving county shall be responsible for the supervision and visitation of the child, the sending county shall develop a formal agreement between the sending and receiving counties. The formal agreement shall specify the supervision and visitation to be provided the child, and shall specify that the receiving county is responsible for providing the supervision and visitation. The formal agreement shall be approved and signed by the sending and receiving counties prior to placement of the child in the receiving county. In addition, upon completion of the case plan, the sending county shall provide a copy of the completed case plan to the receiving county. The case plan shall include information regarding any known or suspected dangerous behavior of the child that indicates the child may pose a safety concern to the receiving county.
(h) Whenever the social worker must change the placement of the child and is unable to find a suitable placement within the county and must place the child outside the county, the placement shall not be made until he or she has served written notice on the parent or guardian at least 14 days prior to the placement, unless the child’s health or well-being is endangered by delaying the action or would be endangered if prior notice were given. The notice shall state the reasons which require placement outside the county. The parent or guardian may object to the placement not later than seven days after receipt of the notice and, upon objection, the court shall hold a hearing not later than five days after the objection and prior to the placement. The court shall order out-of-county placement if it finds that the child’s particular needs require placement outside the county.
(i) Where the court has ordered removal of the child from the physical custody of his or her parents pursuant to Section 361, the court shall consider whether the family ties and best interest of the child will be served by granting visitation rights to the child’s grandparents. The court shall clearly specify those rights to the social worker.
(j) Where the court has ordered removal of the child from the physical custody of his or her parents pursuant to Section 361, the court shall consider whether there are any siblings under the court’s jurisdiction, the nature of the relationship between the child and his or her siblings, the appropriateness of developing or maintaining the sibling relationships pursuant to Section 16002, and the impact of the sibling relationships on the child’s placement and planning for legal permanence.
(k) (1) When an agency has placed a child with a relative caregiver, a nonrelative extended family member, a licensed foster family home, or a group home, the agency shall ensure placement of the child in a home that, to the fullest extent possible, best meets the day-to-day needs of the child. A home that best meets the day-to-day needs of the child shall satisfy all of the following criteria:
(A) The child’s caregiver is able to meet the day-to-day health, safety, and well-being needs of the child.
(B) The child’s caregiver is permitted to maintain the least restrictive and most family-like environment that serves the day-to-day needs of the child.
(C) The child is permitted to engage in reasonable, age-appropriate day-to-day activities that promote the most family-like environment for the foster child.
(2) The foster child’s caregiver shall use a reasonable and prudent parent standard, as defined in paragraph (2) of subdivision (a) of Section 362.04, to determine day-to-day activities that are age-appropriate to meet the needs of the child. Nothing in this section shall be construed to permit a child’s caregiver to permit the child to engage in day-to-day activities that carry an unreasonable risk of harm, or subject the child to abuse or neglect.

SEC. 5.

 Section 450 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

450.
 (a) A minor or nonminor who satisfies all of the following criteria is within the transition jurisdiction of the juvenile court:
(1) (A) The minor is a ward who is older than 17 years and 5 months of age and younger than 18 years of age and in foster care placement, or the nonminor is a ward in foster care placement who was a ward subject to an order for foster care placement on the day he or she attained 18 years of age and on and after January 1, 2012, has not attained 19 years of age, or, commencing January 1, 2013, 20 years of age, or, commencing January 1, 2014, 21 years of age.
(B) Notwithstanding subparagraph (A), the nonminor is a ward who has been receiving aid pursuant to Article 5 (commencing with Section 11400) of Chapter 2 of Part 3 of Division 9 between January 1, 2012, and December 31, 2012, and attains 19 years of age prior to January 1, 2013, or who has been receiving that aid between January 1, 2013, and December 31, 2013, and attains 20 years of age prior to January 1, 2014, and who may continue to receive aid under the applicable program, provided that the nonminor dependent continues to meet all other applicable eligibility requirements as specified in Section 11403.
(2) The ward meets either of the following conditions:
(A) The ward was removed from the physical custody of his or her parents or legal guardian, adjudged to be a ward of the juvenile court under Section 725, and ordered into foster care placement as a ward.
(B) The ward was removed from the custody of his or her parents or legal guardian as a dependent of the court with an order for foster care placement as a dependent in effect at the time the court adjudged him or her to be a ward of the juvenile court under Section 725.
(3) The rehabilitative goals of the minor or nonminor, as set forth in the case plan, have been met, and juvenile court jurisdiction over the minor or nonminor as a ward is no longer required.
(4) (A) If the ward is a minor, reunification services have been terminated; the matter has not been set for a hearing for termination of parental rights pursuant to Section 727.3 or for the establishment of guardianship pursuant to Section 728; the return of the child to the physical custody of the parents or legal guardian would create a substantial risk of detriment to the child’s safety, protection, or physical or emotional well-being; and the minor has indicated an intent to sign a mutual agreement, as described in subdivision (u) of Section 11400, with the responsible agency for placement in a supervised setting as a nonminor dependent.
(B) If the ward is a nonminor, he or she has signed a mutual agreement, as described in subdivision (u) of Section 11400, with the responsible agency for placement in a supervised setting as a nonminor dependent or has signed a voluntary reentry agreement, as described in subdivision (z) of Section 11400 for placement in a supervised setting as a nonminor dependent. A runaway and homeless youth shelter licensed by the State Department of Social Services pursuant to Section 1502.35 of the Health and Safety Code shall not be a placement option pursuant to this section.
(b) A minor who is subject to the court’s transition jurisdiction shall be referred to as a transition dependent.
(c) A youth subject to the court’s transition jurisdiction who is 18 years of age or older shall be referred to as a nonminor dependent.

SEC. 6.

 Section 727 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

727.
 (a) (1) If a minor is adjudged a ward of the court on the ground that he or she is a person described by Section 601 or 602, the court may make any reasonable orders for the care, supervision, custody, conduct, maintenance, and support of the minor, including medical treatment, subject to further order of the court.
(2) In the discretion of the court, a ward may be ordered to be on probation without supervision of the probation officer. The court, in so ordering, may impose on the ward any and all reasonable conditions of behavior as may be appropriate under this disposition. A minor who has been adjudged a ward of the court on the basis of the commission of any of the offenses described in subdivision (b) or paragraph (2) of subdivision (d) of Section 707, Section 459 of the Penal Code, or subdivision (a) of Section 11350 of the Health and Safety Code, shall not be eligible for probation without supervision of the probation officer. A minor who has been adjudged a ward of the court on the basis of the commission of any offense involving the sale or possession for sale of a controlled substance, except misdemeanor offenses involving marijuana, as specified in Chapter 2 (commencing with Section 11053) of Division 10 of the Health and Safety Code, or of an offense in violation of Section 32625 of the Penal Code, shall be eligible for probation without supervision of the probation officer only when the court determines that the interests of justice would best be served and states reasons on the record for that determination.
(3) In all other cases, the court shall order the care, custody, and control of the minor to be under the supervision of the probation officer who may place the minor in any of the following:
(A) The approved home of a relative or the approved home of a nonrelative, extended family member, as defined in Section 362.7. If a decision has been made to place the minor in the home of a relative, the court may authorize the relative to give legal consent for the minor’s medical, surgical, and dental care and education as if the relative caretaker were the custodial parent of the minor.
(B) A suitable licensed community care facility, except a runaway and homeless youth shelter licensed by the State Department of Social Services pursuant to Section 1502.35 of the Health and Safety Code. A placement of a child in a community care facility, as specified in Section 1530.8 of the Health and Safety Code, shall be made in accordance with Section 319.2 or 319.3, as applicable, and with paragraph (8) or (9) of subdivision (e) of Section 361.2, as applicable.
(C) With a foster family agency to be placed in a suitable licensed foster family home or certified family home which has been certified by the agency as meeting licensing standards.
(D) (i) Every minor adjudged a ward of the juvenile court who is residing in a placement as defined in subparagraphs (A) to (C), inclusive, shall be entitled to participate in age-appropriate extracurricular, enrichment, and social activities. No state or local regulation or policy may prevent, or create barriers to, participation in those activities. Each state and local entity shall ensure that private agencies that provide foster care services to wards have policies consistent with this section and that those agencies promote and protect the ability of wards to participate in age-appropriate extracurricular, enrichment, and social activities. A group home administrator, a facility manager, or his or her responsible designee, and a caregiver, as defined in paragraph (1) of subdivision (a) of Section 362.04, shall use a reasonable and prudent parent standard, as defined in paragraph (2) of subdivision (a) of Section 362.04, in determining whether to give permission for a minor residing in foster care to participate in extracurricular, enrichment, and social activities. A group home administrator, a facility manager, or his or her responsible designee, and a caregiver shall take reasonable steps to determine the appropriateness of the activity taking into consideration the minor’s age, maturity, and developmental level.
(ii) A group home administrator or a facility manager, or his or her responsible designee, is encouraged to consult with social work or treatment staff members who are most familiar with the minor at the group home in applying and using the reasonable and prudent parent standard.
(b) (1) To facilitate coordination and cooperation among agencies, the court may, at any time after a petition has been filed, after giving notice and an opportunity to be heard, join in the juvenile court proceedings any agency that the court determines has failed to meet a legal obligation to provide services to a minor, for whom a petition has been filed under Section 601 or 602, to a nonminor, as described in Section 303, or to a nonminor dependent, as defined in subdivision (v) of Section 11400. In any proceeding in which an agency is joined, the court shall not impose duties upon the agency beyond those mandated by law. The purpose of joinder under this section is to ensure the delivery and coordination of legally mandated services to the minor. The joinder shall not be maintained for any other purpose. Nothing in this section shall prohibit agencies that have received notice of the hearing on joinder from meeting prior to the hearing to coordinate services.
(2) The court has no authority to order services unless it has been determined through the administrative process of an agency that has been joined as a party, that the minor, nonminor, or nonminor dependent is eligible for those services. With respect to mental health assessment, treatment, and case management services pursuant to Chapter 26.5 (commencing with Section 7570) of Division 7 of Title 1 of the Government Code, the court’s determination shall be limited to whether the agency has complied with that chapter.
(3) For the purposes of this subdivision, “agency” means any governmental agency or any private service provider or individual that receives federal, state, or local governmental funding or reimbursement for providing services directly to a child, nonminor, or nonminor dependent.
(c) If a minor has been adjudged a ward of the court on the ground that he or she is a person described in Section 601 or 602, and the court finds that notice has been given in accordance with Section 661, and if the court orders that a parent or guardian shall retain custody of that minor either subject to or without the supervision of the probation officer, the parent or guardian may be required to participate with that minor in a counseling or education program including, but not limited to, parent education and parenting programs operated by community colleges, school districts, or other appropriate agencies designated by the court.
(d) The juvenile court may direct any reasonable orders to the parents and guardians of the minor who is the subject of any proceedings under this chapter as the court deems necessary and proper to carry out subdivisions (a), (b), and (c) including orders to appear before a county financial evaluation officer, to ensure the minor’s regular school attendance, and to make reasonable efforts to obtain appropriate educational services necessary to meet the needs of the minor.
If counseling or other treatment services are ordered for the minor, the parent, guardian, or foster parent shall be ordered to participate in those services, unless participation by the parent, guardian, or foster parent is deemed by the court to be inappropriate or potentially detrimental to the minor.

SEC. 6.5.

 Section 727 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

727.
 (a) (1) If a minor or nonminor is adjudged a ward of the court on the ground that he or she is a person described by Section 601 or 602, the court may make any reasonable orders for the care, supervision, custody, conduct, maintenance, and support of the minor or nonminor, including medical treatment, subject to further order of the court.
(2) In the discretion of the court, a ward may be ordered to be on probation without supervision of the probation officer. The court, in so ordering, may impose on the ward any and all reasonable conditions of behavior as may be appropriate under this disposition. A minor or nonminor who has been adjudged a ward of the court on the basis of the commission of any of the offenses described in subdivision (b) or paragraph (2) of subdivision (d) of Section 707, Section 459 of the Penal Code, or subdivision (a) of Section 11350 of the Health and Safety Code, shall not be eligible for probation without supervision of the probation officer. A minor or nonminor who has been adjudged a ward of the court on the basis of the commission of any offense involving the sale or possession for sale of a controlled substance, except misdemeanor offenses involving marijuana, as specified in Chapter 2 (commencing with Section 11053) of Division 10 of the Health and Safety Code, or of an offense in violation of Section 32625 of the Penal Code, shall be eligible for probation without supervision of the probation officer only when the court determines that the interests of justice would best be served and states reasons on the record for that determination.
(3) In all other cases, the court shall order the care, custody, and control of the minor or nonminor to be under the supervision of the probation officer who may place the minor or nonminor in any of the following:
(A) The approved home of a relative or the approved home of a nonrelative, extended family member, as defined in Section 362.7. If a decision has been made to place the minor in the home of a relative, the court may authorize the relative to give legal consent for the minor’s medical, surgical, and dental care and education as if the relative caretaker were the custodial parent of the minor.
(B) A suitable licensed community care facility, except a runaway and homeless youth shelter licensed by the State Department of Social Services pursuant to Section 1502.35 of the Health and Safety Code.
(C) With a foster family agency to be placed in a suitable licensed foster family home or certified family home which has been certified by the agency as meeting licensing standards.
(D) (i) Every minor adjudged a ward of the juvenile court who is residing in a placement as defined in subparagraphs (A) to (C), inclusive, shall be entitled to participate in age-appropriate extracurricular, enrichment, and social activities. No state or local regulation or policy may prevent, or create barriers to, participation in those activities. Each state and local entity shall ensure that private agencies that provide foster care services to wards have policies consistent with this section and that those agencies promote and protect the ability of wards to participate in age-appropriate extracurricular, enrichment, and social activities. A group home administrator, a facility manager, or his or her responsible designee, and a caregiver, as defined in paragraph (1) of subdivision (a) of Section 362.04, shall use a reasonable and prudent parent standard, as defined in paragraph (2) of subdivision (a) of Section 362.04, in determining whether to give permission for a minor residing in foster care to participate in extracurricular, enrichment, and social activities. A group home administrator, a facility manager, or his or her responsible designee, and a caregiver shall take reasonable steps to determine the appropriateness of the activity taking into consideration the minor’s age, maturity, and developmental level.
(ii) A group home administrator or a facility manager, or his or her responsible designee, is encouraged to consult with social work or treatment staff members who are most familiar with the minor at the group home in applying and using the reasonable and prudent parent standard.
(E) For nonminors, an approved supervised independent living setting as defined in Section 11400, including a residential housing unit certified by a licensed transitional housing placement provider.
(b) (1) To facilitate coordination and cooperation among agencies, the court may, at any time after a petition has been filed, after giving notice and an opportunity to be heard, join in the juvenile court proceedings any agency that the court determines has failed to meet a legal obligation to provide services to a minor, for whom a petition has been filed under Section 601 or 602, to a nonminor, as described in Section 303, or to a nonminor dependent, as defined in subdivision (v) of Section 11400. In any proceeding in which an agency is joined, the court shall not impose duties upon the agency beyond those mandated by law. The purpose of joinder under this section is to ensure the delivery and coordination of legally mandated services to the minor. The joinder shall not be maintained for any other purpose. Nothing in this section shall prohibit agencies that have received notice of the hearing on joinder from meeting prior to the hearing to coordinate services.
(2) The court has no authority to order services unless it has been determined through the administrative process of an agency that has been joined as a party, that the minor, nonminor, or nonminor dependent is eligible for those services. With respect to mental health assessment, treatment, and case management services pursuant to Chapter 26.5 (commencing with Section 7570) of Division 7 of Title 1 of the Government Code, the court’s determination shall be limited to whether the agency has complied with that chapter.
(3) For the purposes of this subdivision, “agency” means any governmental agency or any private service provider or individual that receives federal, state, or local governmental funding or reimbursement for providing services directly to a child, nonminor, or nonminor dependent.
(c) If a minor has been adjudged a ward of the court on the ground that he or she is a person described in Section 601 or 602, and the court finds that notice has been given in accordance with Section 661, and if the court orders that a parent or guardian shall retain custody of that minor either subject to or without the supervision of the probation officer, the parent or guardian may be required to participate with that minor in a counseling or education program, including, but not limited to, parent education and parenting programs operated by community colleges, school districts, or other appropriate agencies designated by the court.
(d) The juvenile court may direct any reasonable orders to the parents and guardians of the minor who is the subject of any proceedings under this chapter as the court deems necessary and proper to carry out subdivisions (a), (b), and (c) including orders to appear before a county financial evaluation officer, to ensure the minor’s regular school attendance, and to make reasonable efforts to obtain appropriate educational services necessary to meet the needs of the minor.
If counseling or other treatment services are ordered for the minor, the parent, guardian, or foster parent shall be ordered to participate in those services, unless participation by the parent, guardian, or foster parent is deemed by the court to be inappropriate or potentially detrimental to the minor.

SEC. 7.

 Section 11400 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

11400.
 For the purposes of this article, the following definitions shall apply:
(a) “Aid to Families with Dependent Children-Foster Care (AFDC-FC)” means the aid provided on behalf of needy children in foster care under the terms of this division.
(b) “Case plan” means a written document that, at a minimum, specifies the type of home in which the child shall be placed, the safety of that home, and the appropriateness of that home to meet the child’s needs. It shall also include the agency’s plan for ensuring that the child receive proper care and protection in a safe environment, and shall set forth the appropriate services to be provided to the child, the child’s family, and the foster parents, in order to meet the child’s needs while in foster care, and to reunify the child with the child’s family. In addition, the plan shall specify the services that will be provided or steps that will be taken to facilitate an alternate permanent plan if reunification is not possible.
(c) “Certified family home” means a family residence certified by a licensed foster family agency and issued a certificate of approval by that agency as meeting licensing standards, and used only by that foster family agency for placements.
(d) “Family home” means the family residency of a licensee in which 24-hour care and supervision are provided for children.
(e) “Small family home” means any residential facility, in the licensee’s family residence, which provides 24-hour care for six or fewer foster children who have mental disorders or developmental or physical disabilities and who require special care and supervision as a result of their disabilities.
(f) “Foster care” means the 24-hour out-of-home care provided to children whose own families are unable or unwilling to care for them, and who are in need of temporary or long-term substitute parenting.
(g) “Foster family agency” means any individual or organization engaged in the recruiting, certifying, and training of, and providing professional support to, foster parents, or in finding homes or other places for placement of children for temporary or permanent care who require that level of care as an alternative to a group home. Private foster family agencies shall be organized and operated on a nonprofit basis.
(h) “Group home” means a nondetention privately operated residential home, organized and operated on a nonprofit basis only, of any capacity, or a nondetention licensed residential care home operated by the County of San Mateo with a capacity of up to 25 beds, that accepts children in need of care and supervision in a group home, as defined by paragraph (13) of subdivision (a) of Section 1502 of the Health and Safety Code.
(i) “Periodic review” means review of a child’s status by the juvenile court or by an administrative review panel, that shall include a consideration of the safety of the child, a determination of the continuing need for placement in foster care, evaluation of the goals for the placement and the progress toward meeting these goals, and development of a target date for the child’s return home or establishment of alternative permanent placement.
(j) “Permanency planning hearing” means a hearing conducted by the juvenile court in which the child’s future status, including whether the child shall be returned home or another permanent plan shall be developed, is determined.
(k) “Placement and care” refers to the responsibility for the welfare of a child vested in an agency or organization by virtue of the agency or organization having (1) been delegated care, custody, and control of a child by the juvenile court, (2) taken responsibility, pursuant to a relinquishment or termination of parental rights on a child, (3) taken the responsibility of supervising a child detained by the juvenile court pursuant to Section 319 or 636, or (4) signed a voluntary placement agreement for the child’s placement; or to the responsibility designated to an individual by virtue of his or her being appointed the child’s legal guardian.
(l) “Preplacement preventive services” means services that are designed to help children remain with their families by preventing or eliminating the need for removal.
(m) “Relative” means an adult who is related to the child by blood, adoption, or affinity within the fifth degree of kinship, including stepparents, stepsiblings, and all relatives whose status is preceded by the words “great,” “great-great,” or “grand” or the spouse of any of these persons even if the marriage was terminated by death or dissolution.
(n) “Nonrelative extended family member” means an adult caregiver who has an established familial or mentoring relationship with the child, as described in Section 362.7.
(o) “Voluntary placement” means an out-of-home placement of a child by (1) the county welfare department, probation department, or Indian tribe that has entered into an agreement pursuant to Section 10553.1, after the parents or guardians have requested the assistance of the county welfare department and have signed a voluntary placement agreement; or (2) the county welfare department licensed public or private adoption agency, or the department acting as an adoption agency, after the parents have requested the assistance of either the county welfare department, the licensed public or private adoption agency, or the department acting as an adoption agency for the purpose of adoption planning, and have signed a voluntary placement agreement.
(p) “Voluntary placement agreement” means a written agreement between either the county welfare department, probation department, or Indian tribe that has entered into an agreement pursuant to Section 10553.1, licensed public or private adoption agency, or the department acting as an adoption agency, and the parents or guardians of a child that specifies, at a minimum, the following:
(1) The legal status of the child.
(2) The rights and obligations of the parents or guardians, the child, and the agency in which the child is placed.
(q) “Original placement date” means the most recent date on which the court detained a child and ordered an agency to be responsible for supervising the child or the date on which an agency assumed responsibility for a child due to termination of parental rights, relinquishment, or voluntary placement.
(r) (1) “Transitional housing placement provider” means an organization licensed by the State Department of Social Services pursuant to Section 1559.110 of the Health and Safety Code, to provide transitional housing to foster children at least 16 years of age and not more than 18 years of age, and nonminor dependents, as defined in subdivision (v). A transitional housing placement provider shall be privately operated and organized on a nonprofit basis.
(2) Prior to licensure, a provider shall obtain certification from the applicable county, in accordance with Section 16522.1.
(s) “Transitional Housing Program-Plus” means a provider certified by the applicable county, in accordance with subdivision (c) of Section 16522, to provide transitional housing services to former foster youth who have exited the foster care system on or after their 18th birthday.
(t) “Whole family foster home” means a new or existing family home, approved relative caregiver or nonrelative extended family member’s home, the home of a nonrelated legal guardian whose guardianship was established pursuant to Section 360 or 366.26, certified family home, or a host family home placement of a transitional housing placement provider, that provides foster care for a minor or nonminor dependent parent and his or her child, and is specifically recruited and trained to assist the minor or nonminor dependent parent in developing the skills necessary to provide a safe, stable, and permanent home for his or her child. The child of the minor or nonminor dependent parent need not be the subject of a petition filed pursuant to Section 300 to qualify for placement in a whole family foster home.
(u) “Mutual agreement” means any of the following:
(1) A written voluntary agreement of consent for continued placement and care in a supervised setting between a minor or, on and after January 1, 2012, a nonminor dependent, and the county welfare services or probation department or tribal agency responsible for the foster care placement, that documents the nonminor’s continued willingness to remain in supervised out-of-home placement under the placement and care of the responsible county, tribe, consortium of tribes, or tribal organization that has entered into an agreement with the state pursuant to Section 10553.1, remain under the jurisdiction of the juvenile court as a nonminor dependent, and report any change of circumstances relevant to continued eligibility for foster care payments, and that documents the nonminor’s and social worker’s or probation officer’s agreement to work together to facilitate implementation of the mutually developed supervised placement agreement and transitional independent living case plan.
(2) An agreement, as described in paragraph (1), between a nonminor former dependent or ward in receipt of Kin-GAP payments under Article 4.5 (commencing with Section 11360) or Article 4.7 (commencing with Section 11385), and the agency responsible for the Kin-GAP benefits, provided that the nonminor former dependent or ward satisfies the conditions described in Section 11403.01, or one or more of the conditions described in paragraphs (1) to (5), inclusive, of subdivision (b) of Section 11403. For purposes of this paragraph and paragraph (3), “nonminor former dependent or ward” has the same meaning as described in subdivision (aa).
(3) An agreement, as described in paragraph (1), between a nonminor former dependent or ward in receipt of AFDC-FC payments under subdivision (e) or (f) of Section 11405 and the agency responsible for the AFDC-FC benefits, provided that the nonminor former dependent or ward described in subdivision (e) of Section 11405 satisfies one or more of the conditions described in paragraphs (1) to (5), inclusive, of subdivision (b) of Section 11403, and the nonminor described in subdivision (f) of Section 11405 satisfies the secondary school or equivalent training or certificate program conditions described in that subdivision.
(v) “Nonminor dependent” means, on and after January 1, 2012, a foster child, as described in Section 675(8)(B) of Title 42 of the United States Code under the federal Social Security Act who is a current dependent child or ward of the juvenile court, or a nonminor under the transition jurisdiction of the juvenile court, as described in Section 450, who satisfies all of the following criteria:
(1) He or she has attained 18 years of age while under an order of foster care placement by the juvenile court, and is not more than 19 years of age on or after January 1, 2012, not more than 20 years of age on or after January 1, 2013, or not more than 21 years of age on or after January 1, 2014, and as described in Section 10103.5.
(2) He or she is in foster care under the placement and care responsibility of the county welfare department, county probation department, Indian tribe, consortium of tribes, or tribal organization that entered into an agreement pursuant to Section 10553.1.
(3) He or she is participating in a transitional independent living case plan pursuant to Section 475(8) of the federal Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. Sec. 675(8)), as contained in the federal Fostering Connections to Success and Increasing Adoptions Act of 2008 (Public Law 110-351), as described in Section 11403.
(w) “Supervised independent living placement” means, on and after January 1, 2012, an independent supervised setting, as specified in a nonminor dependent’s transitional independent living case plan, in which the youth is living independently, pursuant to Section 472(c)(2) of the Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. Sec. 672(c)(2)).
(x) “Supervised independent living setting,” pursuant to Section 472(c)(2) of the federal Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. Sec. 672(c)(2)), includes both a supervised independent living placement, as defined in subdivision (w), and a residential housing unit certified by the transitional housing placement provider operating a Transitional Housing Placement-Plus Foster Care program, as described in paragraph (2) of subdivision (a) of Section 16522.1.
(y) “Transitional independent living case plan” means, on or after January 1, 2012, the nonminor dependent’s case plan, updated every six months, that describes the goals and objectives of how the nonminor will make progress in the transition to living independently and assume incremental responsibility for adult decisionmaking, the collaborative efforts between the nonminor and the social worker, probation officer, or Indian tribal placing entity and the supportive services as described in the transitional independent living plan (TILP) to ensure active and meaningful participation in one or more of the eligibility criteria described in paragraphs (1) to (5), inclusive, of subdivision (b) of Section 11403, the nonminor’s appropriate supervised placement setting, and the nonminor’s permanent plan for transition to living independently, which includes maintaining or obtaining permanent connections to caring and committed adults, as set forth in paragraph (16) of subdivision (f) of Section 16501.1.
(z) “Voluntary reentry agreement” means a written voluntary agreement between a former dependent child or ward or a former nonminor dependent, who has had juvenile court jurisdiction terminated pursuant to Section 391, 452, or 607.2, and the county welfare or probation department or tribal placing entity that documents the nonminor’s desire and willingness to reenter foster care, to be placed in a supervised setting under the placement and care responsibility of the placing agency, the nonminor’s desire, willingness, and ability to immediately participate in one or more of the conditions of paragraphs (1) to (5), inclusive, of subdivision (b) of Section 11403, the nonminor’s agreement to work collaboratively with the placing agency to develop his or her transitional independent living case plan within 60 days of reentry, the nonminor’s agreement to report any changes of circumstances relevant to continued eligibility for foster care payments, and (1) the nonminor’s agreement to participate in the filing of a petition for juvenile court jurisdiction as a nonminor dependent pursuant to subdivision (e) of Section 388 within 15 judicial days of the signing of the agreement and the placing agency’s efforts and supportive services to assist the nonminor in the reentry process, or (2) if the nonminor meets the definition of a nonminor former dependent or ward, as described in subdivision (aa), the nonminor’s agreement to return to the care and support of his or her former juvenile court-appointed guardian and meet the eligibility criteria for AFDC-FC pursuant to subdivision (e) of Section 11405.
(aa) “Nonminor former dependent or ward” means, on and after January 1, 2012, either of the following:
(1) A nonminor who reached 18 years of age while subject to an order for foster care placement, and for whom dependency, delinquency, or transition jurisdiction has been terminated, and who is still under the general jurisdiction of the court.
(2) A nonminor who is over 18 years of age and, while a minor, was a dependent child or ward of the juvenile court when the guardianship was established pursuant to Section 360 or 366.26, or subdivision (d), of Section 728 and the juvenile court dependency or wardship was dismissed following the establishment of the guardianship.
(ab) “Runaway and homeless youth shelter” means a type of group home, as defined in paragraph (14) of subdivision (a) of Section 1502 of the Health and Safety Code, that is not an eligible placement option under Sections 319, 361.2, 450, and 727, and that is not eligible for AFDC-FC funding pursuant to subdivision (c) of Section 11402 or Section 11462.

SEC. 7.5.

 Section 11400 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

11400.
 For the purposes of this article, the following definitions shall apply:
(a) “Aid to Families with Dependent Children-Foster Care (AFDC-FC)” means the aid provided on behalf of needy children in foster care under the terms of this division.
(b) “Case plan” means a written document that, at a minimum, specifies the type of home in which the child shall be placed, the safety of that home, and the appropriateness of that home to meet the child’s needs. It shall also include the agency’s plan for ensuring that the child receive proper care and protection in a safe environment, and shall set forth the appropriate services to be provided to the child, the child’s family, and the foster parents, in order to meet the child’s needs while in foster care, and to reunify the child with the child’s family. In addition, the plan shall specify the services that will be provided or steps that will be taken to facilitate an alternate permanent plan if reunification is not possible.
(c) “Certified family home” means a family residence certified by a licensed foster family agency and issued a certificate of approval by that agency as meeting licensing standards, and used only by that foster family agency for placements.
(d) “Family home” means the family residence of a licensee in which 24-hour care and supervision are provided for children.
(e) “Small family home” means any residential facility, in the licensee’s family residence, which provides 24-hour care for six or fewer foster children who have mental disorders or developmental or physical disabilities and who require special care and supervision as a result of their disabilities.
(f) “Foster care” means the 24-hour out-of-home care provided to children whose own families are unable or unwilling to care for them, and who are in need of temporary or long-term substitute parenting.
(g) “Foster family agency” means any individual or organization engaged in the recruiting, certifying, and training of, and providing professional support to, foster parents, or in finding homes or other places for placement of children for temporary or permanent care who require that level of care as an alternative to a group home. Private foster family agencies shall be organized and operated on a nonprofit basis.
(h) “Group home” means a nondetention privately operated residential home, organized and operated on a nonprofit basis only, of any capacity, or a nondetention licensed residential care home operated by the County of San Mateo with a capacity of up to 25 beds, that accepts children in need of care and supervision in a group home, as defined by paragraph (13) of subdivision (a) of Section 1502 of the Health and Safety Code.
(i) “Periodic review” means review of a child’s status by the juvenile court or by an administrative review panel, that shall include a consideration of the safety of the child, a determination of the continuing need for placement in foster care, evaluation of the goals for the placement and the progress toward meeting these goals, and development of a target date for the child’s return home or establishment of alternative permanent placement.
(j) “Permanency planning hearing” means a hearing conducted by the juvenile court in which the child’s future status, including whether the child shall be returned home or another permanent plan shall be developed, is determined.
(k) “Placement and care” refers to the responsibility for the welfare of a child vested in an agency or organization by virtue of the agency or organization having (1) been delegated care, custody, and control of a child by the juvenile court, (2) taken responsibility, pursuant to a relinquishment or termination of parental rights on a child, (3) taken the responsibility of supervising a child detained by the juvenile court pursuant to Section 319 or 636, or (4) signed a voluntary placement agreement for the child’s placement; or to the responsibility designated to an individual by virtue of his or her being appointed the child’s legal guardian.
(l) “Preplacement preventive services” means services that are designed to help children remain with their families by preventing or eliminating the need for removal.
(m) “Relative” means an adult who is related to the child by blood, adoption, or affinity within the fifth degree of kinship, including stepparents, stepsiblings, and all relatives whose status is preceded by the words “great,” “great-great,” or “grand” or the spouse of any of these persons even if the marriage was terminated by death or dissolution.
(n) “Nonrelative extended family member” means an adult caregiver who has an established familial or mentoring relationship with the child, as described in Section 362.7.
(o) “Voluntary placement” means an out-of-home placement of a child by (1) the county welfare department, probation department, or Indian tribe that has entered into an agreement pursuant to Section 10553.1, after the parents or guardians have requested the assistance of the county welfare department and have signed a voluntary placement agreement; or (2) the county welfare department licensed public or private adoption agency, or the department acting as an adoption agency, after the parents have requested the assistance of either the county welfare department, the licensed public or private adoption agency, or the department acting as an adoption agency for the purpose of adoption planning, and have signed a voluntary placement agreement.
(p) “Voluntary placement agreement” means a written agreement between either the county welfare department, probation department, or Indian tribe that has entered into an agreement pursuant to Section 10553.1, licensed public or private adoption agency, or the department acting as an adoption agency, and the parents or guardians of a child that specifies, at a minimum, the following:
(1) The legal status of the child.
(2) The rights and obligations of the parents or guardians, the child, and the agency in which the child is placed.
(q) “Original placement date” means the most recent date on which the court detained a child and ordered an agency to be responsible for supervising the child or the date on which an agency assumed responsibility for a child due to termination of parental rights, relinquishment, or voluntary placement.
(r) (1) “Transitional housing placement provider” means an organization licensed by the State Department of Social Services pursuant to Section 1559.110 of the Health and Safety Code, to provide transitional housing to foster children at least 16 years of age and not more than 18 years of age, and nonminor dependents, as defined in subdivision (v). A transitional housing placement provider shall be privately operated and organized on a nonprofit basis.
(2) Prior to licensure, a provider shall obtain certification from the applicable county, in accordance with Section 16522.1.
(s) “Transitional Housing Program-Plus” means a provider certified by the applicable county, in accordance with subdivision (c) of Section 16522, to provide transitional housing services to former foster youth who have exited the foster care system on or after their 18th birthday.
(t) “Whole family foster home” means a new or existing family home, approved relative caregiver or nonrelative extended family member’s home, the home of a nonrelated legal guardian whose guardianship was established pursuant to Section 360 or 366.26, certified family home, or a host family home placement of a transitional housing placement provider, that provides foster care for a minor or nonminor dependent parent and his or her child, and is specifically recruited and trained to assist the minor or nonminor dependent parent in developing the skills necessary to provide a safe, stable, and permanent home for his or her child. The child of the minor or nonminor dependent parent need not be the subject of a petition filed pursuant to Section 300 to qualify for placement in a whole family foster home.
(u) “Mutual agreement” means any of the following:
(1) A written voluntary agreement of consent for continued placement and care in a supervised setting between a minor or, on and after January 1, 2012, a nonminor dependent, and the county welfare services or probation department or tribal agency responsible for the foster care placement, that documents the nonminor’s continued willingness to remain in supervised out-of-home placement under the placement and care of the responsible county, tribe, consortium of tribes, or tribal organization that has entered into an agreement with the state pursuant to Section 10553.1, remain under the jurisdiction of the juvenile court as a nonminor dependent, and report any change of circumstances relevant to continued eligibility for foster care payments, and that documents the nonminor’s and social worker’s or probation officer’s agreement to work together to facilitate implementation of the mutually developed supervised placement agreement and transitional independent living case plan.
(2) An agreement, as described in paragraph (1), between a nonminor former dependent or ward in receipt of Kin-GAP payments under Article 4.5 (commencing with Section 11360) or Article 4.7 (commencing with Section 11385), and the agency responsible for the Kin-GAP benefits, provided that the nonminor former dependent or ward satisfies the conditions described in Section 11403.01, or one or more of the conditions described in paragraphs (1) to (5), inclusive, of subdivision (b) of Section 11403. For purposes of this paragraph and paragraph (3), “nonminor former dependent or ward” has the same meaning as described in subdivision (aa).
(3) An agreement, as described in paragraph (1), between a nonminor former dependent or ward in receipt of AFDC-FC payments under subdivision (e) or (f) of Section 11405 and the agency responsible for the AFDC-FC benefits, provided that the nonminor former dependent or ward described in subdivision (e) of Section 11405 satisfies one or more of the conditions described in paragraphs (1) to (5), inclusive, of subdivision (b) of Section 11403, and the nonminor described in subdivision (f) of Section 11405 satisfies the secondary school or equivalent training or certificate program conditions described in that subdivision.
(v) “Nonminor dependent” means, on and after January 1, 2012, a foster child, as described in Section 675(8)(B) of Title 42 of the United States Code under the federal Social Security Act who is a current dependent child or ward of the juvenile court, or a nonminor under the transition jurisdiction of the juvenile court, as described in Section 450, who satisfies all of the following criteria:
(1) He or she has attained 18 years of age while under an order of foster care placement by the juvenile court, and is not more than 19 years of age on or after January 1, 2012, not more than 20 years of age on or after January 1, 2013, or not more than 21 years of age on or after January 1, 2014, and as described in Section 10103.5.
(2) He or she is in foster care under the placement and care responsibility of the county welfare department, county probation department, Indian tribe, consortium of tribes, or tribal organization that entered into an agreement pursuant to Section 10553.1.
(3) He or she has a transitional independent living case plan pursuant to Section 475(8) of the federal Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. Sec. 675(8)), as contained in the federal Fostering Connections to Success and Increasing Adoptions Act of 2008 (Public Law 110-351), as described in Section 11403.
(w) “Supervised independent living placement” means, on and after January 1, 2012, an independent supervised setting, as specified in a nonminor dependent’s transitional independent living case plan, in which the youth is living independently, pursuant to Section 472(c)(2) of the Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. Sec. 672(c)(2)).
(x) “Supervised independent living setting,” pursuant to Section 472(c)(2) of the federal Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. Sec. 672(c)(2)), includes both a supervised independent living placement, as defined in subdivision (w), and a residential housing unit certified by the transitional housing placement provider operating a Transitional Housing Placement-Plus Foster Care program, as described in paragraph (2) of subdivision (a) of Section 16522.1.
(y) “Transitional independent living case plan” means, on or after January 1, 2012, a child’s case plan submitted for the last review hearing held before he or she reaches 18 years of age or the nonminor dependent’s case plan, updated every six months, that describes the goals and objectives of how the nonminor will make progress in the transition to living independently and assume incremental responsibility for adult decisionmaking, the collaborative efforts between the nonminor and the social worker, probation officer, or Indian tribal placing entity and the supportive services as described in the transitional independent living plan (TILP) to ensure active and meaningful participation in one or more of the eligibility criteria described in paragraphs (1) to (5), inclusive, of subdivision (b) of Section 11403, the nonminor’s appropriate supervised placement setting, and the nonminor’s permanent plan for transition to living independently, which includes maintaining or obtaining permanent connections to caring and committed adults, as set forth in paragraph (16) of subdivision (f) of Section 16501.1.
(z) “Voluntary reentry agreement” means a written voluntary agreement between a former dependent child or ward or a former nonminor dependent, who has had juvenile court jurisdiction terminated pursuant to Section 391, 452, or 607.2, and the county welfare or probation department or tribal placing entity that documents the nonminor’s desire and willingness to reenter foster care, to be placed in a supervised setting under the placement and care responsibility of the placing agency, the nonminor’s desire, willingness, and ability to immediately participate in one or more of the conditions of paragraphs (1) to (5), inclusive, of subdivision (b) of Section 11403, the nonminor’s agreement to work collaboratively with the placing agency to develop his or her transitional independent living case plan within 60 days of reentry, the nonminor’s agreement to report any changes of circumstances relevant to continued eligibility for foster care payments, and (1) the nonminor’s agreement to participate in the filing of a petition for juvenile court jurisdiction as a nonminor dependent pursuant to subdivision (e) of Section 388 within 15 judicial days of the signing of the agreement and the placing agency’s efforts and supportive services to assist the nonminor in the reentry process, or (2) if the nonminor meets the definition of a nonminor former dependent or ward, as described in subdivision (aa), the nonminor’s agreement to return to the care and support of his or her former juvenile court-appointed guardian and meet the eligibility criteria for AFDC-FC pursuant to subdivision (e) of Section 11405.
(aa) “Nonminor former dependent or ward” means, on and after January 1, 2012, either of the following:
(1) A nonminor who reached 18 years of age while subject to an order for foster care placement, and for whom dependency, delinquency, or transition jurisdiction has been terminated, and who is still under the general jurisdiction of the court.
(2) A nonminor who is over 18 years of age and, while a minor, was a dependent child or ward of the juvenile court when the guardianship was established pursuant to Section 360 or 366.26, or subdivision (d), of Section 728 and the juvenile court dependency or wardship was dismissed following the establishment of the guardianship.
(ab) “Runaway and homeless youth shelter” means a type of group home, as defined in paragraph (14) of subdivision (a) of Section 1502 of the Health and Safety Code, that is not an eligible placement option under Sections 319, 361.2, 450, and 727, and that is not eligible for AFDC-FC funding pursuant to subdivision (c) of Section 11402 or Section 11462.
(ac) “Transition dependent” is a minor between 17 years and five months and 18 years of age who is subject to the court’s transition jurisdiction under Section 450.

SEC. 8.

 Section 11402 of the Welfare and Institutions Code is amended to read:

11402.
 In order to be eligible for AFDC-FC, a child or nonminor dependent shall be placed in one of the following:
(a) The approved home of a relative, provided the child is otherwise eligible for federal financial participation in the AFDC-FC payment.
(b) (1) The licensed family home of a nonrelative.
(2) The approved home of a nonrelative extended family member as described in Section 362.7.
(c) A licensed group home, as defined in subdivision (h) of Section 11400, excluding a runaway and homeless youth shelter as defined in subdivision (ab) of Section 11400, provided that the placement worker has documented that the placement is necessary to meet the treatment needs of the child and that the facility offers those treatment services.
(d) The home of a nonrelated legal guardian or the home of a former nonrelated legal guardian when the guardianship of a child who is otherwise eligible for AFDC-FC has been dismissed due to the child’s attaining 18 years of age.
(e) An exclusive-use home.
(f) A housing model certified by a licensed transitional housing placement provider as described in Section 1559.110 of the Health and Safety Code and as defined in subdivision (r) of Section 11400.
(g) An out-of-state group home, provided that the placement worker, in addition to complying with all other statutory requirements for placing a minor in an out-of-state group home, documents that the requirements of Section 7911.1 of the Family Code have been met.
(h) An approved supervised independent living setting for nonminor dependents, as defined in subdivision (w) of Section 11400.
(i) This section shall become operative on July 1, 2012.

SEC. 9.

 (a) Section 6.5 of this bill incorporates amendments to Section 727 of the Welfare and Institutions Code proposed by both this bill and Assembly Bill 787. It shall only become operative if (1) both bills are enacted and become effective on or before January 1, 2014, (2) each bill amends Section 727 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, and (3) this bill is enacted after Assembly Bill 787, in which case Section 6 of this bill shall not become operative.
(b) Section 7.5 of this bill incorporates amendments to Section 11400 of the Welfare and Institutions Code proposed by both this bill and Assembly Bill 787. It shall only become operative if (1) both bills are enacted and become effective on or before January 1, 2014, (2) each bill amends Section 11400 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, and (3) this bill is enacted after Assembly Bill 787, in which case Section 7 of this bill shall not become operative.

SEC. 10.

 No reimbursement is required by this act pursuant to Section 6 of Article XIII B of the California Constitution because the only costs that may be incurred by a local agency or school district will be incurred because this act creates a new crime or infraction, eliminates a crime or infraction, or changes the penalty for a crime or infraction, within the meaning of Section 17556 of the Government Code, or changes the definition of a crime within the meaning of Section 6 of Article XIII B of the California Constitution.