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AB-1178 Pupil instruction: California Promise Neighborhood Initiative.(2013-2014)

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Amended  IN  Assembly  January 08, 2014
Amended  IN  Assembly  April 23, 2013

CALIFORNIA LEGISLATURE— 2013–2014 REGULAR SESSION

Assembly Bill
No. 1178


Introduced by Assembly Member Bocanegra

February 22, 2013


An act to add and repeal Chapter 18.5 (commencing with Section 11750) to of Part 7 of Division 1 of Title 1 of the Education Code, relating to pupil instruction.


LEGISLATIVE COUNSEL'S DIGEST


AB 1178, as amended, Bocanegra. Pupil instruction: California Promise Neighborhood Initiative.
Existing law establishes a system of public elementary and secondary schools in this state, and authorizes local educational agencies throughout the state to operate schools and provide instruction to pupils in kindergarten and grades 1 to 12, inclusive. Existing law also establishes a system of postsecondary education in the state that consists of 4 segments: the University of California, the California State University, the California Community Colleges, and independent institutions of higher education.
This bill would express findings and declarations of the Legislature about, among other things, the educational, cultural, and health social, and health needs of California’s most distressed communities. The bill would establish the California Promise Neighborhood Initiative to develop a system of up to 40 California promise neighborhoods throughout the state to support children’s development. The bill would, commencing in July 2014 2015, require the State Department of Education to develop an application process for eligible entities to apply for sites to become promise neighborhoods. The bill would require authorize the State Department of Education to designate the up to 40 California promise neighborhoods by January 1, 2016 2017, and would specify that the promise neighborhoods would be selected from areas that voluntarily apply, as prescribed, for that designation. The bill would specify items that would be required to be included in an application to be designated as a California promise neighborhood. The bill would specify the services to be provided to the participating neighborhoods. The bill would also require promise neighborhood designees to undergo a performance reviewevery 3 years conducted by provide a report to the State Department of Education and the community served by the promise neighborhood, every 3 years, containing specified data. These provisions would become operative only if the Superintendent of Public Instruction finds that sufficient funding for its purposes has been provided, as specified.
These provisions would be repealed as of January 1, 2026.
Vote: MAJORITY   Appropriation: NO   Fiscal Committee: YES   Local Program: NO  

The people of the State of California do enact as follows:


SECTION 1.

 Chapter 18.5 (commencing with Section 11750) is added to Part 7 of Division 1 of Title 1 of the Education Code, to read:
CHAPTER  18.5. California Promise Neighborhood Initiative
Article  1. Findings and General Provisions

11750.
 The Legislature hereby finds and declares all of the following:
(a) All children throughout California, regardless of their families’ socioeconomic, English learning, or special education status, or the neighborhoods in which they reside, deserve access to a high-quality education, health services, and social services that will prepare them to succeed in college and in their careers, and that will allow them to become productive citizens contributing to the wealth of our cities, state, and nation.
(b) Many children living in California’s most distressed communities lack access to opportunities that will ensure adequate academic, social, and health preparation for achieving success and helping to end family and neighborhood poverty.
(c) Innovative and comprehensive approaches to break the cycle of poverty are necessary for creating opportunities for children to succeed and ultimately to help turn around poor neighborhoods.
(d) Long-term investments in underserved children’s academic, social, and health development and the strengthening of a system of family and community support shared by various stakeholders are also needed to sustain the future of our communities.
(e) The Harlem Children’s Zone in New York has demonstrated the lasting benefits of developing a network of support services to revitalize an entire community through focusing on the educational, social, and health, and educational development of children.
(f) The Federal Promise Neighborhood Initiative, inspired by the Harlem Children’s Zone, seeks to develop a cradle-to-career pipeline of support services in specific neighborhoods that will transform communities.
(g) Out of more than 50 communities in California that applied for the Federal Promise Neighborhood Initiative grant, eight communities in California were selected to receive planning or implementation grants.
(h) Many of the communities that were not selected by the federal government continue to work on developing community plans because cross-community planning provides lasting benefits in aligning and maximizing resources in a community.
(i) Establishing a network of services to serve specific families breaks down many unnecessary barriers in the effective delivery of programs and services.
(j) The alignment of local, state, and federal resources can maximize existing dollars and better serve specific communities.
(k) Central to the development of the Harlem Children’s Zone and the Federal Promise Neighborhood Initiative has been the use of data to drive real-time decisionmaking and program improvement.

11751.
 (a) The California Promise Neighborhood Initiative is hereby established to develop a system of up to 40 “promise neighborhoods” throughout California to support children’s development from cradle to career. Participation in this initiative is voluntary.
(b) The purpose of the California Promise Neighborhood Initiative is to significantly improve the outcomes and opportunities for children and their families living in California’s most distressed neighborhoods and to transform those communities. By using results-driven accountability and leveraging federal, state, local, and private resources, the state will seek to provide children and their families in these neighborhoods with access to a community-based continuum of high-quality services and practices based on the best available evidence, which will address the needs of children from birth through college and career.
(c) Commencing in July 2014 2015, the department shall develop an application process for eligible entities to apply for sites to become promise neighborhoods pursuant to this article. The department shall may designate up to 40 California promise neighborhoods by January 1, 2016 2017, selecting from applicants that meet eligibility criteria, and have demonstrated that they will implement a comprehensive, integrated continuum of solutions or pipeline of services based on the best available evidence to improve academic achievement, including early childhood programs, child and youth social and health development, college and career readiness, and efforts to build strong family and community supports measured by common outcomes in neighborhoods with high concentrations of low-income families, persistently low-achieving schools, or schools with an achievement gap.
(d) A designee is responsible for, and shall be measured by the department for, demonstrating progress in all of the following common outcomes:
(1) Children enter kindergarten ready to succeed in school.
(2) Pupils are proficient in core academic subjects.
(3) Pupils successfully transition from middle school grades to high school.
(4) Pupils graduate from high school.
(5) High school graduates obtain a postsecondary educational degree, certification, or credential.
(6) Pupils are healthy.
(7) Pupils feel safe at school and in their community.
(8) Pupils live in stable communities.
(9) Families and community members support learning in promise neighborhood schools.
(10) Pupils have access to 21st century learning tools.
(e) The department shall determine acceptable indicators to illustrate progress in each of the above outcomes.

(e)

(f) The department shall begin the California Promise Neighborhood Initiative selection process by guaranteeing eligibility for the federally recognizedcommunities recognized communities in California receiving either planning or implementation grants.

11752.
 As used in this chapter:
(a) A “California promise neighborhood” is a specific geographic area that represents a community focused on revitalization through the establishment of a cradle-to-career network of services aimed at improving the health, safety, education, and economic development of the defined area.
(b) An “eligible applicant” is any of the following:
(1) A nonprofit organization, including a faith-based organization to the extent permitted by law.
(2) A local educational agency.

(2)

(3) An institution of higher education.

(3)

(4) An Indian tribe or tribal organization, serving as a lead agency representative of the proposed geographic area to be served and in partnership with at least one public elementary or secondary school, traditional or charter, located within the identified geographic area.
(c) “Common outcomes” are the outcomes listed in subdivision (d) of Section 11751.

Article  2. Program Provisions

11753.
 (a) The department shall work with the Employment Development Department, the California Health and Human Services Agency, the Business, Transportation and Housing Agency, the California Children and Families Commission, the California Community Colleges, the California State University, the University of California, the Student Aid Commission, the Department of Parks and Recreation, and other agencies and departments selected by the Governor deemed appropriate by the Superintendent of Public Instruction to implement this chapter.
(b) The department shall work with the entities listed in subdivision (a) to identify programs and opportunities for grants suitable for prioritization and granting of bonus points in promise neighborhoods existing programs and grants for which an applicant that is designated a California Promise Neighborhood would receive bonus points, additional recognition, or weighted consideration when competing for those grants.
(c) For purposes of implementing this chapter, the department may use existing available state resources and federal funds. If state or federal funds are not available or sufficient, the department may apply for and accept grants and receive donations and other financial support from public or private sources for purposes of this chapter.
(d) This chapter shall not be construed to require the development or funding of any new programs or grants.

(d)

(e) It is the intent of the Legislature to encourage the Governor to give a high priority to California promise neighborhoods in the expenditure of discretionary federal workforce investment funds.

11754.

(a)The department shall work with the California Health and Human Services Agency and county health and human services agencies to ensure, to the extent feasible, the maximum participation of eligible populations within California promise neighborhoods in the following programs:

(1)The CalFresh program pursuant to Chapter 10 (commencing with Section 18900) of Part 6 of Division 9 of the Welfare and Institutions Code.

(2)The Medi-Cal program pursuant to Chapter 7 (commencing with Section 14000) of Part 3 of Division 9 of the Welfare and Institutions Code.

(b)The department shall have a participation goal of 90 percent, and, beginning January 1, 2016, the department shall post participation rates for these areas. The department shall explore different methods of increasing participation, including, but not necessarily limited to, a universal application and electronic data sharing with schools and school districts.

11755.11754.
 The department shall work with the California Children and Families Commission (First 5 Commission), established pursuant to Division 108 (commencing with Section 130100) of the Health and Safety Code, to ensure that, to the extent feasible, eligible applicants residing within California promise neighborhoods receive bonus points, additional recognition, or weighted consideration for receiving funding for competitive grants administered by that commission.

11756.11755.
 (a) The department shall work with the California Community Colleges, the California State University, the University of California, the Student Aid Commission, and the California Postsecondary Education Commission to ensure that, to the extent feasible, eligible applicants residing within California promise neighborhoods receive bonus points, additional recognition, or weighted consideration, to the extent feasible, when applying for funding for competitive grants.
(b) Schools, school districts, and institutions of higher education within California promise neighborhoods shall, at a minimum, for purposes of meeting the shared outcomes common outcomes of the promise neighborhood initiative, to the extent not in conflict with federal law or with an initiative measure, receive bonus points, additional recognition, or weighted consideration for receiving funding for the following competitive grants:
(1) The After School Education and Safety Program established pursuant to Section 8482.
(2) A California Partnership Academy established pursuant to Article 5 (commencing with Section 54690) of Chapter 9 of Part 29 of Division 4 of Title 2.

(3)The Immediate Intervention-Underperforming Schools Program established pursuant to Section 52053.

(4)

(3) Career technical education pathways grants pursuant to Section 88532.

(5)

(4) School improvement grants, to the extent that a school within a promise neighborhood is presently low achieving and is eligible for Title 1 funding pursuant to Chapter 70 (commencing with Section 6301) of Title 20 of the United States Code.

11757.11756.
 The department shall work with the Employment Development Department, the California Workforce Investment Board, and the Employment Training Panel to ensure that, to the extent feasible, eligible applicants residing within California promise neighborhoods receive bonus points, additional recognition, or weighted consideration for receiving funding for competitive grants.

11758.11757.
 (a) The department shall work with the Department of Parks and Recreation to ensure that eligible applicants residing within California promise neighborhoods receive, to the extent feasible, bonus points, additional recognition, or weighted consideration for receiving funding for competitive grants.
(b) Cities and counties in which California promise neighborhoods are located shall, with the support of the promise neighborhoods, demonstrate that multiple sources of block grant assistance are being coordinated and invested in support of the planning, implementation, and long-term results of their promise neighborhood program.
(c) Cities and counties in which California promise neighborhoods are located shall receive, to the extent feasible, bonus points, additional recognition, or weighted consideration for funding for the creation of new parks and recreation activities in underserved communities.

11759.11758.
 (a) For purposes of receiving a California promise neighborhood designation, an eligible applicant shall submit an application to the department at a time, in the manner, and containing the information, the department may require.
(b) An eligible applicant shall submit a description of the geographically defined area or neighborhood to be served and the level of distress in that area based on indicators of need and other relevant indicators.
(c) In order for an area to apply, the geographic area of the proposed California promise neighborhood shall meet all of the following minimum criteria:

(1)Contain a designated high school or schools and feeder schools that use a transformation model that includes, but is not necessarily limited to, full-service community schools, charter schools, turnaround schools as defined by the federal government, and career pathways.

(2)

(1) Contain a high school with a graduation rate below 70 percent.

(3)

(2) Have unemployment rates higher than the state as a whole.

(4)

(3) Have more than 25 percent of households with annual incomes below twenty-two thousand dollars ($22,000).
(d) An eligible applicant, at a minimum, shall include the following partners as part of its application:
(1) Other community organizations.
(2) Child development organizations.
(3) Schools or school districts.
(4) Postsecondary educational institutions.
(5) City and county governments.
(6) Representatives of local business and industry.
(e) An eligible applicant shall submit a preliminary memorandum of understanding, signed by representatives of each partner entity or agency, that includes, but is not necessarily limited to, all of the following:
(1) Each partner’s commitment and contribution toward achieving each common outcome at population level.
(2) Each partner’s financial and programmatic commitment with respect to the strategies described in the application, including an identification of the fiscal agent.
(3) The governance structure proposed for the promise neighborhood, including a system for how the eligible applicant will hold partners accountable, the representation of geographical areas on the eligible applicant’s governing and advisory boards, and resident engagement from the neighborhood in the organization’s decisionmaking process.
(4) Each partner’s long-term commitment to providing pipeline services that, at a minimum, account for the cost of supporting the pipeline, including the period after grant funds are no longer available, and potential changes in local government. pipeline.
(5) Each partner’s mission and plan that will govern the work that partners do together.
(6) Each partner’s long-term commitment to supporting the pipeline through data collection, monitoring, reporting, and sharing.
(7) Each partner’s commitment to ensure sound fiscal management and controls, including evidence of a system of supports and personnel.
(f) Eligible applicants shall submit a description of a plan to significantly improve the academic, health, and social outcomes of children living in an identified neighborhood and to support the healthy development and well-being of children and youth in the neighborhood by providing a continuum of solutions to address the neighborhood’s needs. The continuum of solutions proposed by the eligible applicant shall be based on the best information available to the applicant.
(g) An eligible applicant shall submit an analysis of community assets within, or accessible to, the neighborhood, including, at a minimum, a description of all of the following:
(1) Early learning programs and network networks, including home visiting, high-quality child care, Early Head Start programs, Head Start programs, and prekindergarten programs.
(2) Community centers, after school programs, and other opportunities for out-of-school activities.
(3) Transportation resources.
(4) Parks and recreational facilities.
(5) Available healthy food options and opportunities for physical activity.
(6) Existing family and student support organizations.
(7) Businesses and employers located in the community.
(8) Postsecondary educational institutions located in or near the community.
(h) A description of the process by which to develop, launch, and implement a longitudinal data system that integrates student-level data from multiple sources to measure progress on educational and family and community support indicators for all children in the neighborhood.
(i) Any funding received as a result of the promise neighborhood designation shall only be used for the development of the promise neighborhood common outcomes.

(j)(1)As used in this chapter, “full-service community school” means a school that aligns the efforts and resources of school leaders, public agencies, and community partners to create safe, healthy, and supportive schools that provide equitable opportunities for all children and youth to develop the skills needed for healthy and successful transitions to college, careers, and life-long learning. The principles of equity and academic excellence drive the full-service community school to meet the needs of all pupils, including, and most especially, those pupils identified as vulnerable to social disconnection and dropping out of school.

(2)(A)The core elements of a full-service community school include, but are not necessarily limited to, all of the following:

(i)A high-quality education plan that attends to the full range of 21st century skills, including core subjects and themes such as both of the following:

(I)Civics, health, and environmental literacy.

(II)Information, media, technology, career, and life skills appropriate to each grade from prekindergarten to grade 12.

(ii)The alignment of school and community resources with the needs of pupils and families.

(iii)A collaborative governance structure for the effective braiding of school and community resources and family and community engagement.

(iv)Expanded learning opportunities for all pupils, including before and after school enrichment programs, workplace learning opportunities, and postsecondary partnerships.

(v)Access to onsite, coordinated support services for pupils and families, including physical and mental health services, social services, and youth, family, and community engagement and development.

(B)The services set forth in this paragraph are designed to holistically address the mental, emotional, and physical health of pupils and to support the acceleration of academic achievement.

11760.11759.
 Every three years, promise neighborhood designees shall undergo a performance review conducted by the department and the community served by the promise neighborhood. The review shall examine performance in all of the following outcomes, as defined by the department California promise neighborhoods shall provide the department with a report. The department may add requirements to the report, but the report shall include, but is not necessarily limited to, all of the following information:

(a)Children enter kindergarten ready to succeed in school.

(b)Pupils are proficient in core academic subjects.

(c)Pupils successfully transition from middle school grades to high school.

(d)Pupils graduate from high school.

(e)High school graduates obtain a postsecondary degree, certification, or credential.

(f)Pupils are healthy.

(g)Pupils feel safe at school and in their community.

(h)Pupils live in stable communities.

(i)Families and community members support learning in promise neighborhood schools.

(j)Pupils have access to 21st century learning tools.

(a) An assessment and discussion of the promise neighborhood’s progress on each of the common outcomes.
(b) A discussion of the data indicators, as determined by the department under subdivision (e) of Section 11751, that demonstrates critical analysis of the designated promise neighborhood’s progress on each of the common outcomes.
(c) A plan for updating strategies to continue the promise neighborhood’s progress on each of the common outcomes for children and their families in promise neighborhoods.

11760.
 This chapter shall become operative only if the Superintendent finds that sufficient funding for the purposes of this chapter has been provided through a combination of state, federal, or private funds. The Superintendent shall prominently post this finding on the department’s Web site.

11761.
 This chapter shall remain in effect only until January 1, 2026, and as of that date is repealed, unless a later enacted statute, that is enacted before January 1, 2026, deletes or extends that date.