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AB-2211 Coastal resources: California Coastal Act of 1976: goals and legislative findings and declarations.(2011-2012)

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CALIFORNIA LEGISLATURE— 2011–2012 REGULAR SESSION

Assembly Bill
No. 2211


Introduced  by  Assembly Member Jones

February 24, 2012


An act to amend Sections 30001.5 and 30007.5 of the Public Resources Code, relating to coastal resources.


LEGISLATIVE COUNSEL'S DIGEST


AB 2211, as introduced, Jones. Coastal resources: California Coastal Act of 1976: goals and legislative findings and declarations.
The California Coastal Act of 1976 provides for the planning and regulation of development, under a coastal development permit process, within the coastal zone, as defined. The act makes legislative findings and declarations regarding the resolution of conflicts under the act and declares that the basic goals of the state include, among other things, assuring the orderly, balanced utilization and conservation of coastal zone resources, taking into account the social and economic needs of the people of the state. The act also specifies that the Legislature declares that, in carrying out the provisions of the act, conflicts be resolved in a manner that, on balance, is the most protective of significant coastal resources.
This bill would revise the above-described goal to specify that “social and economic needs” includes both the infrastructure and development that are needed to support the continued economic and population growth of the state. The bill would instead specify that the Legislature declares that, in carrying out the provisions of the act, conflicts be resolved in a manner that balances the protection of significant coastal resources with the economic and social benefits provided by a proposed coastal development project to the community at large, which includes, but is not limited to, the economic prosperity of the region.
Vote: MAJORITY   Appropriation: NO   Fiscal Committee: NO   Local Program: NO  

The people of the State of California do enact as follows:


SECTION 1.

 Section 30001.5 of the Public Resources Code is amended to read:

30001.5.
 The Legislature further finds and declares that the basic goals of the state for the coastal zone are to:
(a) Protect, maintain, and, where feasible, enhance and restore the overall quality of the coastal zone environment and its natural and artificial resources.
(b) Assure orderly, balanced utilization and conservation of coastal zone resources taking into account the social and economic needs of the people of the state. For purposes of this subdivision, “social and economic needs” includes both the infrastructure and development that are needed to support the continued economic and population growth of the state.
(c) Maximize public access to and along the coast and maximize public recreational opportunities in the coastal zone consistent with sound resources conservation principles and constitutionally protected rights of private property owners.
(d) Assure priority for coastal-dependent and coastal-related development over other development on the coast.
(e) Encourage state and local initiatives and cooperation in preparing procedures to implement coordinated planning and development for mutually beneficial uses, including educational uses, in the coastal zone.

SEC. 2.

 Section 30007.5 of the Public Resources Code is amended to read:

30007.5.
 The Legislature further finds and recognizes that conflicts may occur between one or more policies of the division. The Legislature therefore declares that in carrying out the provisions of this division such those conflicts be resolved in a manner which on balance is the most protective of that balances the protection of significant coastal resources with the economic and social benefits provided by a proposed coastal development project to the community at large, which includes, but is not limited to, the economic prosperity of the region. In this context, the Legislature declares that broader policies which, for example, serve to concentrate development in close proximity to urban and employment centers may be more protective, overall, than specific wildlife habitat and other similar resource policies.