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AB-1959 Building standards: green building standards: toxic air contaminants.(2011-2012)

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AB1959:v98#DOCUMENT

Amended  IN  Assembly  April 16, 2012

CALIFORNIA LEGISLATURE— 2011–2012 REGULAR SESSION

Assembly Bill
No. 1959


Introduced  by  Assembly Member Williams

February 23, 2012


An act to add Section 18941.10 to the Health and Safety Code, relating to building standards.


LEGISLATIVE COUNSEL'S DIGEST


AB 1959, as amended, Williams. Building standards: green building standards: toxic air contaminants.
The California Building Standards Law provides for the adoption of building standards by state agencies by requiring all state agencies that adopt or propose adoption of any building standard to submit the building standard to the California Building Standards Commission for approval and adoption. In the absence of a designated state agency, the commission is required to adopt specific building standards, as prescribed. Existing law requires the commission to publish, or cause to be published, editions of the code in its entirety once every 3 years.
This bill would require the commission Department of Housing and Community Development, as a part of the next triennial edition of the California Green Building Standards Code adopted after January 1, 2013 2014, to consider adopting building standards for toxic air contaminants as a part of the mandatory minimum building standards. proposing standards to the commission for indoor air pollutants in residential buildings. The bill would require the commission, as a part of the next triennial edition of the California Green Building Standards Code adopted after January 1, 2014, to consider proposing standards for indoor air pollutants in nonresidential buildings.
Vote: MAJORITY   Appropriation: NO   Fiscal Committee: YES   Local Program: NO  

The people of the State of California do enact as follows:


SECTION 1.

 The Legislature finds and declares all of the following:
(a) Toxins in the built environment cause serious health problems, including cancer, premature death, asthma, and other respiratory disease.
(b) Infants and children may be more susceptible to indoor air pollutants in comparison to the general population and are additionally likely to be disproportionately exposed more often to indoor pollutants in comparison to the general population.
(c) Sources of pollutants include all of the following:
(1) Volatile organic compounds used in fumigants or formaldehyde in furniture.
(2) Metals such as lead and mercury.
(3) Semivolatile organic compounds, such as carbon bonded to bromine, chlorine, fluorine used in flame retardants and stain repellents.
(4) Endocrine disruptors such as phthalates and BPA used as softeners in plastics, cash register receipts, and air fresheners.
(5) Environmental tobacco smoke.
(d) Sources of pollutants in the built environment are numerous, and because people spend most of their time indoors, the risk from indoor air pollution is substantial. Californians, like others in industrialized nations, average about 87 percent of their time indoors. Indoor emissions are partially trapped inside buildings, and people’s activities put them very near indoor sources. Consequently, some scientists estimate that pollutants emitted indoors are about 1,000 times more likely to be inhaled than comparable outdoor emissions.
(e) Indoor pollution is estimated to cost California’s economy more then forty five billion dollars ($45,000,000,000) each year due to premature deaths, medical costs, lost worker productivity, and related impacts. The total cost is likely much higher, because the total health impacts are not known.
(f) Therefore, toxins in the built environment should be reduced.

SEC. 2.

 Section 18941.10 is added to the Health and Safety Code, to read:
18941.10.

(a)As used in this section, “toxic air contaminants” has the same meaning as defined in Section 39655.

(b)

18941.10.
 (a) As a part of the next triennial edition of the California Green Building Standards Code (Chapter 11 (commencing with Section 101) of Title 24 of the California Code of Regulations) adopted after January 1, 2013, the commission shall consider adopting building standards for toxic air contaminants as a part of the mandatory minimum building standards. 2014, the Department of Housing and Community Development shall consider proposing standards to the commission for indoor air pollutants in residential buildings, and the commission may adopt those standards.
(b) As a part of the next triennial edition of the California Green Building Standards Code (Chapter 11 (commencing with Section 101) of Title 24 of the California Code of Regulations) adopted after January 1, 2014, the commission shall consider proposing standards for indoor air pollutants in nonresidential buildings.
(c) In preparation of regulations proposed pursuant to subdivision (a) or (b), the categories of indoor air pollutants that the commission and the department may consider include, but are not limited to, volatile organic compounds, semi-volatile organic compounds, metals, and endocrine disruptors.
(d) In preparation of regulations proposed pursuant to subdivision (a) or (b), the commission and the department may consider existing research completed by other state agencies on the topic of indoor air quality, such as the State Air Resources Board’s 2005 Report to the California Legislature “Indoor Air Pollution in California,” and work prepared by the California Environmental Contaminant Biomonitoring Program (Chapter 8 (commencing with Section 105440) of Part 5 of Division 103).
(e) Regulations adopted pursuant to this section shall be feasible within the meaning of Section 21061.1 of the Public Resources Code, and shall comply with the criteria specified in subdivision (a) of Section 18930.