Today's Law As Amended

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SB-2 Building Homes and Jobs Act.(2017-2018)



SECTION 1.
 This act shall be known as the Building Homes and Jobs Act.
SEC. 2.
 (a) The Legislature finds and declares that having a healthy housing market that provides an adequate supply of homes affordable to Californians at all income levels is critical to the economic prosperity and quality of life in the state.
(b) The Legislature further finds and declares all of the following:
(1) Funding approved by the state’s voters in 2002 and 2006, as of June 2015, has financed the construction, rehabilitation, and preservation of over 14,000 shelter spaces and 245,000 affordable homes. These numbers include thousands of supportive homes for people experiencing homelessness. In addition, these funds have helped tens of thousands of families become or remain homeowners. Nearly all of the voter-approved funding for affordable housing has been awarded.
(2) The requirement in the Community Redevelopment Law that redevelopment agencies set aside 20 percent of tax increment for affordable housing generated roughly $1 billion per year. With the elimination of redevelopment agencies, this funding stream has disappeared.
(3) In 2014, the Legislature committed 10 percent of ongoing cap-and-trade funds for affordable housing that reduces greenhouse gas emissions and dedicated $100 million in one-time funding for affordable multifamily and permanent supportive housing. In addition, the people of California thoughtfully approved the repurposing of $600 million in already committed bond funds for the creation of affordable rental and permanent supportive housing for veterans through the passage of Proposition 41.
(4) In 2015, the Legislature approved $2 billion in revenue bonds for the construction and rehabilitation of permanent supportive housing for homeless individuals with mental illness through the “No Place Like Home” initiative and increased funding for the CalWORKs Housing Support Program to $47 million per year. Another $45 million was directed to Emergency Solutions Grants to fund rapid rehousing, outreach, shelters, and homeless prevention and $10 million was provided to reduce homelessness among families who are part of the child welfare system.
(5) Despite these investments, the need for affordable housing in the State of California greatly exceeds the available resources, demonstrated by the Public Policy Institute of California finding that, as of January 2016, 31.5 percent of mortgaged homeowners and 47 percent of all renters are spending more than 35 percent of their household incomes on housing.
(6) California has 12 percent of the United States population, but 20 percent of its homeless population. California has the highest percentage of unsheltered homeless in the nation, with 64 percent of homeless Californians not having shelter. California has 24 percent of the nation’s homeless veterans population and one-third of the nation’s chronically homeless population. California also has the largest population of unaccompanied homeless children and youth, with 28 percent of the national total.
(7) Furthermore, four of the top 10 metropolitan areas in the country with the highest rate of homelessness are in the following metropolitan areas in California: San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, Los Angeles-Long Beach-Santa Ana, Fresno, and Stockton.
(8) California continues to have the second lowest homeownership rate in the nation, and the Los Angeles metropolitan area is now a majority renter area. In fact, five of the eight lowest homeownership rates are in metropolitan areas in California.
(9) Los Angeles and Orange Counties have been identified as the epicenter of overcrowded housing, and numerous studies have shown that children in crowded homes have poorer health, worse scores on mathematics and reading tests, and higher rates of depression and behavioral problems—even when poverty is taken into account.
(10) Millions of Californians are affected by the state’s chronic housing shortage, including seniors, veterans, people experiencing chronic homelessness, working families, people with mental, physical, or developmental disabilities, agricultural workers, people exiting jails, prisons, and other state institutions, survivors of domestic violence, and former foster and transition-aged youth.
(11) California has 109 federally recognized tribes and 723,000 residents with Native American ancestry, the largest number of tribes and residents in the United States. Due to historic dislocation and lack of housing choices, most do not live on tribal lands and those who do live in severely substandard, overcrowded homes lacking quality water and sewer services at rates greater than the general population.
(12) Low rates of teacher recruitment and retention have been exacerbated by many factors, including housing. In high housing cost areas, low teacher recruitment and retention rates are largely a consequence of salaries insufficient to cover housing costs. In rural areas, rental housing is often unavailable. In both instances, the long commute faced by teachers and other classified employees further pushes school employees to leave their position or the profession entirely. School employee housing provides a tool that school districts can use to recruit and retain qualified teachers.
(13) Eight of the top 10 hardest hit cities by the foreclosure crisis in the nation were in California. They include the Cities of Stockton, Modesto, Vallejo, Riverside, San Bernardino, Merced, Bakersfield, and Sacramento.
(14) California’s workforce continues to experience longer commute times as persons in the workforce seek affordable housing outside the areas in which they work. If California is unable to support the construction of affordable housing in these areas, congestion problems will strain the state’s transportation system and exacerbate greenhouse gas emissions.
(15) Many economists agree that the state’s higher than average unemployment rate is due in large part to massive shrinkage in the construction industry from 2005 to 2009, including losses of nearly 700,000 construction-related jobs, a 60-percent decline in construction spending, and an 83-percent reduction in residential permits. Restoration of a healthy construction sector will significantly reduce the state’s unemployment rate.
(16) The lack of sufficient housing impedes economic growth and development by making it difficult for California employers to attract and retain employees.
(17) To keep pace with continuing demand, the state should identify and establish a permanent, ongoing source or sources of funding dedicated to affordable housing development. Without a reliable source of funding for housing affordable to the state’s workforce and most vulnerable residents, the state and its local and private housing development partners will not be able to continue increasing the supply of housing after existing housing bond resources are depleted.
(18) The investment will leverage billions of dollars in private investment, lessen demands on law enforcement and dwindling health care resources as fewer people are forced to live on the streets or in dangerous substandard buildings, and increase businesses’ ability to attract and retain skilled workers.
(19) In order to promote housing and homeownership opportunities, the recording fee imposed by this act shall not be applied to any recording made in connection with a sale of real property. Purchasing a home is likely the largest purchase made by Californians, and it is the intent of this act to not increase transaction costs associated with these transfers.

SEC. 3.

 Section 27388.1 is added to the Government Code, to read:

27388.1.
 (a) (1) Commencing January 1, 2018, and except as provided in paragraph (2), in addition to any other recording fees specified in this code, a fee of seventy-five dollars ($75) shall be paid at the time of recording of every real estate instrument, paper, or notice required or permitted by law to be recorded, except those expressly exempted from payment of recording fees, per each single transaction per parcel of real property. The fee imposed by this section shall not exceed two hundred twenty-five dollars ($225). “Real estate instrument, paper, or notice” means a document relating to real property, including, but not limited to, the following: deed, grant deed, trustee’s deed, deed of trust, reconveyance, quit claim deed, fictitious deed of trust, assignment of deed of trust, request for notice of default, abstract of judgment, subordination agreement, declaration of homestead, abandonment of homestead, notice of default, release or discharge, easement, notice of trustee sale, notice of completion, UCC financing statement, mechanic’s lien, maps, and covenants, conditions, and restrictions.
(2) The fee described in paragraph (1) shall not be imposed on any real estate instrument, paper, or notice recorded in connection with a transfer subject to the imposition of a documentary transfer tax as defined in Section 11911 of the Revenue and Taxation Code or on any real estate instrument, paper, or notice recorded in connection with a transfer of real property that is a residential dwelling to an owner-occupier.
(b) The county recorder shall remit quarterly, on or before the last day of the month next succeeding each calendar quarterly period, the fees, after deduction of any actual and necessary administrative costs incurred by the county recorder in carrying out this section, to the Controller for deposit in the Building Homes and Jobs Trust Fund established by Section 50470 of the Health and Safety Code, to be expended for the purposes set forth in that section. In addition, the county shall pay to the Controller interest, at the legal rate, on any funds not paid to the Controller before the last day of the month next succeeding each quarterly period.
(c) If the Department of Housing and Community Development determines that any moneys derived from fees collected are being allocated by the state for a purpose not authorized by Section 50470 of the Health and Safety Code, the county recorder shall, upon notice of the determination, immediately cease collection of the fees, and shall resume collection of those fees only upon notice that the moneys derived from the fees collected are being allocated by the state only for a purpose authorized by Section 50470 of the Health and Safety Code.

SEC. 4.

 Chapter 2.5 (commencing with Section 50470) is added to Part 2 of Division 31 of the Health and Safety Code, to read:

CHAPTER  2.5. Building Homes and Jobs Act
Article  1. General Provisions
50470.
 (a) (1) There is hereby created in the State Treasury the Building Homes and Jobs Trust Fund. All interest or other increments resulting from the investment of moneys in the fund shall be deposited in the fund, notwithstanding Section 16305.7 of the Government Code.
(2) Moneys in the Building Homes and Jobs Trust Fund shall not be subject to transfer to any other fund pursuant to any provision of Part 2 (commencing with Section 16300) of Division 4 of Title 2 of the Government Code, except to the Surplus Money Investment Fund.
(b) Moneys in the Building Homes and Jobs Trust Fund shall be appropriated either through the annual Budget Act, or as provided in this subdivision, in accordance with the following:
(1) Moneys collected on and after January 1, 2018, and until December 31, 2018, shall, upon appropriation by the Legislature, be allocated as follows:
(A) Fifty percent of deposits into the fund shall be made available for local governments to update planning documents and zoning ordinances in order to streamline housing production, including, but not limited to, general plans, community plans, specific plans, sustainable communities strategies, and local coastal programs. Eligible uses also include new environmental analyses that eliminate the need for project-specific review and local process updates that improve and expedite local permitting.
(i) Five percent of the funds specified by this subparagraph shall be available for technical assistance to jurisdictions updating specified planning documents. Technical assistance shall be provided by the department and the Governor’s Office of Planning and Research.
(ii) The funds to be allocated pursuant to this subparagraph shall be held by the department until a local government submits a request for use. The request shall include a description of the proposed use of the funds in the interest of accelerating housing production. The proposed use of these funds shall be included in the local government’s funding plan and annual reports pursuant to subclauses (II) and (III) of clause (ii) of subparagraph (B) of paragraph (2). Any of these funds not allocated by the department within the first two years that those funds are available shall be made available by the department for the Multifamily Housing Program (Chapter 6.7 (commencing with Section 50675)).
(B) Fifty percent of deposits into the fund shall be made available to the department to assist persons experiencing or at risk of homelessness, including, but not limited to, providing rapid rehousing, rental assistance, navigation centers, and the new construction, rehabilitation, and preservation of permanent and transitional rental housing.
(C) The department shall ensure geographic equity in the distribution and expenditure of funds allocated pursuant to this paragraph.
(2) Moneys collected on and after January 1, 2019, shall be allocated as follows:
(A) Twenty percent of all moneys in the fund shall, upon appropriation by the Legislature, be expended for affordable owner-occupied workforce housing.
(B) (i) Seventy percent of moneys deposited in the fund shall, upon appropriation by the Legislature, be made available to local governments as follows:
(I) Ninety percent of the moneys specified in this subparagraph shall be allocated based on the formula specified in Section 5306 of Title 42 of the United States Code, in accordance with the distribution of funds pursuant to that formula for the federal Fiscal Year 2017, except that the portion allocated to nonentitlement areas pursuant to that section shall be distributed through a competitive grant program, administered by the department, as follows:
(ia) The department shall award priority points to a county that has a population of 200,000 or less within the unincorporated areas of the county, to a local government that did not receive an award based on the formula specified in Section 5306 of Title 42 of the United States Code in 2016, and to a local government that pledges to use the money awarded pursuant to a competitive grant under this subclause to assist persons experiencing or at risk of homelessness, including, but not limited to, providing rapid rehousing, rental assistance, navigation centers, and the new construction, rehabilitation, and preservation of permanent and transitional rental housing.
(ib) Moneys awarded to a local government pursuant to the competitive grant program shall be used for the purposes specified in subparagraph (D).
(II) The remaining 10 percent of the moneys specified in this subparagraph shall be allocated equitably among local jurisdictions that are nonentitlement areas pursuant to the formula specified in Section 5306 of Title 42 of the United States Code for federal Fiscal Year 2017.
(ii) To receive moneys pursuant to this subparagraph, local governments shall document minimum standards including the following:
(I) Submit a plan to the department detailing the manner in which allocated funds will be used by the local government in a manner consistent with this paragraph and to meet the local government’s unmet share of the regional housing needs allocation.
(II) Have a compliant housing element with the state and submit a current annual report pursuant to Section 65400 of the Government Code.
(III) Submit an annual report to the department that provides ongoing tracking of the uses and expenditures of any allocated funds.
(IV) Funds may be expended for the uses listed in subparagraph (D). Two or more local governments that receive an allocation pursuant to this subparagraph may expend those moneys on a joint project that is an authorized use under subparagraph (D).
(V) Prioritize investments that increase the supply of housing to households that are at or below 60 percent of area median income, adjusted for household size.
(VI) If a local government does not have a documented plan to expend the moneys allocated to it pursuant to this subparagraph within five years of that allocation, those moneys shall be exempt from the allocation requirements in this paragraph and shall revert to, and be paid and deposited in, the Housing Rehabilitation Loan Fund established pursuant to Section 50661 to be used for the Multifamily Housing Program (Chapter 6.7 (commencing with Section 50675)) or for technical assistance for local governments.
(VII) A local government may petition the department to return any moneys allocated to it pursuant to this subparagraph. Any moneys returned pursuant to this clause shall be used for the Multifamily Housing Program (Chapter 6.7 (commencing with Section 50675)).
(C) Thirty percent of moneys deposited in the fund shall be made available to the department for use as follows:
(i) Five percent of the moneys deposited in the fund shall, upon appropriation by the Legislature, be used for state incentive programs, including loans and grants administered by the department. If the department receives insufficient funding applications for incentive programs financed pursuant to this clause, the department shall make those funds available for the Multifamily Housing Program (Chapter 6.7 (commencing with Section 50675)).
(ii) Ten percent of the moneys deposited in the fund shall, upon appropriation by the Legislature, be used to address affordable homeownership and rental housing opportunities for agricultural workers and their families.
(iii) Fifteen percent of the moneys deposited in the fund shall, notwithstanding any other provision of this section or Section 13340 of the Government Code, be continuously appropriated to the California Housing Finance Agency for the purpose of creating mixed income multifamily residential housing for lower to moderate income households pursuant to Chapter 6.7 (commencing with Section 51325) of Part 3.
(D) The moneys in the fund allocated to local governments may be expended for the following purposes:
(i) The predevelopment, development, acquisition, rehabilitation, and preservation of multifamily, residential live-work, rental housing that is affordable to extremely low, very low, low-, and moderate-income households, including necessary operating subsidies.
(ii) Affordable rental and ownership housing that meets the needs of a growing workforce earning up to 120 percent of area median income, or 150 percent of area median income in high-cost areas.
(iii) Matching portions of funds placed into local or regional housing trust funds.
(iv) Matching portions of funds available through the Low and Moderate Income Housing Asset Fund pursuant to subdivision (d) of Section 34176 of the Health and Safety Code.
(v) Capitalized reserves for services connected to the creation of new permanent supportive housing, including, but not limited to, developments funded through the Veterans Housing and Homelessness Prevention Bond Act of 2014.
(vi) Assisting persons who are experiencing or at risk of homelessness, including providing rapid rehousing, rental assistance, navigation centers, emergency shelters, and the new construction, rehabilitation, and preservation of permanent and transitional housing.
(vii) Accessibility modifications.
(viii) Efforts to acquire and rehabilitate foreclosed or vacant homes.
(ix) Homeownership opportunities, including, but not limited to, downpayment assistance.
(x) Fiscal incentives or matching funds to local agencies that approve new housing for extremely low, very low, low-, and moderate-income households.
(3) A state or local entity that receives an appropriation or allocation pursuant to this chapter shall use no more than 5 percent of that appropriation or allocation for costs related to the administration of the housing program for which the appropriation or allocation was made.
(c) Both of the following shall be paid and deposited in the fund:
(1) Any moneys appropriated and made available by the Legislature for purposes of the fund.
(2) Any other moneys that may be made available to the department for the purposes of the fund from any other source or sources.
(d) In consultation with stakeholders, the department may adopt guidelines to implement this section, including to determine allocation methodologies. Any guideline, rule, policy, or standard of general application employed by the department in implementing this chapter shall not be subject to the requirements of the Administrative Procedure Act (Chapter 3.5 (commencing with Section 11340) of Part 1 of Division 3 of Title 2 of the Government Code).
50470.5.
 For purposes of this chapter:
(a) “Department” means the Department of Housing and Community Development.
(b) “Local government” means any city, county, or city and county.
50471.
 The department and the California Housing Finance Agency shall report on the expenditure of funds pursuant to this chapter in accordance with Sections 50408 and 51005, respectively.
Article  2. Audits and Reporting
50475.
 (a) The Office of State Audits and Evaluation may conduct periodic audits to ensure that the annual allocation to individual programs is awarded by the department in a timely fashion consistent with the requirements of this chapter.
(b) The department shall reimburse the Office of State Audits and Evaluation for the actual costs of audit work performed pursuant to this section.
SEC. 5.
 No reimbursement is required by this act pursuant to Section 6 of Article XIII B of the California Constitution because a local agency or school district has the authority to levy service charges, fees, or assessments sufficient to pay for the program or level of service mandated by this act, within the meaning of Section 17556 of the Government Code.
SEC. 6.
 This act is an urgency statute necessary for the immediate preservation of the public peace, health, or safety within the meaning of Article IV of the California Constitution and shall go into immediate effect. The facts constituting the necessity are:
In order to provide affordable housing opportunities at the earliest possible time, it is necessary for this act to take effect immediately.